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Pri app sci_std_file_y6_s5 Pri app sci_std_file_y6_s5 Document Transcript

  • 1 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Zoe (Year 6 secure level 5)Child profileZoe is a high-achieving child who is listed on the school’s Gifted and Talented register as a ‘general all-round high achiever’. Literacy and mathematical skills are her particular strengths. She is working at asecure level 5.The evidence1. Iron ships2. Helpful and unhelpful friction3. Investigating crystal formation4. Alien plant5. A night in Lymstone6. Investigating ‘Eco-Roll’QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 2 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Iron shipsAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3ContextThe activity was linked to work on forces and to historical work on Victorians. The children were required toidentify and explain a scientific or technological idea from that period. Their task was to convince wealthyfunders that their idea was a good one that was worthy of financial support. They had to imagine theattitudes of these funders and to find ways to overcome their possible objections.The children started the task in school, and completed it as a home learning task. They chose their ownformats for the final piece of work.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 3 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s notesZoe chose to tea-stain the paper. She tried to use Victorian styles of language, as discussed in recentliteracy lessons.In explaining her work to others, she said, ‘Some people thought that metal always sinks just because alump of metal does, but boats are full of air’.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009 View slide
  • 4 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Encouragement to make creative use of diagrams to aid scientific explanation. Further exploration of the reasons why some objects float and some objects sink. Discussion of further challenges to children’s ideas, such as, in Zoe’s case, the suggestion that, ‘Metal goes rusty – won’t that be a new problem that doesn’t affect wood?’Assessment commentaryAlthough Zoe needs to develop a full explanation, which would require a little more detail, she explains thephenomenon of floating by drawing on abstract ideas about forces. She can suggest solutions to problemsand describes a different viewpoint that people may have had, historically, about scientific or technologicaldevelopments, linking applications to their underpinning scientific ideas. She understands the importance ofeconomic and moral issues, and uses evidence rather than opinion to support the scientific arguments.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009 View slide
  • 5 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Helpful and unhelpful frictionAssessment focusesAF1, AF2ContextDuring a part of a lesson in which children investigated friction, one class group identified different ways inwhich friction can be helpful or unhelpful. They drew diagrams and annotated them to aid theirexplanations.The children were asked to identify all areas of their chosen situations where they considered friction wouldact, and explain a couple of these.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 6 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s notesZoe’s comments showed that she could relate ideas about friction to various technologies. She did notidentify all areas on her sketches where she thought friction would act, and this was something she initiallyfound difficult to understand. Zoe said that the arrows showed both the movement and the force. She coulddescribe how the friction worked against the direction the sledge was moving.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 7 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Discussion of why arrows are so useful for representing forces. Brainstorming the different ways in which arrows are used in scientific diagrams and sketches.Assessment commentaryZoe can use models to help describe phenomena. She can link applications to their underpinning scientificideas, and use a scientific convention to communicate the concept of force.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 8 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating crystal formationAssessment focusAF4ContextThis was a self-initiated task.There had been a lesson on evaporation and its use to separate solutions into their components, followedby examination of and discussion about the crystals formed. Zoe went home and decided to investigatewhether adding additional liquids affected crystal size.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 9 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 10 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesIn discussion back in school, Zoe explained that the same total volume of liquid had been used in eachcase to make it a fair test. She explained the importance of using a measuring cylinder to obtain accuratevolume measurements.Next steps Discussion of the importance of replication in investigative science, followed by a repeat of Zoe’s investigation in school. Work on the use of charts and tables to provide concise presentations of findings.Assessment commentaryZoe shows that she is able to recognise significant variables in investigations, and she explains whyparticular pieces of equipment are appropriate.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 11 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Alien plantAssessment focusesAF1, AF3ContextThe work was based on a review of previous activity about plants, including adaptation to habitat, lifecycles, and features of flowering plants.The children were given a challenge: they were scientists who had visited the far-flung reaches of thefurthest galaxies in search of new species of plant life, and had brought specimens back to Earth.The children were asked to create a ‘junk model’ of their new species, draw a diagram and annotate it.Some children, including Zoe, chose to use a writing frame for this aspect of the task. The children also hadaccess to a Key Stage 2 study guide to help them look back at earlier learning.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 12 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 13 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 14 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesDuring discussion, Zoe could demonstrate a good understanding of pollination, fertilisation and seeddispersal.Next steps Consideration of the wider ecosystems of the various children’s plants, and in particular how their creations would live alongside other living things and compete for space, light, water and nutrients.Assessment commentaryZoe uses complex ideas and appropriate terminology to describe her alien plant. She is able to explainsome biological processes by drawing on some abstract ideas.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 15 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 A night in LymstoneAssessment focusesAF5ContextThe aim of the work was to analyse data and its sources.The class was introduced to the school’s new data loggers during an ICT lesson, and the teacher then left adata logger outside her home overnight.The children were told that the house is situated away from roads and that there is plenty of local wildlife(including foxes, badgers and a variety of birds). They were asked to analyse and explain the dataobtained.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 16 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 17 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Use of the data logger to measure sound and light levels in an urban environment (matching the school’s location) considering issues of sound and light pollution.Assessment commentaryZoe correctly identified that the three sets of data were representing the temperature, the light level and thesound level, and labelled them correctly. She recognised when sunset and sunrise were occurring, andidentified the dawn chorus. She carried out some calculations to work out the actual time from the elapsedtime. She has interpreted data in an unfamiliar format and with some complex explanations, using the datato reach valid conclusions that utilise more than one piece of supporting evidence.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 18 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Investigating ‘Eco-Roll’Assessment focusesAF3, AF4, AF5ContextChildren were asked to consider some advertising they had seen on TV for ‘science-based’ products suchas cleaning materials and cosmetics.They used a number of real products and planned and carried out scientific tests to find the one that theythought was best. They then produced a TV advertisement and were asked to illustrate the research toback up their claims. No further support was given.Zoe and three others carried out this activity with four different types of kitchen roll.The evidenceSee the video clip of Zoe taking part in a mock advert, available on the National Strategies webarea (go to www.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/nationalstrategies and browse the primary standardsfiles or search for ‘APP science standards file: Zoe’).See also the spreadsheet setting out the data from testing the absorbancy of kitchen towels. Thisis available on the National Strategies web area (go towww.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/nationalstrategies and browse the primary standards files orsearch for ‘APP science standards file: Zoe’).Teacher’s notesThe group conducted a fair test to determine which kitchen roll was the most absorbent and to determinetheir strength when wet. These two sets of results identified one kitchen roll, which they decided to call‘Eco-Roll’.The group chose to repeat measurements and observations, and could explain that these gave themenough evidence on which to base reliable conclusions. Zoe was able to say that they, ‘repeatedmeasurements in case any of them had gone wrong’. She also explained how the work was collaborative,with each child taking on different tasks, recognising that they would be more efficient in their evidencecollection.Next steps Compilation of the work into a research report, showing the objectives of the research, methodology, and the research outcomes. Consideration of advertising and how opinion is sometimes presented rather than scientific evidence.Assessment commentaryZoe is able to use evidence to support the identification of ‘Eco-Roll’ as the best kitchen roll. Sheis able to suggest how collaborative approaches to investigative work are beneficial. Zoerecognises significant variables in investigations, understands that repeated measurementimproves reliability and draws valid conclusions.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 19 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyZoe can apply abstract ideas and models in her explanations of processes and phenomena and whensolving problems. She goes some way towards identifying the use of creative thinking in the historicaldevelopment of scientific ideas.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceHer work on ‘Eco-Roll’ demonstrates that she is aware of technological developments affecting differentpeople and recognises social and economic issues, and she also addresses moral issues through her workon iron ships. She is able to tease out the underpinning scientific ideas when considering science andtechnology.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceZoe’s high literacy level and good social skills have contributed to her strength in this area. Shedistinguishes between opinion and scientific evidence, uses appropriate scientific terminology tocommunicate abstract ideas, and can suggest how collaborative approaches are beneficial to evidencecollection.AF4 Using investigative approachesZoe recognises significant variables, explains when it is appropriate to use a particular piece of equipmentand makes appropriate repetition of measurements.AF5 Working critically with evidenceZoe can interpret data in a variety of formats and draw valid conclusions that utilise more than one piece ofsupporting evidence.Overall assessment judgementThe evidence in the assessment focus table, which was gathered over six months, shows Zoe working atsecure level 5. She touches on level 6 for a small number of isolated assessment criteria but there is notenough evidence of higher level attainment to show that Zoe is at high level 5 and ready to move to level 6.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009
  • 20 of 20 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 5 and 6 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically with applications and implications of collaborating in science approaches evidence scienceL Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and6 practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use abstract ideas or models or  Describe how different decisions on  Identify lack of balance in the  Apply scientific knowledge and  Suggest reasons based on multiple factors when explaining the uses of scientific and presentation of information or understanding in the planning of scientific knowledge and processes or phenomena technological developments may evidence investigations, identifying significant understanding for any limitations or  Identify the strengths and be made in different economic,  Choose forms to communicate variables and recognising which inconsistencies in evidence weaknesses of particular models social or cultural contexts qualitative or quantitative data are independent and which are collected  Explain how societies are affected appropriate to the data and the dependent  Select and manipulate data and  Describe some scientific evidence that supports or refutes by particular scientific applications purpose of the communication  Justify their choices of data information and use them to particular ideas or arguments, or ideas  Distinguish between data and collection method and proposed contribute to conclusions including those in development  Describe how particular scientific or information from primary sources, number of observations and  Draw conclusions that are technological developments have secondary sources and simulations, measurements consistent with the evidence they  Explain how new scientific evidence is discussed and provided evidence to help scientists and present them in the most  Collect data choosing appropriate have collected and explain them interpreted by the scientific pose and answer further questions appropriate form ranges, numbers and values for using scientific knowledge and community and how this may  Describe how aspects of science measurements and observations understanding lead to changes in scientific are applied in particular jobs or  Independently recognise a range of  Make valid comments on the ideas roles familiar risks and take action to quality of their data control themL Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and5 practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use abstract ideas or models or  Describe different viewpoints a  Distinguish between opinion and  Recognise significant variables in  Interpret data in a variety of more than one step when range of people may have about scientific evidence in contexts related investigations, selecting the most formats, recognising obvious describing processes or scientific or technological to science, and use evidence rather suitable to investigate inconsistencies phenomena developments than opinion to support or challenge  Explain why particular pieces of  Provide straightforward  Explain processes or  Indicate how scientific or scientific arguments equipment or information sources explanations for differences in phenomena, suggest solutions to technological developments may  Decide on the most appropriate are appropriate for the questions or repeated observations or problems or answer questions by affect different groups of people in formats to present sets of scientific ideas under investigation measurements drawing on abstract ideas or different ways data, such as using line graphs for  Repeat sets of observations or  Draw valid conclusions that utilise models  Identify ethical or moral issues continuous variables measurements where appropriate, more than one piece of supporting  Recognise scientific questions linked to scientific or technological  Use appropriate scientific and selecting suitable ranges and evidence, including numerical data that do not yet have definitive developments mathematical conventions and intervals and line graphs answers  Link applications of science or terminology to communicate abstract  Make, and act on, suggestions to  Evaluate the effectiveness of their  Identify the use of evidence and technology to their underpinning ideas control obvious risks to themselves working methods, making practical creative thinking by scientists in scientific ideas  Suggest how collaborative and others suggestions for improving them the development of scientific approaches to specific experiments ideas or investigations may improve the evidence collected     BLIE Overall assessment (tick one box only) Low 5 Secure 5  High 5 Low 6 Secure 6 High 6 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-12 © Crown copyright 2009