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Facebook for Nonprofits
 

Facebook for Nonprofits

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Are you looking to integrate Facebook with your nonprofit’s online presence and use Facebook to better connect with key constituents?...

Are you looking to integrate Facebook with your nonprofit’s online presence and use Facebook to better connect with key constituents?

Register for this session and learn the following topics:

How do I get started on Facebook?
How do I get buy-and support from my board and executive team?
Understanding Facebook terminology: Likes, Friends, Subscribers, Apps, Timeline
Setting up your organization’s Facebook Timeline
Using Facebook to engage supporters
Facebook Case Study
Session aims:

Get your Facebook presence setup correctly the first time
Understand Facebook Timeline for brands
Engage with your existing supporters and use Facebook for peer-to-peer fundraising
Reach new supporters via a medium they are already using

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  • As many of you already know, Facebook Timeline has arrived for Brand Pages. Whether this is a positive or negative change for your organization is up to you, but let’s face it, this change is on the horizon so the best thing brands can do is arm themselves with information on what to do and how to do it.For that reason, I’m going to focus most of this presentation today on Timeline. I’m going to start with a short update of 2012 statistics and a bit about what’s new at Facebook.Then we’re going to jump right in to timeline. What exactly is it and how does it work? Once we have those basics down, I’ll jump right into what’s noteworthy. What’s really changed and how is that going to affect the way that organizations present their brand on Facebook. Last, but not the least, I’m going to do a quick overview of the MyCharityConnects program, and then we’ll go into the question and answer period.
  • It’s fairly common knowledge that Facebook is the largest social network out there with 845 million active users spending an average of 20 minutes on the site each visit. Just over 50% of North Americans are on Facebook. That’s half the continent! – the last time I saw statistics for Canadian users was around a year ago, and we were fairly close to that number – somewhere around 47%One out of every 5 pages viewed on the internet is on Facebook and 2.7 billion likes every dayInteresting fact – a higher number of female users on Facebook – 57% to be exactThere are 37 million pages with 10+ likes on Facebook – so there are A LOT of organizations – both for profit and non profit – competing for attention. As nonprofits, I think what this means is we really need to find great ways to be unique and engaging. Between 2010 and 2011, the company’s net income almost doubled, going from 606 million to 1 billion USD – that’s a pretty steep rate of growth and of course, as I’m sure everyone knows, on February 1st, Facebook declared an Initial Public Offering. I think it’s safe to assume that there are probably more changes (although maybe nothing as significant as timeline) in the near future.
  • It’s fairly common knowledge that Facebook is the largest social network out there with 845 million active users spending an average of 20 minutes on the site each visit. Just over 50% of North Americans are on Facebook. That’s half the continent! – the last time I saw statistics for Canadian users was around a year ago, and we were fairly close to that number – somewhere around 47%One out of every 5 pages viewed on the internet is on Facebook and 2.7 billion likes every dayInteresting fact – a higher number of female users on Facebook – 57% to be exactThere are 37 million pages with 10+ likes on Facebook – so there are A LOT of organizations – both for profit and non profit – competing for attention. As nonprofits, I think what this means is we really need to find great ways to be unique and engaging. Between 2010 and 2011, the company’s net income almost doubled, going from 606 million to 1 billion USD – that’s a pretty steep rate of growth and of course, as I’m sure everyone knows, on February 1st, Facebook declared an Initial Public Offering. I think it’s safe to assume that there are probably more changes (although maybe nothing as significant as timeline) in the near future.
  • It’s fairly common knowledge that Facebook is the largest social network out there with 845 million active users spending an average of 20 minutes on the site each visit. Just over 50% of North Americans are on Facebook. That’s half the continent! – the last time I saw statistics for Canadian users was around a year ago, and we were fairly close to that number – somewhere around 47%One out of every 5 pages viewed on the internet is on Facebook and 2.7 billion likes every dayInteresting fact – a higher number of female users on Facebook – 57% to be exactThere are 37 million pages with 10+ likes on Facebook – so there are A LOT of organizations – both for profit and non profit – competing for attention. As nonprofits, I think what this means is we really need to find great ways to be unique and engaging. Between 2010 and 2011, the company’s net income almost doubled, going from 606 million to 1 billion USD – that’s a pretty steep rate of growth and of course, as I’m sure everyone knows, on February 1st, Facebook declared an Initial Public Offering. I think it’s safe to assume that there are probably more changes (although maybe nothing as significant as timeline) in the near future.
  • It’s fairly common knowledge that Facebook is the largest social network out there with 845 million active users spending an average of 20 minutes on the site each visit. Just over 50% of North Americans are on Facebook. That’s half the continent! – the last time I saw statistics for Canadian users was around a year ago, and we were fairly close to that number – somewhere around 47%One out of every 5 pages viewed on the internet is on Facebook and 2.7 billion likes every dayInteresting fact – a higher number of female users on Facebook – 57% to be exactThere are 37 million pages with 10+ likes on Facebook – so there are A LOT of organizations – both for profit and non profit – competing for attention. As nonprofits, I think what this means is we really need to find great ways to be unique and engaging. Between 2010 and 2011, the company’s net income almost doubled, going from 606 million to 1 billion USD – that’s a pretty steep rate of growth and of course, as I’m sure everyone knows, on February 1st, Facebook declared an Initial Public Offering. I think it’s safe to assume that there are probably more changes (although maybe nothing as significant as timeline) in the near future.
  • It’s fairly common knowledge that Facebook is the largest social network out there with 845 million active users spending an average of 20 minutes on the site each visit. Just over 50% of North Americans are on Facebook. That’s half the continent! – the last time I saw statistics for Canadian users was around a year ago, and we were fairly close to that number – somewhere around 47%One out of every 5 pages viewed on the internet is on Facebook and 2.7 billion likes every dayInteresting fact – a higher number of female users on Facebook – 57% to be exactThere are 37 million pages with 10+ likes on Facebook – so there are A LOT of organizations – both for profit and non profit – competing for attention. As nonprofits, I think what this means is we really need to find great ways to be unique and engaging. Between 2010 and 2011, the company’s net income almost doubled, going from 606 million to 1 billion USD – that’s a pretty steep rate of growth and of course, as I’m sure everyone knows, on February 1st, Facebook declared an Initial Public Offering. I think it’s safe to assume that there are probably more changes (although maybe nothing as significant as timeline) in the near future.
  • Timeline – what is it and how is it going affect your organization.
  • I’m not sure how many people here today have switched over to Timeline, but either way, this image should look pretty familiar to most of you. It’s what the older/non-timeline Facebook Brand Pages look like. This is what will be disappearing by the end of the month…to be replayed by….
  • Timeline for Brands. This is what CanadaHelps’ new brand page looks like. Just as a little bit of background, Timeline opened up to the masses late last year – a few days before Christmas, if I’m not mistaken. No announcements have been made yet on exactly when it will be mandatory for all users to switch over to timeline, but Facebook has said that the change is coming.On February 29, they held the Facebook Marketing Conference in New York, where they announced Timeline for Brand Pages. Essentially, on March 30th, all brand pages will be switched over to timeline. Anyone interested in switching over to Timeline can do so between now and March 29th.
  • Cover Photos – takes up between ½ and 1/3 of screen (depending on size) when you visit a Page or Profile with Timeline – it’s the first thing people see so make sure it’s sending an impactful message and engaging your audiences. Profile Pictures – in the past, a lot of organizations put their logo in this space (some of my later examples will show how that can still work. Still shows up in newsfeed and next to posts.Org Name & Stats – fairly self evident – find out how many people like youApps – Photos can’t be moved but you can prioritize the rest of the apps based on your needs. For example, if your organization makes a lot of videos or if you have a custom app, you would probably want that to show up on your page rather than in the expansion menuTimeline – this is where the new format gets its name; also where you add milestonesAbout Section – highlights most relevant information about your business or organizationFriend-prioritized view – Facebook is placing a greater emphasis on relationships. Users see the brands through a social lens. You can’t see it in this screen shot, unfortunately, but right beneath this section, where it says 3 friends like coca-cola, what I see on my screen is any recent activity these friends may have had with the brand. Why is this important? Now, more than ever, it’s important for brands to make sure they are responding and engaging with users who are posting – it not only affects that user, but also those in their networks.Pinning posts – allows posts to stay at the top of your page for 7 days – use to highlight important news or new information
  • Just a little how-to note: if you are signed into Facebook and using it as the ‘brand’, when you hover over a post, image, the timeline, or anything else, a little pencil (a sign for edit) should show up. Most of the time this is what you’re clicking on.Starring a post will make it widescreen – this means that it will span across both the columns on your timeline (almost the same width as the cover photo).Pinning a post, as I mentioned earlier, keeps it at the top of your timeline for 1 week.
  • Now that we’ve talked a little bit about timeline and all the different features, I’d like to dive a little deeper into some of these features and what Canadian charities and nonprofit organizations can do to maximize their efforts on Facebook.
  • We all know the importance of storytelling. It’s one of the best ways a nonprofit org or charity can engage with key audiences. Kirstin, who is our Marketing & Communications Manager here at CanadaHelps has mentioned in a couple of her webinars that this – 2012 - is going to be the year that Canadian charities and nonprofits learn to tell better stories. I for one, am all for that..and from everything I’ve seen of Timeline, it seems like Facebook might be as well. Cover photos, which I’ve already mentioned are pretty large - I know on my netbook, cover photos sometimes take up ¾ of the page so when I’m on a Facebook page where the user has timeline, the cover photo is literally all I can see. That’s an amazing opportunity for engagement – using the cover photo to tell a visual story. I think Timeraiser is a fantastic example – for anyone that doesn’t know. Timeraiser is a project of Framework, who we actually share our offices with here at CanadaHelps – if you have a look at their About section, it’s an accurate description of what they do. There are events in cities across the country where people can go and bid volunteer hours on works of art, rather than money. SO when I look at their Cover Photo – the first thing I see is the frame, which immediately makes me think of art. And the second thing you see is the image – a busy event where people look like they’re enjoying themselves. Art & enjoyment – I think that tells a pretty accurate visual story.
  • Another great example of the kind of impact or engagement you can have with a cover photo. Use your supporters if possible – create cover photos with your organization’s name or logo prominently visible and make them available to your supporters. It’s similar to having 1 billboard ad versus 2 or 3 or 300 or however many supporters you can get. When you’re trying to raise awareness or get attention, the higher the visibility, the better.
  • A great example is my personal page. I switched over to timeline very early on and I tried a few of my own images for cover photos, but because the cover photo is a fairly odd size.A few organizations like the Ocean Conservancy actually managed to anticipate a need I didn’t even know I had until I came across this cover photo. Not only did finding the cover photo prompt me to find out more about the organization, but I’ve actually had this image up for months so anyone who has visited my Facebook page since the beginning of January has seen this picture and now knows about the organization.
  • Just a few notes about cover photos…Facebook is fairly strict about what kind of information can and cannot be shown on a cover photo. This is a screen shot from the Page guidelines section of Facebook’s help section and I really encourage all of you to take the time to look through all the information Facebook has to offer to ensure you’re not violating any of their restrictions. One of the biggest changes that I’ve seen is that there seems to be a lot more control – there are minimum requirements for cover photo sizes – I’m assuming that’s to make sure that images are sharp, clear, and visually appealing. There are also restrictions of what kind of content you can and cannot include in cover photos. Three main ones are – no information on price or discounts or anything like that and no calls to action. As nonprofits, I think this is something to seriously consider and keep in mind when you are designing your cover photo. We’re almost at the one year anniversary for the Japan tsunami but the Red Cross couldn’t have anything on their cover photo to remind people that donating is still important – they couldn’t have something like “Donate $5 today to help a survivor” on their cover photo. What this means for us? A picture is worth a thousand words – if we can’t say things then what we need to learn to do is tell compelling stories with images.Another thing to note is that Facebook has gotten fairly strict about what each section of the timeline is for. If you have contact information to display, that needs to go in the About section rather than on your cover photo. There are advantages and disadvantages to something like this. The standardization means that all users know exactly where to look for this kind of information. But on the flip side, let say you’re an organization like Kids Help Phone and you have a 24-hour crisis help line – you couldn’t inform users about that on your cover photo, where it would be the first thing people who visit your page would see.
  • Share your milestones! I looked at 15 different nonprofit org. brand pages and not one of them (including CanadaHelps) has really personalized their page yet and added milestones yet…so I had to turn to the for profit world for an example. As I’ve already mentioned, timeline makes for a great storytelling opportunity…so USE IT! Had a great campaign a few years ago? Share it with your supporters – upload it onto your timeline and make sure your supporters know about it. Does your organization have interesting or unique roots? Create a post and share it with your supporters. Make your organization relatable – this is how you add that personal element.
  • The Admin Panel – a bit like a one-stop-shop for all your Page needs. When you’re signed in – not something that has changed, you can access it by clicking on on the Admin Panel button right above your timeline (on the right side).In the Admin Panel, you can see notifications (as you would as an individual user), Insights (analytics about your users), a new addition – the Messages section (private 1:1 messages with your fans). You can also edit any information on your page and view your activity log, which is how you manage your Timeline. It shows you all your posts (including ones that you have hid – so if you accidentally hid a post that you want to show, this is where you would go to unhide that post).One of the things you can change in your activity log under messages is the default visibility of posts – from here, you can choose to hide or delete posts, hide fans from the page (which means their posts wont automatically show up, as they did on the wall), until the post has been approved. What’s great about this is that during a crisis, page administrators have far more control when it comes to monitoring and managing conversations – you no longer have to turn off fan posts completely.Another great thing to note about messages is that the ability to address questions or concerns is now private. This is a great tool for organizations that are dealing with sensitive issues – lets say you have a counselling service and someone is requesting assistance – this is no longer something that needs to be done publically on your Wall. Although, it is important to note that pages cannot send proactive messages to individuals. A user has to contact the page before the page can respond. For any organizations that are not interested in the messages feature, it can be turned off (which would mean that users are engaging with the brand out in public, on it’s Timeline).If you have the chance, I recommend taking sometime to play around with the Admin Panel once you have switched over to Timeline. It’s a bit of a different interface and it’s worth spending time familiarizing yourself with how to navigate this area of your page.
  • Now that we’ve talked a little bit about timeline and all the different features, I’d like to dive a little deeper into some of these features and what Canadian charities and nonprofit organizations can do to maximize their efforts on Facebook.
  • I think fear is always a big issue that people face with social media and my answer to that is to face your fears. It’s often very easy to shy away from things and say no because we’re afraid of them but that can result in missed opportunities. Before I came to CanadaHelps I was working at a mid-sized health-based nonprofit and there were a couple of staff members on the marketing team that really wanted to build a social media initiative into the overall communications plan; however they were facing a lot of objection from board members. One of the things that we did was actually sign these board members and the CEO up for Twitter and Facebook so that they could play around with it and really understand the networks and potential benefits or drawbacks for themselves. A few weeks ago I emailed my former CEO to ask a question and within minutes, she had sent me a reply not by email but on Facebook! She took to social networks like a duck to water – all I had to do was take that first step and work as a bit of a catalyst. So what I’m saying – sometimes getting buy in is difficult but it’s important to be a catalyst for that change. If I hadn’t signed up Another tip that’s not on here but is important to consider is to start small. Nobody is saying you have to figure everything out immediately – with social networks being an open forum for conversation, there are Examples of successful organizations
  • Now that we’ve talked a little bit about timeline and all the different features, I’d like to dive a little deeper into some of these features and what Canadian charities and nonprofit organizations can do to maximize their efforts on Facebook.
  • The secret to social media success. This is really the question or the idea from which this presentation was born. So as I’ve already mentioned, I work with CanadaHelps on the MyCharityConnects program and in all the work that we do – webinars, workshop, and even the conference, there is always this lingering question of, ‘is there a secret to social media success, and if so, what is it?’. Personally, I don’t think there’s any secret. It really comes down to two things …
  • Building a strong community and having good content And of course the ways in this you would support these two things is through structured planning (as I mentioned, this is often a missed step), having a social culture (so that’s within your organization, making sure that there is openness, sharing, collaboration, and things like that), a willingness to measure & learn – I think many of us do the former (measuring) but it’s one thing to collect data and a whole other thing to really analyze what it’s showing you and learn from your successes and failures, and of course all of this at the end of the day needs to translate into actions. So really, it’s one long process and that brings me to what we’re going to talk about today.
  • First I’m going to start by apologizing for this image – it was cold, rainy, and I didn’t have the patience to take a clear shot…but I hope most of you can read what this sign says. For anyone who can’t it reads, “when children suffer, so does our future. 2012. stop joseph kony - @invisible”. So before we jump in, I want to explain this slide. I actually started thinking about this webinar and exactly what my ten tips would be a couple of weeks ago and I thought I had everything ready to go and it all made sense. But on Monday evening, I was heading to a café with some coworkers and this sign caught my eye…First, probably because I saw the words 2012 and Kony, which immediately make me think of the recent videoSecondly, though, I think it caught my eye because of how visible @invisible is…and of course, that’s invisible children’s twitter handle for anyone who doesn’t already follow the organization.And this really made me question how many organizations are actually doing this. I’ve been doing some workshops recently for the MyCharityConnects program, where I talk about social media strategies and a reoccurring question I’ve been asked by organizations all over is ‘how do we increase the number of twitter followers we have”. Well, my answer is that we can all learn a lesson from this picture. Ask yourself – how many of your key constituents know that your organization is on twitter? How many places and how many people have you informed and asked to follow you? Is it on your email signature? Is it on all your promotional material? I think the first step is to really make sure the people who already care about your organization know that you’re online so say it loud and don’t be afraid to repeat yourself. The whole notion of ‘if you build it, they will come’ doesn’t always apply in the world of social media. You still have to work on marketing what you have.
  • How many have heard about Networked Nonprofit?Beth Kanter & Allison Fine wrote a book about the ways in sm is bringing about or signalling a shift in the ways that nonprofits operate. It’s an interesting book – and I know that not all of us are going to change over night – I do recommend it, thoughBuilding relationships, simplicity, building trust through openness, open governance structures, learning organizationIt’s not a how-to guide; rather its about nonporfits changing how they work.
  • Listen learn adaptAre some of your posts generating a lot of links, likes retweets? Is a particular community really active online and promoting you? Does this signal a new strategy you should take?Does something you post regularly never take off – stinks? Stop doing it.
  • Third annual conferenceJoin non-profits from across Canada and social media experts for the premier social media and online fundraising learning opportunity of the year.After 3 sold-out years, MyCharityConnects is back and better than ever for 2012. Join us for thought-provoking keynotes, practical how-to workshops and plenty of chances to learn from other non-profits about what works online… and what doesn’t.

Facebook for Nonprofits Facebook for Nonprofits Presentation Transcript

  • Facebook for Nonprofits May 29, 2012
  • What is CanadaHelps? A public charitable foundation that provides accessible and affordable online technology to both donors and charities.For Charities A cost-effective means of raising funds online.For Donors A one-stop-shop for giving. CanadaHelps is a charity helping charities. CanadaHelps is giving made simple. MyCharityConnects is a initiative of CanadaHelps.
  • AgendaWhat is Facebook? 2012 Stats Understanding the terminology Timeline Using Facebook Case Study: Stratford Shakespeare Festival on FacebookQ&A
  • Facebook
  • Who? Why (Should You Care)? Founded by: Mark Zuckerberg , Eduardo It’s huge! Saverin, Dustin Moskovitz, and Chris Hughes Facebook is the world’s largest social network, with over 900 million monthly active Owned & Operated by: Facebook Inc. users (March 2012)Used by: Over 900 million monthly active users There’s a lot of activity on Facebook and your worldwide org. needs to be a part of it. What? • More than 300 million photos uploaded to A social networking site Facebook per day (Jan. – March 2012) • An average of 3.2 billion Likes and When? Comments generated by Facebook users per Launched in February 2004. day (Jan. – March 2012) • More than 42 million Pages with ten or more Where? Likes at the end of March 2012. Web: www.facebook.comMobile: Android, Blackberry, and iPhone apps Facebook is available in more than 70 different languages
  • 2012 Stats Source: Infographic Labs
  • FACEBOOK TERMINOLOGY
  • People
  • Groups
  • Subscriptions vs. Friends
  • Applications
  • BRANDS & PAGES
  • Old Brand Pages
  • Timeline for Brands February 29, 2012: Facebook announces Timeline for Brand Pages at the Facebook Marketing Conference March 30, 2012: All brands using Timeline on their pages.
  • Components of Timeline Organization Statistics Photos & Page Apps NameCover Photo Profile Picture Timeline More Apps“About”Section Friend- prioritizedPinned Post view
  • Notice Anything Missing?The most notable differences: Have a custom app?- No more default landing - Old apps still work with pages the new Timeline pages- Less emphasis on apps - Drive traffic by linking to- Aesthetic differences web address, using- Brand managers (you!) have Facebook ads, or more control over content pinning posts Draw attention and tell your audience what to pay attention to by starring or pinning posts.
  • USING FACEBOOK
  • Cover Photos The first thing people see when they visit your organization’s page. Make sure your cover photo is unique and tells a story about your organization
  • Cover Photos • Timeline - not mandatory for individual users, but it will be in the near future. • Create Facebook Timeline Cover Photos that your supporters can use. • Let supporters promote your organization to their network on Facebook.
  • Cover Photos • Cover Photos: 850 x 315 (pixels) • Odd shape for a lot of people • Provide supporters with an easy to use, aesthetical ly appealing cover photo
  • Cover Photos
  • Share Your Milestones Tell your story! Make sure to use images, videos, articles, etc. to make the information interesting and engaging.
  • The Admin Panel One-Stop-Shop: - Notifications - Insights - Messages (1:1 conversations) - Edit page - Activity log (manage page Timeline)
  • GETTING BUY-IN
  • Tips for Getting Buy-In• Sign people up for tools to reduce fear• Seek out example organizations and show their success• Search for your organization & show the conversation’s already happening
  • CASE STUDY
  • The SECRET TO SOCIAL MEDIA SUCCESS is…
  • Strong GoodCOMMUNITY CONTENT
  • Before you get started… Do people know your organization is online?
  • March 2012
  • May 2012
  • Take Action• Listen, learn, and adapt.• Which posts generate conversation and sharing? Which don’t?
  • MyCharityConnects Conference 2012 JUNE 12 – 13 | Allstream Centre, Toronto Collaborate to build a stronger sector. Innovate to solve complex problems. Celebrate our work and the difference we’re making.• Join non-profits from across Canada and social media experts for the premier social media and online fundraising learning opportunity of the year.• Register today! www.mycharityconnects.org/conference
  • Questions? THANK YOU! karag@canadahelps.org @karagolani @CanadaHelpswww.mycharityconnects.org