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Handouts Regarding the Student Assessments

Handouts Regarding the Student Assessments

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Assessment handout Assessment handout Presentation Transcript

  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 1 of 18 Supervisor Assessment of Student College and Career Readiness SCORING GUIDE 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsFOUNDATIONAL SKILLS The student has limited The student has some curiosity The student is open to learning The student is very open to learning, curiosity and research and research skills, and locates and has adequate research skill; and has high level research skills; skills, and does not information, but does not locates information, understands locates, understands, and organizes a readily seek out organize it, understand it, or it, organizes it, and evaluates its large quantity of information, information, understand evaluate it. credibility. evaluates it, and presents it in a usefulLocating, it, or organize it for form.comprehending, analysis.and evaluating Example: When asked to Example: The student began an Example: The student was able to Example: The student was able to find build an itinerary, the Internet search but only sought out find all needed information on the all needed information on the Internetinformation student was not able to 2 sources, and printed out web Internet and in office databases; and in office databases; understood and identify key words to begin pages but did not organize, understood and organized the organized the information by useful an Internet search. evaluate, or reference information; information by useful categories; and categories; chose destinations based on the client was not able to chose destinations based on client client interest; and prepared a list of all determine how selections were interest. the pertinent websites so the client could made. investigate further. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 2 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsFOUNDATIONAL SKILLS The student appears The student may occasionally The student usually appears The student usually appears attentive; inattentive and does not appear inattentive, but retains attentive and retains most of retains information delivered, as retain information delivered, most of the information the information delivered, as evidenced through subsequent as evidenced through delivered, as evidenced evidenced through performance; takes notes as subsequent performance. through subsequent subsequent performance; the necessary; and asks questions or performance. student knows to take notes repeats back key ideas, demonstratingListening and if necessary to remember that information was heard.observation important information. Example: When office policies Example: When office policies Example: When office policies Example: When office policies were(Note: Young adult behavior or were explained, the student were explained, the student were explained, the student explained, the student appeared attentivecultural factors may suggest appeared inattentive and later appeared attentive but later appeared attentive and later and later asked questions that deepened had to ask about the topics asked numerous questions of asked questions of clarification. understanding of issues that were notthat the student is not listening reviewed. fact about the topics reviewed. covered in the presentation.when in fact he/she is;subsequent performance ismore important than affect— The student notices few The student notices some The student notices many The student notices many details details about the work details about the work details about the work about the work environment, ase.g., eye contact—when judging environment, as evidenced by environment, as evidenced by environment, as evidenced by evidenced by being able tolistening ability.) not being able to execute being able to execute proper being able to demonstrate demonstrate safety or other safety or other procedures safety or other procedures safety or other procedures procedures after minimal after repeated after several demonstrations. after minimal demonstration. demonstration; the student also demonstrations. makes additional observations. Example: The student did not Example: The student noticed Example: After only two Example: After one demonstration, the put supplies away properly or that supplies had to be put demonstrations, the student student was able to retain important did not adhere to safety away, but did not know where to was able to retain important safely information; and, in written work, procedures after repeated put them, after several safety information; and, in noticed formatting problems and other demonstrations; did not notice demonstrations; and, in written written work, noticed formatting details about the document. that supplies were still out; and, work, did not notice formatting problems. in written work, did not notice problems. formatting problems. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 3 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsFOUNDATIONAL SKILLS The student demonstrates The student demonstrates The student demonstrates significant The student exercises a high level of minimal critical thinking and some critical thinking and critical thinking and problem solving reasoning and analytical thinking, making problem solving ability, problem solving ability, ability, exercising sound reasoning judgments and explaining perspectives making hasty judgments based making judgments based on and analytical thinking, making based on evidence and previous findings on limited information and some information and with judgments and explaining or experience, and uses knowledge, facts, with limited reasoning; when some reasoning; when perspectives based on evidence and and data to solve workplace problems. confronted with challenges at confronted with challenges previous findings; uses knowledge, work, the student does not at work, the student knows facts, and data to solve workplaceCritical know what to do or avoids to ask for assistance. problems. trying to address thethinking, challenges.problemformulation, Example: In helping with a bank Example: In helping with a Example: In helping with a bank Example: In helping with a bank transaction, transaction, the student could bank transaction, the student transaction, the student was able to the student was able to explain why he/sheand problem not explain why he/she would understood why he/she would explain why he/she would follow specific would follow specific procedures to ensure thesolving follow specific procedures to follow specific procedures to procedures to ensure the security of the security of the client’s assets and suggested ensure the security of the client’s ensure the security of the client’s assets; when a customer was additional security strategies based on assets; when a customer was client’s assets; when a upset about a business policy, the previous experience; when a customer was upset about a business policy, customer was upset about a student provided adequate information upset about a business policy, the student the student did not know what business policy, the student and solicited appropriate support. provided all necessary information and to do and did not ask for help. provided some information, solicited support primarily to verify the but needed significant support. approach. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 4 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsFOUNDATIONAL SKILLS The student is only minimally The student articulates The student articulates thoughts The student articulates thoughts and able to articulate thoughts thoughts and ideas with and ideas clearly and effectively. ideas clearly and effectively; the verbally. moderate effectiveness. student has public speaking skills.Oralcommunication Example: In a staff meeting, the Example: The student had logical Example: The student presented Example: The student presented ideas student did not present ideas ideas to present but was reticent ideas effectively in a staff meeting; effectively in a staff meeting and spoke logically; the student either did not and only moderately effective in information was presented effectively before a group of people that contribute or interrupted others conveying the ideas orally. completely and logically. she/he did not know. frequently. The student writes memos, The student writes memos, The student writes memos, The student writes memos, letters, letters, and technical reports letters, and technical reports letters, and technical reports with and technical reports with correct with incorrect grammar and with largely correct grammar correct grammar and grammar and punctuation; writing is punctuation; writing is and punctuation; writing is punctuation; writing is clear; all clear, complete, and effective.Written incomplete and unclear. clear. necessary information is provided.communication Example: A letter to a client had Example: A letter to a client was Example: A letter to a client was Example: A letter to a client was written incomplete or run-on sentences written with a few spelling errors written correctly and clearly; all correctly and clearly; all information was and numerous spelling errors; but was otherwise grammatically pertinent information was included presented; the tone was appropriate and substantial information was correct; some information was and minimal editing was required. almost no editing was required. missing. missing. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 5 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsFOUNDATIONAL SKILLS The student cannot perform The student performs basic The student usually performs The student nearly always performs basic mathematical mathematical computations but basic mathematical computations mathematical computations quickly and computations and/or interpret slowly and with errors, and/or quickly and accurately interprets accurately interprets graphically- graphically-displayed data. misinterprets graphically-displayed graphically-displayed data and/or displayed data. data. knows to ask questions about the data. Example: The student was not Example: The student calculated hours Example: The student calculated Example: The student calculated hoursQuantitative able to quickly count change, use worked, counted change, and used hours worked, counted change, worked, counted change, used fractionsreasoning fractions and decimals in fractions and decimals in calculating used fractions and decimals in and decimals in calculating weights and calculating weights and weights and distances, but was not calculating weights and distances, distances, performed algebraic distances, or verify the accuracy able to perform other operations and was able to verify the accuracy computations, and was able to verify the of operations performed by Excel necessary to verify the accuracy of of sums and percentages generated accuracy of complex operations performed and displayed graphically. percentages generated by Excel and by Excel and displayed graphically. by Excel and displayed graphically. displayed graphically. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 6 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsFOUNDATIONAL SKILLS The student does not know The student is somewhat unclear The student generally knows what The student knows what type of what type of precision is about what type of precision is type of precision is appropriate to the precision is appropriate to the task and appropriate to the task and appropriate to the task and the task and the subject area, is able to the subject area, is able to increase the subject area, and is not subject area, and is able but not increase precision and accuracy when precision and accuracy when a task or able to increase precision flexible in modulating precision and a task or process is repeated, and process is repeated, and uses precision and accuracy when a task or accuracy as needed; the student uses precision appropriately to reach appropriately to reach correct process is repeated. makes several attempts before correct conclusions in the context of conclusions in the context of the task orPrecision understanding the level of detail the task or subject. subject. needed for the task.andaccuracy Example: In presenting a travel Example: In presenting a travel itinerary Example: In presenting a travel itinerary Example: In presenting a travel itinerary to itinerary to the client, the to the client, most information was to the client, information was correct and the client, all information was correct and information was insufficiently correct, but was not sufficiently detailed sufficiently detailed, and most very detailed, and all information had been detailed and some information and was not verified. information was verified. verified. At the same time, the student was wrong; insufficient detail understood that an internal memo did not was provided after feedback need to be as carefully crafted. was given. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 7 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsAPPLIED WORKPLACE SKILLS The student does not The student has an intuitive idea The student generally understands how The student has a clear understand how parts of a about how part of a whole parts of a whole interact and how understanding of how the parts of a whole interact and how interact and how action in one actions in one area create whole inter-relate and interact with actions in one area create part of a system can affect other consequences elsewhere and can each other in complex systems to consequences elsewhere. parts, but has difficulty explaining articulate this with straightforward produce overall outcomes and it with real examples. examples. provides sophisticated examples.Systemsthinking For example, the student For example, the student For example, the student can explain how For example, the student can describe performs his/her own tasks but understands that there are different departments contribute to the organization how the various departments in a hotel does not understand how his/her departments in an organization but as a whole; how a company’s high ethical contribute to hotel functioning, how department fits into the larger cannot explain how they contribute standards affect the bottom line; and the occupancy rates may be linked to organization. to the organization as a whole. role that the company plays in its changes in the economy, or how the community. company’s improvement efforts are linked to changes in the industry. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 8 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsAPPLIED WORKPLACE SKILLS The student exhibits little The student sometimes exhibits The student exhibits insight, intuition, The student exhibits insight, insight, intuition, and insight, intuition, and imagination, and imagination, and builds on the ideas intuition, and imagination, and builds imagination, and rarely builds and rarely builds on the ideas of of co-workers; demonstrates originality effectively on the ideas of co- on the ideas of co-workers; co-workers; demonstrates some and inventiveness in work, workers, generating new solutions; demonstrates little originality originality and inventiveness in communicates new ideas to others, and demonstrates originality and and inventiveness in work, work, sometimes communicates integrates knowledge across different inventiveness in work, communicates rarely communicates new new ideas to others, and sees disciplines. new ideas to others, integrates ideas to others, and is not able connections across different knowledge across different to see connections across disciplines. disciplines, and uses resulting ideas different disciplines. to propose alternative options.Creativityand Example: In IT, the student was Example: In IT, the student Example: In IT, the student identified a Example: In IT, the student stymied by having to network proposed a few ideas related to new way to network computers at a new implemented a new way to networkinnovation computers at a new office networking at a new office location; office location; in Finance, the student was computers at a new office location; in location; the student had few in Finance, the student made a link able to apply cost-cutting measures learned Finance, the student was able to apply original ideas; in Hospitality, the between home budgeting and small- at home to a budget issue faced by a small cost-cutting measures learned in several student was not able to build on business budgeting; in Hospitality, business; in Hospitality, the student actively other situations to a budget issue, co-worker ideas to create a new the student took others’ ideas but engaged with co-workers to create a new coming up with a new alternative; in menu for customers with unusual did not contribute any of his/her menu for customers with unusual dietary Hospitality, the student engaged with dietary restrictions. own, when asked to create a new restrictions. co-workers to create a new menu for menu for customers with unusual customers with unusual dietary dietary restrictions. restrictions and suggested a new process for amending the menu in the future. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 9 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsAPPLIED WORKPLACE SKILLS The student does not possess The student selects and uses The student selects and uses The student readily selects and uses basic computer skills. some technology to accomplish a appropriate technology to accomplish a appropriate technology to given task and applies some given task and applies computing skills accomplish a given task and easilyInformation computing skills to problem to problem solving. applies computing skills to problemtechnology solving. solving.application For example, the student was not For example, the student was able For example, the student was able to use For example, the student had facility able to use either Word or Excel to use Word for word processing Microsoft Office Suite, and had facility with with Word, Excel, and PowerPoint; had and had limited facility with the and accessed the Internet, but did the Internet. facility with the Internet; and was able Internet. not know Excel or PowerPoint. to do some limited programming in HTML. The student builds minimal The student builds collaborative The student builds collaborative The student builds collaborative relationships with colleagues relationships with colleagues and relationships with colleagues and relationships with colleagues and and customers and has customers and is able to work customers and is able to work customers; is able to work difficulty working in a team. comfortably in a team comfortably in a team environment, comfortably in a team environment, environment, with varying with varying viewpoints and divisions of with varying viewpoints and divisions viewpoints and divisions of responsibility; contributes actively to of responsibility; contributes actively responsibility. the team effort. to the team effort; and negotiates and manages divergent perspectivesTeamwork/ and any conflict as it arises.collaboration For example, at an IT product For example, at an IT product For example, at an IT product development For example, at an IT product development meeting, the development meeting, the student meeting, the student participated in project development meeting, the student student participated minimally in participated in project planning and planning, recognized differing points of participated in project planning and project planning and does not recognized differing points of view, view, volunteered to participate in the readily volunteered to participate in the volunteer to contribute. but did not readily volunteer to research component, and contributed ideas research component; the student was contribute to the project. to the discussion about next steps. able to work effectively in an environment of divergent perspectives and synthesize these perspectives to move the team’s work forward. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 10 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsAPPLIED WORKPLACE SKILLS The student is occasionally The student works The student learns from and works The student learns from and works disrespectful of others. collaboratively with individuals collaboratively with individuals collaboratively with individuals representing diverse cultures, representing diverse cultures, races, representing diverse cultures, races, races, ages, genders, religions, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and ages, genders, religions, lifestyles,Ability to lifestyles, and viewpoints. viewpoints. and viewpoints; seeks outwork with opportunities to leverage diverse experiences.diverseindividuals For example, the student made For example, the student was For example, the student worked For example, the student not only a comment related to a staff respectful and did not make successfully within a diverse group; in worked well with others but learned member’s age. inappropriate judgments. planning a meeting, was careful to avoid about others’ experiences and built days that might conflict with the religious trust; sought out more experienced observances of team members. staff members to learn about the history of the organization. The student acts somewhat The student demonstrates The student demonstrates integrity and The student demonstrates integrity irresponsibly with regard to integrity and ethical behavior. ethical behavior; the student acts and exemplary ethical behavior; the office procedures. responsibly with the interests of others student acts responsibly with the in mind. interests of others in mind.Ethicalbehavior Example: The student was not Example: The student was careful in Example: The student was careful in Example: The student was careful in careful in following computer following computer security following computer security procedures and following computer security procedures, security procedures. procedures. was helpful to others. was helpful to others, and served as an example to other interns. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 11 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Does Not Meet Approaches Expectations Meets Expectations Exceeds Expectations ExpectationsAPPLIED WORKPLACE SKILLS The student cannot respond The student can respond to The student can respond to change The student can respond to change to change easily and spends change to some degree. quickly and adjust plans accordingly. quickly and adjust plans accordingly; more energy resisting than the student is flexible and arrives at finding solutions. new solutions when necessary toFlexibility/ adapt to a new situation.adaptability For example, in a computer For example, in a computer For example, in a computer installation For example, in a computer installation installation project, the student installation project, the student was project, the student was able to adjust project, the student adjusted plans and was stuck when parts did not able to adjust plans but needed plans and workflow when parts did not workflow when parts did not arrive on arrive on schedule. encouragement. arrive on schedule. schedule; the student quickly came up with a workaround. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 12 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Rarely Sometimes Usually AlwaysSELF-MANAGEMENT AND PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY The student does not The student sometimes The student usually estimates The student accurately estimates how accurately estimate how estimates how much time it how much time it takes to much time it takes to complete much time it takes to takes to complete outstanding complete outstanding and outstanding and anticipated tasks and complete outstanding and and anticipated tasks and tries to anticipated tasks and allocates allocates sufficient time to complete anticipated tasks or allocate allocate sufficient time to sufficient time to complete the the tasks; uses calendars and creates sufficient time to complete complete the tasks; sometimes tasks; usually uses calendars “to do” lists to organize tasks into the tasks; does not use uses calendars and “to do” lists; and creates “to do” lists to productive chunks of time; locates andManages time calendars or “to do” lists; sometimes locates and utilizes organize tasks; usually locates utilizes settings conducive to propereffectively; places him-/herself in settings conducive to proper and utilizes settings conducive concentration; prioritizes work time in settings that allow for concentration; does not always to proper concentration; relation to competing demands such aspunctual distraction; does not prioritize work time usually prioritizes work time in school and socializing; is nearly always prioritize work time in appropriately; and is sometimes relation to competing on time and present, and always relation to competing late or absent without informing demands; is usually on time informs his/her supervisor if delayed or demands; and is rarely on his/her supervisor. and present, and if delayed or absent. time or frequently absent absent, informs his/her without informing his/her supervisor. supervisor. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 13 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Rarely Sometimes Usually AlwaysSELF-MANAGEMENT AND PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY The student waits for The student does not always The student usually takes The student takes initiative; is easily direction and rarely takes take initiative; the student needs initiative and asks for support able to work independently and locate initiative; the student significant support to maintain as needed; the student is able resources as needed; actively seeksSelf-directed; requires ongoing monitoring productivity. to work independently and guidance; and keeps his/her supervisortakes initiative; to maintain productivity. seek out resources, but needs apprised of progress.resourceful guidance. The student does not seek The student sometimes seeks The student seeks out new The student actively seeks out newTakes out new knowledge and out new knowledge and skills, knowledge and skills, is aware knowledge and skills; monitors his/her skills, does not monitor but needs significant support; is of his/her own learning needs, own learning needs and is strategic inresponsibility his/her own learning needs, moderately aware of his/her and usually learns from his/her addressing them; and learns fromfor learning; and does not learn from own learning needs; and mistakes. his/her mistakes, rarely repeating the his/her mistakes. sometimes repeats mistakes. same mistake.seeks to learn The student either asks The student sometimes knows The student usually knows The student knows when to ask for questions that are not when to ask for assistance or when to ask for assistance or assistance or information and collects appropriate or does not ask information, but sometimes asks information and usually sufficient information to ask thoughtfulAsks questions when information questions that are not well collects sufficient information questions; prepares in advance asappropriate is needed. reasoned. to ask thoughtful questions. necessary; and engages in activequestions dialogue. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 14 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Rarely Sometimes Usually AlwaysSELF-MANAGEMENT AND PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY The student has difficulty The student is sometimes able The student is able to The student is able to readily understanding the relative to understand the relative understand the relative understand the relative importance of importance of tasks and importance of tasks and organize importance of tasks with active tasks and organize work accordingly;Prioritizes organizing work accordingly. work accordingly. guidance of the supervisor and the student comes to his/her supervisortasks then organize work if he/she needs guidance. accordingly. The student is not able to The student is sometimes able The student is usually able to The student is able to persist when persist when presented with to persist when presented with persist when presented with a presented with a novel, difficult, or a novel, difficult, or a novel, difficult, or ambiguous novel, difficult, or ambiguous ambiguous task; the student has great ambiguous task and is easily task but can be discouraged, not task and finds strategies that tenacity, finding sometimes novelPersistent discouraged. finding effective strategies to enable him/her to do so; the strategies to maintain motivation and maintain motivation and student does not give up easily. productivity and solve problems. productivity. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 15 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Rarely Sometimes Usually AlwaysSELF-MANAGEMENT AND PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY The student fails to bring The student tries to brings tasks The student usually brings The student brings tasks to completion tasks to completion and and projects to completion after tasks and projects to after sufficient persistence, meetsBrings tasks and misses deadlines. sufficient persistence and meets completion after sufficient deadlines, and effectively negotiates any deadlines most of the time. persistence and meets changes to priorities and timing alongprojects to deadlines. the way.completion The student is rarely aware The student is sometimes aware The student is generally aware The student is highly aware of his/her of his/her current level of of his/her current level of of his/her current level of current level of mastery and mastery and understanding mastery and understanding (and mastery and understanding understanding (and misunderstandings) (and misunderstandings) of a misunderstandings) of a subject; (and misunderstandings) of a of a subject; is able to reflect on what subject; is not able to reflect the student needs significant subject; with some guidance, worked and what needed improvementAware of own on what worked and what guidance to reflect on what the student is able to reflect regarding a particular task; is highly needed improvement worked and what needed on what worked and what reasoned and realistic in self-appraisal;abilities and regarding a particular task; improvement regarding a needed improvement and knows where improvement isperformance has unrealistic expectations particular task; the student is regarding a particular task; the necessary or not necessary, both in a of him-/herself (either too somewhat aware of his/her student is aware of his/her given task and for his/her overall high or too low); and is overall strengths and areas overall strengths and areas development. unaware of his/her overall needing improvement. needing improvement. strengths and areas needing improvement. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 16 of 18 1 2 3 4 SCORE Rarely Sometimes Usually AlwaysSELF-MANAGEMENT AND PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITYExhibits The student behaves The student behaves somewhat The student behaves The student behaves exceptionally irresponsibly and/or responsibly and professionally, responsibly and professionally, responsibly and professionally, based onresponsible and unprofessionally, based on based on standards in the as appropriate to the industry, the standards in the industry, field, and standards in the industry, industry, field, and workplace in field, and workplace in which workplace in which he/she is working.professional field, and workplace in which which he/she is working. he/she is working.behaviors as he/she is working.defined by theindustry or field Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 17 of 18 1 2 3 4 Level of Knowledge Level of Knowledge Level of Knowledge Meets Level of Knowledge Exceeds SCORE Approaches Expectations Falls Below Expectations Expectations ExpectationsKNOWLEDGE OF THE FIELD AND ORGANIZATIONAL CONTEXT Example: In the healthcare Example: In the healthcare field, Example: In the healthcare field, Example: In the healthcare field, the field, the student has little the student has some the student generally understands student fully understands the range ofUnderstands understanding of the range of understanding of the range of the range of opportunities in the opportunities in the healthcare field —career opportunities in the healthcare opportunities in the healthcare healthcare field — from pediatrics from pediatrics to gerontology, from homeopportunities/ field and does not know where field, some knowledge about where to gerontology, and from home health care assistance to surgery, and there will be areas of growth. there will be areas of growth, and health care assistance to surgery from service delivery to biomedicalrequirements in knows the general education — and generally knows where research — and knows where there willthe industry or requirements for various there will be areas of growth; be areas of growth; knows what education professions in the industry. knows what education level is level is required for various professionsfield overall required for various professions. and what kinds of knowledge, skills, and dispositions are needed for success.Understands Example: The student has little Example: The student understands Example: The student has broad Example: The student fully understands acareer understanding of the basics some basics about the area of understanding of the basics of the range of issues in the area of pediatricopportunities/ about the area of pediatric pediatric nursing, such as the key field of pediatric nursing, such as nursing, such as the key responsibilities, nursing, such as the key responsibilities and education level the key responsibilities, education education level required, technologyrequirements in responsibilities and education required to enter the field. level required, and technology demands, future trends in the field, andthe specific level required in the field. requirements. demand in the local region.occupationalarea related tothe internshipor studentproject Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 18 of 18 1 2 3 4 Level of Knowledge Level of Knowledge Level of Knowledge Meets Level of Knowledge Exceeds SCORE Approaches Expectations Falls Below Expectations Expectations ExpectationsKNOWLEDGE OF THE FIELD AND ORGANIZATIONAL CONTEXT Example: The student does not Example: The student has some Example: The student clearly Example: The student fully understandsUnderstands understand the organization; understanding of the overall understands the overall the overall organization’s structure,the culture, the student did not master organization’s structure, organization’s structure, geographic geographic service area, size, and range ofetiquette, and simple organizational geographic service area, size, and service area, size, and range of opportunities in the organization; the “navigation” tasks, such as range of opportunities in the opportunities in the organization; the student is very successful in basicpractices of the completing timesheets, calling in organization; the student knows student is successful in basic workplace “navigation,” such asworkplace or sick, participating in meetings, how to complete timesheets, call workplace “navigation,” such as completing timesheets, calling in sick, and obtaining information about in sick, participate in meetings, completing timesheets, calling in sick, participating in meetings, and obtainingproject client’s other processes. and obtain information about participating in meetings, and information; the student is able to makeorganization and other processes. obtaining information about other additional suggestions to improve officeknows how to processes. practice.navigate theorganization Example: The student did not Example: The student usually used Example: The student used effective Example: The student used effective use effective communication effective communication communication approaches (email, communication approaches (email,Knows how to approaches (e.g., emails were approaches, but some telephone, etc., as requested); telephone, etc., as requested), was too informal) and did not communications were not observed “office hours” and other professional in all communications, andinteract with understand “office hours” and professional, and the student did protocols; and appeared to work observed “office hours” and othersupervisors, other protocols. not always know how to interact relatively easily with his/her protocols; the student appeared to work with his/her supervisor and supervisor and teammates, even easily with his/her supervisor andclients, and teammates. though it was a new environment. teammates, was very sensitive to varyingteammates work styles, and adjusted his/her own style accordingly. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 1 of 2 GUIDELINES FOR COORDINATORS OF THE SUPERVISOR ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESSINTRODUCTIONThe National Academy Foundation (NAF) has long advocated for the value of work-based learning opportunities asessential to helping youth succeed as adults in the world of work and beyond. High school internships and similar in-depthwork-based learning experiences, such as school-based enterprises, represent the culmination of a series of carefullyplanned learning opportunities that bring together key workplace lessons and prepare youth for college, careers, and life.NAF has partnered with WestEd, an educational research, development, and service agency, to develop a comprehensivestudent assessment and certification system for NAF Career Academies. The system will benefit students, colleges, andindustry; it provides academy students with critical feedback about the skills and knowledge they need to succeed inpostsecondary and workforce pursuits, while providing colleges and employers with a valid, authentic, and unique measureof student readiness for further education and work.A key component of the certification system is the Supervisor Assessment of College and Career Readiness.OVERVIEW OF THE ASSESSMENTWho: The assessment is designed for completion by the student’s direct supervisor or an adult mentor who has had theopportunity to observe the student’s work. If the student rotates to a variety of positions within a single internship orother work-based learning experience, each supervisor would complete a separate assessment, or the employer point-of-contact will combine the scores, as appropriate. Please work with the employer point-of-contact to make the properarrangements.When: The assessment should be completed at the end of the internship or other culminating work-based learningexperience (CWBL). It is intended to assess the skills and knowledge gained over the course of the student’s academyexperience, including coursework, projects, previous career exploration and work-based learning experiences, and theculminating internship experience itself, as evidenced by the application of knowledge and skills in the “real world” ofwork.What: The assessment includes a list of 14 Foundational and Applied Workplace Skills, 9 items to assess Self-Management and Personal Responsibility, and 4 items related to Knowledge of the Field and Organizational Context.These items are intended to measure readiness for both college and careers. They were arrived at through a thoroughreview of the literature and consultation with a team of experts.The assessment also includes space to list technical skills that are specific to a particular industry, field, or workplace, aswell as for additional commentary.How: The assessment is designed to be easy to complete. Most of the questions are on a simple four-point scale. Thesupervisor simply selects the number that corresponds to the assessment of the student on each item. The supervisorshould respond as objectively and candidly as possible. A glossary and a scoring guide are provided to assist supervisorsand promote consistency in scoring.Why: The assessment will contribute to the student’s overall certification, but will not be the sole measure. We needaccurate and reliable information to both support student success and continuously improve the program. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 2 of 2IMPLEMENTATIONIn Advance of the Experience: Setting the stage for learning and successContact the internship or other work-based learning site to generally orient the direct supervisor to the internship as alearning experience and the purpose of the assessment. Provide copies of the Gold Standards, the document“Orientation of Supervising Professionals to the NAF Internship Assessment,” and the assessment itself.With supervisors, discuss the following key points about the assessment: We recognize some skills may be more important in one industry or job than another, but the skills listed are based on research on essential skills for students’ long-term success in whichever path they choose to pursue. The assessment will be completed online, and should not take more than 15–30 minutes. We ask that the assessment be completed as objectively as possible; we want students to learn about themselves through the experience. If students receive any low scores, they will have the opportunity to learn the related skills through supplemental projects at school so they can transition to college and future careers fully prepared.With both supervisors and students: Review the assessment as an integral component of the Learning Plan process.Review the Glossary and Scoring Guide to ensure that the supervisors and students both understand each item. Usethe assessment to help guide the identification of the student’s learning goals — goals that will enable the student toboth build on strengths and work on areas that may be challenging. Include these goals in the student’s Learning Plan.During the Experience: Early identification of strengths and challengesWith supervisors: Maintain contact with the supervisor to identify areas of challenge for the student, to enable thesupervisor and the student to address these skill areas before the final assessment.With students: Use the assessment to facilitate students’ self-assessment and discussion about what they are learning inthe various skill areas, where they feel strong, and where they feel challenged. Have students provide specific examples (evidence) of areas of learning, strength, and challenge, as this is important for self-knowledge and for communication with the supervisor; this will also deepen the student’s understanding of the industry or field and provide useful insights for college applications and future career development. Facilitate problem-solving and guide students in how to speak with their supervisors to ensure learning. Enable students to request support if needed.At the End of the Experience: The final assessmentProvide a notification to the supervisor(s) about the need to complete the assessment online by a given date.If more than one supervisor is assessing one student, contact the employer to discuss how the results will be combined.Follow-Up as Needed:A phone call should be made to the supervisor to verify scores in cases such as the following: The scores appear very unusual (though workplace performance will often differ from classroom performance). The scores are extremely uniform. (Few students are equally skilled in all areas.) The student received scores of “1” — follow-up would be to a) understand in what ways the student performed less than adequately; b) explore activities that would enable the student to bring the scores up. There was more than one “N/A” —“No Opportunity to Observe” per section. This affects how complete the assessment is. Programmatically, you will want to ask if the opportunity was not provided at all or whether it was provided but not observed. This will inform next steps for the student and future conversations with the employer. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 1 of 4 Supervisor Assessment of Student College and Career Readiness GLOSSARYSKILL DEFINITIONFoundational Skills The student is open to learning and demonstrates the following information-gathering skills: • seeks out and locates informationLocating, • understands and organizes informationcomprehending, • evaluates information for quality of content, validity, credibility, and relevanceand evaluating • references sources of information appropriatelyinformation For example, the student gathers information to build an itinerary for a group of travelers, understands the information, and is able to identify which information is credible and valuable for the travelers based on their expressed interests and needs; the student keeps track of which web sites were accessed. The student pays attention to verbal information and instructions; follow-up questions and subsequent action reflect attentiveness and comprehension; the student observes workplaceListening and events, notices details, and remembers procedures, processes, and demonstrations.observation For example, the student listens to instructions about office policies and asks questions if instructions were not understood; in an IT setting or a commercial kitchen, the student pays careful attention to steps that are followed, to safety procedures, and to quality control standards. The student demonstrates the following critical thinking and problem solving skills: • exercises sound reasoning and analytical thinking (formulates problems, makes judgments andCritical thinking, explains perspectives based on evidence and previous findings)problem • uses knowledge, facts, and data to solve workplace problemsformulation, and For example, in helping with a bank transaction, the student can explain why he/she would follow specificproblem solving procedures to ensure the security of the client’s assets; when a customer is upset about a business policy, the student identifies the source of the problem, provides adequate information, and solicits appropriate support. The student articulates thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively; the student has public speakingOral skills.communication For example, the student can present ideas effectively in a staff meeting.Written The student writes memos, letters, and technical reports with correct grammar and punctuation; writing is clear and effective.communication For example, a letter to a client is written correctly and clearly.Quantitative The student performs basic mathematical computations quickly and accurately. For example, the student can calculate hours worked, count change, use fractions and decimals inreasoning calculating weights and distances, and verify the accuracy of operations performed by Excel. The student knows what type of precision is appropriate to the task and the subject area, is able to increase precision and accuracy when a task or process is repeated, and uses precisionPrecision and appropriately to reach correct conclusions in the context of the task or subject.accuracy For example, in presenting a travel itinerary to the client, information is sufficiently detailed and all information has been verified. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 2 of 4SKILL DEFINITIONApplied Workplace Skills The student has a clear understanding of how the parts of a whole inter-relate and interact with each other in complex systems to produce overall outcomes.Systems thinking For example, in Hospitality, the student can describe how the various departments in a hotel contribute to hotel functioning, the role of the hotel in the community, or how occupancy rates may be linked to changes in the economy. The student exhibits insight, intuition, and imagination, and builds on others’ ideas to develop something new; demonstrates originality and inventiveness in work; communicatesCreativity and new ideas to others; and integrates knowledge across different disciplines.innovation For example, in IT, the student identifies a new way to network computers at a new office location; in Finance, the student is able to apply cost-cutting measures learned at home to a budget issue faced by a small business; in Hospitality, the student engages with co-workers to create a new menu for customers with unusual dietary restrictions. The student selects and uses appropriate technology to accomplish a given task and appliesInformation technology computing skills to problem-solving.application For example, the student is able to use Excel for calculations and has facility with the Internet. The student builds collaborative relationships with colleagues and customers; is able to work comfortably in a team environment, with varying perspectives and divisions ofTeamwork/collaboration responsibility, contributing appropriately to the team effort; and negotiates and manages conflict effectively. For example, the student participates effectively in a project planning, recognizes various points of view, and volunteers to contribute to the research effort. The student learns from and works effectively with individuals representing diverseAbility to work with cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, lifestyles, and viewpoints.diverse individuals For example, the student listens respectfully to the views of diverse teammates and ensures that a planned meeting date does not conflict with team members’ religious observances, even if these differ from his/her own. The student demonstrates integrity and ethical behavior; the student acts responsibly withEthical behavior the interests of others in mind. For example, the student is careful in following computer security procedures. The student can respond to change quickly and adjust plans accordingly.Flexibility/adaptability For example, in a computer installation project, the student is able to adjust plans and workflow when parts do not arrive on schedule. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 3 of 4SKILL DEFINITIONSelf-Management and Personal Responsibility The student accurately estimates how much time it takes to complete outstanding and anticipated tasks and allocates sufficient time to complete the tasks; uses calendars and createsManages time “to do” lists to organize tasks into productive chunks of time; locates and utilizes settingseffectively; punctual conducive to proper concentration; prioritizes work time in relation to competing demands such as school and socializing; arrives on time and attends consistently; and informs his/her supervisor if there are changes.Self-directed; takes The student takes initiative and is able to work independently as needed; the student looks forinitiative; resourceful the means to solve problems.Takes responsibility The student actively seeks out new knowledge and skills, monitors his/her own learning needs,for learning; seeks to and learns from his/her mistakes.learnAsks appropriate The student knows when to ask for assistance or information and collects sufficientquestions information to ask thoughtful questions. The student is able to understand the relative importance of tasks and organize workPrioritizes tasks accordingly. The student is able to persist when presented with a novel, difficult, or ambiguous task andPersistent finds strategies that enable him/her to do so.Brings tasks and The student brings tasks and projects to completion after sufficient persistence; the studentprojects to meets deadlines.completionAware of own abilities The student is able to reflect on what worked and what needed improvement regarding a particular task; the student is aware of his/her current level of mastery and understanding (andand performance misunderstandings) of a subject and of his/her strengths and areas needing improvement.Exhibits responsibleand professional The student behaves responsibly and professionally, as appropriate to the industry, field, andbehaviors as defined workplace in which he/she is working.by the industry orfield Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 4 of 4SKILL DEFINITIONKnowledge of the Field and Organizational ContextUnderstands career For example, in the healthcare field, the student understands the range of opportunities in theopportunities/requirements healthcare field and knows where there will be areas of growth.in the industry or field overallUnderstands careeropportunities/requirementsin the specific occupational For example, in the healthcare field, the student understands basics about the area of pediatricarea related to the nursing, such as the key responsibilities and education level required to enter the field.internship or studentprojectUnderstands the culture,etiquette, and practices of For example, the student understands the overall organization’s culture and etiquette,the workplace or project structure, geographic service area, size, and range of opportunities in the organization; theclient’s organization and student knows how to perform basic work processes such as completing timesheets, calling in sick, and participating in meetings, and knows how to obtain additional information as needed.knows how to navigate theorganizationKnows how to interact with For example, the student uses effective and appropriate email communication approaches, cansupervisors, clients, and request meetings as needed, and adjusts interaction style to fit varying situations.teammates Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 1 of 3 SUPERVISOR ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT COLLEGE AND CAREER READINESS 1Directions: Please answer the following items based upon your experience observing the student.Please be objective and candid in your assessment; your responses will help strengthen our program.If you have not had the opportunity to observe the student’s skill level or behavior in a particular area, please respondN/A: “No Opportunity to Observe.”Part I. Common Core College and Career Readiness SkillsPlease rate the student’s foundational and applied workplace skills according to the rating scale below. 1 2 3 4 N/A Does Not Meet Approaches Meets Exceeds No Opportunity Expectations Expectations Expectations Expectations to Observe A. Foundational Skills Locating, comprehending, and evaluating 1 2 3 4 N/A information Listening and observation 1 2 3 4 N/A Critical thinking, problem formulation, and problem 1 2 3 4 N/A solving Oral communication 1 2 3 4 N/A Written communication 1 2 3 4 N/A Quantitative reasoning 1 2 3 4 N/A Precision and accuracy 1 2 3 4 N/A B. Applied Workplace Skills Systems thinking 1 2 3 4 N/A Creativity and innovation 1 2 3 4 N/A Information technology application 1 2 3 4 N/A Teamwork/collaboration 1 2 3 4 N/A Ability to work with diverse individuals 1 2 3 4 N/A Ethical behavior 1 2 3 4 N/A Flexibility/adaptability 1 2 3 4 N/A1For the purpose of earning the NAF Student Certificate, all work-based learning experiences assessed with this instrument areexpected to adhere to the NAF Gold Standards for High School Internships to the fullest extent possible. Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 2 of 3C. Self-Management and Personal ResponsibilityPlease rate the student’s self-management skills and personal responsibility according to the rating scalebelow. 1 2 3 4 N/A Rarely Sometimes Usually Always No Opportunity to Observe Manages time effectively; punctual 1 2 3 4 N/A Self-directed; takes initiative; resourceful 1 2 3 4 N/A Takes responsibility for learning; seeks to learn 1 2 3 4 N/A Asks appropriate questions 1 2 3 4 N/A Prioritizes tasks 1 2 3 4 N/A Persistent 1 2 3 4 N/A Brings tasks and projects to completion 1 2 3 4 N/A Aware of own abilities and performance 1 2 3 4 N/A Exhibits responsible and professional behaviors as defined 1 2 3 4 N/A by the industry or fieldPart II. Knowledge of the Field and Organizational ContextPlease rate the student’s knowledge of the industry/field, occupation, and organizational contextaccording to the rating scale below. 1 2 3 4 N/A Level of Knowledge Level of Knowledge Level of Knowledge Level of Knowledge No Opportunity Falls Below Approaches Meets Exceeds to Observe Expectations Expectations Expectations Expectations Understands career opportunities/requirements in the 1 2 3 4 N/A industry or field overall Understands career opportunities/requirements in the specific occupational area related to the internship or 1 2 3 4 N/A student project Understands the culture, etiquette, and practices of the workplace or the project client’s organization and knows 1 2 3 4 N/A how to navigate the organization Knows how to interact with supervisors, clients, and 1 2 3 4 N/A teammates Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.
  • 8/20/2012 Field Test Version Page 3 of 3 Part III. Position-Specific Technical Skills Please list one to three position-specific technical skills of particular significance in your industry, specific occupation, workplace, or project that the student was clearly expected to use during the internship. Do not repeat general skills assessed in Parts I and II. Examples of position-specific skills include computer networking, accounting skills, event planning, second language fluency, etc., that might appear as requirements on a job description. Then, please rate the student on skills demonstrated according to the rating scale below. 1 2 3 4 Skill Falls Below Skill Approaches Skill Meets Skill Exceeds Expectations Expectations Expectations Expectations Skill Rating 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Part IV. Evidence for Low and High Performance RatingsPlease provide evidence (examples of performance) for lowest ratings (skills rated at level 1) and highestratings (skills rated at level 4). Rating Skill Example of Performance Copyright © 2012 National Academy Foundation. All rights reserved.