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In Depth Workshop: Academy Development - Day 1 of 2 Day Workshop - Handouts
 

In Depth Workshop: Academy Development - Day 1 of 2 Day Workshop - Handouts

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Handouts for the Academy Development Workshop.

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    In Depth Workshop: Academy Development - Day 1 of 2 Day Workshop - Handouts In Depth Workshop: Academy Development - Day 1 of 2 Day Workshop - Handouts Document Transcript

    • The Coach’s Guide Your Academy PlanAcademy/School: _______________________________________________________Participants: __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ © 2011 Thom Markham, Ph.D. 1
    • Your Ideal Student… What would you like to see in students?The story of Cody… How intelligent are your students? What do you believe about intelligence? Can you help students get ‘smarter?’ Does you Academy support the intellectual/emotional growth of your students? 2
    • Your Academy Graduate…Analyze your specific Academy. What skills, dispositions, and core competenciesdo you want your academy graduates to demonstrate?The three most important skills: 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________The three most important dispositions: 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________The three most important core competencies: 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________Your 2011 – 2012 students…For incoming or continuing students, how will you teach and train them to masterthe skills, dispositions, and core competencies that you have identified as criticalto your program? Imagine your students at the end of the year. What kind ofexperiences they have had that helps them become more proficient? What stepscan you take to create a high performance culture next year? 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________ 4. ______________________________________ 3
    • 5. ______________________________________ 6. ______________________________________From Groups to Teams… Discuss the tools available for teams. What tools will be most helpful to your academy? _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ How do you implement them? Do you need to write new material? Train other teachers? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________List the most helpful resources… ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________The Coach’s Guide and reflections on PBL… How will it help? How can you improve projects? Can you identify gaps in your projects? What projects do you want to plan for next year? Do you want to start with a ‘Project-Project?’ 4
    • ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________Your Action Plan for 2011 – 2012… ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 5
    • Critical Friends Protocol feedback on your project… ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________Look back on your reflections on your ideal graduate. You’reyour plan help your students meet the ideal? 6
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. Project Planning FormName of Project: Creating High Performance Culture and Traditions for AOHT Duration: TJHSClass(es): Principles of Hospitality and Tourism, English Semester:Content/Curriculum Geography and World Cultures, Englishareas to partner withProject Idea(investigation, The challenge is to build a sustainable culture of high academic and workforce performance which willscenario, problem, yield high caliber, focused, energized and committed students.challenge, issue, etc.)Entry Event As class begins, teacher to give following directions:(grabber) to launch -students with blue pens stand upinquiry and spark -students born 1st 6 months of the year, face the windowscuriosity -students born last 6 months of the year, stay seated but make “live long and prosper sign” each time I speak (You can make addl ones of the above as needed to make this fun) Wait for students to ask why their doing this? Then teacher to say this classroom is “my country” and I can make things what I want. So we want you to think about making the Academy “your country”. Take a few moments and scribble down everything you need to develop the culture of the Academy of Hospitality and Tourism as your country.
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. Entry Event: Class to break into groups and develop a flag and/or symbols and introductory motto that embrace ideals. Next Event: Individuals to develop personal mission statement.The DrivingQuestion, Problem orChallenge How do we create high performance culture and traditions in AOHT and AOF Academies?Statement or IssueContent and Skills Insert link or copy and paste on bottom of planning formStandards addressed: T P T PPartnership for P21 Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Social Literacy and Cross/Multi-Cultural LiteracySkills to be taught (T) Communication (oral and written) Productivity and Accountabilityand practiced (P): ICT Literacy Leadership and ResponsibilityCheck all that apply Collaboration ξ ξ Financial, Economic and Entrepreneurial literacy Information Literacy Civic Literacy Flexibility and Adaptability Health Literacy Initiative and Self-Direction Global Awareness Presentation
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. Audience Major group Personal Mission Statement; AOHT Mission Statement; Personalized Class Student work product(s): Portfolio (Digital or Hard Copy); Pledge; Uniform Design; School  Community Governance or Decorum; Signature Events; Affiliations (DECCA); Experts  Major individual Personal Mission Statement; Personalized Portfolio Web  product(s): Other  Rubric(s) I’ll use Collaboration/work ethic ξ Content Knowledge (check all that apply) Critical Thinking CTE Competencies Assessment Oral Communication Physical Education skills & Written Communication Reflection Visual/Performing Arts Other assessments, Quizzes/tests Practice presentations benchmarks & Self-evaluations Notes checkpoints (check all Peer evaluations Checklists that apply) On-line tests/exams Concept Maps Reflections Survey Focus group Discussion Learning plan Journal write/learning log Resources On-site personnel:
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. Technical (equipment) Community resources Material resources PROJECT TEACHING AND LEARNING GUIDE Project: Course/Semester: Knowledge and Skills Needed by Students Scaffolding / Materials / Lessons to be Provided to successfully complete culminating products and by the project teacher, other teachers, experts, performances, and do well on summative assessments mentors, community members    
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded.    P R O J E C T C A L E N D A R Project: Start Date: M O N D AY T U E S D AY W E D N E S D AY T H U R S D AY F R I D AY PROJECT WEEK ONE Grabber Event then Continue creation Create teams to work Continue product Finalize Product Brainstorm ideas for process and make on selections and development Development Academy culture final selections begin creation of branding items and products develop teams to create items
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. PROJECT WEEK TWO Present final products Present final products Gallery Walk Present final products Present final products PROJECT WEEK THREE Revise based on Finalize items Final Presentations Finetuning of Culminating Event— Gallery Walk on products and products and Induction Ceremony- Develop Personal personal mission personal mission Unveiling Academy Mission Statements statements statements Mission Statement; And Present to Personal Mission Statements--Candle class Lighting Ceremony; Flag; Logo; Officers. Parents invited. Virtual Tour of students journey in creating items shown during the ceremony.
    • P R E S E N T A T I O N R U B R I C (for secondary and upper elementary grades) Below Standard Approaching Standard At Standard Above Standard • does not look at audience; reads notes or • makes some eye contact, or scans the room • keeps eye contact with audience most of the In addition to At Standard criteria: slides quickly, but reads notes or slides most of the time; only reads notes or slides sometimes + keeps eye contact all the time, slowly Eye Contact • holds things in hands nervously or keeps time • uses hands naturally, making some gestures scanning all of the audience; does not read & Physical hands in pockets • uses a few gestures but they do not look • confident posture notes or slides • posture does not show confidence; (fidgets, natural, or keeps hands too still to look • clothes are appropriate for the occasion + uses gestures smoothly, naturally to Presence slouches) natural emphasize or illustrate points • clothes are not appropriate for the occasion • posture shows some confidence, with only a + moves with purpose little fidgeting or nervous movement • some attempt to wear appropriate clothing for the occasion • mumbles or goes too fast or slow • speaks clearly some of the time; sometimes • speaks clearly; not too fast or slow In addition to At Standard criteria: • speaks too softly to be heard too fast or slow • speaks loudly enough for everyone to hear; + adds variety to speaking style (lower or Speaking • frequently uses “filler” words (“uh, um, so, • speaks loudly enough for some of the changes tone to maintain interest higher volume, change of pace, use of and, like”) audience to hear, but may speak in a • rarely uses filler words character voices) • pronounces several words incorrectly monotone • pronounces words correctly + uses pauses for dramatic effect or to let ideas • speaks in a style that is not appropriate for the • occasionally uses filler words • speaks in a style that is appropriate for the sink in occasion • pronounces a few words incorrectly occasion • speaks in a style that is appropriate for the occasion, most of the time • does not meet requirements for what should • meets most requirements for what should be • meets all requirements for what should be In addition to At Standard criteria: be included in the presentation included in the presentation included in the presentation + has a memorable introduction and conclusion Organization • selects too much or too little information or • sometimes selects too much or too little • selects the right amount and kind of + connects introduction and conclusion (returns the wrong kind of information information, or the wrong kind, about some information to present to a story, theme, or metaphor) • gets ideas mixed up topics • states main idea & moves from one idea to + effectively uses humor, stories, or metaphors • time is not used well; the whole presentation, • some ideas are connected, but not all the next clearly, in an order that makes sense or several parts of it, are too short or too long • some parts feel too short or too long; too • time is well spent; no part feels too short of • does not have an introduction and/or much or too little time is spent on one topic, too long conclusion slide, or idea • has a clear and interesting introduction and • has an introduction and conclusion, but they conclusion are not clear or interesting • does not use aids (pictures, drawings, objects, • uses aids but they do not add much to, and • aids add to the presentation In addition to At Standard criteria: posters, maps, recordings, slides, other may distract from, the presentation • aids are easy to see and/or hear, and are neat + aids are especially creative and/or powerful Audio/Visual electronic media, etc.) • aids are hard to read or hear, or are messy • aids are ready to use and included smoothly + shows skill in creating aids and/or using Aids (writing or graphics are not neat or sound is into the presentation technology not clear) + smoothly handles problems with aids and • aids are not ready to use and are not technological glitches, if they occur smoothly brought into the presentation • does not address the audience’s questions; • may answer some of the audience’s • answers audience’s questions clearly and In addition to At Standard criteria: Response to says little or goes off the topic questions, but not clearly and/or completely completely + answers questions in a way that adds details, • may try to answer a challenging question by • when asked a question he or she does not examples, or new points to the presentation Audience faking it know the answer to, says “I don’t know” or + smoothly handles questions that are unclear, Questions explains how the answer could be found off the topic, distracting, or challenging© 2011 Buck Institute for Education
    • GROUP CONTRACTMembersDustin, Cooney, Voudy, Jessica, Stephen, AnthonyBlockBlock 3ProjectNature of ManTask ListJohn & Voudy – Filming and Video EditingStephen, Anthony, Jessica, Dustin– script writingAnthony – drivingEveryone- individual research on specific philosophersGroup ConstitutionForward: This contract is a binding legal document and governsthe group until the assigned project deadline. If the groupseparates, or a member is fired, the basic contract laws remainintact for both parties. However, being fired may cause workresponsibilities to shift.Article I: Absence Policya. If a group member will be absent on a day in which work isdue, they must tell another group member a day in advance andhave all work that they are responsible for turned in. All groupmembers must stick to the provided agenda to have theassignments completed on time. If there will be an unexpectedabsence, the group member is to complete the work from homeand email another group member to let them know they are gonefor the day.
    • b. Group members will contact one another if they are absentfor any amount of period during the time allotted for working onthe projects.Article II: Work Policya. Any member that is mentally or physically disabled and canprove that they cannot complete the work assigned to themalone they may acquire assistance from other group members tohelp complete it. This will only apply for work that is group workand not individual work, and work will only be finished by thatgroup member, and the assisting group member will not write it.b. Each group member will work to the best of their ability,making sure to complete the work is up to standards, and thatthey completed it with punctuality.c. If a group member commits plagiarism, they are solelyresponsible and incur the punishment on their own.Article III: Leadershipa. At the beginning of the project, a leader will be voted upondemocratically. If a group member is absent at the time of voting,they waive their right to participate in voting. The person whowins the most votes becomes the leader. If there is an unclearoutcome (same number of votes for different people), the groupwill have no leader until one can be chosen by a revote.b. By being elected leader, the person must perform the following duties:1. Organize group meetings.2. Create and enforce a group agenda to govern group progress.3. Organize any out of school project efforts.4. Provide communication between group members in order to help individuals work towards the project goal.
    • If they fail to perform these duties, or another person is alsocarrying them out, a revote may be taken to determine whetherto obtain a new leader.c. If a leader fulfills his or her duties, they will receive the 20extra credit leadership points at the end of the project. Thecurrent group leader will receive these points, regardless of howlong they lead the group for. If no leader has been assigned, amajority vote will decide who receives the leadership points.Article IV: Work Ethicsa. If a group member does not complete work they wereassigned, the punishment for the infringement will be ofdetriment solely to the group member at fault. No negativegrading shall be given to any other group members.b. At the end of the project, ‘hard workers’ will be designatedby means of a democratic vote. The people voted as the top twowill each receive the ten bonus points. If one candidate is votedas hard worker by a margin of 75%, they will receive 20 points. Ifthere is a tie, the group will discuss and come to resolution orelse no points will be granted to the disputed individuals.Article V: Member Dismissala. The following conducts will result in a group member beingable to be dismissed; i. Incomplete or missing group work. ii. Plagiarism or any form of cheating. iii. If group member decides to leave under his or her own will.b. Any group member leaving under their own will be able tosubmit all their own work, while the other group members maynot. Any group member fired for breaking any of the conducts
    • under Article V-a (i-iii). will have their work taken from theirpossession to be used at the discretion of the original group, butnot for the individual being fired. In addition, any fired membermay not use any work completed by other group members,subject to punishment under Article 2-c.c. If a group member leaves under the stipulation of Article V-a (iv), they retain all the work they have already provided for thegroup. The original group cannot use this work or it is subject topunishment under Article 2-c.Article VI: SignatureBy signing this contract the following group members abide tothe articles above. If any member fails to abide by the articles ofthis contract, they may be fired from the group given at least a50% vote in favor of firing the individual.Project LeaderThe group has elected __________________________ as the projectleader under Article III.Signature
    • The Coach’s Guide Your Academy PlanAcademy/School: _______________________________________________________Participants: __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ © 2011 Thom Markham, Ph.D. 1
    • Your Ideal Student… What would you like to see in students?The story of Cody… How intelligent are your students? What do you believe about intelligence? Can you help students get ‘smarter?’ Does you Academy support the intellectual/emotional growth of your students? 2
    • Your Academy Graduate…Analyze your specific Academy. What skills, dispositions, and core competenciesdo you want your academy graduates to demonstrate?The three most important skills: 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________The three most important dispositions: 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________The three most important core competencies: 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________Your 2011 – 2012 students…For incoming or continuing students, how will you teach and train them to masterthe skills, dispositions, and core competencies that you have identified as criticalto your program? Imagine your students at the end of the year. What kind ofexperiences they have had that helps them become more proficient? What stepscan you take to create a high performance culture next year? 1. ______________________________________ 2. ______________________________________ 3. ______________________________________ 4. ______________________________________ 3
    • 5. ______________________________________ 6. ______________________________________From Groups to Teams… Discuss the tools available for teams. What tools will be most helpful to your academy? _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ How do you implement them? Do you need to write new material? Train other teachers? ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________List the most helpful resources… ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________The Coach’s Guide and reflections on PBL… How will it help? How can you improve projects? Can you identify gaps in your projects? What projects do you want to plan for next year? Do you want to start with a ‘Project-Project?’ 4
    • ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________Your Action Plan for 2011 – 2012… ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ 5
    • Critical Friends Protocol feedback on your project… ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________Look back on your reflections on your ideal graduate. You’reyour plan help your students meet the ideal? 6
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. Project Planning FormName of Project: Creating High Performance Culture and Traditions for AOHT Duration: TJHSClass(es): Principles of Hospitality and Tourism, English Semester:Content/Curriculum Geography and World Cultures, Englishareas to partner withProject Idea(investigation, The challenge is to build a sustainable culture of high academic and workforce performance which willscenario, problem, yield high caliber, focused, energized and committed students.challenge, issue, etc.)Entry Event As class begins, teacher to give following directions:(grabber) to launch -students with blue pens stand upinquiry and spark -students born 1st 6 months of the year, face the windowscuriosity -students born last 6 months of the year, stay seated but make “live long and prosper sign” each time I speak (You can make addl ones of the above as needed to make this fun) Wait for students to ask why their doing this? Then teacher to say this classroom is “my country” and I can make things what I want. So we want you to think about making the Academy “your country”. Take a few moments and scribble down everything you need to develop the culture of the Academy of Hospitality and Tourism as your country.
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. Entry Event: Class to break into groups and develop a flag and/or symbols and introductory motto that embrace ideals. Next Event: Individuals to develop personal mission statement.The DrivingQuestion, Problem orChallenge How do we create high performance culture and traditions in AOHT and AOF Academies?Statement or IssueContent and Skills Insert link or copy and paste on bottom of planning formStandards addressed: T P T PPartnership for P21 Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Social Literacy and Cross/Multi-Cultural LiteracySkills to be taught (T) Communication (oral and written) Productivity and Accountabilityand practiced (P): ICT Literacy Leadership and ResponsibilityCheck all that apply Collaboration ξ ξ Financial, Economic and Entrepreneurial literacy Information Literacy Civic Literacy Flexibility and Adaptability Health Literacy Initiative and Self-Direction Global Awareness Presentation
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. Audience Major group Personal Mission Statement; AOHT Mission Statement; Personalized Class Student work product(s): Portfolio (Digital or Hard Copy); Pledge; Uniform Design; School  Community Governance or Decorum; Signature Events; Affiliations (DECCA); Experts  Major individual Personal Mission Statement; Personalized Portfolio Web  product(s): Other  Rubric(s) I’ll use Collaboration/work ethic ξ Content Knowledge (check all that apply) Critical Thinking CTE Competencies Assessment Oral Communication Physical Education skills & Written Communication Reflection Visual/Performing Arts Other assessments, Quizzes/tests Practice presentations benchmarks & Self-evaluations Notes checkpoints (check all Peer evaluations Checklists that apply) On-line tests/exams Concept Maps Reflections Survey Focus group Discussion Learning plan Journal write/learning log Resources On-site personnel:
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. Technical (equipment) Community resources Material resources PROJECT TEACHING AND LEARNING GUIDE Project: Course/Semester: Knowledge and Skills Needed by Students Scaffolding / Materials / Lessons to be Provided to successfully complete culminating products and by the project teacher, other teachers, experts, performances, and do well on summative assessments mentors, community members    
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded.    P R O J E C T C A L E N D A R Project: Start Date: M O N D AY T U E S D AY W E D N E S D AY T H U R S D AY F R I D AY PROJECT WEEK ONE Grabber Event then Continue creation Create teams to work Continue product Finalize Product Brainstorm ideas for process and make on selections and development Development Academy culture final selections begin creation of branding items and products develop teams to create items
    • Suggestions:-Allow each Freshman class to develop its own flag, pledge, class mission statement, that move forward with them, etc.-Expand idea of “country”-Mission statement to “citizenship oath” and develop passport/Way to place concrete structure aroundit/Reflection items??/Assessment piece-criteria to assess if feel part of culture—possible pre and post surveys/tests to gauge feelingsof inclusion for evaluation—Reconsider timing of project (1st 6 weeks may not be optimal)—Do more than 3 weeks and measureperformance of efforts—reassess statement at end of semester or year—do mini projects throughout the year that reinforce—Have asmuch concrete info on paper as possible—Look at what is culture, etc. with mini lessons along with why those failed or succeeded. PROJECT WEEK TWO Present final products Present final products Gallery Walk Present final products Present final products PROJECT WEEK THREE Revise based on Finalize items Final Presentations Finetuning of Culminating Event— Gallery Walk on products and products and Induction Ceremony- Develop Personal personal mission personal mission Unveiling Academy Mission Statements statements statements Mission Statement; And Present to Personal Mission Statements--Candle class Lighting Ceremony; Flag; Logo; Officers. Parents invited. Virtual Tour of students journey in creating items shown during the ceremony.
    • P R E S E N T A T I O N R U B R I C (for secondary and upper elementary grades) Below Standard Approaching Standard At Standard Above Standard • does not look at audience; reads notes or • makes some eye contact, or scans the room • keeps eye contact with audience most of the In addition to At Standard criteria: slides quickly, but reads notes or slides most of the time; only reads notes or slides sometimes + keeps eye contact all the time, slowly Eye Contact • holds things in hands nervously or keeps time • uses hands naturally, making some gestures scanning all of the audience; does not read & Physical hands in pockets • uses a few gestures but they do not look • confident posture notes or slides • posture does not show confidence; (fidgets, natural, or keeps hands too still to look • clothes are appropriate for the occasion + uses gestures smoothly, naturally to Presence slouches) natural emphasize or illustrate points • clothes are not appropriate for the occasion • posture shows some confidence, with only a + moves with purpose little fidgeting or nervous movement • some attempt to wear appropriate clothing for the occasion • mumbles or goes too fast or slow • speaks clearly some of the time; sometimes • speaks clearly; not too fast or slow In addition to At Standard criteria: • speaks too softly to be heard too fast or slow • speaks loudly enough for everyone to hear; + adds variety to speaking style (lower or Speaking • frequently uses “filler” words (“uh, um, so, • speaks loudly enough for some of the changes tone to maintain interest higher volume, change of pace, use of and, like”) audience to hear, but may speak in a • rarely uses filler words character voices) • pronounces several words incorrectly monotone • pronounces words correctly + uses pauses for dramatic effect or to let ideas • speaks in a style that is not appropriate for the • occasionally uses filler words • speaks in a style that is appropriate for the sink in occasion • pronounces a few words incorrectly occasion • speaks in a style that is appropriate for the occasion, most of the time • does not meet requirements for what should • meets most requirements for what should be • meets all requirements for what should be In addition to At Standard criteria: be included in the presentation included in the presentation included in the presentation + has a memorable introduction and conclusion Organization • selects too much or too little information or • sometimes selects too much or too little • selects the right amount and kind of + connects introduction and conclusion (returns the wrong kind of information information, or the wrong kind, about some information to present to a story, theme, or metaphor) • gets ideas mixed up topics • states main idea & moves from one idea to + effectively uses humor, stories, or metaphors • time is not used well; the whole presentation, • some ideas are connected, but not all the next clearly, in an order that makes sense or several parts of it, are too short or too long • some parts feel too short or too long; too • time is well spent; no part feels too short of • does not have an introduction and/or much or too little time is spent on one topic, too long conclusion slide, or idea • has a clear and interesting introduction and • has an introduction and conclusion, but they conclusion are not clear or interesting • does not use aids (pictures, drawings, objects, • uses aids but they do not add much to, and • aids add to the presentation In addition to At Standard criteria: posters, maps, recordings, slides, other may distract from, the presentation • aids are easy to see and/or hear, and are neat + aids are especially creative and/or powerful Audio/Visual electronic media, etc.) • aids are hard to read or hear, or are messy • aids are ready to use and included smoothly + shows skill in creating aids and/or using Aids (writing or graphics are not neat or sound is into the presentation technology not clear) + smoothly handles problems with aids and • aids are not ready to use and are not technological glitches, if they occur smoothly brought into the presentation • does not address the audience’s questions; • may answer some of the audience’s • answers audience’s questions clearly and In addition to At Standard criteria: Response to says little or goes off the topic questions, but not clearly and/or completely completely + answers questions in a way that adds details, • may try to answer a challenging question by • when asked a question he or she does not examples, or new points to the presentation Audience faking it know the answer to, says “I don’t know” or + smoothly handles questions that are unclear, Questions explains how the answer could be found off the topic, distracting, or challenging© 2011 Buck Institute for Education
    • GROUP CONTRACTMembersDustin, Cooney, Voudy, Jessica, Stephen, AnthonyBlockBlock 3ProjectNature of ManTask ListJohn & Voudy – Filming and Video EditingStephen, Anthony, Jessica, Dustin– script writingAnthony – drivingEveryone- individual research on specific philosophersGroup ConstitutionForward: This contract is a binding legal document and governsthe group until the assigned project deadline. If the groupseparates, or a member is fired, the basic contract laws remainintact for both parties. However, being fired may cause workresponsibilities to shift.Article I: Absence Policya. If a group member will be absent on a day in which work isdue, they must tell another group member a day in advance andhave all work that they are responsible for turned in. All groupmembers must stick to the provided agenda to have theassignments completed on time. If there will be an unexpectedabsence, the group member is to complete the work from homeand email another group member to let them know they are gonefor the day.
    • b. Group members will contact one another if they are absentfor any amount of period during the time allotted for working onthe projects.Article II: Work Policya. Any member that is mentally or physically disabled and canprove that they cannot complete the work assigned to themalone they may acquire assistance from other group members tohelp complete it. This will only apply for work that is group workand not individual work, and work will only be finished by thatgroup member, and the assisting group member will not write it.b. Each group member will work to the best of their ability,making sure to complete the work is up to standards, and thatthey completed it with punctuality.c. If a group member commits plagiarism, they are solelyresponsible and incur the punishment on their own.Article III: Leadershipa. At the beginning of the project, a leader will be voted upondemocratically. If a group member is absent at the time of voting,they waive their right to participate in voting. The person whowins the most votes becomes the leader. If there is an unclearoutcome (same number of votes for different people), the groupwill have no leader until one can be chosen by a revote.b. By being elected leader, the person must perform the following duties:1. Organize group meetings.2. Create and enforce a group agenda to govern group progress.3. Organize any out of school project efforts.4. Provide communication between group members in order to help individuals work towards the project goal.
    • If they fail to perform these duties, or another person is alsocarrying them out, a revote may be taken to determine whetherto obtain a new leader.c. If a leader fulfills his or her duties, they will receive the 20extra credit leadership points at the end of the project. Thecurrent group leader will receive these points, regardless of howlong they lead the group for. If no leader has been assigned, amajority vote will decide who receives the leadership points.Article IV: Work Ethicsa. If a group member does not complete work they wereassigned, the punishment for the infringement will be ofdetriment solely to the group member at fault. No negativegrading shall be given to any other group members.b. At the end of the project, ‘hard workers’ will be designatedby means of a democratic vote. The people voted as the top twowill each receive the ten bonus points. If one candidate is votedas hard worker by a margin of 75%, they will receive 20 points. Ifthere is a tie, the group will discuss and come to resolution orelse no points will be granted to the disputed individuals.Article V: Member Dismissala. The following conducts will result in a group member beingable to be dismissed; i. Incomplete or missing group work. ii. Plagiarism or any form of cheating. iii. If group member decides to leave under his or her own will.b. Any group member leaving under their own will be able tosubmit all their own work, while the other group members maynot. Any group member fired for breaking any of the conducts
    • under Article V-a (i-iii). will have their work taken from theirpossession to be used at the discretion of the original group, butnot for the individual being fired. In addition, any fired membermay not use any work completed by other group members,subject to punishment under Article 2-c.c. If a group member leaves under the stipulation of Article V-a (iv), they retain all the work they have already provided for thegroup. The original group cannot use this work or it is subject topunishment under Article 2-c.Article VI: SignatureBy signing this contract the following group members abide tothe articles above. If any member fails to abide by the articles ofthis contract, they may be fired from the group given at least a50% vote in favor of firing the individual.Project LeaderThe group has elected __________________________ as the projectleader under Article III.Signature
    • Developing Your AcademyCreating a high performance, collaborative, PBL-friendly culture National Academy Foundation Annual Conference July 18 – 19, 2011 San Francisco, CA Thom Markham, Ph.D. thom@thommarkham.com www.thommarkham.com © Thom Markham 2011
    • East Career & Technical Academy STUDENT: ____________________________Work Ethic Rubric ~ BLOCK/PERIOD: _______ EMERGING STANDARD MASTERY Criteria Weight (1) (2) (3) The student is The student is The student is NEVER FREQUENTLY late to SOMETIMES LATE to late to class. class (two of the five days class (once biweekly) bi-weekly) The student ALWAYS The student USUALLY comes to class with the The student comes to class with the required materials (paper, FREQUENTLY (3 out required materials (paper, pen or pencil, homework, of five days bi-weekly) pen or pencil, homework, etc) comes to class etc) 80% of the time or 4 WITHOUT required of the 5 days bi-weekly. The student is focused Work Ethic 100 points materials (paper, pen or throughout class (at least pencil, homework, etc) The student is 90% of the time) and USUALLY focused on DOES NOT distract The student turns in their work (roughly 80% from the learning of other LESS THAN 70% of of the time), but has a students. their work in on time. tendency to become off task and distract others. The student turns in ALL work on time. The student turns in 80% of their work on time. 0-------------50-----------69 70-----------80------------89 90-----------95-----------100*Adapted from New Technology High School & New Technology Foundation
    • Envision Schools Leadership Skills Rubric Think critically Manage Projects Express themselves Communicate effectively Solve problems Collaborate productively Effectively creatively and persuasively resourcefullyBreakthrough Reasoning is clear, logical, • Advanced • Integrates concepts in • Self and ideas “come • Initiates opportunities • Identifies relationships and thorough; interprets or understanding and previously unimagined alive” to audience for collaboration between problems calculates information use of project planning ways • Ideas are complex • Manages and resolves • Invents new tools for accurately and creatively; skills • Employs media and creative conflicts to achieve solving problems Excellent supports statements with • Meets goals in innovatively • Communication is consensus • Proposes and evidence advance of deadlines • Evokes emotional clear and well • Inspires groups to evaluates multipleIncludes all of • Acquires and uses response from the organized increase their potential solutions the criteria effectively original audience • Work is accurate and • Assumes leadership included in information. complete with rolescapable, and: • Evaluation provides consistent and new insights to project superior development; management and shows attention to leanring detail • Almost no language errors are evident Reasoning is clear and • Demonstrates an • Develops and • Student effectively • Works well in diverse • Approaches problem logical; interprets or understanding of and expresses a point of presents self and groups creatively and flexibly calculates information uses project-planning view, opinion, or idea ideas to audience • Employs personal • Identifies and accurately; supports skills. in a unique way • Ideas are complex strengths and skills for organizes needed statements with explanation • Sets goals and • Employs artistic • Communication is the team information developed strategies processes and skills clear and organized • Assumes some • Proposes reasonable to meet those goals in using appropriate • Work is accurate and leadership roles and workable Capable a timely manner. media fully developed solutions • Acquires and use • Though minor information and language errors are resources to evident, ideas are implement their understandable strategies. • Evaluates the effectiveness of their approach. Reasoning is unclear, • Demonstrates lack of • Produces work that is • Student needs greater • Participates minimally • Approaches problems illogical, or superficial; understanding and unoriginal awareness of the and superficially from only one interprets or calculates struggles to use • Does not develop audience • Rarely utilizes perspective information inaccurately; project-planning skills processes and skills • Ideas are not contributions of others • Does not take makes statements with little • Project misses complex; copies • Struggles to define advantage of available Emerging explanation deadlines others collaborative role resources • Does not access • Communication is • Proposes limited or sufficient information disorganized impractical solutions • Fails to evaluate • Work needs to be effectiveness of more accurate and approach complete • Errors in language make ideas difficult to understandUnacceptable
    • Envision Schools Leadership Skills Rubric
    • National Academy Foundation Conference Workshop ‘Developing Your Academy’ July 18 – 19, 2011 Agenda Time Task ActivityMonday, 7/189:30 – 10:15 am Welcome/Agenda/Teams The story of Cody10:15 – 10:30 am The Academy Plan What do you believe? Need to Knows10:30 – 10:45 am Break10:45 – 11:15 am The D&T culture: Thom presents Education, Youth Development, and PBL Team exercise11:15 – 12:15 pm The Academy Plan: Identify your vision Core skills Draft a Graduate Profile Core dispositions The 2011 – 2012 student12:15 – 1:15 pm Lunch1:15 – 2:15 pm Share your goals Teams/whole group2:15 – 2:45 pm The D&T culture: Review tools: Norming to performing Creating a collaborative, Groups to teams high-performing culture Contracts and norms Skills rubrics2:45 – 3:00 pm Break3:00 – 4:00 pm The Academy Plan: Review Coach’s Guide Resource Hunt Decide/adapt tools
    • Tuesday, 7/198:30 – 9:30 am The D&T culture: Thom presents Opening the Year How PBL fits Project Planning Process9:30 – 10:15 am The Academy Plan: Teams(includes break) Project Planning10: 15 – 11:00 am The D&T culture: Thom Increasing performance Tools11:00 – 12:00 pm The Academy Plan: AOHT sample The ‘Open the Year’ Plan The ‘Project-Project’ Spiraling projects12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch1:00 – 1:30 pm The Academy Plan: Teams Finalize plan1:30 – 2:30 pm The Academy Plan: Teams Protocol and debrief2:30 – 2:45 pm Break2:45 – 3:15 pm The Academy Plan: Protocol and debrief3:15 – 4:00 pm Action planning Thom/teams
    • PEER COLLABORATION AND WORK ETHIC NAME OF PERSON BEING EVALUATED CRITERIA WEIGHT UNSATISFACTORY PROFICIENT ADVANCED LEADERSHIP 25% Group member played a passive role, Group member played an active role in generating In addition to the “Acceptable” qualities, the group generating few new ideas; tended to only do new ideas, took initiative in getting tasks organized member provided leadership to the group by what they were told to do by others, or did and completed and sought help when needed. thoughtfully organizing and dividing the work, not seek help when needed. checking on progress, or providing focus and direction for the project. 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 5 - - - - - - - - - - - - 15 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - - 24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25 EXAMPLE: FACILITATION AND 25% Group member seemed unable or unwilling Group member demonstrated willingness to help In addition to the “Acceptable” qualities, the group to help others, made non-constructive other group members when asked, actively listened member would actively checked with others to SUPPORT criticisms toward the project or other group to the ideas of others, and helped create a positive understand how each member was progressing and members or was distracted other members. work environment. how he or she may be of help. 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 5 - - - - - - - - - - - - 15 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - - 24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25 EXAMPLE: CONTRIBUTIONS AND 50% Group member was often off task, did not Group member was prepared to work each day, met In addition to the “Acceptable” qualities, the group complete assignments or duties, or had due dates by completing assignments/duties, and member made up for work left undone by other WORK ETHIC attendance problems that significantly worked hard on the project a most of the time. If group members, demonstrated willingness to spend impeded progress on project. May have absent, other group members knew the reason and significant time outside of class/school to complete worked hard but on relatively unimportant progress was not significantly impeded. the project. parts of the project. 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 15 - - - - - - - - - - - - 30 34 - - - - - - - - - - - - 38 - - - - - - - - - - - - 42 44 - - - - - - - - - - - - 46 - - - - - - - - - - - - 50 EXAMPLE:PROJECT INFORMATION ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: PROJECT NAME: COURSE: TEACHER: DATE: / /
    • Developing Your AcademyCreating a high performance, collaborative, PBL-friendly culture National Academy Foundation Annual Conference July 18 – 19, 2011 San Francisco, CA Thom Markham, Ph.D. thom@thommarkham.com www.thommarkham.com © Thom Markham 2011
    • East Career & Technical Academy STUDENT: ____________________________Work Ethic Rubric ~ BLOCK/PERIOD: _______ EMERGING STANDARD MASTERY Criteria Weight (1) (2) (3) The student is The student is The student is NEVER FREQUENTLY late to SOMETIMES LATE to late to class. class (two of the five days class (once biweekly) bi-weekly) The student ALWAYS The student USUALLY comes to class with the The student comes to class with the required materials (paper, FREQUENTLY (3 out required materials (paper, pen or pencil, homework, of five days bi-weekly) pen or pencil, homework, etc) comes to class etc) 80% of the time or 4 WITHOUT required of the 5 days bi-weekly. The student is focused Work Ethic 100 points materials (paper, pen or throughout class (at least pencil, homework, etc) The student is 90% of the time) and USUALLY focused on DOES NOT distract The student turns in their work (roughly 80% from the learning of other LESS THAN 70% of of the time), but has a students. their work in on time. tendency to become off task and distract others. The student turns in ALL work on time. The student turns in 80% of their work on time. 0-------------50-----------69 70-----------80------------89 90-----------95-----------100*Adapted from New Technology High School & New Technology Foundation
    • Envision Schools Leadership Skills Rubric Think critically Manage Projects Express themselves Communicate effectively Solve problems Collaborate productively Effectively creatively and persuasively resourcefullyBreakthrough Reasoning is clear, logical, • Advanced • Integrates concepts in • Self and ideas “come • Initiates opportunities • Identifies relationships and thorough; interprets or understanding and previously unimagined alive” to audience for collaboration between problems calculates information use of project planning ways • Ideas are complex • Manages and resolves • Invents new tools for accurately and creatively; skills • Employs media and creative conflicts to achieve solving problems Excellent supports statements with • Meets goals in innovatively • Communication is consensus • Proposes and evidence advance of deadlines • Evokes emotional clear and well • Inspires groups to evaluates multipleIncludes all of • Acquires and uses response from the organized increase their potential solutions the criteria effectively original audience • Work is accurate and • Assumes leadership included in information. complete with rolescapable, and: • Evaluation provides consistent and new insights to project superior development; management and shows attention to leanring detail • Almost no language errors are evident Reasoning is clear and • Demonstrates an • Develops and • Student effectively • Works well in diverse • Approaches problem logical; interprets or understanding of and expresses a point of presents self and groups creatively and flexibly calculates information uses project-planning view, opinion, or idea ideas to audience • Employs personal • Identifies and accurately; supports skills. in a unique way • Ideas are complex strengths and skills for organizes needed statements with explanation • Sets goals and • Employs artistic • Communication is the team information developed strategies processes and skills clear and organized • Assumes some • Proposes reasonable to meet those goals in using appropriate • Work is accurate and leadership roles and workable Capable a timely manner. media fully developed solutions • Acquires and use • Though minor information and language errors are resources to evident, ideas are implement their understandable strategies. • Evaluates the effectiveness of their approach. Reasoning is unclear, • Demonstrates lack of • Produces work that is • Student needs greater • Participates minimally • Approaches problems illogical, or superficial; understanding and unoriginal awareness of the and superficially from only one interprets or calculates struggles to use • Does not develop audience • Rarely utilizes perspective information inaccurately; project-planning skills processes and skills • Ideas are not contributions of others • Does not take makes statements with little • Project misses complex; copies • Struggles to define advantage of available Emerging explanation deadlines others collaborative role resources • Does not access • Communication is • Proposes limited or sufficient information disorganized impractical solutions • Fails to evaluate • Work needs to be effectiveness of more accurate and approach complete • Errors in language make ideas difficult to understandUnacceptable
    • Envision Schools Leadership Skills Rubric
    • National Academy Foundation Conference Workshop ‘Developing Your Academy’ July 18 – 19, 2011 Agenda Time Task ActivityMonday, 7/189:30 – 10:15 am Welcome/Agenda/Teams The story of Cody10:15 – 10:30 am The Academy Plan What do you believe? Need to Knows10:30 – 10:45 am Break10:45 – 11:15 am The D&T culture: Thom presents Education, Youth Development, and PBL Team exercise11:15 – 12:15 pm The Academy Plan: Identify your vision Core skills Draft a Graduate Profile Core dispositions The 2011 – 2012 student12:15 – 1:15 pm Lunch1:15 – 2:15 pm Share your goals Teams/whole group2:15 – 2:45 pm The D&T culture: Review tools: Norming to performing Creating a collaborative, Groups to teams high-performing culture Contracts and norms Skills rubrics2:45 – 3:00 pm Break3:00 – 4:00 pm The Academy Plan: Review Coach’s Guide Resource Hunt Decide/adapt tools
    • Tuesday, 7/198:30 – 9:30 am The D&T culture: Thom presents Opening the Year How PBL fits Project Planning Process9:30 – 10:15 am The Academy Plan: Teams(includes break) Project Planning10: 15 – 11:00 am The D&T culture: Thom Increasing performance Tools11:00 – 12:00 pm The Academy Plan: AOHT sample The ‘Open the Year’ Plan The ‘Project-Project’ Spiraling projects12:00 – 1:00 pm Lunch1:00 – 1:30 pm The Academy Plan: Teams Finalize plan1:30 – 2:30 pm The Academy Plan: Teams Protocol and debrief2:30 – 2:45 pm Break2:45 – 3:15 pm The Academy Plan: Protocol and debrief3:15 – 4:00 pm Action planning Thom/teams
    • PEER COLLABORATION AND WORK ETHIC NAME OF PERSON BEING EVALUATED CRITERIA WEIGHT UNSATISFACTORY PROFICIENT ADVANCED LEADERSHIP 25% Group member played a passive role, Group member played an active role in generating In addition to the “Acceptable” qualities, the group generating few new ideas; tended to only do new ideas, took initiative in getting tasks organized member provided leadership to the group by what they were told to do by others, or did and completed and sought help when needed. thoughtfully organizing and dividing the work, not seek help when needed. checking on progress, or providing focus and direction for the project. 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 5 - - - - - - - - - - - - 15 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - - 24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25 EXAMPLE: FACILITATION AND 25% Group member seemed unable or unwilling Group member demonstrated willingness to help In addition to the “Acceptable” qualities, the group to help others, made non-constructive other group members when asked, actively listened member would actively checked with others to SUPPORT criticisms toward the project or other group to the ideas of others, and helped create a positive understand how each member was progressing and members or was distracted other members. work environment. how he or she may be of help. 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 5 - - - - - - - - - - - - 15 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - - 24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25 EXAMPLE: CONTRIBUTIONS AND 50% Group member was often off task, did not Group member was prepared to work each day, met In addition to the “Acceptable” qualities, the group complete assignments or duties, or had due dates by completing assignments/duties, and member made up for work left undone by other WORK ETHIC attendance problems that significantly worked hard on the project a most of the time. If group members, demonstrated willingness to spend impeded progress on project. May have absent, other group members knew the reason and significant time outside of class/school to complete worked hard but on relatively unimportant progress was not significantly impeded. the project. parts of the project. 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 15 - - - - - - - - - - - - 30 34 - - - - - - - - - - - - 38 - - - - - - - - - - - - 42 44 - - - - - - - - - - - - 46 - - - - - - - - - - - - 50 EXAMPLE:PROJECT INFORMATION ADDITIONAL COMMENTS: PROJECT NAME: COURSE: TEACHER: DATE: / /
    • WORK ETHIC RUBRIC -- Polaris High School/Prospect Middle School STUDENT: __________________________________ EMERGING STANDARD MASTERY Criteria Weight • FREQUENTLY late to • SOMETIMES LATE to • NEVER late to class. class class • ALWAYS comes to class with • FREQUENTLY comes • USUALLY comes to class the required materials. to class WITHOUT with the required materials. • TURNS in ALL work on required materials • TURNS in 80% of their time • LESS THAN 70% of work on time. • ALWAYS attends class, work turned in on time. • USUALLY attends class. except when sick. • ABSENT two or more • FOCUSED on work • FOCUSED throughout class days per week. during class roughly 80% of at least 90% of the time. • RARELY works in class the time. • ALWAYS assists other and distracts learning of • REGULARLY assists students.Work 100 other students. other students. • WORKS WELL in team.Ethic points • SHOWS no or little • ABLE to work in team • RARELY requests hall pass initiative in helping other when necessary. during class. students achieve. • OCCASIONALLY • ALWAYS willing to do work • SHOWS little ability to requests hall pass. outside of class to meet goals. work in team. • WILLING to do work • REGUARLY requests outside of class. hall pass during class. • RARELY does any work outside of class. 0-------------50-----------69 70-----------80------------89 90-----------95-----------100*Adapted from New Technology High School & New Technology Foundation
    • The Coach’s Guide The Project Design Cycle A planning guide for your projectProject title: __________________________________________________________Participants: __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________Date: ______________ School: __________________________________________ © 2011 Thom Markham, Ph.D. 1
    • Overview of the Project Design Cycle Facilitate the Identify the Teams Challenge Craft theEnroll and Driving Keep theEngage End in Mind Question Build the Plan Assessment Backwards 2
    • The Design Cycle begins with generating an authentic challenge. Start with big ideas, not standards. Then capture the challenge in the form of a Driving Question that will guide and engage students during the project. Identify the Challenge1. Summarize the authentic challenge in this project:_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________2. Share your ideas with a colleague. Discuss the following:Can you make the challenge more authentic and more likely to lead to deeperlearning?Review the scope of the challenge. Do you need to make it more manageable?Can students refine the challenge?Put a ‘soft focus’ on your standards. Does the challenge help students learn thecontent of your course?How will students ‘solve’ the challenge and present their solutions at the end of theproject?3. What concepts will students learn in the project?__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3
    • Craft the Driving QuestionDraft a Driving Question for the project: Using a Project Development rubric, discuss your draft question with colleagues. Refine and redraft the question as necessary.Preliminary Driving Question for the project:The final Driving Question may change as you proceed in your planning. Keep the space below blank until you complete your planning.Final Driving Question for the project: 4
    • Start outlining the project Plan Backwards – Section 1Imagine your student sat the end of the project. What will they know? Howwill they behave? How will they be different?1. Describe the skills that students will learn in the project.2. Describe the personal strengths or habits of mind that students will learnin the project.3. List or describe the key concepts that students will learn in the project.4. List critical content gaps that must be taught in the project. 5
    • Plan Backwards – Section 21. How will the project involve the community or allow students to interactwith other adults?2. Fill in the Project Schedule.Share your schedule with a colleague. What did they notice?3. If necessary, prune and revise the Project Schedule. 6
    • Use the next two boxes to focus on evaluation and grading Build the Assessment – Section 11. Define the products and artifacts for the project:Product or Early Middle End Graded? Assessment Tool artifact2. Choose and refine the rubrics for the project. Attach the rubrics to theProject Design Cycle form.3. How will you evaluate personal strengths?_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 7
    • Build the Assessment – Section 24. Fill in a grading matrix for the project. Product Tool Weight5. How will students answer the Driving Question?_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________6. Notes on grading.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ outcomes for the project? 8
    • Use the next three planning boxes to guide the PBL process. Enroll and Engage1. Plan the first two days of the project. Check tools to be used to begin the project.Entry event _____ Handouts _____Need to know _____ Review rubrics _____Contract _____ Refine DQ _____Set norms _____ Protocol _____Review timeline ___ Form teams _____Exemplars _____2. Create the Entry Event for the project. Attach to the Project Design Cycle form. Facilitate the Teams1. How will you form teams?____________________________________________________________________2. List team building/training plans:_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________3. Other considerations for effective teams:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 9
    • Keep the End in Mind1. Plan for exhibition or public event.________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________2. How will student work be shared publicly?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________3. How will students reflect on their performance?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________4. How will students celebrate their success?________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 10
    • PROJECT: _____________________________ NEW TECHNOLOGY FOUNDATION PROJECT DEVELOPMENT RUBRIC AUTHOR: _____________________________ UNSATISFACTORY PROFICIENT ADVANCED CRITERIA (Below Performance Standards) (Minimal Criteria) (Demonstrates Exceptional Performance) Goals • Goals of the project do not seem to be tied to any • The goals of the project are tied to specific content area In addition to meeting the PROFICIENT criteria … specific content area standards or are not rigorous standards and 21st Century Skills • Goals of the project are clearly defined and successfully enough to challenge the students • Goals are rigorous enough to challenge all students. integrate content standards from multiple subject areas • Goals of the project seem to address only the • Goals of the project require the students to use high-order lowest levels of critical thinking critical thinking skills. 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 8 - - - - - - - - - - - - 16 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - -24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25 Entry Doc • Entry document or event seems unlikely to engage • Entry document or event seems likely to engage the In addition to meeting the PROFICIENT criteria … the student’s curiosity. student’s curiosity in a realistic scenario • Entry document or event engages the students in a real or Event • Entry document or event fails to create a realistic • Entry document or event establishes a clear role and task world problem that they can help solve role or project for the students for the students. • Entry document creates a thorough list of relevant, • Task seems unclear and does lead to a list of • Entry document or event leads to a list of content-based content specific “need to knows” content-based “need to knows” or next steps. “need to knows” and next steps • Project is launched with the help of outside person or • Entry document or event fails to establish a • Entry document or event establishes a clear timeline and entity timeline assessment criteria • Entry document or event fails to externalize the • Entry document or event successfully externalizes the enemy enemy 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 8 - - - - - - - - - - - - 16 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - -24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25 Planning • The project plan may be a good idea, but little • The project has a general outline including the various • The project plan includes a detailed description of the thought has been put into how to implement the phases and student activities various phases with progress checks and benchmarks idea in the classroom • Some thought has been put into resources and materials • The project has a complete list of resources and materials • No thought has been put into the resources and that are required for this project • The project has a well thought out plan for implementation materials required for this project • The project has a list of student products • The project includes a description of student products and how they will be evaluated against the project goals 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 8 - - - - - - - - - - - - 16 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - -24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25 Scaffolding The project lacks appropriate activities designed to The project has appropriate activities designed to help The project has differentiated activities designed to help help students… students… individual students and groups … • work as an effective team on a long term project • work as an effective team on a long term project (time • work as an effective team on a long term project • reflect on their “need to knows” and to develop next management, collaboration, etc) • reflect on their “need to knows” and to develop next steps steps • reflect on their “need to knows” and to develop next steps • understand the content and make use of the resources • understand the content and make use of the • understand the content and make use of the resources available (including any necessary remediation that might resources available (including any necessary available (including any necessary remediation that might be needed) remediation that might be needed) be needed) 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 8 - - - - - - - - - - - - 16 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - -24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25Assessment • Rubrics are not developed, don’t seem tied to the • The rubric is designed to clearly lay out expectations of • Several rubrics are used to evaluate multiple individual goals of the project, or are unusable by students the final product as defined by the goals of the project and group products based on the stated content and 21st • Evaluation does not include use of school-wide • Evaluation includes the use of school-wide rubrics Century goals of the project. rubrics • Rubrics are easy for students to use in self- and peer- • Assessment includes input from outside sources assessment activities. 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 8 - - - - - - - - - - - - 16 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - -24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25End Product • End product does not demonstrate understanding • End product clearly demonstrates understanding and • End product is composed of multiple opportunities for and application of content standards application of content standards students to demonstrate their learning (multiple products) • End product is not authentic • End product is authentic and reflects real world work • End product will be used by an outside person or entity • End product is not age level appropriate • End product is tailored to age and skill level of students • End product incorporates the use of a variety of media 0 - - - - - - - - - - - - 8 - - - - - - - - - - - - 16 17 - - - - - - - - - - - - 19 - - - - - - - - - - - - 21 23 - - - - - - - - - - - -24 - - - - - - - - - - - - 25COMMENTS:  New Technology Foundation 2001-2005
    • Using Professional Learning Community Protocols to Launch and Sustain Project Based Learning Six Key Protocols... Collaborative Project Design Project Peer Inquiry Reviews Circles using Critical Friends ...to help PBL blossom at your school. Looking at Post Project Student Reviews Work Sessions Lesson Study 1 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PLC Protocol # 1 - Collaborative Project DesignOverviewTo sustain project based learning, school leaders should provide collaboration time for teachers to continue to design and fine-tune projects.It is helpful to designate a person to support teachers in this process on an ongoing basis. If grade level, subject area, or interdisciplinaryteams are expected to collaboratively plan projects, they should be scheduled to meet together. Shared file systems, including Googledocuments, can be very helpful in the planning process.ResourcesBIE Project Planning FormBIE Project Teaching and Learning GuideBIE Project Calendar 2 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Project Planning FormName of Project: Duration:Class(es): Semester:Content/Curriculumareas to partner withProject Idea(investigation,scenario, problem,challenge, issue, etc.)Entry Event(grabber) to launchinquiry and sparkcuriosityThe DrivingQuestion, Problem orChallengeStatement or IssueContent and Skills Insert link or copy and paste on bottom of planning formStandards addressed: T P T PPartnership for P21 Critical Thinking/Problem Solving Social Literacy and Cross/Multi-Cultural LiteracySkills to be taught (T) Communication (oral and written) Productivity and Accountabilityand practiced (P): ICT Literacy Leadership and ResponsibilityCheck all that apply Collaboration Financial, Economic and Entrepreneurial literacy Information Literacy Civic Literacy Flexibility and Adaptability Health Literacy Initiative and Self-Direction Presentation 3 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Audience Major group Class Student work product(s): School  Community Experts  Major individual Web  product(s): Other  Rubric(s) I’ll use Collaboration Content Knowledge (check all that apply) Critical Thinking CTE CompetenciesAssessment Oral Communication Physical Education skills & Written Communication Physical Education skillsReflection Visual/Performing Arts Other assessments, Quizzes/tests Practice presentations benchmarks & Self-evaluations Notes checkpoints (check all Peer evaluations Checklists that apply) On-line tests/exams Concept Maps Reflections Survey Focus group Discussion Learning plan Journal write/learning log Resources On-site personnel: Technical (equipment) Community resources Material resources 4 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PROJECT TEACHING AND LEARNING GUIDEProject: Course/Semester: Knowledge and Skills Needed by Students Scaffolding / Materials / Lessons to be Provided to successfully complete culminating products and by the project teacher, other teachers, experts, performances, and do well on summative assessments mentors, community members        5 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • P R O J E C T C A L E N D A RProject: Start Date: M O N D AY T U E S D AY W E D N E S D AY T H U R S D AY F R I D AY PROJECT WEEK ONE PROJECT WEEK TWO PROJECT WEEK THREE 6 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • 7 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PLC Protocol #2 - Project Peer Reviews using Critical FriendsOverviewOn the second day of the BIE PBL 101 session, the teachers engage in a project peer review using the Critical Friends protocol. Thispowerful experience provides teachers with helpful information to revise their project plans, but it also cultivates a positive, reflectiveculture among the teachers. To sustain project based learning after the session, school leaders should schedule and facilitate additionalproject peer review sessions. During the review session, teachers form a circle and the facilitator reviews the protocol steps, facilitates thereview session, and serves as the time keeper. If the group is a reasonable size, all members can participate in the session. If the group is toolarge, the facilitator can utilize a fishbowl format and form an inner and outer circle for the session. There are two format options for projectpeer reviews using Critical Friends. One option is to have the group provide general feedback about any aspect of the project plan. In schoolsin more advanced stages of PBL implementation, it can be helpful to identify a few qualities of project design on which to focus during theproject peer review. This way, participants can provide more focused feedback based on identified qualities that teachers can use in makingrevisions. Examples of qualities on which to focus during a peer review are authenticity and alignment between the learning targets, drivingquestion, products, and teaching and learning activities.ResourcesProject Peer Review Agenda Template 8 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Project Peer Review Agenda TemplateDate:Time:Location:Facilitator:Project Plan Presenter:Learning Targets:*I can review a project plan and evaluate the degree to which:  The driving question, end products, rubrics, and key learning experiences are aligned and linked to standards.  The project is authentic.  The directions for products and performances are clear.  The project is structured so that students can work in high-performance teams.  The project is effectively scaffolded and incorporates research-based instructional strategies.  The rubric clearly articulates the criteria for success to enable students to easily use the rubric to evaluate their work during the revision process.*These are only examples of learning targets. Include learning targets on which you intend to focus during the peer review. It can bepowerful to “zero in on” one or two aspects of the plan instead of attempting to provide feedback about all facets of the project plan.Remember: The purpose of the review is to provide concrete, helpful feedback that the teacher can use to make revisions.Report (5 minutes): Teacher/s provide details on the driving question, project overview, hook and student products. 1. What is the driving question for your project? 2. What key standards and 21st century skills will you address in your project? 3. What will the students create? Describe both group and individual performances and products. 4. What is the duration of the project? 5. How will you launch the project to spark student curiosity and propel students into learning? 6. What strategies will you use to scaffold instruction? 9 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • 7. What tool/s will you use to evaluate student work. (Share the rubric/s.) 8. How will you structure collaborative inquiry? How will students work in teams to find answers to questions and create high-quality products?Clarifying the air (2 minutes): Audience asks short, clarifying questions.Good stuff (3 minutes): Audience shares details of what they liked about project.Wondering stuff (3 minutes): Audiences shares details of their concerns and unanswered questions.Next stuff (3 minutes): Audience shares their thoughts on resources and improvements.Reflection(3 minutes): Audience and group talk.Optional - Participants score the project with a project design rubric and give copies to the presenters. 10 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PLC Protocol # 3 - Looking at Student Work SessionsOverviewLooking at Student Work sessions are a common component of a lesson study process. However, they can be facilitated separately as aprofessional professional development activity. A Looking at Student Works session can be a wonderful next step after a PBL 101 session formany reasons. The experience provides teachers with an opportunity to look at the outcome of a first project – authentic student work. It alsoprovides teachers the opportunity to have healthy discussions about what, in fact, constitutes “high quality” work. Products can be formativeor summative assessments, but should be authentic and have a performance continuum that makes it possible to score the assessment with arubric. Teachers can be grouped by grade level or subject area, but work samples from one grade level or course should be selected to reviewduring the session. In small schools in which only one person teaches a grade or course, it might be necessary to form teams across gradelevels or interdisciplinary teams.Examples: 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade teachers look at 2nd grade project work. 6th -12th grade Math teachers look at Algebra 1 project work. 9th -12th grade English and History teachers look at English work from a 10th grade interdisciplinary project.Many PBL schools schedule and facilitate 4 to 6 looking at student work sessions annually – some with even greater frequency.ResourcesLooking at Student Work ProcessLooking at Student Work ChartLooking at Student Work Reflection Sheet 11 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Looking at Student Work ProcessMaterials: 1. Authentic student work samples from each teacher. (Cover student name; number pages; 1 packet for each teacher) 2. Directions and rubric for the assignment 3. Chart Paper – Record the following on chart paper: # At Not at Evidence for the Judgment Standard Standard 1 2 3 4 5 6 7Purpose of Looking at Student Work session:  Reflect on success of the use of an instructional protocol or practice.  Refine learning targets.  Make sure that your rubric really defines standards mastery.STEPS:1) Distribute student work packets.2) Review the standard addressed and the directions for the assessment. (If the assessment identified more than one standard, identify one standard on which to focus during the Looking at Student Work session.)3) Working with student work item # 1, review the student work and decide whether it is “at standard” and provides evidence for the judgment. (Record notes on chart.)4) Continue with all student work items.5) Share findings6) Discuss student work items on which the group lacks consensus.7) Discussion item: a) What are the strengths for all of these products? 12 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • b) What are the weaknesses for all of these products? c) What are the implications for instruction? (Do we need to revise the task? Do we need to re-instruct any or all aspects of the standard?)8) Review the rubric. a) Review the proficient strand. b) Is the language that describes proficiency accurate?*Adapted from Lesson Study Protocol by Mary Camezon. 13 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Looking at Student Work Chart # At Not at Evidence for the Judgment Standard Standard 1 2 3 4 5 6 7*Adapted from Lesson Study Protocol by Mary Camezon. 14 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Looking at Student Work Reflection Sheet  What are the strengths for all of these products?  What are the weaknesses for all of these products?  What are the implications for instruction? (Do we need to revise the task? Do we need to re-instruct any or all aspects of the standard?)*Adapted from Lesson Study Protocol by Mary Camezon. 15 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PLC Protocol # 4 - Lesson StudyOverviewIn Professional Learning in the Learning Profession: A Status Report on Teacher Development in the United States and Abroad, the authorsaddress the importance of creating professional learning systems to bolster teaching quality and student achievement. One professionaldevelopment strategy described in the report that has proven to be effective in high-achieving countries is Japans lesson study approach. Thelesson study approach, when used to review scaffolded lessons in a project, can be very helpful in sustaining project based learning. Thefollowing excerpt from the report provides an overview of the lesson study process: Japan’s Lesson Study Approach to Professional Development In Japan kenkyuu jugyou (research lessons) are a key part of the learning culture. Every teacher periodically prepares a best possible lesson that demonstrates strategies to achieve a specific goal (e.g., students becoming active problem-solvers or students learning more from each other) in collaboration with other colleagues. A group of teachers observe while the lesson is taught and usually record the lesson in a number of ways, including videotapes, audiotapes, and narrative and/or checklist observations that focus on areas of interest to the instructing teacher (e.g., how many student volunteered their own ideas). Afterwards, the group of teachers, and sometimes outside educators, discuss the lesson’s strengths and weakness, ask questions, and make suggestions to improve the lesson. In some cases the revised lesson is given by another teacher only a few days later and observed and discussed again (Fernandez, 2002; Pang, 2006; Barber & Mourshed, 2007). Teachers themselves decide the theme and frequency of research lessons. Large study groups often break up into subgroups of 4-6 teachers. The subgroups plan their own lessons but work toward the same goal and teachers from all subgroups share and comment on lessons and try to attend the lesson and follow up discussion. For a typical lesson study, the 10-15 hours of group meetings are spread over 3-4 weeks. While schools let out between 2:40 and 3:45 pm, teachers’ 16 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • work days don’t end until 5:00 pm, which provides additional time for collegial work and planning. Most lesson study meetings occur during the hours after school lets out. The research lessons allow teachers to refine individual lessons, consult with other teachers and receive feedback based on colleagues’ observations of their classroom practice, reflect on their own practice, learn new content and approaches, and build a culture that emphasizes continuous improvement and collaboration (Fernandez, 2002). Source: Wei, R. C., Darling-Hammond, L., Andree, A., Richardson, N., Orphanos, S. (2009). Professional learning in the learning profession: A status report on teacher development in the United States and abroad. Dallas, TX. National Staff Development Council.In project based learning, teachers facilitate lessons to build background knowledge for inquiry and scaffold the inquiry process. AlthoughPBL teachers use a variety of formats for lesson design, one common lesson planning framework is the workshop model. The followingresource, the PBL Workshop Study Protocol, is an adaptation of lesson study concept for schools that use the workshop model. A workshopstudy can be a next step after a looking at student work session. (We analyzed student work and determined the strengths and weaknessesand implications for instruction. Now what? Design a workshop to respond to student needs!)ResourcePBL Workshop Study ProtocolPBL Workshop Planning TemplatePBL Workshop Study Protocol - Looking at Student Work ProcessPBL Workshop Study Protocol - Looking at Student Work ChartPBL Workshop Study Protocol -Looking at Student Work Reflection Sheet 17 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PBL Workshop Study ProtocolDefinition of a PBL Workshop:In project based learning, teachers design workshops to build background knowledge for inquiry, teach skills, and guide students through theprocess of developing high-quality projects. The workshop model is based on the learning theory that knowledge emerges in a community ofactivity, discourse, and discussion. The workshop model is a lesson planning framework that is compatible with inquiry-based curriculumdesign models like project based learning because workshops create the conditions for investigating, inquiring, discussing, collaborating, andconstructing. In That Workshop Book, Samantha Bennett introduces the workshop model in the following way: What does it look like when students are doing the work of thinking? The work of learning? The work of achieving? The work of becoming better human beings? Literally and metaphorically, it looks like a workshop, a place where works— concrete demonstrations of understanding—are created.Components of the Workshop Model:1. Mini-LessonTeachers plan a hook to build students’ curiosity and motivation an introduction that clarifies the learning target(s) a model to show studentswhat is expected. Examples:  Think-aloud  Interactive conversation  Simulation  Role-play  Critique2. Practice/ApplicationStudents work individually and/or in pairs and/or In small groups (It may be appropriate to bounce back and forth between mini-lessons andpractice/application sessions for scaffolding purposes.)3. Assessment for Learning 18 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Students and teachers assess progress toward the learning target(s) by:  conferring during practice/application  keeping running records  building an anchor chart  teachers can scribe  students can scribe  students can write sticky notes  discussing ideas with a small group  recording thoughts on a recording form or in a learning log/journalTeachers plan their next instructional steps based on the assessment information.Definition of a PBL Workshop study:The process by which a group of teachers who are implementing the same project choose a skill or concept that students are having difficultymastering, develop a PBL Workshop (or a series of workshops) to uncover the topic or address the skills and ensure that as many students aspossible succeed, facilitate the workshop, and review the student work products to determine its effectiveness. ProcessPhase 1: In a collaborative group: Review formative assessment data (authentic student work) 4. Collaboratively review authentic student work. What are the strengths of the student work? What are the areas that prompt further instruction? 5. Use the results to determine the focus of the workshop to be developed. 6. Review and unpack the focus standards. 7. Create the learning targets.Phase 2: In a collaborative group: Designing the PBL workshop to teach the learning targets *See PBL Workshop Planning Template.Phase 3: In a collaborative group: Review the student work products to determine the degree to which students mastered the skillsand knowledge  Gather data or student work samples to bring to the meeting 19 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    •  Review the item analysis/student work to determine how many students mastered the skills and knowledge  Determine the areas of strength and weakness  Begin the process of PBL Workshop study againMany schools offer teachers an opportunity to observe their peers facilitate the workshop either through classroom or videotapedobservation.Recommended Reading:That Workshop Book by Samantha BennettHeinemann PublishingAdapted from Lesson Study Protocol by Mary Camezon. 20 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PBL Workshop Planning TemplateConcept/Comprehension/ Writing Strategy or Skill to be taught:Learning Target(s):Introduction How will you introduce this strategy? How will you hook the students?Mini Lesson for independent practice – (The teacher models the strategy/ activity with no student interruptions). *Purpose: Prepare kidsfor truly independent work so teacher can assess, confer, etc. 21 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Application/Practice – (Students practice what has been modeled by the teacher)Are students going to work with the same text that was modeled, finishing the text if you did not, or are they going to work with a new text?What are students going to do individually first, and what are they going to do in their small groups? Will they need a response sheet or anyother materials? *Teachers confer (individuals or invitational groups) OR do formative assessments.* Individual WorkSmall GroupMaterialsShare/Debrief (Teacher and students discuss work that was done). How are students going to report out on the work they have done duringApplication/Practice? How will students’ responses be recorded?Debrief Questions: Source: Expeditionary Learning Schools 22 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PBL Workshop Study Protocol Looking at Student Work ProcessMaterials: • Student work samples from each teacher. (Cover student name; number pages; 1 packet for each teacher) • Chart # At Not at Evidence for the Judgment Standard Standard 1 2 3 4 5 6 7Purpose of Looking at Student Work session: • Reflect on success of the use of an instructional protocol or practice. • Refine learning targets. • Make sure that your rubric really defines standards mastery.STEPS: 9. Distribute student work packets. 10. Review the standard addressed and the directions for the assessment. (If the assessment identified more than one standard, identify one standard on which to focus during the Looking at Student Work session.) 11. Working with student work item # 1, review the student work and decide whether it is “at standard” and provides evidence for the judgment. (Record notes on chart.) 12. Continue with all student work items. 13. Share findings 23 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • 14. Discuss student work items on which the group lacks consensus.15. Discussion item: 1. What are the strengths for all of these products? 2. What are the weaknesses for all of these products? 3. What are the implications for instruction? (Do we need to revise the task? Do we need to re-instruct any or all aspects of the standard?)16. Review the rubric. 1. Review the proficient strand. 2. Is the language that describes proficiency accurate? 24 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PBL Workshop Study Protocol Looking at Student Work Chart# At Not at Evidence for the Judgment Standard Standard1234567 25 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PBL Workshop Study Protocol Looking at Student Work Reflection Sheet1) What are the strengths for all of these products?2) What are the weaknesses for all of these products?3) What are the implications for instruction? (Do we need to revise the task? Do we need to re-instruct any or all aspects of the standard?) 26 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PLC Protocol # 5 - Post Project ReviewsOverviewAfter finishing a project, it is important to provide teachers with an opportunity to reflect upon the success of the project. The Post ProjectReview is a protocol that provides a framework for looking at the success of the project from many different angles. The protocol is verycomprehensive and could possibly overwhelm a teacher. For some teachers who are new to PBL, it might be helpful to select a few qualitieson which to focus for an initial review. If the project is launched by a team of teachers, it is helpful to reflect on the success of the project asa team. The person designated to support teachers in the PBL process should serve as the facilitator and a teacher should be identified torecord the reflection notes. The protocol includes discussion questions that can be used during the post project review and a space to recordnotes. After facilitating the post project review meeting, the teacher or team should select and archive work samples and upload the projectplan, related documents, and reflection notes in a space designated for archiving curriculum documents.Resource:Teachers Post Project Review 27 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Teachers Post-Project ReviewProject:Teacher:Date:*Select the items upon which you would like to reflect. Delete the rows that you do not intend to discuss during the reflection.Project idea, design, Sample Discussion Questions Reflectionsand implementationconsiderations 1. Student  What was the level of student engagement during engagement the project?  What key aspects of the project design or delivery contributed to the level of student engagement? 2. Overall idea for  What reflections do you have about the overall idea the project for the project? 3. Overall results  What goals did you establish regarding student for student performance on the culminating products? learning  To what degree did you achieve your goals?  What key aspects of the project design or delivery contributed to the overall results for student learning? 4. Authenticity of  Did the project focus on actual community issues? project tasks and If so, what issues? If it did not, could it be refined products to focus on actual issues?  Was the project useful to an outside audience? Did 28 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Project idea, design, Sample Discussion Questions Reflectionsand implementationconsiderations it meet an authentic need? If it did not, could it be refined to meet an authentic need?  Did students present to an audience beyond families or the classroom teacher? If not, would this enhance the project?  Were students required to consider multiple perspectives on issues? If not, could the project be refined to enable them to do so?  Were experts from the community utilized to help students critique their work against professional standards? If not, would this enhance the project? 5. Quality and Use  Were your students able to easily read and of Driving comprehend the driving question? Question  The driving question should clearly state the purpose of the project and give a focus to all of the tasks students do. To what degree did your driving question accomplish this?  How effectively did your students answer the driving question in completing their products and performances?  What strategies did you use to maintain a focus on the driving question throughout the project?  Do you plan to refine the driving question before launching this project in the future? 6. Scope:  Would you adjust the scope of the project before Length of time launching this project in the future? Complexity  Duration? Number of  Complexity? subjects/people/  Interdisciplinary planning? 29 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Project idea, design, Sample Discussion Questions Reflectionsand implementationconsiderations organizations  Involvement with local experts? involved  Use of technology? Use of technology 7. Selection of  To what degree did the project demand breadth and content standards depth of specific knowledge of central concepts?  To what degree were the driving question, end products, rubrics, and key learning experiences aligned and linked to the selected standards? 8. Selection of  What 21st century skills did you teach and assess? appropriate 21st  Would you add any additional 21st century skills in century skills subsequent projects? 9. Selection of  How well did your culminating products and culminating performances align with your intended outcomes? products and  How authentic were the products and performances performances? (How similar was the student work to the work that people in the professional world would do if they were involved in a similar project?) 10. Effectiveness of  How effective was your entry event in sparking entry event student interest and igniting their curiosity?  Did your entry event cause your students to pose questions about the topic and tasks?  Would you make any revisions to your entry event or adjust your approach when launching the project in the future? 11. Quality of  Ideally, your rubrics clearly articulate the criteria rubrics for success to enable students to easily use the 30 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Project idea, design, Sample Discussion Questions Reflectionsand implementationconsiderations rubric to evaluate their work during the revision process. To what degree did your rubrics accomplish this?  Did you use your rubric as a teaching tool? 12. Quantity and mix  How well did you build your students background of scaffolding knowledge for inquiry? and learning  How effective was your project “scaffolding”. (To activities what degree did you provide the necessary amount of skill instruction, mini-lessons, and use of models and drafts to build the understanding and skills needed to produce high quality work?) 13. Ability of  How well did the students work in groups? students to work  How did your selected project management well in groups strategies/structures contribute to your students level of success with team work? 14. Ability of  How well did the students work independently? students to work  How did your selected project management well strategies/structures contribute to your students independently level of success in working independently? 15. Ability of  What did you observe about your students ability students to use to use inquiry skills and think deeply about the inquiry skills and topic of study? think deeply 16. My management  What role did you play while students were engage of the process, in group work? coaching of  How did you respond when students needed students, and support? providing of  To what degree did you promote a culture of 31 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Project idea, design, Sample Discussion Questions Reflectionsand implementationconsiderations support independence? 17. Involvement of  What role did adults from the community, or other other adults places beyond the community, play in your project?  Were they involved in helping you design the project? Teaching the students? Critiquing work against professional standards?  Were they helpful? Would you make any adjustments in the way in which you used these resources in the future? 18. Adequacy of  Would you make any adjustments to the resources resources that you provided students to help them engage in inquiry?Adapted from Teachers Post Project Review (pg. 134):Larmer, J., Ross, D., Mergendoller, J., Ravitz, J. (2009). PBL starter kit. Buck Institute for Education, Novato, CA. 32 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PLC Protocol # 6 - Inquiry CirclesOverviewThe Inquiry Circles protocol, which replaces the “book club” format used in many schools, enables school leaders to model the inquiryprocess with teachers. The process could include the entire staff or a group of teachers who have a common challenge or question to exploreregarding PBL implementation. The process is powerful because teachers strengthen their understanding of PBL by providing an opportunityto actually engaging in inquiry.ResourceInquiry Circle Protocol 33 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PLC Inquiry Circle ProtocolCraft a Driving Question for InquiryExample:What is the most effective way to scaffold inquiry in Kindergarten?Share an Entry EventExample: Watch a compelling video clip.Build Background KnowledgeExamples:Distribute (or, post on-line) research journals.Read a common article that introduces the topic.Generate Research QuestionsGenerate individual research questions – What are you wondering about this topic? (Record inresearch notebooks.)Whole-group Sharing of Research Questions– Record on anchor chart.Form Expert GroupsCluster research questions/topics into subtopics. Shape topics into specific topics for research groups (Umbrella topic – DQ).Share with participants and allow participants to self-select groups Inform group about literature, reading schedule, and final product Each research group will need to identify their specific key research questions related to 34 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • their topic and the driving question and determine how they will creatively share their findings with the larger group in the form of an authentic product. (Encourage participants to be creative!) Encourage participants to go beyond the selected text to search for answers to their research questions. (Interviews, classroom observations, articles, videos, etc...)Facilitate Inquiry Facilitate a series of meetings in which participants work in their inquiry groups to discuss the text, search for answers to their research questions, and continue to develop new questions.Share Knowledge  Teams (creatively!) present their findings to one another during a scheduled meeting.  Teams determine next steps - How can we incorporate our findings into our practice?  Sharing with larger group 35 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Pulling it all Together – Developing a Plan to Sustain PBLOverviewWe know from experience that PBL cannot be parachuted into a teachers classroom – or into a school. PBL 101 is the first step of a lengthyprocess of transforming a school into a truly project-based community. The use of protocols in the professional learning community can bevery effective in sustaining PBL, but youll need a written plan to carry this out. It is helpful to involve stakeholders, especially teachers, incrafting the plan. The attached PBL Implementation Planning Template is designed to help you in the process. Like all school plans, it shouldbe developed collaboratively, shared with the people who will be impacted, and the individuals involved should have an opportunity toreflect upon the success of the plan.ResourcePBL Implementation Planning Template 36 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PBL Implementation Planning TemplateName of School:Planning Team Members:Date:Summary of PBL Training/Coaching to Date: (Site visits to PBL schools, participation in PBL 101, etc...)CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT(For elementary schools) What model will you utilize for PBL implementation? (Full, partial, or separate)How frequently will teachers meet in grade level or subject area teams to collaboratively design projects and related materials?Who will support teams through the ongoing curriculum development process?What technological tools will be used to enable teams of teachers to collaborate on the design of projects? (Google shared documents?Wikis?) Where will project plans and related documents be archived?How many projects would you like the PBL 101 participants to implement next year? 37 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY PLANNINGWhat Professional Learning Community protocols will you incorporate to launch and sustain PBL? Professional Tool How frequently Which teams will participate? Who will facilitate? Learning will this happen Community next year? protocolCollaborative BIE Projectproject design Planning form?Lesson Study Workshop StudyProcess Protocol?Looking at Looking atStudent Work Student WorkSessions Protocol?Project Peer Project DesignReview Process Rubric and Critical Friends? Inquiry CirclesInquiry Circles Template?*Paste the PLC tools that you plan to use into this document. 38 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • CLASSROOM WALK-THROUGHSHow frequently will you observe PBL implementation in classrooms? *What observation tool will you use? How will you share the toolwith teachers?*Paste the observation tool that you plan to use into this document.Will teachers have an opportunity to observe PBL implementation in other classrooms? How frequently? How will the observations bestructured?STAFF DEVELOPMENTWhat additional support will your teachers need to launch and sustain PBL?What additional professional development will your teachers receive this year to enhance PBL implementation?CALENDAR OF PLC AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIESCreate a calendar of PLC and professional development activities.REFLECTING UPON THE LEVEL OF SUCCESSHow will you know if you are successful?*It is helpful to develop or adopt a PBL implementation rubric that defines the criteria for success. 39 Contact: sarahallermann@yahoo.com
    • Team Members: STEM Scoring Rubric Subject: 21st Century SKILLS Points EMERGING PROFICIENT COMMENDED BREAKTHROUGH • Reasoning is unclear, illogical or • Reasoning is clear and logical. In addition to meeting the Critical Thinking superficial. • Interprets or calculates PROFICIENT criteria … • Interprets or calculates information accurately. • Reasoning is thorough. information inaccurately. • Supports statements with • Makes statements with little explanations. • Uses creativity. explanation. • Supports statements with evidence. 0 - - - - - - - -3 - - - - - - - - - 5 6--------------------7 8-------------------9 10+ • Materials detracted from content or purpose of presentation or • Materials added, did not detract In addition to meeting the Technology from presentation. PROFICIENT criteria … were of such low quality as to discredit speaker • Materials used were quality • Creatively integrated a • Information shown has products; easy to see and hear. variety of objects, charts and substantial inaccuracies • Information shown is mostly graphs to amplify the accurate. message. • Information shown is all accurate. 0 - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - 2 3 4 5+ • Speaker was hard to hear or • Speaker was easy to hear and Oral Communication understand. understand. In addition to meeting the PROFICIENT criteria … • Voice or tone distracted from • Speaks clearly, correctly and purpose of presentation. without verbal fillers. • Speaker was enjoyable to hear; used expression and • Excessive use of verbal fillers. • Strong eye contact with entire emphasis. • Little eye contact with audience. audience. • Speaker used voice to create • Poor or slouchy posture. • Posture conveyed confidence. an emotional response in • Attire was inappropriate for • Attire was appropriate for audience. audience. audience and purpose. • Posture was commanding • Time was not used appropriately. • Time requirement was met for and purposeful. specific assignment (neither too • Attire was chosen to long nor too short.) enhance presentation.TIME: 0 - - - - -3 - - - - - -6 - - - - - - 9 10 - - - - - - - - - - 11- - - - - - - - - 12 13 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 14 15+ Written Communication • No formal introduction or no • Introduction had clear thesis In addition to meeting the clear thesis statement nor offered statement and a preview of PROFICIENT criteria … any preview of topics to be topics to be discussed. • Clever attention getting discussed. • Main ideas were separated into introduction or an • Main ideas were not separated a logical progression. imaginative thesis and into a logical progression. • Supported important ideas and preview. • Important ideas were not viewpoints through accurate • Ideas connected by original supported with references. and detailed references to text transitions, logical • No conclusion or conclusion did or other works. throughout; creative pattern. not adequately summarize • Conclusion tied to thesis • Conclusion tied writing presentation. statement and summarized the together and left audience ideas presented. with memorable message. 0 - - - - -3 - - - - - -6 - - - - - - 9 10 - - - - - - - - - - 11- - - - - - - - - 12 13 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 14 15+
    • 21st Century Skills Points EMERGING PROFICIENT COMMENDED BREAKTHROUGH • Group members played a passive • Group members played an role in completion of the project. active role in generating new In addition to meeting the PROFICIENT criteria … • Group made unconstructive ideas, took initiative in getting criticisms toward the project or tasks organized and completed • Thoughtfully organized other group members; did not and sought help when needed. and divided the work, Teamwork add value to the group. • Group demonstrated checked on progress, or • Group was often off task, did not willingness to help each other provided focus and complete assignments or duties. when asked. direction for the project. • Group had attendance problems • Group was prepared, managed • Actively checked with that significantly impeded time well, and worked others to understand how progress on project. diligently. each member was • If absent, other group members progressing and how he or knew the reason and progress she may be of help. was not significantly impeded. • Made up for work left undone by other group members. • Demonstrated willingness to spend significant time outside of class/school to complete the project. 0 - - - - -3 - - - - - -6 - - - - - - 9 10 - - - - - - - - - - 11- - - - - - - - - 12 13 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 14 15+ Content Knowledge 0 - - - - - - - - - 7- -- - - - - - 13 14 - - - - -- - - - -22 - - - - - - - - - 27 28 - - - - - - - 34 - - - - - - - - - 39 40+ Project Total:PROJECT INFOMRATION: Additional Comments:Project Name:Project Evaluators:Date: / /
    • 1 Establish a ‘Drive and Thrive’ Culture Good projects grow out of passion and purposeThe last ten years have been the most productive period for project based learning in itsshort history. Thousands of teachers in many hundreds of schools have helped studentscarry out impressive, noteworthy projects. In these projects, students often report aqualitatively different experience of education, from one of rote recipient to activepartner. Just as often, they demonstrate skills and behaviors associated with success in21st century life—a sense of purpose, mastery of concepts, and a positive attitude towardlearning. These outcomes cross all demographics and age groups, as well as nationalboundaries.Why do carefully-designed projects help students perform so well? Because PBL tapsinto intangibles that make learning effortless and engaging: Drive, passion, and purpose.That is the core strength of PBL; it can inspire peak performance in students.But other than pointing to ‘relevant’ themes or ‘authentic’ challenges, little discussionhas taken place to explain why students enjoy PBL and work hard for good results. Thisis not surprising, given that education emphasizes curriculum and instruction rather thanthe natural strengths and innate curiosity of learners.In a learner-centered process like PBL, this equation must be reversed—a task that beginswith incorporating the following ideas into your daily routines.1. Begin with TrustOutside of education, the success of PBL is not a mystery. Over three decades, the fieldof human performance—blending findings from organizational psychology, positivepsychology, and emotional intelligence—has identified the core factors that maximizeindividual effort and the desire to achieve. Most important for educators, these samefindings hold true for research in youth development, adolescent mental health, anddevelopmental psychology.These factors can be condensed into three bullet points: • Caring relationships. Whether growing up in a household, studying in school, or working in a job, people perform better when they feel cared for and attended to. The central role of a caring relationship in a young person’s ability and desire to perform cannot be overstated. A caring relationship begins with recognizing and respecting the autonomy of the individual. • The desire for meaning. Human beings work harder—on behalf of themselves or others—when they have a goal and purpose. The goal must be relevant to the person’s needs and desires.
    • 2 • The power of mastery. Achievement is a natural state of being. People enjoy doing tasks well, and feel an intrinsic reward that perpetuates a spiral of further achievement.Well designed projects offer students significant autonomy, a relevant learningexperience, and the opportunity for mastery. Without these factors in place, young peopletend to learn the minimum amount necessary to avoid sanctions, such as just getting goodenough grades for college rather than working for intrinsic reward. This means, in mostcases, they will do the work required for the test, but not much more.Underlying all of these factors is trust. Successful PBL depends very much on your beliefthat young people desire to learn and will perform well when respected by an adult andguided appropriately. If you hold a secret belief that students are naturally unmotivated,or need to be frightened into learning, you will not get the results you want in PBL.2. Redefine RigorThe factors essential to performance—caring relationships, mastery, and meaning—match the mantra that drove education reform in the first decade of the 21st century:rigor, relevance, and relationship. More relevant education attempts to infuse learningwith greater authenticity and meaning. Attention to student-centered teaching methods orimproved school climate reflect the desire to harness the power of relationships.Most teachers see evidence that student centered methods and better relationships lead toimproved learning. But there is a key reason that these two advances have not fullyimpacted education: The concept of rigor has remained static. Rigor is still associatedexclusively with information mastery and testing. Whether it’s the quantity of problemsassigned for homework, the amount of reading required for the next day, or the‘hardness’ of the test, rigor is defined in industrial terms.In the human performance field, rigor is defined quite differently. It is a measure ofpersonal performance, not a standard to quantify how much information has been learned.As a PBL teacher, you must also make this crucial shift and envision a new goal forstudents: To become a rigorous person. Think of rigor as the broad capacity to know,apply, communicate, and share information. In the global world, knowing and doing areinseparable parts of the whole. We need to teach both, measure both, and honor both.An updated definition of rigor encompasses three aspects of performance: • Core knowledge. Students must be able to demonstrate mastery of the central conventions of the discipline and deeply understand a subject. This aspect of rigor is most closely related to the traditional goals of secondary education. However, the information age mandates that educators focus on concepts and principles, rather than facts and data.
    • 3 • Skills. Knowledge accumulation, critical thinking, reading, and writing have long been considered the essential skills necessary for preparing students for college entry. But students are now expected to master the key ‘soft’ skills necessary to function at a proficient level in college, a career, and as a citizen, including communication and collaboration skills. • Dispositions. Navigating a changing world demands a flexible, empathetic, resilient, and persistent person. These are not skills, but well defined dispositions, personality attributes, habits of mind, or signs of emotional intelligence that lead to better work ethic, more engagement, improved relationships, and greater sense of well being.One guideline to keep in mind: A performance based world does not distinguish skills,content, and dispositions. Learning always includes an emotional component. Even more,it is not possible to teach to the new definition of rigor without integrating academic,emotional, and behavioral learning.This may require you to expand your skill set as a teacher and think more like a systemsplanner. Typically, education separates instruction, skills, and behavior into discretedomains. For example, the mastery of content is regarded as a purely cognitive process—the province of a core academic teacher—while attitudes about learning or emotionalbarriers are shunted to counselors or special education teachers. You will need to workaround those barriers and simultaneously address the what, the why, and the how. PBLsucceeds when teachers blend instruction, skill building, and the basics of humanperformance into a powerful project design methodology.3. Create the Right ConditionsCreating a drive and thrive culture that supports PBL begins with an honest admission:Peak performance cannot be taught; rather, much like a plant, it grows under the rightconditions. This requires that the PBL teacher design the environment in which peakperformance flourishes. Many teachers have their own techniques for connecting andcommunicating with students. The following guidelines can also set the foundation forperformance: • Use the language of peak performance – Creativity starts with teacher attitudes. For example, research confirms that IQ is malleable and performance is driven by self-fulfilling belief systems. Students who move from a ‘fixed mindset’ to a ‘growth mindset’ will believe in themselves, and in their creative potential. • Treat ‘soft’ skills as ‘hard’ skills. Common core standards for performance learning are coming, but there will never be a test or national curriculum for ‘dependability.’ So you will need to judge these ‘soft’ skills by ‘soft’ standards. It’s not that difficult, however. Most teachers and students know what this behavior looks like in practice—and they can identify the necessary levels of performance. Include these assessments in your grade book.
    • 4 • Expect mastery. Setting high expectations for academic performance is usual in good teaching. But setting high expectations for performance is crucial in PBL. Expect students to communicate, collaborate, and manage themselves according to the standards of high performing industries, not to the standards of industrial education. When you stress personal mastery of difficult skills—and hold students to that high standard—they respond by performing like adults. • Train the imagination. Societies around the world have rapidly focused on a new goal for education: Teaching innovation, problem solving, and creativity to the global generation. In a world that is clearly trying to reinvent itself, creativity will soon be valued as a basic skill and has been identified as the number one leadership competency of the future. Use proven creativity exercises to help student think divergently. • Reward ‘wow!’ Currently, we have no measure for peak performance in schools. But you can design rubrics with a ‘breakthrough’ category—a blank column that invites students to deliver a product that cannot be anticipated or easily defined in words. It’s not the ‘A’ category—that’s Mastery or Commended or a similar high- ranking indicator. The breakthrough column goes beyond the A, rewarding innovation, creativity, and unusual performance—a kind of ‘wow’ column. • Pass along the 10,000 hour rule. Recent research indicates that mastering a skill at a very high level takes 10,000 hours of practice. Your students aren’t likely to put those kind of hours into Algebra 1. But let them know that practice works— and the more they practice, the better they will be. Most important, world class educators know that achievement comes from hard work, not a special gene for brilliance. • Teach to the iceberg. Remember that anything engaging the deeper self—the domain of creativity—is not immediately accessible or public. Take time and care to surface the process. This applies to all skills. Think in terms of an iceberg. Below the tip of the iceberg is 90% of the human being. If we want skillful creators, we need to pay attention to empathy, bias, and all the normal variations in a young person’s emotional makeup. Creativity requires time and opportunities to reflect, discuss, meditate, brainstorm, and experience the cycle of failure and success.5. Learn from the GamersMany students who barely perform in school often experience peak performance on adaily basis—through playing the huge number of multi-level, multi-player games thatattract nearly 700 million players worldwide. The reason? Virtually every expert ongames points to the feeling of accomplishment and whole-hearted engagement derivedfrom games. Though the results may matter only in virtual reality, games provide anintense, meaningful outlet for using a player’s skills and creativity to the utmost.
    • 5It is too soon to know how games and education will hybridize themselves in the nearfuture. But as a PBL teacher (and perhaps as a game player) I urge you to thinkfuturistically. Not only can lessons be applied to PBL, it is clear that game playingphilosophy will affect the design of on-line projects. As you design your projects andseek ways to help you student maximize their performance, consider the following gameelements: • Leveling up. The purpose of a game is to ‘level up’ by becoming more masterful. Increased mastery and pride in accomplishment are noticeable by their absence in many classrooms today—but they are essential to peak performance. • More ‘ferio.’ As gamers progress, they attain superpowers. The faster they go, the more powerful they become. As their powers increase, studies show that gamers increasingly enter the ‘flow’ state—the brain state associated with peak performance and effortless achievement. In gameplay, this is known as ‘ferio.’ This cycle of reward also operates quickly, giving players instant feedback and allowing them to change course quickly. The lesson for PBL? Create meaningful rewards for peak performance and allow students to fail as they learn. • Creative collaboration. Despite the image of the solitary gamer, millions of gamers interact globally to form teams, solve problems, offer specific expertise, or otherwise collaborate towards the ultimate goal of leveling up. Many gamers play for this precise experience of melding with others to achieve a meaningful goal. This can translate into effective, high performing teams of students in projects. • Epic quests. Games allow ordinary humans to accomplish extraordinary acts of heroism and service. The most popular games offer ‘epic’ quests that traverse daunting environments and strange lands. The challenges encourage heroic actions against ‘boss rule’ opponents and overwhelming odds. In school, the quests for grades are less epic, so it may be difficult to compete with a digital world. But think about the challenges the earth and its inhabitants face over the next century. The challenges are no less daunting—and infinitely more real. • The right to be wrong. In gameplay failure is considered necessary to success, and gamers report the ‘fun of failure.’ In fact, games lower the risk of failure so that players will explore, take risks, and seek alternative solutions. Try this: When a student gives a wrong answer, encourage the rest of the class to applaud. Or, use the Japanese solution: Have one student come up to the board and demonstrate his or her solution to a math problem. Engages the rest of the class in a community dialogue on the efficacy of the solution. In general, reward speculation, informed guesses, and well-intentioned mistakes.
    • 6 • Narrative and well-ordered problems. Gamers don’t thrive on facts and information. They solve problems, relying on clear goals, good tools, and copious feedback to succeed. Inject those elements into your projects.6. Design Projects that MatterThe primary power of any project can be traced to its authenticity. Does it matter, to theworld or the students?Today’s students are less motivated by grades, college entrance, and preparing for theworkplace than by resonant themes such as service, change, innovation, or the future.Using these themes and others, beneath every powerful project must lie a big idea orauthentic challenge—a stirring foundation that infuses the project with meaning andpurpose.This tells us why games that feature epic quests provide important clues to the future ofproject based learning. They also hint at another important avenue for encouraging topperformance: Providing students with meaningful challenges that engage them actively inthe world. I call this ‘PBL with a purpose.’Often, projects use social or environmental issues as central themes around which theproject is organized. But as the world enters a stormier, more chaotic period characterizedby life-altering issues that will directly affect them as adults, it is likely students willdemand a larger role in finding solutions. PBL offers you, as the PBL teacher, an idealopportunity to blend academic work with sustainability by designing projects that matterto young people.It also opens up the use of the most powerful motivational tool available to educators:The desire of young people to collaborate on behalf of solving local and global issues thatdirectly impact their future. In fact, experts predict that contributing to the social goodwill constitute the main challenges for future generations.Throughout the Guide, we’ll discuss ways to make projects authentic and meaningful tostudents. These guidelines include several important ideas for successful PBL in thecoming decade:Looking beyond the walls of school is the first step to authentic projects. Whether globalor community-based, problems exist—and they need solutions. Turn your students looseon the important issues of the day and they will respond with enthusiasm. Tie the goals ofthe project to your standards, organize the project around a challenge, and let studentspresent their findings to the public. • Blend PBL and community service. Service learning is often project oriented, but not directly connected to academic learning. It is possible to do both. Center your project on an important social issue, scientific debate, or pressing local issue.
    • 7 • Take on community challenges. Within a three block area of any school can be found an assortment of authentic challenges that students can address. Have students survey their community, assess the needs, and work on solutions. Use PBL to positively impact the local environment. • Practice planet craft. Don’t be timid about taking on global challenges that encourage an attitude of sustainable engagement in students. You cannot solve global issues in a classroom—that’s true. But you can define questions in ways that allow students to deeply examine global issues, and then offer their best ideas for solutions. These ideas can then be shared, debated, and discussed in end of project exhibitions.7. Know the Seven Rules of EngagementEngaging students in learning is not an accident, but an intentional act. PBL takesadvantage of the natural inclination to be engaged in meaningful work by relying on thefollowing ‘rules of engagement’ for projects: 1. The learning is active. 2. The concepts arouse passion or invite fascination. 3. The problem mirrors the challenges faced in the adult world. 4. Students learn about their own community. 5. They have ‘choice and voice’ in the project. 6. They bring their own life experiences to the project. 7. They collaborate.8. Retrain Your StudentsFor PBL to be effective, students must commit to performing at their best. Depending ontemperament, emotions, time of day, school background, or home life, this commitmentnaturally varies. But more difficult is the fact that your students very likely have not beentrained to perform. School reinforces passive skills, such as listening and payingattention. Instead, your goal is to teach students to be flexible in their skills (know whennot to pay attention).Orienting students to this new expectation takes time, patience, and an insistent focus.Plus, be prepared for some groaning and objection. Performance takes more effort andcommitment than listening or taking notes. Some approaches that help: • Begin the year or semester with a culture-building event. Shaking the perceptions students hold about school is a good place to begin. Prior to introducing the curriculum, begin the year with playful, unusual exercises such as listening, team building, or other activities that stimulate curiosity and reflection. • Use a ‘project-project.’ If you’ve had experience with PBL, plan a short project that opens the year with questions such as “Why School?” or “Why Algebra?”
    • 8 Teach the basics of teamwork or presentation during the first week. Let them know that projects may be different from what they have experienced in the past• Use classroom space as your ally. Arrange your classroom to take you away from the front of the room and set you up visually as a mentor, not a lecturer. Good facilitators use their desks as a workspace, not as a symbol of power or barrier to communication. Keep the desk small and out of the way. Decorate with as much color as you’re allowed. Turn the classroom into a creative workspace. No rows.• Show them the ‘why.’ Give them data they’ve never seen. For example, recent research reported that the biggest predictor of college success is a student’s conscientiousness, as measured by dependability, perseverance, and work ethic. The next best predictors were agreeableness, including teamwork, and emotional balance. A ‘drive and thrive’ culture teaches these dispositions and habits.• Plan a skill building curriculum. Treat skills just like any other curriculum. Introduce and identify the key skills of 21st century life, and reinforce this skill building throughout the year. Use scaffolds, such as listening exercises, before teaching teamwork. Teach the ability to hold eye contact with an audience before teaching presentations.• Go back to the ‘why.’ When students forget their commitments to better performance, go back to basics. Why is performance essential to success? What are the differences between school skills and real-life skills? Never hesitate to stop and have a meaningful, reflective discussion about the commitment to performance. Students know how important these skills are to their life. Just keep working at getting them to buy in.• Create an intentional community. Good teachers create a welcoming sense of community in a classroom. In PBL, this becomes paramount. Use the typical tools for building community—ice breakers, games, discussions, and group activities— to build and reaffirm community throughout the year. Institute rituals that reinforce community and connection, like I Love You walls, or Circle Time for sharing ideas and observations.• Establish norms, not rules. Communities operate under a set of common norms to guide behavior and interaction. Rules dictate behavior, while norms help internalize behavior. At the beginning of the year, take a class period or two to build and agree on a set of norms. Post and revisit as necessary.
    • The Story of CodyMy earliest years of high school teaching were spent in a student support classworking with what I called the artists, rebels, and misfits. Included in this group,as a sort of flag bearer, was a boy named Cody, a big, tough 15-year-old with akeen look in his eye. I liked him immediately, but he had a reputation that wasprobably deserved. If there was a fight in the hallway, Cody was usually there—and he seemed to have something to do with it. The assistant principal nevercould gain a conviction, though. Back in elementary school, Cody had masteredplausible denial.In his first year of high school, Cody failed nearly every class, and by hissophomore year, he was completely disengaged. However, in the middle of tenthgrade, something caught my eye: Cody always carried a wad of cash in hispocket, usually amounting to more than a hundred dollars. The assistant principalsaid it was drug money. But I asked Cody about it one day, and he had asurprising explanation: He was the acclaimed master mechanic in hisneighborhood. He fixed cars and motorcycles for friends and neighbors—andthey paid him in cash.As the year went on and I gained his trust, Cody also confided to me the reasonfor his academic failures: he couldn’t read. This was a source of embarrassmentto him, a secret from his parents, and the reason he did poorly in school. He andI took on the challenge, embarking on a program to help him pass his GED.Ultimately, he didn’t pass the test. But, in the end, he went on to achieve greatsuccess—and he taught me a vital lesson: to question my assumptions aboutintelligence.Here’s what happened. Discouraged and angry, in his junior year Cody quit highschool and enrolled in a race car mechanics course at a nationally knownspeedway. It was a big leap—at 17 he became the youngest member of acontingent of aspiring mechanics whose average age was 30. But Cody finishedfirst in his class. Along the way he appeared regularly on ESPN with several ofthe winning drivers of his cars. Upon completing the 18-week course, he receivedan offer to join a pit crew at the Indianapolis 500 Motor Speedway—the ultimateaccolade.Cody returned to visit me every so often after that, grateful for the GED help,even calling me the best teacher he’d ever had. Of course, all I had done was tolisten respectfully and allow him to share his well-kept secret. His visits gave methe opportunity to probe the reasons for his success and his ability to perform asa really terrific mechanic. He told me, “In my mind, I can see how the enginecomes apart and goes back together. It’s like I have a picture to work from—it’seasy.”
    • Most educators have similar stories to tell. There are countless tales of kids whodon’t fit the mold of school, who demonstrate unusual talents, and who oftensucceed in spite of expectations. But Cody has stuck with me. I realized thatwhat Cody found easy would leave most valedictorians at a loss. Thatunderstanding led me to ask: Who is smarter? Who is more intelligent?These kinds of questions are at the forefront of education today. Kids areexhibiting a vast array of talents—some related to school, many not. They buildWeb pages in the second grade and multitask effectively as teens. They shareintimacies more freely than any other generation in history, usually on aworldwide network of buddies. They invent, solve, and create at a dizzying pace(just look at the growth of Content sites on the Web). The millennial generation isintelligent, productive, resourceful—and not necessarily easy to work with in theclassroom.On the other side of the coin, many students “do” school quite well. For instance,nearly one in five students in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, area claimed aweighted GPA of 4.6 or better, according to a 2010 report by ASCD. But GPAshardly reflect the real nature of intelligence. The prevailing reward system favorsa certain type of student—the note-takers, textbook readers, and writers. In fact,some educators remarked that the Pittsburgh scores can be attributed toteacher-pleasing behavior—anything done on time and in the right format.So it’s important to know a bit more about intelligence. Let’s consider a fewfindings:Intelligence and genes. Most people, kids included, believe intelligence isa genetic trait—that is, IQ is ”fixed” at birth. But it’s not. To the surprise ofpsychologists and researchers, IQ scores have been on the rise with eachdecade. Moreover, recent research shows that students who are told theirachievement depends on believing in their ability to get smarter actually dobetter, while students who leave intelligence to fate and count on their genes doless well.Measuring IQ. No agreement exists on the varying forms of intelligence, or howto measure IQ. Particularly, we don’t know enough about the brain and mind tosettle the dispute between the cognitive scientists (intelligence is “all in brainfunction”) and social intelligence practitioners (“environment influencesintelligence,” a`la Vygotsky).Emotions and intelligence. The advent of neuroscience makes the intelligencedebate even fuzzier. Neurologist Antonio Damasio has shown how the brain andemotions intertwine, giving intelligence a clear emotional component. In fact,Robert Sternberg, a leading authority on intelligence from Harvard, believes thatadding wisdom, creativity, personality, and emotional processing to theintelligence picture scrambles the conventional concept of intelligence to the
    • extent that it may simply fall apart. Intelligence may be too multifaceted to reduceto one number or one cause.Where does this leave us as educators? I think it’s essential to keep students likeCody in mind. Some pondering points: • Just as intelligence isn’t narrowly focused or fixed, neither should education be anchored solely to traditional academic outcomes. To capture intelligent behavior, outcomes must be focused on a triad of performance indicators: 1) academic and content mastery; 2) skills for life, work, and citizenship; and 3) habits of mind or emotional competencies. • I have consistently questioned the current concept of rigor, arguing that rigor needs to be defined in terms of individual skills and strengths, not by the number of problems assigned for homework or the amount of reading crammed into an AP class. Cody‘s work as a mechanic qualified as ‘rigorous,’ but he failed traditional classes. That increasingly commonplace story describes children who are distractible, don’t read well, and can’t harness themselves to school—but who are highly creative, with great visual skills. It’s likely that in the future, we will need to find ways to measure competency as a blend of creativity, problem-solving, innovation, and self-reliance. • The fact that intelligent behavior also includes character virtues such as empathy, integrity, collaborative ability, and unbiased communication complicates the picture further. How do we activate these more subtle aspects of intelligence? And, again, how do we measure them? • In a chaotic global world, the idea that intelligence and environment are related takes on special significance. Will our world make children smarter or less so? And, more to the point, if intelligence is a function of beliefs about one’s abilities, how do we convince every student they can be a genius?