Meaningful MarketingStrategy Workshop4.17.12                       twitter.com/buildingbelief                       facebo...
The Ten Pillars of Meaningful Marketing™Understanding                                              EngagementWhat do your ...
What We’re Doing Today
Agenda•   The media and marketing world we live in today•   What it takes to break through with meaning•   Understanding y...
TODAY’S MARKETINGENVIRONMENT
Creating Change   The Rider   (Intellect, Logic)                                                                          ...
Beginning Assumptions
Good
Not So Good
UNDERSTANDING
Understanding• Market            • Decision Process and  – Segmentation      Triggers• Decision-Makers   • Competitors  – ...
Sources: FlightView, The WiseMarketer 11/3/11    How Understanding Can Open Doors•   78% of airline customers are "often f...
Client Segmentation•   Industry•   Region•   Size - Revenue – Historic and potential (Lifetime Value)•   Reputation? Influ...
How Do Consumers in YourIndustry Make Decisions?• Their buying criteria   – What is paramount on their list of must haves/...
Identifying the Influencers      Who They Are                                              Ranking Their Influence      • ...
Exercise• Who are the influencers in your…  – Niche segments                                    Message  – Key Regions    ...
#shale Influencers
Customer Segmentation MapCustomer   Demo-      Functional   Emotional   Affinities &   Gathering   Decision-   Current    ...
Audience/Persona SummaryCustomer Segment          Awareness/Affinity             Primary Needs/Desires       #1           ...
Competitive Map  Competitor   Functional Advantages Emotional Advantages
PRIORITY
Priority• Of your client segments, which are most critical for  meeting short and long-term goals? Why?   – Stack rank seg...
DIFFERENTIATION
Differentiation• Differentiation drives growth• What are the core elements of service in your  industry?• What elements ar...
The Discipline of Market LeadersThe Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy and Fred Wiersema. Addison-Wesley. 1995
Three Characteristics of a     Good Strategy     • Focus            – Southwest emphasizes only three factors: friendly se...
Core Elements of CreativeServices?• Critical• Nice to have• Not that relevant (perceived)
Defining the Value Proposition For (Target Customer): Who Needs: The (Offering Name) Is a (Category) That (Provides Key Be...
MYTHOLOGY
Mythology• myth·ol·o·gy a set of stories, traditions, or  beliefs associated with a particular group or the  history of an...
Can You Share the Myth?
Newer Examples
Emotional Value:       Connecting via Archetypes                                                            Stability & Co...
Emotional Value:       Connecting via Archetypes                                                            Stability & Co...
What Builds Trust?• Consistency of word and action• Unselfish action• Authenticity and openness (Non-  manipulated admissi...
Exercise• Considering your client segment priorities and their  corresponding emotional/functional needs, what  mythology ...
What’s the Difference• The Power of the Sale                   • The Power of the Story  – Media plan                     ...
What Makes an Idea Stick?     SUCCESs     •   Simplicity           – Finding the core of the idea     •   Unexpectedness  ...
Successful Advertising Templates•   Pictorial analogy - Featuring extreme, exaggerated analogies rendered    visually•   E...
Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesAccomplishment   Enlightenment   Redemption    Beaut...
Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesAccomplishment•Achieving goals and making something ...
Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesCommunity•A sense of unity with others around us and...
Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful Experiences Duty •The willing application of oneself to a respo...
Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesFreedom•The sense of living without unwanted constra...
Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesJustice•The assurance of equitable and unbiased trea...
Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesRedemption•Atonement or deliverance from past failur...
Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesTruth•A commitment to honesty and integrity. This ex...
How Archetypes Map to Meaning        Archetype                 Meaning         Caregiver                Validation        ...
Exercise•   Building from your value          •   Simplicity    proposition, use the principals    of communication SUCCES...
ENGAGEMENTDIALOG, SURPRISE, EMPOWERMENT
Marketing Accountability              2011-12 Objective             2011-12 Goals/Metrics              Maximum % aware in ...
Tip: Use “hashtags” to join inWhat are the business                                                  or start conversation...
Rings of Influence and Interest                                                           Implication                     ...
Developing an Influencer Strategy •   An influencer is someone who helps other people buy from you •   Influence is contex...
Time to Build Belief…         jeffj@mythologymarketing.com             mythologymarketing.com
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Meaningful Marketing Strategy

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Customers pay attention when messages mean something to them. Learn how to build meaningful marketing that helps you grow brand, revenue and relationships.

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  • Of the three players in this picture, which is ultimately most powerful? The Rider – Intellect Value Proposition Product/Service Information Ratings, Reports The Path Tools and Communications that Make it Easy to Learn, Buy, Consume and Share (Web Site, Displays, Packaging) The Elephant (Emotion) Brand Expressed Through Emotion-Driven Story-Telling All three need to be addressed and be in alignment to be effective in creating change, but the emotion is the most powerful if engaged properly
  • Airlines are missing a big opportunity to strengthen both customer loyalty and customer service while reducing operational costs, according to a gate-side survey conducted by real-time flight information service FlightView. 78% of customers are "often frustrated by the lack of timely, accurate information " about delays 45% of travellers said their biggest frustration was not knowing where their plane was, or when it would arrive. Another 34% said their biggest frustration was not receiving fast enough or accurate enough updates on new departure times. In both cases, the lack of information was felt to create a more stressful travel experience. In addition to declining customer satisfaction, failing to provide at-the-gate flight updates and information could also cost airlines financially. When travellers learn that their flights have been delayed while at the gate and they can't get enough information on a new take-off time: 62% are frustrated or very frustrated; 40% said they consider avoiding that airline the next time they fly; 22% say it's partly why they don't like flying and may avoid flying, if possible, the next time they travel.
  • Example of Final Value Proposition Form: For IBM PC Users who want the advantages of a Macintosh-style graphical user interface, Microsoft Windows 3 is an industry-standard operating system that provides ease-of-use and consistency on a PC-compatible platform, unlike other implementations of this type of interface. Windows 3 is now or will very shortly be supported by every major PC application software package.
  • Meaningful Marketing Strategy

    1. 1. Meaningful MarketingStrategy Workshop4.17.12 twitter.com/buildingbelief facebook.com/mythologymarketingJeff James linkedin.in/in/jeffjameswv youtube.com/mythologyworkshops
    2. 2. The Ten Pillars of Meaningful Marketing™Understanding EngagementWhat do your employees/customers/partners believe? Campaigns and communication - How, when, where the Ten Pillar DescriptionsWhat do they want to believe? What do you want them story will be told in unexpected, breakthrough waysto believe about you or your product/service?Priority SurpriseChoosing first the ones who will choose you - Unexpected value - emotional and functional – thatSegmenting customers and stack-ranking who is most exceeds expectations and builds into a dependence thatvaluable to you they won’t be able to live withoutDifferentiation DialogCompetitive strengths that set you apart- Finding the The power of intimacy and the path to loyalty -core of who your organization is and why that is special Interactive communications that lead to relationshipsand unique in both emotional and functional benefitcategoriesAlignment EmpowermentInternal buy-in and readiness…are your people ready? Incentive and opportunity to share the great experienceHelping your team see, understand, believe and live out with othersthe visionMythology InnovationYour brand, your story that builds belief and inspires The next surprise - Feeding the addiction of beingaction delighted with new value http://www.mythologymarketing.com/pillars/
    3. 3. What We’re Doing Today
    4. 4. Agenda• The media and marketing world we live in today• What it takes to break through with meaning• Understanding your customer/constituent segments• Building your value proposition• Creating “sticky” stories and meaningful messages
    5. 5. TODAY’S MARKETINGENVIRONMENT
    6. 6. Creating Change The Rider (Intellect, Logic) To effect change, The Elephant you must (Emotion, Desire, address all three Impulse) effectively The Path (Environment, Prompts, Tools)Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard © 2010 Chip and Dan Heath
    7. 7. Beginning Assumptions
    8. 8. Good
    9. 9. Not So Good
    10. 10. UNDERSTANDING
    11. 11. Understanding• Market • Decision Process and – Segmentation Triggers• Decision-Makers • Competitors – Personas • Influencers • Your Team
    12. 12. Sources: FlightView, The WiseMarketer 11/3/11 How Understanding Can Open Doors• 78% of airline customers are "often frustrated by the lack of timely, accurate information" about delays• 45% of travellers said their biggest frustration was not knowing where their plane was, or when it would arrive.• Another 34% said their biggest frustration was not receiving fast enough or accurate enough updates on new departure times. In both cases, the lack of information was felt to create a more stressful travel experience.• Implications: – 40% said they consider avoiding that airline the next time they fly; – 22% say its partly why they dont like flying and may avoid flying, if possible
    13. 13. Client Segmentation• Industry• Region• Size - Revenue – Historic and potential (Lifetime Value)• Reputation? Influence in the area? Industry?• Relationship history?• Relationship/service cost?• Business Philosophy? Risk tolerance? Growth stage?
    14. 14. How Do Consumers in YourIndustry Make Decisions?• Their buying criteria – What is paramount on their list of must haves/nice to haves? – Relationship vs. function?• Their decision process – Who’s involved? How is decision made? – Where do they gather data?• Their influences – Industry data/reviews, peers?• Their decision calendar – Time of year? Frequency?
    15. 15. Identifying the Influencers Who They Are Ranking Their Influence • Activists: influencers get • Market Reach – the number of involved, with their communities, people an individual has the ability political movements, charities and to connect with. so on. • Quality of Impact – the esteem in • Connected: influencers have which an individual’s view and large social networks opinions are held. • Impact: influencers are looked up • Frequency of Impact – the to and are trusted by others number of opportunities an • Active minds: influencers have individual has to influence buying multiple and diverse interests decisions. • Trendsetters: influencers tend to • Closeness to Decision – how be early adopters (or leavers) in near an individual is to the markets decision-makerKeller, Ed and Berry, Jon. The Influentials, Free Press, 2003
    16. 16. Exercise• Who are the influencers in your… – Niche segments Message – Key Regions Influencer Influencer Influencer Market
    17. 17. #shale Influencers
    18. 18. Customer Segmentation MapCustomer Demo- Functional Emotional Affinities & Gathering Decision- Current OtherSegments Graphics Needs Needs Interests Spots Making Beliefs About Process You
    19. 19. Audience/Persona SummaryCustomer Segment Awareness/Affinity Primary Needs/Desires #1 Engaged Keys to Success What do We Want Them to Believe? What do We Want Them to Do?
    20. 20. Competitive Map Competitor Functional Advantages Emotional Advantages
    21. 21. PRIORITY
    22. 22. Priority• Of your client segments, which are most critical for meeting short and long-term goals? Why? – Stack rank segments – Stack rank sub-segments within segment• Factors to consider – Revenue potential – Historic revenue – Profitability – Reputation influencer• How are current resources being applied towards these priority segments? – What adjustments need made in order to ensure the most important segments receive appropriate investment?
    23. 23. DIFFERENTIATION
    24. 24. Differentiation• Differentiation drives growth• What are the core elements of service in your industry?• What elements are essential vs. non-essential?• What element will you be the absolute best at in your market area – Becomes key point of differentiation
    25. 25. The Discipline of Market LeadersThe Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy and Fred Wiersema. Addison-Wesley. 1995
    26. 26. Three Characteristics of a Good Strategy • Focus – Southwest emphasizes only three factors: friendly service, speed and frequent point-to-point departures • Divergence – Value curve should stand apart from competitors – Southwest offered point-to-point travel between midsize cities vs. hub-and-spoke • Compelling Tagline – Authentic, clear, memorableBlue Ocean Strategy, Harvard Business School Press. W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne, 2005
    27. 27. Core Elements of CreativeServices?• Critical• Nice to have• Not that relevant (perceived)
    28. 28. Defining the Value Proposition For (Target Customer): Who Needs: The (Offering Name) Is a (Category) That (Provides Key Benefit): Unlike (Primary competitive alternative) Because (Our offering’s primary differentiation):
    29. 29. MYTHOLOGY
    30. 30. Mythology• myth·ol·o·gy a set of stories, traditions, or beliefs associated with a particular group or the history of an event, arising naturally or deliberately fostered• What builds belief?• Purpose of mythology - What human emotions can you connect with?• What should the structure of the story look like?
    31. 31. Can You Share the Myth?
    32. 32. Newer Examples
    33. 33. Emotional Value: Connecting via Archetypes Stability & Control By a factor of three, what you do is not nearly as important as how it makes people feel. - Seth Godin, April 2007 Caregiver Creator Ruler Care for others Craft Exert Control something new Belonging Independence & Regular & Jester Lover Sage Explorer Innocent Enjoyment Have a Guy/Gal Find and Understand Maintain Retain or Fulfillment good time OK as you are give love our world independence renew faithThe Hero and the Outlaw, Margaret Mark& Carol Pearson © 2001 Risk & Mastery
    34. 34. Emotional Value: Connecting via Archetypes Stability & Control Caregiver Creator Ruler Care for others Craft Exert Control something new Belonging Independence & Regular & Jester Lover Sage Explorer Innocent Enjoyment Have a Guy/Gal Find and Understand Maintain Retain or Fulfillment good time OK as you are give love our world independence renew faith Hero Outlaw Magician Save the day Break the Affect rules transformationThe Hero and the Outlaw, Margaret Mark& Carol Pearson © 2001 Risk & Mastery
    35. 35. What Builds Trust?• Consistency of word and action• Unselfish action• Authenticity and openness (Non- manipulated admission)• Unrelated third-party validation• Familiarity and intimacy• Unexpected benefit http://www.forbes.com/2006/09/25/trust-relationships-confidencetech_cx_ll_06trust_0925tips.html?boxes=custom
    36. 36. Exercise• Considering your client segment priorities and their corresponding emotional/functional needs, what mythology should you develop, communicate and reinforce to establish your value proposition?• Sources of inspiration – Historic examples – Employee and client stories• How many belief-building elements can you incorporate?
    37. 37. What’s the Difference• The Power of the Sale • The Power of the Story – Media plan VS. – Story plan – Audience plan – Storyteller plan – Memorization by brute – Memorization by force stickiness Can a commercial message have the same power as an organic story? There are built in obstacles, but it’s possible.
    38. 38. What Makes an Idea Stick? SUCCESs • Simplicity – Finding the core of the idea • Unexpectedness – Combining surprise and interest • Concreteness – Bringing it alive with the five senses (memory Velcro) • Credibility – Tapping the power of authority – or anti-authority – to build belief • Emotional – Priming people to care • Stories – Generating involvement that leads to actionMade to Stick, Heath and Heath © 2007 Random House
    39. 39. Successful Advertising Templates• Pictorial analogy - Featuring extreme, exaggerated analogies rendered visually• Extreme consequences - Exaggerated results of not using the advertised product/service, or extreme benefits of using it (NOTE: The majority of award-winning ads fall under these first two categories)• Extreme situations - A product/service is shown performing under unusual circumstances, or an attribute is exaggerated to the extreme• Competition - In which a product/service wins a "bake-off" with the competition; even better if the bake-off circumstances are exaggerated• Interactive experiment - Where people interact with the product/service directly to "see for themselves"• Dimensionality alteration - Shows the long-term implications of a decision, such as not using or using the product/service• 2009’s best ads – http://www.youtube.com/user/AceMetrix#p/c/6DB48DCE2DC7066A/6/OWrAJT1IDuM
    40. 40. Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesAccomplishment Enlightenment Redemption Beauty Freedom Security Creation Harmony Truth Community Justice Validation Duty Oneness Wonder
    41. 41. Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesAccomplishment•Achieving goals and making something of oneself; a sense of satisfaction that can resultfrom productivity, focus, talent, or status. American Express has long benefited fromtransmitting a hint of this meaning to its card holders by establishing itself as a credit cardintended for those who are successful. Nike relies on the essence of this meaning formany in its “Just Do It” campaign.Beauty•The appreciation of qualities that give pleasure to the senses or spirit. Of course beautyis in the eye of the beholder and thus highly subjective, but our desire for it is ubiquitous.We aspire to beauty in all that surrounds us, from architecture and fine furnishing toclothing and cars. Enormous industries thrive on the promise of beauty stemming fromshinier hair, whiter teeth, and clearer skin. Beauty can also be more than mereappearance.•For some, it is a sense that something is created “correctly” or efficiently with anelegance of purpose and use. Companies such as Bang & Olufsen audio equipment andJaguar automobiles distinguish themselves through the beauty of their design.
    42. 42. Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesCommunity•A sense of unity with others around us and a general connection with other humanbeings. Religious communities, unions, fraternities, clubs, and sewing circles are allexpressions of a desire for belonging. The promise and delivery of community underliesthe offerings of several successful organizations including NASCAR with its centralizingfocus on car racing and leagues of loyal fans that follow the race circuit, Harley-Davidsonmotorcycles and their Harley Owners Group (HOG), and Jimmy Buffet with his dedicatedParrotheads. These businesses attract and support user communities who embodyspecific values tied to their products and services.Creation•The sense of having produced something new and original, and in so doing, to havemade a lasting contribution. Besides driving our species to propagate, we enjoy thisexperience through our hobbies, the way we decorate our home, in telling our stories,and in anything else that reflects our personal choices. Creation is what makes“customizable” seem like a desirable attribute, rather than more work for the buyer, forexample, making the salad bar a pleasure rather than a chore.
    43. 43. Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful Experiences Duty •The willing application of oneself to a responsibility. The military in any country counts on the power of this meaning, as do most employers. Duty can also relate to responsibilities to oneself or family, such as reading the daily paper to stay abreast of the news. Commercially, anything regarded as “good for you,” including vitamins, medications, Cross-Your-Heart bras, and cushioned insoles relays some sense of duty and the satisfaction it brings. Enlightenment •Clear understanding through logic or inspiration. This experience is not limited to those who meditate and fast, it is a core expectation of offerings from Fox News, which promises “fair and balanced” reporting, the Wall Street Journal, which many consider the ultimate authority for business news, and the Sierra Club, which provides perspective on environmental threats and conservation.
    44. 44. Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesFreedom•The sense of living without unwanted constraints. This experience often plays tug-of-warwith the desire for security; more of one tends to decrease the other. Nevertheless,freedom is enticing, whether it’s freedom from dictators, or in the case of Google, thefreedom to quickly search the Web learning and interacting with millions of people andresources.Harmony•The balanced and pleasing relationship of parts to a whole, whether in nature, society, oran individual. When we seek a work/life balance, we are in pursuit of harmony. Likewise,when we shop at Target for a toaster that matches our mixer, we are in pursuit ofharmony. Much of the aesthetic appeal of design depends on our personal desire for thevisual experience of harmony.
    45. 45. Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesJustice•The assurance of equitable and unbiased treatment. This is the sense offairness and equality that underlies our concept of “everyman” or Average Joe.It helps explain the immense popularity of the Taurus and the Camry, the ranchhouse, Levi jeans, and white cotton T-shirts—all products with a simple,impartial appeal to a very broad audience.Oneness•A sense of unity with everything around us. It is what some seek from thepractice of spirituality and what others expect from a good tequila. Although wedon’t normally think of them as a company, the Grateful Dead sustained itsrevenues for decades building an experience that connected with its fans’desire for oneness. Similarly, organizations that connects their members intonature or a broader sense of the world, like the Monterey Bay Aquarium or theUnited Nations, are capable of evoking a meaning of oneness.
    46. 46. Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesRedemption•Atonement or deliverance from past failure or decline. Though this might seemto stem from negative experiences, the impact of the redemptive experience ishighly positive. Like community and enlightenment, redemption has a basis inreligion, but it also attracts customers to Weight Watchers, Bliss spas, and thegrocery store candy aisle. Any sensation that delivers us from a less desirablecondition to a more pleasing another one can be redemptive.Security•The freedom from worry about loss. This experience has been a cornerstoneof civilization but in the U.S. in particular, acquired increased meaning andrelevance after 9/11. On the commercial side, the desire for this experiencecreated the insurance business, and it continues to sell a wide range ofproducts from automatic rifles to Depends undergarments to credit cards thatoffer protection from identity theft.
    47. 47. Making Meaning: How Successful CompaniesDeliver Meaningful ExperiencesTruth•A commitment to honesty and integrity. This experience plays an important role in mostpersonal relationships, but it also is a key component of companies like Whole Foods,Volkswagen, and Newman’s Own, all of which portray themselves as simple, upright, andcandid.Validation•The recognition of oneself as a valued individual worthy of respect. Every externallybranded piece of clothing counts on the attraction of this meaningful experience whetherit’s Ralph Lauren Polo or Old Navy, as does Mercedes Benz, the Four Seasons hotelchain, and any other brand with status identification as a core value.Wonder•Awe in the presence of a creation beyond one’s understanding. While this might soundmystical and unattainable, consider the wonder that Las Vegas hotels create simplythrough plaster and lights. Disney has been a master of this experience for decades, andtechnology companies routinely evoke awe as they enable their users to do what seemedimpossible the year before.
    48. 48. How Archetypes Map to Meaning Archetype Meaning Caregiver Validation Creator Accomplishment, Creation Ruler Justice, Security Jester Validation Regular Guy/Girl Community, Harmony Lover Harmony, Oneness Sage Truth, Enlightenment, Wonder Explorer Freedom Innocent Oneness, Beauty, Redemption Hero Duty, Validation Outlaw Freedom Magician Wonder
    49. 49. Exercise• Building from your value • Simplicity proposition, use the principals of communication SUCCESs • Unexpectedness and the tools in today’s media toolkit to build a “sticky” • Concreteness concept targeting a priority • Credibility client segment that spreads the brand mythology • Emotional • Stories• You can use images, stories or abstract ideas to develop your sticky concept
    50. 50. ENGAGEMENTDIALOG, SURPRISE, EMPOWERMENT
    51. 51. Marketing Accountability 2011-12 Objective 2011-12 Goals/Metrics Maximum % aware in % aware of org and message target audience Make consideration % preferred in consideration set set out of X choices # and % taking a step Web site visits, lead form submitted towards participation Win participation # and % converted Turn customers into % repeat customer, % proactively repeat customers and advocating vocal advocates
    52. 52. Tip: Use “hashtags” to join inWhat are the business or start conversations, ongoals? 7 Twitter such as #buzznuggets 6 Interact and listen Pull out interestingWho’s planning, to audience formanaging, measuring? tidbits for posting on new content social media sites usingWhat’s the target ideas. Ask them a simple tool likeaudience? to contribute HootSuite or Tweetdeck contentWhat value are you reallydelivering to theaudience? Why shouldthey care to follow? 1 2 4 5 Use the blog headlines toWho’s building thecontent calendar? Plan and develop your e- Distribute newsletter; Create Your customers willWho’s creating content? Publish via Social Organization’s click back to yourWhat are the weekly/ via Blog Media and blog to read themonthly story ideas? (Sticky) Email full articles,Who’s approving the Content which willcontent? 3 Optimize with your improve your search engineWho’s responding/ priority search Tip: “Sticky” = 1) unexpected, 2) rankings!conversing with the delivers emotional, functional or engine keywords entertainment value, 3) simpleaudience? The Social Media Planning and Execution twitter.com/buildingbelief Map
    53. 53. Rings of Influence and Interest Implication Interest “Brag Communities Network” Friends/Famil y Topic/Theme Admirers Interest Communities Content Participants General & Topics Teams/Clubs/ Population Groups/ Media/Blogs Schools/Church Who Cover the Topic/Theme /Alumni and/or its Implications Networks Workplace Interest in the Individual Participants Interest in the TopicTurbo-Charged by Popularity of Participant Turbo-Charged by SUCCESs Criteria
    54. 54. Developing an Influencer Strategy • An influencer is someone who helps other people buy from you • Influence is contextual • Popularity is not influence • Passion, knowledge advocacy and popularity are factors of influence • Everyone can be an influencer about the topics they are passionate about • You don’t have to know your influencers (but it can help). Instead of finding them allow influencers to self-identify • Influencers are “turned-on” by empowering them to be advocates • Most influencers are hard to influence. You can’t buy influence – stay authentic • Your most influential customers are already predisposed to buy from you • Influencers are often driven by status: recognition is more important than rewards • (bonus) If your products suck it will be really hard to find influencers. The opposite is true, of course.
    55. 55. Time to Build Belief… jeffj@mythologymarketing.com mythologymarketing.com

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