Acknowledgements     The aut hors w ould like to thank the follow ing people and i nstitutions:1.   The staff of Tourism R...
1   INTRODUCTION                                              index               12   AIMS OF RESEARCH                   ...
4.24 PARK ANIMAL RATING                         26    4.25 PARK VISITATION                            27          4.25.1 D...
List of figuresFigure 1: Gender .............................................................................................
List of tablesTable 1: Park expansions ......................................................................................
List of mapsMap 1: Addo Elephant National Park..........................................................................3 ...
1.introductionBefore the proclamation of the Park in 1931, a Major PJ Pretorius had been hired by the CapeProvincial Gover...
The core conservation areas of the GAENP are the AENP, the Zuurberg National Park, the WoodyCape Nature Reserve and the To...
2.aims of research          This research project had the following three primary aims:                 •   To determine t...
For the overnight visitors, the following approach was implemented:This survey was conducted from 30 June to 4 July 2012. ...
4.results                                                              Section a                                          ...
4.2               AgeThe majority of respondents (46%) were between the ages of 35 and 49 years, followed by28% in the 50 ...
4.3               Home languageThe majority of tourists visiting AENP during July 2012 were Afrikaans speaking (56%). Thir...
4.4                Marital statusFigure 4 indicates that the majority of respondents (79%) are married. Ten percent (10%) ...
4.5               Country of residenceAs indicated in Table 3, 90% of respondents were living in South Africa. This corres...
4.6              Province of residenceVisitors from the Western Cape remain the Park’s largest market with 66%, followed b...
4.7                Level of educationFigure 4 indicates that 88% of the visitors to the AENP are well educated, with 41% t...
4.8               Age of first exposure to                  national parkFrom Table 5 it can clearly be seen that most vis...
Section b                                                      economic impact4.9              Number of people in tour gr...
Table 10: People paid for (2010/2012)  NUMBER OF PEOPLE                      NOVEMBER 2010            JANUARY 2012        ...
Compared to the January 2012 survey, 4x4s and sedan vehicles remained the most preferredmodes of transport.Table 11: Trans...
The largest portion of respondents (28%) earn a gross annual income of more than R552 001,suggesting that it is people fro...
4.14          expenditureThe average spending per group in June 2012 was R3 640.98, which is higher than thespending repor...
Table 12: Expenditure for 2003-2012                                                                                Nov    ...
4.15              wild card information                 No                                                        Yes     ...
Table 13: Number of visits to National Parks over the past three years                                         JANUARY 201...
Section c                                                                        Consumer                                 ...
elephants     I prefer the Park for its                                       22%                 26%                 40% ...
To be with family or to spend time                                             43%   57%    62%     74%    -       71%    ...
4.20 park marketing          4. 20 .1 heard about the parkTable 18: Source of Park info                                 JA...
4.20 .2 magazines, newspapers and radio   From the 30% of respondents that indicated that they had read about the Park in ...
Directions                    3%          1%         19%        36%         32%             9%Pamphlets/                  ...
•   General maintenance of facilities                  (81%);   •   General maintenance of accommodation units            ...
4.23 member of conservation     organisation                                                           Yes                ...
4.24 park animal ratingTable 20: Animal rating                                    JANUARY 2012                  JULY 2012A...
Buffalo                                      R99.35                      R148.07Lion                                      ...
Table 23: Trip initiatorINITIATOR                  PERCENTAGE   PERCENTAGE                           JAN 2012     JUL 2012...
5.conclusions and                                                                 recommendations      The following concl...
FOREIGN TOURIST     The Netherlands/     Germany/ UK          Germany/ USA          Germany/ The         Germany/ United  ...
For family           To learn about       For family            To get away from     Value for money                   rec...
FAVOURITE                -         -          -          -          -   Elephant; Lion;     Elephant; Lion;ANIMALS IN PARK...
5.2            conclusions from the overnight visitorsBased on the results of the survey, the following conclusions can be...
• Respondents indicated that, in general, their favourite animals were elephants,  lions and leopards and these animals we...
•    Heaters in chalets   •    Chalets for paraplegic persons   •    Plugs in bathrooms next to mirrors   •    Make use of...
A marking analysis of overnight visitors to Addo Elephant National Park 2012
A marking analysis of overnight visitors to Addo Elephant National Park 2012
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A marking analysis of overnight visitors to Addo Elephant National Park 2012

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A marking analysis of overnight visitors to Addo Elephant National Park 2012

  1. 1. Acknowledgements The aut hors w ould like to thank the follow ing people and i nstitutions:1. The staff of Tourism Research in Economic Environs & Society (TREES) at the North-W est Universit y f or their help.2. The staff at South Af rican Nat ional Parks, especially Mr Glenn Phillips, f or f inancial assistance and support dur ing the sur vey.3. All the students of the North-W est Univer sit y f or the f ieldwork.4. Special thanks to the Park war den, regional manager and marketing manager f or their cooperat ion a nd f riendliness.5. All the visitors and tourists f or complet ing the questionnaires.6. Ms Cecilia van der W alt f or language editing.
  2. 2. 1 INTRODUCTION index 12 AIMS OF RESEARCH 33 METHOD OF RESEARCH 34 RESULTS 5 SECTION A: SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC 4.1 GENDER 5 4.2 AGE 6 4.3 HOME LANGUAGE 7 4.4 MARITAL STATUS 8 4.5 COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE 9 4.6 PROVINCE OF RESIDENCE 10 4.7 LEVEL OF EDUCATION 11 4.8 AGE OF FIRST EXPOSURE TO NATIONAL PARK 12 SECTION B: ECONOMIC IMPACT 4.9 NUMBER OF PEOPLE IN TRAVELLING GROUP 13 4.10 NUMBER OF PEOPLE PAID FOR 13 4.11 MODE OF TRANSPORT 14 4.12 ANNUAL GROSS INCOME 15 4.13 ACCOMPANYING CHILDREN 16 4.14 EXPENDITURE 17 4.15 WILD CARD INFORMATION 16 4.16 NUMBER OF VISITS TO NATIONAL PARKS OVER THE PAST THREE 16 YEARS 4.17 LENGTH OF STAY 17 SECTION C: CONSUMER PROFILE 4.18 MOTIVATIONAL FACTORS 18 4.19 SUPPORT FOR NEW PARK ACTIVITIES 20 4.20 PARK MARKETING 21 4.20.1 HEARD ABOUT THE PARK 21 4.20.2 MAGAZINES, NEWSPAPERS AND RADIO 22 4.21 LEVEL OF SERVICE DELIVERY 22 4.22 FAVOURITE ANIMAL IN NATIONAL PARKS 24 4.23 MEMBER OF CONSERVATION ORGANISATION 25 ii
  3. 3. 4.24 PARK ANIMAL RATING 26 4.25 PARK VISITATION 27 4.25.1 DECIDED TO VISIT PARK 27 4.25.2 INITIATOR OF TRIP 27 4.26 RECOMMEND THIS PARK 285 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 29 5.1 PROFILE OF VISITORS 29 5.2 CONCLUSIONS FROM THE OVERNIGHT VISITORS 33 5.3 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR OVERNIGHT VISITORS 34 5.3.1 MANAGERIAL PROPOSALS 34 5.3.2 MARKETING PROPOSALS 34 5.3.3 DEVELOPMENT PROPOSALS 34 iii
  4. 4. List of figuresFigure 1: Gender ....................................................................................................... 5Figure 2: Age............................................................................................................. 6Figure 3: Language ................................................................................................... 7Figure 4: Marital status .............................................................................................. 8Figure 5: Level of education .................................................................................... 11Figure 6: Transport mode ........................................................................................ 14Figure 7: Income ..................................................................................................... 15Figure 8: Children accompanying parents ............................................................... 16Figure 9: Wild Card holder....................................................................................... 16Figure 10: Conservation organisation membership.................................................. 25Figure 11: Recommend this Park ............................................................................ 28 iv
  5. 5. List of tablesTable 1: Park expansions .......................................................................................... 2Table 2: Number of questionnaires completed since 2003 ........................................ 3Table 3: Age (Jan & Jul 2012) ................................................................................... 6Table 4: Age (Jan & Jul 2012) ................................................................................... 7Table 5: Country of residence (2010 & 2012) ............................................................ 9Table 6: Province of residence: Comparison between surveys 2003-2012 .............. 10Table 7: Level of education (Jan & Jul 2012) ........................................................... 11Table 8: First exposure ............................................................................................ 12Table 9: Number of people ...................................................................................... 13Table 10: People paid for (2010/2012) .................................................................... 14Table 11: Transport (Jan & Jul 2012) ...................................................................... 15Table 12: Expenditure for 2003-2012 ...................................................................... 15Table 13: Number of visits to National Parks over the past three years ................... 17Table 14: Length of stay .......................................................................................... 17Table 15: Reasons for visiting the Park ................................................................... 18Table 16: Reasons considered as very important to extremely important ................ 19Table 17: Activities .................................................................................................. 20Table 18: Source of Park info .................................................................................. 21Table 19: Rating of services .................................................................................... 22Table 20: Animal rating ........................................................................................... 26Table 21: Willingness to pay.................................................................................... 26Table 22: Decided to visit park ................................................................................ 27Table 23: Trip initiator.............................................................................................. 28Table 24: Profile of overnight visitors to Addo Elephant National Park during 2007,2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012..................................................................................... 29 v
  6. 6. List of mapsMap 1: Addo Elephant National Park..........................................................................3 vi
  7. 7. 1.introductionBefore the proclamation of the Park in 1931, a Major PJ Pretorius had been hired by the CapeProvincial Government to “reduce” the numbers of the elephants that were plaguing the farmers andwere plundering crops in the area. The malaria-free Addo Elephant National Park (AENP), formerlydubbed “a Hunter’s Hell” due to the dense vegetation, was then proclaimed to protect the remainingsixteen elephants (De la Harpe, 2002:63). However, after the Park had been proclaimed in 1931, theelephants were found not to be in the Park, for they had fled into the densest part of the Addo Bush,due to their fear of Pretorius. The task of driving the elephants back into the Park was left to the parkranger, SH Trollope. When the eleven remaining elephants were safely driven into the Park, anotherproblem surfaced – the Park was still inadequately fenced. After numerous experiments with variouselectrical fencing types, the Park was finally fenced with the “Armstrong Fence” in 1954, which is said tobe one of the strongest fences in the world. Thereafter, the elephant numbers finally increased andsteadily grew to form a 450-strong herd in 2007 (Hall-Martin, 1981b:6-8; SANParks, 2005:2-3).A very exciting development is currently underway – that of extending and merging the Park with otherparks, farms and protected areas. This will make it South Africa’s third largest National Park and theonly “Big 7” (elephant, rhino, lion, buffalo, leopard, whale and shark) reserve in the world. The Park willbe known as the Greater Addo Elephant National Park (GAENP). It will by far be the most biotically andgeomorphologically diverse conservation area in the country, as it will include five of the sevenvegetation zones (Forest, Nama Karoo, Fynbos, Thicket and Grassland) found in South Africa, as wellas including a marine reserve that will include the Bird and St. Croix Islands in Algoa Bay.The proposal for the GAENP received numerous awards, including the Wildlife and EnvironmentSociety’s prestigious President’s Special Award, and was the overall winner of the Green TrustEnvironmental Award (Anon, 2000a:43).Since 2000, the AENP has been greatly expanded. New land purchases have been made possiblethanks to funds from the government, overseas donors, the Leslie Hill Succulent Karoo Trust and theIFAW (Anon, 2000a:43; SANParks, 2007n:2). Expansions have been enabled by means of a uniquelydeveloped land acquisition policy with an incentive framework. Farmers in the area are increasinglyturning away from livestock farming to more profitable game farming and eco-tourism activities. Morethan 62% of the land needed has been acquired (as at December 2004). Priority areas have beenincluded by means of direct purchase, contractual agreements and conservancies. Three contractualagreements have been signed – those of Kuzuko in the north, as well as the River Bend area andLangvlakte in the Woody Cape. In 2009, a magnificent new picnic site, new entrance gates as well asan interpretation centre were opened. 1
  8. 8. The core conservation areas of the GAENP are the AENP, the Zuurberg National Park, the WoodyCape Nature Reserve and the Tootabie Nature Reserve (Kerley & Boshoff, 1997:8-9). The Park isultimately expected to grow to 356 000 ha, of which 236 000 ha will be a terrestrial area and 120 000 haa marine park area. Together, these will make it the third largest National Park in South Africa(SANParks, 2005:4).From information provided by Moolman (2007), Table 1 lists the expansions of the Park since it wasproclaimed in 1931.Table 1: Park expansions Year Hectare 1931-1954 ± 2 270 ha 1980 ± 4 270 ha 1985 ± 43 000 ha 1990 ± 55 000 ha 1995 ± 60 000 ha 2000 ± 90 000 ha 2005 ± 148 000 ha 2007 ± 174 000 ha(Personal communication: Lucius Moolman, 2007)Map 1: Addo Elephant National Park 2
  9. 9. 2.aims of research This research project had the following three primary aims: • To determine the profile of overnight tourists visiting the Addo Elephant National Park; • To determine the spending patterns of overnight tourists; and • To analyse trends and make recommendations concerning market segments. 3.method of research In order to achieve the above-mentioned aims, the following approach was followed: A questionnaire was developed focusing on the following aspects: • Demographic data; • Expenditure patterns; • Reason for visiting the Park; • Tourist behaviour; and • Level of service. Table 2: Number of questionnaires completed since 2003 NOVEMBER 2005 2006 (SUMMER) 2009 (SUMMER) 2006 (WINTER) 2009 (WINTER) NOVEMBER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER (SUMMER) (SUMMER) (SUMMER) (SUMMER) JANUARY (WINTER) JUNE JULY JULY 2003 2004 2007 2008 2010 2012 2012Number ofquestionnaires 61 82 67 90 49 90 112 86 117 131 104 128distributedChalets 43 54 49 51 36 59 60 - 81 80 65 73Camping 18 28 18 39 13 31 52 - 36 51 35 55Day visitors - - - - - 96 153 - - - - - 3
  10. 10. For the overnight visitors, the following approach was implemented:This survey was conducted from 30 June to 4 July 2012. Based on purposive sampling, 128respondents, representing a group or family, formed part of the survey. The questionnaires weredistributed among tourists staying in the chalets and the campsites. This information, together with thatfrom previous surveys, will be useful to develop a holistic picture of tourists visiting the Addo ElephantNational Park. Only tourists (per definition) completed the questionnaire. For the purpose of thisdocument, a tourist is a person who makes an economic input with regard to any other area than that inwhich he/she generally lives and works, or a tourist is a person who voluntarily visits a place, away fromhis/her normal abode, for a period of at least 24 hours. For the purpose for this report, any reference tovisitors or respondents implies tourists. 4
  11. 11. 4.results Section a Socio-demographicThe next section focuses on analysing the profile of the visitors to the Addo Elephant National Park andcan be useful in determining marketing strategies.4.1 GENDERFigure 1 shows that 57% of respondents at AENP were female, while 43% were male. 57% 43% Male FemaleFigure 1: Gender 5
  12. 12. 4.2 AgeThe majority of respondents (46%) were between the ages of 35 and 49 years, followed by28% in the 50 to 64 years category and 14% in the 25 to 34 years category. 65+ 6% 50-64 28% 35-49 46% 25-34 14% 20-24 6%Figure 2: AgeThe average age of respondents to AENP in July 2012 was 45 years, which matches January2012’s average but is still significantly younger than November 2010’s average of 53.7 years.Table 3: Age (Jan & Jul 2012) AGE JANUARY 2012 JULY 201220-24 5% 6%25-34 18% 14%35-49 40% 46%50-64 26% 28%65+ 11% 6% 6
  13. 13. 4.3 Home languageThe majority of tourists visiting AENP during July 2012 were Afrikaans speaking (56%). Thirty-six percent (36%) of tourists were English speaking, while 8% spoke other languages, whichincluded Dutch, French and German (see Figure 3). 56% 36% 8% Afrikaans English OtherFigure 3: LanguageCompared to the summer survey (January 2012), there is a significant fluctuation in thenumber of Afrikaans and English-speaking respondents with July 2012 having a significantlyhigher number of Afrikaans respondents (Table 3).Table 4: Age (Jan & Jul 2012) LANGUAGE JANUARY 2012 JULY 2012Afrikaans 27% 56%English 51% 36%Other 22% 8% 7
  14. 14. 4.4 Marital statusFigure 4 indicates that the majority of respondents (79%) are married. Ten percent (10%) aresingle, followed by those living together (6%), those divorced (3%) and 2% that are widowed. 79% 10% 6% 3% 2% Single Married Living together Divorced Widow/erFigure 4: Marital statusCompared to the January 2012 survey, one can see that married persons form the largest partof the Park’s market. This is followed by persons that are single and others that are livingtogether.Table 4: Marital status (Jan & Jul 2012) LANGUAGE JANUARY 2012 JULY 2012Single 13% 10%Married 72% 79%Living together 11% 6%Divorced 1% 3%Widow/er 3% 2% 8
  15. 15. 4.5 Country of residenceAs indicated in Table 3, 90% of respondents were living in South Africa. This corresponds wellwith the home languages indicated. Three percent (3%) were from Germany, 2% wasrepresented by France and the Netherlands each, while 1% was accounted for by each ofthose from Belgium, the UK and the USA. Compared to the previous surveys, it becomesapparent that AENP has a larger South African market during the winter months.Table 5: Country of residence (2010 & 2012)COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE NOVEMBER 2010 JANUARY 2012 JULY 2012Australia 1% 2%Austria 1% -Belgium 2% 1% 1%Canada - 1%Czech Republic 2% -France 1% 2% 2%Germany 14% 10% 3%The Netherlands 4% 3% 2%New Zealand 1% -Reunion island - 1%Scotland - 3%South Africa 60% 68% 90%Spain 1% -Sweden 1% 2%Switzerland 2% 1%United Kingdom (UK) 9% 2% 1%United States of America 1% 4% 1%(USA) 9
  16. 16. 4.6 Province of residenceVisitors from the Western Cape remain the Park’s largest market with 66%, followed by those fromGauteng, which has shown a strong decline to 9%. This correlates well with the June 2009 wintersurvey during which the numbers of persons from the Western Cape and of those from Johannesburgwere similar to those of 2012. Visitors from the Eastern Cape made up 19% of respondents, while theFree State accounted for 3%, the Northern Cape for 2% and KwaZulu-Natal for 1%e.Table 6: Province of residence: Comparison between surveys 2003-2012 PROVINCE OF DEC NOV NOV NOV NOV NOV RESIDENCE 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Gauteng 46% 42% 20% 4% 13% 10% KwaZulu-Natal 6% 4% 7% 4% - 2% Eastern Cape - - 27% 11% 29% 32% Western Cape 21% 50% 40% 24% 47% 48% Northern Cape 4% - - 5% - - Limpopo 2% - - 2% - - Mpumalanga 4% - - 0 7% - Free State 2% 4% 3% 0 4% 9% North West 15% - 3% 50% - - NOV NOV JAN JUL PROVINCE OF JUN 2009 2009 2010 2012 2012 RESIDENCE WINTER SUMMER SUMMER SUMMER WINTER Gauteng 6% 14% 13% 22% 9% KwaZulu-Natal 3% 5% 6% 5% 1% Eastern Cape 22% 31% 38% 13% 19% Western Cape 65% 46% 40% 54% 66% Northern Cape 2% 4% - 1% 2% Limpopo - - - - - Mpumalanga 1% - 1% - - Free State - - 1% 5% 3% North West 1% - 1% - - 10
  17. 17. 4.7 Level of educationFigure 4 indicates that 88% of the visitors to the AENP are well educated, with 41% that hadobtained a diploma/degree, 29% a post-graduate qualification and 20% that had obtained aprofessional qualification. Ten percent (10%) of the respondents had matriculated. Comparedto previous years, it becomes clear that the market to AENP is well educated. This is also truefor other South African National Parks. Other 0% Professional 20% Post-graduate 29% Diploma/degree 41% Matric 10% No school 0%Figure 5: Level of educationTable 7: Level of education (Jan & Jul 2012) LEVEL OF EDUCATION JANUARY 2012 JULY 2012No school 0% 0%Matric 13% 10%Diploma/degree 39% 41%Post-graduate 23% 29%Professional 23% 20%Other 2% 0% 11
  18. 18. 4.8 Age of first exposure to national parkFrom Table 5 it can clearly be seen that most visitors to AENP have experienced a nationalpark at a young age with 49% having been younger than 10 years when they had their firstnational park experience. This is followed by those respondents that were between the agesof 11 and 20 years (27%) and then by the 12% that were between 21 and 30 years old. Theaverage age of first exposure to a park was 15.6 years, which is younger than January 2012’saverage of 19.3 years.Table 8: First exposureAGE PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE JAN 2012 JUL 20120-10 years 40% 49%11-20 years 17% 27%21-30 years 21% 12%31-40 years 11% 6%41+ years 11% 6% 12
  19. 19. Section b economic impact4.9 Number of people in tour groupTable 9: Number of peopleNUMBER OF PEOPLE JANUARY 2012 JULY 20121 person 1% -2 people 36% 31%3 people 14% 13%4 people 25% 29%5 people 11% 13%6 people 8% 5%7+ people 5% 9%The majority of respondents travelled in groups of two (31%) or four persons (29%), whileeach of the groups travelling in 3s or 5s each accounted for 13%. Nine percent (9%) travelledin groups of seven or more persons. The reasons for the first two groups being higher can beascribed to the fact that they may be travelling either as a couple (2 people) or as a family (4people). Overall, the average number of people in a tour group was 4.14, which is a largergroup than January 2012’s 3.8 average.4.10 Number of people paid forThe majority of respondents (32%) visiting the AENP were responsible for two personsfinancially, followed by those that paid for four persons (26%). This correlates well with theresults displayed in Table 6. Eighteen percent (18%) of the respondents were responsible forthree persons financially, while 11% were not responsible for anyone financially speaking. Theaverage number of people that the respondents were responsible for financially was 2.85,which matches the January 2012 average, but which is slightly higher than November 2010’saverage of 2.40 persons. 13
  20. 20. Table 10: People paid for (2010/2012) NUMBER OF PEOPLE NOVEMBER 2010 JANUARY 2012 JULY 2012None 0% 6% 11%1 person 14% 7% 2%2 people 60% 40% 32%3 people 10% 11% 18%4 people 10% 24% 26%5 people 3% 8% 7%6+ people 3% 4% 4%4.11 mode of transportThe largest group of respondents preferred to travel in a 4x4 (35%), followed by those optingfor a sedan (27%), a 2x4 vehicle or leisure vehicle (16% each) and 6% that preferred a kombi(see Figure 5). 35% 27% 16% 16% 6% 0% 4x4 Kombi Leisure vehicle Sedan 2x4 bakkie OtherFigure 6: Transport mode 14
  21. 21. Compared to the January 2012 survey, 4x4s and sedan vehicles remained the most preferredmodes of transport.Table 11: Transport (Jan & Jul 2012)TRANSPORT PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGETYPE JAN 2012 JUL 20124x4 36% 35%Kombi 5% 6%Leisure 13% 16%vehicleSedan 31% 27%2x4 bakkie 14% 16%Other 1% 0%4.12 annual gross income R552 001> 28% R431 001 - R552 000 7% R305 001 - R431 000 16% R221 001 - R305 000 12% R140 001 - R221 000 16% R20 001 - R140 000 19% < R20 000 2%Figure 7: Income 15
  22. 22. The largest portion of respondents (28%) earn a gross annual income of more than R552 001,suggesting that it is people from a higher income group with a better qualification that aremore likely to visit AENP. Nineteen percent (19%) earned between R20 001 and R140 000and 16% earned between R140 001 and R 221 000 and another 16% between R305 001 andR431 000. A further 12% earned between R221 001 and R305 000, while 7% earned betweenR431 001 and R552 000. Only 2% eared less than R20 000 per annum.4.13 accompanying childrenSixty-one percent (61%) of respondents had their children accompanying them to the Park asopposed to January 2012 where 51% of respondents did not have their childrenaccompanying them. No 39% Yes 61%Figure 8: Children accompanying parents 16
  23. 23. 4.14 expenditureThe average spending per group in June 2012 was R3 640.98, which is higher than thespending reported for all the other surveys (Table 8). The categories with the highest spendinginclude accommodation (R1936.46), transport (R807.02), food (R275.83) as well as entranceand conservation fees (R249.89). There was a sharp rise in spending in accommodation andtravel costs compared to previous surveys. Reasons for this could be the high cost of petroland diesel and an increase in accommodation fees. 17
  24. 24. Table 12: Expenditure for 2003-2012 Nov Nov Nov Jun Nov Nov Jan July ITEMS 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2009 2010 2012 2012Entrance and conservation fee R173.00 - R123.84 R 143.04 R 226.19 R 170.28 R 136.92 R 183.62 R 170.43 R272.59 R249.89Accommodation R524.00 R983.59 R603.18 R 801.48 R 524.09 R 597.85 R 1,519.33 R 675.96 R 1331.89 R1218.49 R1936.46Restaurants R306.00 R197.39 R183.19 R 192.38 R140.08 R 203.96 R 137.56 R 171.03 R 121.79 R156.59 R145.71Food R85.00 R89.15 R184.70 R 139.80 R 83.52 R 111.65 R 198.28 R 136.20 R 204.01 R217.39 R275.83Beverages R31.00 R38.70 R83.48 R 53.96 R 47.18 R 47.77 R 78.19 R 51.38 R 112.83 R91.50 R108.97Tobacco products R1.00 R3.94 R4.03 R 2.00 R 7.03 R 6.96 R 5.35 R 1.28 - - -Clothing and footwear R5.00 R148.31 R20.90 R 43.80 R 25.27 R 24.66 R 13.72 R 29.87 R 11.30 R38.94 R49.28Transport to the Park R105.00 R619.86 R205.37 R433.06 R355.00 R 312.77 R 514.30 R 498.03 R 364.44 R619.13 R807.02Transport at the Park - - - - - R 167.95 R 97.27 R 51.62 -Activities R4.002 R82.96 R175.07 R 88.44 R 35.60 R67.77 R 64.56 R 73.85 R 119.31 - -Medicine R0.00 R2.82 R3.73 R 0.80 R 0.00 R 31.34 R 4.65 R 0.94 - - -Toiletries R4.00 R9.72 R1.49 R 61.40 R 2.14 R 7.01 R 41.40 R 7.95 - - -Souvenirs and jewellery R23.00 R42.39 R46.27 R 108.50 R 68.13 R 30.67 R 51.74 R 88.33 R 59.73 R61.39 R45.76Telephone, fax, Internet R23.00 R2.07 R8.19 R 4.40 R 4.62 R 6.60 R 4.48 R 1.24 - - -Other expenses - R0.00 R0.30 - R 77.25 R 14.38 R 0.78 R 7.86 R12.49 R25.68 R22.07AVERAGE SPENDING PER R1,322.00 R2,083.38 R1,643.75 R2,073.06 R 1,596.11 R 1,801.61 R 2,868.51 R 1,979.16 R2,508.22 R2701.72 R3640.98GROUP 15
  25. 25. 4.15 wild card information No Yes 52% 48%Figure 9: Wild Card holderFigure 9 reveals that more than half (52%) of respondents do not own a Wild Card, while48% do.4.16 number of visits to national parks over the past three yearsTable 9 indicates that the majority of the respondents (50%) had visited national parks asday visitors only once during the past three years, while 21% had not visited a nationalpark as a day visitor during the three-year period. In three years, eleven percent (11%)visited National Parks as day visitors twice, and the same applies to those that visited itthree times. When looking at overnight visits, the majority of respondents had visited anational park at least once (53%), while 25% had stayed twice and 12% had stayed at anational park 3 times. On average, respondents visited national parks, as day visitors, 1.36times, and twice as overnight visitors. As day visitors, the July 2012 respondents visitedNational Parks more than those in January 2012 (0.57 times), but as overnight visitorsthey only visited it 1.7 times in Jan 2012). 16
  26. 26. Table 13: Number of visits to National Parks over the past three years JANUARY 2012 JULY 2012NUMBER OF Overnight Overnight Day visitor Day visitorVISITS visitor visitorHad not visited 70% - 21% -Once 15% 67% 50% 53%Twice 11% 20% 11% 25%3 times - 7% 11% 12%4 times 2% 1% 4% 3%5 times - 1% 3% 2%6 times 2% 1% - 3%8 times - 1% - 2%10 times - 1% - -4.17 length of stayTable 14: Length of stayLENGTH OF STAY PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE JAN 2012 JUL 20121 night 22% 17%2 nights 38% 28%3 nights 17% 18%4 nights 12% 16%5 nights 3% 12%6 nights 3% 3%7+ nights 4% 6%Twenty-eight percent (28%) of respondents preferred to stay 2 nights, 18% stayed threenights and 17% stayed one night (Table 10). The average length of stay at AENP wasthree nights, which is longer than January 2012’s 2.64 nights average. 17
  27. 27. Section c Consumer profile 4.18 motivational factors Table 15: Reasons for visiting the Park NOT AT ALL LESS VERY EXTREMELY REASONS IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANT IMPORTANTTo get away from my 3% 9% 17% 25% 46%routineTo relax 5% 2% 15% 27% 51%To explore a new 7% 16% 29% 26% 22%destinationTo spend time with my 29% 11% 17% 20% 23%friendsFor the benefit of my 25% 2% 8% 24% 41%childrenPrimarily foreducational reasons (to 21% 19% 32% 20% 8%learn things, increasemy knowledge)To photograph animals 17% 24% 27% 20% 12%and plantsIt is a spiritual 35% 10% 30% 12% 13%experienceThe Park has greataccommodation 11% 16% 38% 23% 12%facilitiesThe Park has a varietyof accommodation to 12% 20% 36% 23% 9%choose fromIt is value for money 8% 15% 38% 21% 18%Primarily to see the 8% 14% 29% 32% 17% 18
  28. 28. elephants I prefer the Park for its 22% 26% 40% 9% 3% geographical features To see the Big 7 14% 22% 26% 20% 18% This question focused on the main motivations of respondents for visiting AENP. This information is most useful when developing marketing strategies aimed at specific markets. The following reasons for staying in the AENP may be considered to be important to extremely important: • To relax 78% • To get away from my routine 71% • For the benefit of my children 65% • Primarily to see the elephants 49% • To explore a new destination 48% Reasons that were less important to not at all important included: • I prefer the Park for its geographical features 48% • It is a spiritual experience 45% • To photograph animals and plants 41% • Primarily for educational reasons (to learn things, 40% increase my knowledge) Table 12 depicts a comparison between respondents’ motives for travelling to AENP in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2012. When looking at July 2012, certain aspects of the travel motivations of the respondents appear to have changed. The motives of relaxation, exploration and escape from routine continued to be the most important reasons for respondents to visit AENP. One other aspect that has become a more important motive for travelling to the Park is that they do so for the benefit of their children. Table 16: Reasons considered as very important to extremely important NOV NOV NOV JUN NOV NOV JAN JUL 2006 2007 2008 2009 2009 2010 2012 2012To relax 45% 70% 71% 80% 58% 75% 75% 78%To explore a new destination 43% 59% 66% 58% 64% 68% 62% 49%To get away from routine 54% 63% 62% 75% 55% 62% 68% 71%For the benefit of my children - - - - - - - 65% 19
  29. 29. To be with family or to spend time 43% 57% 62% 74% - 71% -with someone specialTo learn about animals in general - - - - 53% 59% 33%To photograph animals and plants - - - - 71% 78% 53%Great accommodation facilities - - - - - 63% 41%The park has a variety of - - - - - 63% 40%accommodation to choose fromIt is value for money - - - - - 64% 50%It is an ideal holiday destination - - - - - 60% -Primarily to see the elephants - - - - - 51% 47% 49% 4.19 support for new park activities Table 17: Activities ACTIVITY YES NO Guided hikes 75% 25% Mountain biking routes 46% 54% Marine activities, e.g. boat trips 53% 47% Whale and shark watching 54% 46% Other 5% 95% Table 13 indicates that 75% of respondents would support guided hikes as a park activity, followed by 54% that would enjoy whale and shark watching. Fifty-three percent (53%) would support marine activities while only 46% would like to go mountain biking. Other activities (5%) mentioned included bird watching tours, horse rides, communal boma, game flights and trail running. 20
  30. 30. 4.20 park marketing 4. 20 .1 heard about the parkTable 18: Source of Park info JAN 2012 JUL 2012HEARD ABOUT THE PARK YES NO YES NOWebsite 25% 75% 25% 75%Shows 2% 98% 5% 95%Friends and family 53% 47% 59% 41%Radio 0% 100% 3% 97%Television 2% 98% 5% 95%Magazines 17% 83% 16% 84%SANParks 23% 77% 25% 75%Previous visits 25% 75% 31% 69%Facebook 0% 100% 0% 100%Twitter 0% 100% 0% 100%Internet blogs 5% 95% 0% 100%Other 11% 89% 3% 97%Fifty-nine percent (59%) of respondents had heard about the Park from friends and family(word-of-mouth), followed by 31% that had known about the Park through previous visitsand 25% that had heard about the Park through websites and another 25% fromSANParks. Other (3%) sources of information on the Park included respondents that hadknown about the Park since childhood and those that had heard about it from travelagencies. Compared to January 2012, the most influential marketing media remained thesame. 21
  31. 31. 4.20 .2 magazines, newspapers and radio From the 30% of respondents that indicated that they had read about the Park in magazines, those that were the most effective are: Weg (41%); Getaway (31%); Wild (8%); Wegry (4%); and Wegsleep (4%). Other less popular magazines (12%) included: Camp; Country Life; Leisure Wheels; Live; and Wegbreek. When looking at newspapers as source of information on AENP, 8% respondents stated that they had read about the Park in them. Newspapers included: Die Burger (70%); Beeld, Sunday Times and Weekend Post (10% each). When referring to radio stations as marketing medium for the Park, only 7% or respondents had heard about the Park on radio. Radio stations included: Algoa FM (56%); Bay FM (11%) and RSG (33%). Table 19: Magazines MAGAZINES PERCENTAGE Getaway 31% Weg 41% Wegry 4% Wegsleep 4% Wild 8% Other 12% 4.21 level of service delivery Table 19: Rating of services Not FACILITY Very poor Poor Fair Good Excellent applicableRestaurants 2% 3% 21% 17% 12% 45%Shops 0% 2% 31% 36% 21% 10% 22
  32. 32. Directions 3% 1% 19% 36% 32% 9%Pamphlets/ 3% 0% 9% 26% 15% 47%brochures purchasedPamphlets/ 1% 3% 15% 38% 27% 16%brochures free4x4 routes 3% 0% 8% 9% 5% 75%Laundry service 5% 3% 10% 8% 3% 71%Picnic sites 0% 1% 6% 24% 25% 44%Braai facilities at 1% 3% 15% 36% 35% 10%chalet/tentFriendliness and service 1% 2% 15% 30% 44% 8%of Park personnelGeneral maintenance of 0% 4% 8% 34% 43% 11%accommodation unitsGeneral maintenance of 1% 3% 6% 35% 46% 9%facilitiesAdequate interpretation 0% 2% 12% 34% 28% 24%in ParkAdequate activities in the 0% 2% 16% 42% 26% 14%ParkCheck-in process 0% 2% 14% 28% 48% 8%Sufficient informationregarding contact 6% 12% 16% 26% 22% 18%persons in case ofemergencyInformation regardingattractions and activities 0% 7% 18% 43% 22% 10%in the ParkFriendliness and service 5% 3% 13% 30% 40% 9%at reception Respondents were asked to rate a list of services as they had experienced them in the Park (Table 16). The following services were rated good to excellent: 23
  33. 33. • General maintenance of facilities (81%); • General maintenance of accommodation units (77%); • Check-in process (76%); • Friendliness and service of Park personnel (74%); • Braai facilities at chalet/tent (71%); and • Friendliness and service at reception (70%).Respondents had not made use of any of these services or facilities: • 4x4 route (75%); and • Laundry service (71%).4.22 favourite animal in national parkSRespondents were asked to indicate their favourite animal in any National Park. The mostpopular animals mentioned included: • Elephant (52%); • Lion (10%); • Leopard (8%); • Cheetah (4%); • Rhino (4%); • Kudu (3%); and the • Warthog (2%). 24
  34. 34. 4.23 member of conservation organisation Yes 18% No 82%Figure 10: Conservation organisation membershipOnly 18% of respondents indicated that they were members of some form of conservationorganisation. The main organisations included: • Botanical Society of South Africa; • Greenpeace; • Cape Nature; • Nedbank Infinity Program; • Rhino conservation (Save the rhinos); • Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animal (SPCA); • SA Hunters and Animal Conservation Association; and • World Wildlife Fund (WWF); 25
  35. 35. 4.24 park animal ratingTable 20: Animal rating JANUARY 2012 JULY 2012ANIMAL RATING (1-7) % RATING (1-7) %Elephant 2.79 60% 2.88 59%Rhino 3.28 53% 3.15 55%Southern right 4.89 30% 5.15 26%whaleLeopard 2.84 59% 2.65 62%Great white shark 4.97 29% 5.31 24%Buffalo 4.54 35% 4.08 42%Lion 2.82 60% 2.90 59%Table 17 reflects the respondents’ ratings of animals from most popular (1) to least popular(7). The most popular animal was the leopard (2.65), followed by the lion (2.9), theelephant (2.88), the rhino (3.15) and buffalo (4.08). The southern right whale (5.15) andthe great white shark (24%) were the least popular. When expressing willingness inmonetary value (Rand value) to be able to see these animals in monetary value (Randvalue) (Table 18), the leopard was the animal that respondents would pay for most to see(R300.00). This is followed by the value of the sighting of the lion (R234.00); rhino(R187.27); buffaloes (R148.07); Addo elephants (R146.59), the great white shark (R79.56)and lastly the southern right whale (R63.59).Table 21: Willingness to payANIMAL RAND (R) VALUE RAND (R) VALUE JAN 2012 JUL 2012Elephant R149.03 R146.59Rhino R170.97 R187.27Southern right whale R107.42 R63.59Leopard R250.65 R300.00Great white shark R125.41 R79.56 26
  36. 36. Buffalo R99.35 R148.07Lion R200.97 R234.004.25 park visitation 4. 25 .1 decided to visit parkTable 22: Decided to visit parkWHEN DECIDED PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE JAN 2012 JUL 2012Spontaneous decision 9% 12%A month ago 14% 29%More than a month ago 76% 56%Other 1% 2%According to Table 19, 56% of respondents had made the decision to visit AENP morethan a month prior to their visit. Twenty-nine percent (29%) had decided to visit a monthbefore hand and 12% made a spontaneous decision to visit. Other respondents (2%) hadplanned to visit the Park a year in advance of their trip. When comparing the July 2012results to those of January 2012, respondents took less time making their decision to visitthe Park. 4. 25 .2 initiator of tripBasically half of the respondents decided for themselves to visit AENP (49%), followed by22% of trips that were initiated by their spouse, 17% by the respondents’ families and 10%by their friends. Two percent (2%) of respondents’ visitations were initiated by other meanswhich included travel agencies. Compared to the January 2012 survey, respondents’spouses made a larger impact as initiator of the trip to AENP in July 2012. 27
  37. 37. Table 23: Trip initiatorINITIATOR PERCENTAGE PERCENTAGE JAN 2012 JUL 2012Self 52% 49%Friends 14% 10%Spouse 13% 22%Family 18% 17%Other 3% 2%4.28 recommend this park No 1% Yes 99%Figure 11: Recommend this ParkAccording to Figure 11, an overwhelming 99% of respondents would recommend this Parkto other people. 28
  38. 38. 5.conclusions and recommendations The following conclusions can be drawn from the results of the survey/s: 5.1 PROFILE OF VISITORS The following table (Table 20) provides an overview of the profile of overnight visitors during the 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012 surveys. Accurate market segmentation will aid in effectively applying marketing strategies and using financial and human resources. Table 24: Profile of overnight visitors to Addo Elephant National Park during 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012CATEGORY OVERNIGHT: OVERNIGHT: OVERNIGHT: OVERNIGHT: OVERNIGHT: OVERNIGHT: OVERNIGHT: JANUARY 2012 JULY 2012 2007 2008 JUNE 2009 NOVEMBER 2009 NOVEMBER 2010GENDER - - - - - Male (53%) Female (57%)HOME LANGUAGE English speaking / English speaking / Afrikaans speaking / English speaking / English speaking / English (51%); Afrikaans (56%); Foreign Foreign Local Foreign Local Afrikaans (27%) English (36%)AGE 52 years 47.7 years 48.1 years 52.7 years 53.7 years 44.8 years 45 yearsMARITAL STATUS Married Married Married Married Married Married (72%) Married (79%)PROVINCE OF Western Cape/ Western Cape/ Western Cape/ Western Cape/ Western Western Cape Western CapeRESIDENCE Eastern Cape Eastern Cape Eastern Cape Eastern Cape Cape/Eastern Cape (54%) (66%) 29
  39. 39. FOREIGN TOURIST The Netherlands/ Germany/ UK Germany/ USA Germany/ The Germany/ United Germany/ USA/ UK Germany/France/ Germany Netherlands Kingdom The NetherlandsLEVEL OF 69% well qualified 82% well qualified 87% well qualified 79% well qualified 89% well qualified 85% well qualified Diploma/degreeEDUCATION (41%)AGE OF FIRSTEXPOSURE TO A - - - - - 19.3 years 15.6 yearsNATIONAL PARKNUMBER OF 2.8 persons 2.1 persons 3.03 persons 3.79 persons 2.4 persons 2.89 persons 2.85 personsPEOPLE PAID FORNUMBER OF - - - - - 3.8 people 4.14 personsPEOPLE IN GROUPMODE OF Sedan Sedan 4x4 Sedan Sedan 4x4 (36%); Sedan 4x4 (35%); SedanTRANSPORT (31%) (27%)ANNUAL GROSS - - - - - R551 001> (34%) R551 001 (28%)INCOMEACCOMPANYING - - - - - No (51%) Yes (61%)CHILDRENNUMBER OF VISITS 6.3 times 4 times 4 times 4 times 6.3 times Day visitor: 0.57 Day visitor: 1.36TO NATIONAL times/ Overnight times/ OvernightPARKS OVER visitors: 1.7 times visitors: 2 timesTHREE YEARSLENGTH OF STAY 2 Nights 2.6 Nights 2.5 Nights 2.25 Nights 3.24 Nights 2.64 Nights 3 NightsREASONS FOR To relax To relax To relax To photograph To photograph To relax (75%); To To relax (78%); ToVISITING THE PARK animals animals get away from my get away from my To get away from To photograph To explore a new routine (68%); To routine (71%); For routine animals destination To explore a new To relax explore a new the benefit of my destination destination (62%) children (65%) To explore a new To explore a new To get away from To explore a new destination destination routine To relax destination 30
  40. 40. For family To learn about For family To get away from Value for money recreation animals in general recreation routine Great and variety To learn about To get away from For the benefit of To learn about accommodation animals in general routine my children animals in general To photograph For family animals recreationSUPPORT FOR - - - - - Guided hikes Guided hikesNEW PARK (77%); Whale and (75%); Whale andACTIVITIES shark watching shark watching (68%) (54%)EXPENDITURE R1586.11 R1801.61 R 2868.51 R 1979.16 R 2508.22 R 2701.72 R3640.98HEARD ABOUT THE Word-of-mouth Word-of-mouth Word-of-mouth Word-of-mouth Previous visits Word-of-mouth Word-of-mouthPARK (friends & family) (friends & family)SOURCE OF PARK - - - - - Magazine: Magazine: WegINFO Getaway (43%); (41%); Newspaper: Die Newspaper: Die Herald & Die Beeld; Burger (70%); Radio station: Radio station: Algoa FM Algoa FM (56%)WILD CARD OWNER Yes No No No Yes No (54%) No (52%)LEVEL OF SERVICE Improved Not improved Has improved - - Check-in process General (78%); Friendliness maintenance of and service at facilities (81%); reception (78%); General General maintenance of maintenance of accommodation facilities (76%) units (77%); Check-in process (76%); Friendliness and service of Park personnel (74%) 31
  41. 41. FAVOURITE - - - - - Elephant; Lion; Elephant; Lion;ANIMALS IN PARKS Rhino LeopardMEMBER OF - - - - - No (72%) No (82%)CONSERVATIONORGANISATIONPARK ANIMAL - - - - - 1: Elephant 1: LeopardRATING (R149.03); (R300.00); 2. Lion (200.97); 2. Lion (R234.00); 3. Leopard 3. Elephant (R250.65) (R146.59)DECISION TO TAKE - - - - - More than a month More than a monthTRIP ago (76%) ago (56%)TRIP INITIATOR - - - - - Self (52%) Self (49%)RECOMMEND PARK 92% 97% 100% 98% 100% Yes (98%) Yes (99%) 32
  42. 42. 5.2 conclusions from the overnight visitorsBased on the results of the survey, the following conclusions can be drawn:• In general, the profile has altered somewhat compared to those of the previous surveys. This is possibly because this year’s survey was conducted at a different time of year (July 2012) than those of previous years, and many visitors to AENP were foreigners.• Visitors to AENP in July 2012 were 45 years old, mostly Afrikaans speaking, married and from the Western Cape.• When looking at the visitors, Germany remained the dominant foreign market.• The visitors were well qualified, earned an annual gross income exceeding R551 001 and they chose 4x4s as their preferred mode of transport.• They travelled in groups of four people, and the respondents were responsible financially for three people.• Visitors stayed an average of three nights and spent a total of R3640.98 per group.• Over the past three years, respondents had visited the Park only once as day visitors and twice as overnight visitors during this period.• Respondents were, on average, 16 years old when they had experienced a national park for the first time.• More than half of the respondents had their children accompanying them to the Park.• Visitors mainly travelled to the AENP to relax, to escape their everyday environment and for the benefit of their children.• The majority of respondents cited family and friends (word-of-mouth) as their main source of information about the Park.• Respondents had decided to visit the Park by themselves, and they had done so more than a month in advance.• In general, the respondents were pleased with the levels of service in the Park. These included the general maintenance of facilities and accommodation units, the check-in process as well as the friendliness and service of Park personnel.• More than half of the respondents did not own a Wild Card and most were not members of a conservation organisation. 33
  43. 43. • Respondents indicated that, in general, their favourite animals were elephants, lions and leopards and these animals were also rated as respondents’ favourite animals.• Almost all respondents would recommend AENP to other people.5.3 recommendations for overnight visitorsThe following recommendations, obtained from the respondents, are made inaddition to the information obtained by the survey:5.3.1 managerial proposals • There is not enough hot water at the camping ablution • More activities for children • Night drives are too expensive for the average South African. Consider family packages, for example • More info on tourist activities in the Park • Show distances on Park road signage • Shops are far too expensive • Management should be able to give accommodation to other people willing to pay for it if the persons that had booked it had not arrived • The maintenance of the ablution blocks needs attention5.3.2 marketing proposals • Introduce marine activities and other activities as indicated in the report • Promote the above-mentioned activities, as well as the Big 7 • Promote the Kirkwood section of the park, particularly the 4x4 routes5.3.3 development proposals • Improve signage to the Park. Respondents struggled to find the Park 34
  44. 44. • Heaters in chalets • Chalets for paraplegic persons • Plugs in bathrooms next to mirrors • Make use of solar heaters • Wi-Fi access throughout the camp • Washing machines for self-use by visitors • More washing up sinks in camping communal area • Upgrade the campsite ablution so that it can accommodate more people5.3.4 Researchers’ highlightsHighlightsThe number of species and the quantity per species that we saw was fantastic. Onecan especially take note the enormous elephant and kudu populations in the Park.DisappointmentsLeopards are still eluding us (after 11 years) of visiting AENP. 35

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