Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

AOF Culminating Final Industry Assessment

197

Published on

The AOF Industry Assessment is a powerful culminating project experience that encompasses a wide range of curriculum and themes, helps students develop valuable skills and provides evidence of college …

The AOF Industry Assessment is a powerful culminating project experience that encompasses a wide range of curriculum and themes, helps students develop valuable skills and provides evidence of college and career readiness. Hear how employer partners join with academy teachers to implement this engaging assessment experience.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
197
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Johnathan H. Christoforatos Alternative Energy
  • 2. Why Alternative Energies? The rise of gasoline and oil prices may be the most prominent concern driving the consuming public’s interest in alternative fuels, but there are a variety of other factors that attract investors and consumers to the alternative energy sector:  Global Industry  Concerns of global warming  Public desire for energy independence  Geopolitical concerns  Expansion of federal and/or state incentives and tax benefits.  The alternative energy sector offers dramatic growth whereas the oil industry can potentially become stagnant  Significant increase in the generation and distribution of alternative energies
  • 3. Industry History 1700 Coal Begins to Displace Use of Other Energies 1800/1821 Process of Electrolysis Discovered. First Natural Gas Well in US Is drilled 1882 First Electric Plant Built by Thomas Edison in New York. First Hydroelectric plan in operation 1888 First Windmill to Generate Electricity 1906 The "Free Alcohol Bill" Is Signed to Promote the Use of Alcohol as an Alternative to Gasoline 1924-1927 First Federal Law Established to Control Pollution from the Oil Industry. First Commercial Wind Turbines Sold to Generate Electricity 1957 First Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Begins Operation 1973 OPEC Oil Embargo Against the US Causes Gas Shortages and Rationing 1977 Department of Energy Organization Act Is Signed, Creating the US Department of Energy
  • 4. Industry History (Cont.) 1979 Three Mile Island Nuclear Accident in Pennsylvania 1986/1989 Largest Nuclear Accident Ever Takes Place at Chernobyl. Exxon Valdez Disaster in Alaska Becomes the Largest Oil Spill in US Waters 2003 President Bush Unveils the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative to Promote Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development 2009 US Invests $3.4 Billion to Modernize Energy Grid 2010/2011 BP Oil Rig Explodes & Causes Largest Oil Spill in US History. Earthquake off Coast of Japan Damages Six Power plants 2012 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Approves New Nuclear Power Plants
  • 5. Variety of Alternatives • Nuclear • Natural Gas • Biomass • Geothermal • Wind • Solar • Hydroelectricity • Wave • Tidal Power • Landfill Gas
  • 6. Energy Regulation • Department of Energy (DOE) • North American Electric Reliability Corp. (NERC) • U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) • Bureau of Ocean Energy Mgmt. (BOEM) • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) • National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) • Chemical Safety Board (Recommendations) • Deregulation of Electricity Utilities
  • 7. Mission Statement  “The AES Corporation is a global power company with generation and distribution companies. Through our portfolio of thermal and renewable fuel sources-biomass, coal, diesel, gas, hydropower, solar, wind—we safely provide affordable and sustainable energy in 29 countries. We are committed to operational excellence and to meeting the world’s changing energy needs.” Target Market: All Building owners looking to utilize electricity. Virtually the entire world.
  • 8. AES History  1980’s  AES is founded  First AES power plant built  AES becomes largest independent power producer in the USA  1998  AES acquires a minority stake in a power plant in the first-and-only generation privatization in India  2002-2011  AES pioneers new pollution control technology and biomass conversions in 5 countries.  Brought Renewable energy to market through acquisition and development of AES Wind generation in the U.S. and Europe  2012  AES Brings patented storage operation system to market
  • 9. AES Corporation Marketing • The AES Corporation (AES) is a global power company • AES owns a portfolio of electricity generation and distribution businesses in 25 countries across five continents • Distribution networks serving over 11 million people • Generation capacity of approximately 43,000 megawatts (MW) Strengths • Global presence • Strong financial performance • Diversified and balanced energy portfolio Weaknesses • Concentrated suppliers and customers • Very Slow Growth in latter years Opportunity • Project order backlog • Increasing demand for electricity in the U.S. • Focus on alternative energy Threats • Rising fuel prices • Foreign currency fluctuation • Environmental regulations Coal 37% Natural Gas 36% Renewables 23% Oil 2% Diesel 2% AES Energy Generation Portfolio
  • 10. AES ManagementCharles Rossoti Non Executive Chairman of the board Holds MBA with high distinction from Harvard Business school. From 1997 to 2002 Rossoti was the commissioner of internal revenue for the IRS Executive Vice President, CFO COO, Executive Vice President CIO, SVP of Global Operations Brian Miller Executive Vice President, General Counsel, and Corporate Secretary Andrés Gluski President, Director, CEO Holds insightful experience in the global electricity business. Named International CEO of the Year by Latin Trade Magazine
  • 11. AES Litigation  Craig Imler, et al. v. AES Corporation, et al  Claim: AES issued a series of material misrepresentations to the market between April 26, 2001 and February 14, 2002, thereby artificially inflating the price of AES securities.  Outcome: AES settled the lawsuits which resulted in them having to pay a total of $5 million to the settlement fund.  Donald O. Stafford, et al. v. AES Corporation, et al.  Claim: AES materially misrepresented the Company's business condition and failing to disclose material facts concerning the impact of the business decline of its United Kingdom operations  Outcome: Court dismissed all of the claims except for the claim alleging that the registration statement and prospectus disseminated to the IPALCO stockholders for purposes of the Share Exchange failed to disclose purported temporary defaults on their contracts
  • 12. Mission Statement  “At Duke Energy, we make people’s lives better by providing gas and electric services in a sustainable way — affordable, reliable and clean. This requires us to constantly look for ways to improve, to grow and to reduce our impact on the environment.”
  • 13. Duke Energy History  Early 1900’s  Catawba Power Company is founded by three visionaries  Catawba Hydro Station became CPC’s first electricity providing power plant  Hydroelectric fleet continues to grow and begins to serve both commercial and residential grids  1965  The first nuclear project, the Keowee-Toxaway Project, was launched  Keowee-Toxaway project earns Duke Energy its first of three Edison Awards, the power industry's highest honor  1980’s  Duke Power president leads the creation of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations  Duke president again takes the lead and organized the World Association of Nuclear Operators  1990’s  Duke takes interest in natural gas  Duke Power and PanEnergy merged to form Duke Energy  2000-Present  Duke Energy and Cinergy Corp merge expanding services into 3 states  Duke Energy and Progress Energy merge and expands service into Florida and forms the largest electric utility in the United States
  • 14. Duke Energy Mgmt. Jim Rogers Chairman, President and CEO Rogers has been with Duke Energy for over 15 years. Also he was Chairman and CEO of Cinergy Corp. from 1994 until its merger with Duke Energy Jennifer Weber Executive Vice President and CHRO Keith Trent Executive Vice President and COO Lee Mazzocchi Senior Vice President and CIO Lynn Good Executive Vice President and CFO
  • 15. Duke Energy Marketing Strengths • Strong market position • Increasing revenues and operating profits • Extensive generation, transmission and transportation infrastructure Weaknesses • Concentrated area of operation • Unfavorable generation portfolio Opportunity • Growing popularity of renewable energy • Rising population in Ohio • Increasing demand for electricity in the U.S. Threats • Consolidation in the North American electricity utility industry • Compliance to enviromental laws and regulations • Economic slowdown in the U.S. • Corporate Social Responsibility • New Nuclear Generation • Smart Grid • Energy Efficiency & Conservation Initiatives Coal 94% 1% 1% 1% .03% 2% 1% 2012 Duke Energy Generation Portfolio (Indiana) Hydro Renewable Mkt EE CC CT
  • 16. Duke Energy Litigation  KENNETH WALTON GEORGE, et al, v. DUKE ENERGY RETIREMENT CASH BALANCE PLAN, et al. (2002)  Claim: The class pursued claims that Duke Energy calculated interest credits at an incorrect rate and that Duke energy also failed to properly calculate certain lump sum distributions.  Outcome: Duke Energy and plaintiffs came to settlement resulting in Duke Energy paying $30 million dollars to class members  Maurine Nieman, et al. v. Duke Energy Corporation, et al. (2012)  Claim: The class is currently pursuing claims that Duke Energy issued misleading statements about their merger with “Progress Energy” in order to obtain approval from Progress Energy’s Board of Directors.  Outcome: Pending
  • 17. Mission Statement  “We are committed to meet future energy demand with less impact on our climate and with minimal burden on the nation’s economy. To meet these challenges, the Exelon family of companies strives for the highest standards in all aspects of energy, from generation to marketing to delivery.”
  • 18. Exelon History  Early 1900’s  The Philadelphia Electric Company (PE) is incorporated  Samuel Insull merges Commonwealth Electric Company and Chicago Edison Company to form Commonwealth Edison (ComEd)  1930’s  PE merges with United Gas Improvement Company  1953  The Public Service Company of Northern Illinois merges with ComEd  1960’s  ComEd operates the nation's first privately financed commercial nuclear power station  1990-2000  PE adopts the name PECO Energy Company; ComEd becomes part of a new holding company, Unicom Corporation  PECO and Unicom merge to form Exelon Corporation  2012  Exelon Corporation merges with Constellation
  • 19. Exelon Management Christopher Crane President & CEO Crane has over 30 years in the alternative energy industry. Since joining Exelon in 1998, Crane served as Chief Nuclear officer, and currently serves as president and CEO. Amy Best Senior VP & CHRO Best is responsible for setting the human resources strategy and service delivery for 9,500 employees. Ruth Gillis Executive VP & CAO Gillis joined the Exelon family in 2000. Gillis has over 35 years in the financial sectors. Jonathan Thayer Executive VP CFO Thayer has been with Exelon for over 10 years. Has an MBA from Harvard University Sonny Garg Senior VP & CIO Controls all aspects of IT and oversees 1300 IT employees.
  • 20. Exelon Marketing  Corporate Social Responsibility  Diversified Energy Portfolio  Exelon 2020 Strengths • Significant nuclear power generation assets • Strong retail customer base • Extensive generation, transmission and transportation infrastructure Weaknesses • Sluggish revenue growth and fluctuating margins • Weak performance of ComEd • Dependence to meet financial obligations Opportunity • Growing popularity of renewable energy • Investment in solar energy • Increasing demand for electricity in the U.S. Threats • Consolidation in the North American electricity utility industry • Environmental Liabilities • Expiry of PPA Nuclear 55% Gas 28% Oil 3% Wind/Solar 4% Hydro 6% Coal 4% Exelon Energy Generation Portfolio
  • 21. Exelon Corp. Litigation  Nicholas Stavros, et al., v. Exelon Corporation, et al.  Claim: Exelon repeatedly issued statements concerning the strength of its operations and repeatedly assured the market that it would meet or beat its $4.50 per share earnings figure for 2001.  Outcome: Exelon won the case. Defendants' earnings projections were accompanied by sufficient cautionary language such that the statements fall under the first prong of the PSLRA's safe harbor.  United States v. Exelon Corporation and Constellation Energy Group, Inc.  Claim: Exelon’s acquisition of Constellation Energy group would create one of the largest electricity companies in the United States, and substantially lessen competition.  Outcome: The courts ruled that the acquisition of Constellation may be approved given that Exelon sell three electricity-generating plants.
  • 22. Financials Current Ratio Debt Ratio Growth Rate P/E Ratio AES Corporation 1.02 .89 7% N/A Duke Energy Corporation 1.01 .64 35% 20.64 Exelon Corporation 1.3 .72 23% 14.28
  • 23. 6 Month Comparison
  • 24. Technological Impact • Technology is always changing and evolving • New safety and protection to avoid disasters • More efficient energy generation structures • The U.S. is investing in technology to increase the production of Alternative Energies  “The advance of technology, like the growth of population and industry, has also been proceeding exponentially.” ----CARL KAYSEN, Foreign Affairs
  • 25. Alternative Energy’s Future • Research into Polymer Solar Cells • Common Algae for Biofuel Production • Flying Wind Farms: Future Power Harvesters
  • 26. My Recommendation • A lot of room for growth • Diversified Energy generation portfolio • Stable financials • Great Management background*  *AES Legislation issues

×