Pri app sci_std_file_y2_h1

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Pri app sci_std_file_y2_h1

  1. 1. 1 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Joshua (Year 2 high level 1)Child profileJoshua is a Year 2 child with good social skills and he enjoys practical activity. His communication skills areat a slightly lower level of development, and a current overall judgement of his progress in science placeshim at high level 1.The evidence1. Listening to sounds2. Describing and sorting sounds from instruments3. Investigating the direction of sounds4. Investigating sounds from far away5. Investigating materials to make a raft6. Investigating ‘ice balloons’QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  2. 2. 2 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Listening to soundsAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4ContextThis work is from the beginning of a sound and hearing topic and linked to a theme called ‘In the Woods’.The topic was introduced through a story, This is the Bear and the Scary Night. With their partners, childrendiscussed the noises the bear might have heard while in the woods, recalling their own experiences ofbeing out at night. The children drew things they might hear on a walk in the woods.The class then visited the local woods for some listening activities. Working in pairs, they were encouragedto listen for one minute, keeping a tally on fingers of the different sounds they could hear before sharingwith their partner. The activity was repeated to listen for different types of bird song and again for very quietnoises. Back in the classroom, the children shared their observations and were asked to describe thesounds and to name their sources.They then played a ‘bat’ game to explore the use of our sense of hearing to determine where we are. In theplayground, they took turns to be blindfolded and to walk through the forest of children who were instructedto stay still and call out ‘tree!’ if they were going to be bumped into. They then played ‘bat and moth’, wherethe blindfolded child had to catch a child acting as a moth by calling out and then listening for the ‘echo’.Hayes, S., illustrated by Craig, H (2003) This is the Bear and theScary Night, Walker Books Ltd., UKQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  3. 3. 3 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTeacher’s notesJoshua could share his ideas with his partner and listen to the ideas of others. He said that he had heard awoodpecker in the woods before and he thought the trees might make a noise if it was windy. During thelistening activities, Joshua could identify a range of different noises, including people moving their feet.When he was blindfolded, he was able to turn towards the noise and could find the other child.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  4. 4. 4 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Use of a tally chart to record observations. Discussion of when it is most useful to be able to hear and about strategies used by people with hearing impairments.Assessment commentaryJoshua relates simple ideas about hearing to his own direct and everyday experience. He shares his ideaswith others and listens to them, and is developing confidence in communicating his observations, includingby the use of drawings and by talking. He uses his senses to make simple observations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  5. 5. 5 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Describing and sorting sounds from instrumentsAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4ContextThe class brainstormed a list of words to describe how we could make sounds using different instruments.In pairs, the children initially selected two instruments to look at in detail. They then formed into groups offour and sorted the instruments according to how they make sound. Individuals then each chose oneinstrument to draw and to record how it makes sound.In the plenary the class looked closely at what was happening to the instruments when they made a noise,leading on to discussions and demonstrations of vibrations.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  6. 6. 6 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesJoshua explained how a variety of instruments could be used to make a noise. With some guidance he saidthat he could feel the top of the drum move when it was played. With support, Joshua grouped theinstruments according to how they are played.Next steps Investigating how to make sounds louder and quieter, using strings in order to relate this to the observable vibrations. Looking at the differences in instruments from different cultures and different times in history.Assessment commentaryJoshua is able to sort instruments according to their features. By grouping and by drawing diagrams,Joshua communicates simple features of objects in appropriate ways, and he uses his senses to makeobservations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  7. 7. 7 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating the direction of soundsAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThis was a follow-up activity to the previous ‘bat and moth’ games played in the playground.The class agreed to investigate whether our ears can tell us exactly where sounds are coming from. Thechildren contributed their ideas to a class discussion and they decided to have a blindfolded child sitting inthe middle of the circle. A class member was chosen to make a noise and the blindfolded child had to pointto where they thought the noise was coming from. It was then suggested to investigate whether it is harderto pinpoint the direction of the sound by covering over one ear with the palm of a hand.The children were asked to consider what they had observed and to record independently what they hadlearnt about how we hear.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  8. 8. 8 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesJoshua shared his ideas about how to do the investigation with his partner. He said someone needed to beblindfolded to test their ears and suggested that we could try to listen with only one ear. He drew a simplepicture of how the investigation was set up and wrote about what he had observed.During their experiments, some children thought they could hear where a sound was coming from. Joshuawas unconvinced; however, he recognised that it was more difficult to detect sound using only one ear.Next steps Support in using appropriate vocabulary with care – including ‘listen’, ‘hear’, ‘sound’, ‘noise’, ‘direction’. Discussion of the importance of being able to sense the direction that sounds are coming from.Assessment commentaryIn presenting his information, Joshua shows that he can respond to the teacher’s suggestions to identifyevidence to answer a question. By commenting on the difficulty of locating a sound with just one ear,Joshua identifies a link to science. He is able to use some everyday terms to describe his ideas verbally.He can share his ideas with a partner and communicate his observations using everyday terms and by asimple drawing. He uses his senses to make simple observations and is able to report what happens insimple terms.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  9. 9. 9 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Investigating sounds from far awayAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThis work began with discussions in small groups, with an adult with each group. The key discussion pointswere: Which sounds can we hear from far away? What happens as we get nearer to something that is making a sound?The class were then told that they were going to investigate the furthest distances from which some chosensounds can be heard. The discussion included possible approaches and some suggestions were made tothe children, such as whether to work inside or outside, different possible sources of sound, and ways ofmeasuring.In pairs, they were asked to think about sources of sound they could use, and what they would do. Havingshared their ideas and agreed a method, the children completed the writing frame for the investigation,thinking about what they were going to measure, and how. They also recorded their results on the writingframe.They were then asked to repeat the experiment using a quieter sound source and to draw their own table inwhich to enter their results.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  10. 10. 10 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesJoshua’s ‘hasn’ or ‘hash’ means ‘hands’.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  11. 11. 11 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesDuring his planning, Joshua decided to use a shaker as his sound source. He began the discussion with hispartner by saying the person listening had to go outside the door and later added ‘they can see how faraway they can get until they can’t hear it’.With some guidance, Joshua completed the writing frame for his investigation. He attempted to draw hisown table for the second part of the investigation. He did not volunteer what evidence he would need tocollect to answer the question, but was able to choose correctly from a list. When he measured the distancebetween the sound source and the person listening, he showed he could not use non-standard measuresas he changed the size of his steps so that his answer was identical to his partners. He continued to dothis, even after his partner explained he was smaller so he would take more steps to measure the samedistance. Joshua believed it was more important to get the same answer as his partner rather than to checkhis own measurement by repetition.The following conversation took place: Teacher: What sounds can we hear from far away? Joshua: Traffic and a dog barking. Teacher: What do we need to do to see how far away we have to be before we can’t hear a sound any more? Joshua: Go outside the door … and see how far you can get until they can’t hear it.Joshua could identify sounds he can hear from far away. He gave a dog barking and traffic as examples,which he remembered hearing on the previous walk. He agreed with another child’s statement that a soundgets louder and louder as it gets closer.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  12. 12. 12 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Opportunity to make non-standard measurements with consistency, linked with learning in mathematics.Assessment commentaryThe link between his observations and a familiar context in Joshua’s environment is made here. Joshuacan present his evidence using a template provided, and can produce a simple table himself. Withguidance, including presentation of alternative ideas, he is able to suggest how to find an answer andunderstands that measurements need to be made. He gives a reason for adapting his approach, but doesnot use non-standard measures correctly. In his discussions he reports what he has found out.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  13. 13. 13 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Investigating materials to make a raftAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextUsing the Primary Upd8 resource, ‘Crossing The River’ (www.primaryupd8.org.uk), the children wereintroduced to a scenario in which children in South America are facing a dangerous journey across a riverto get to school and then back home again. The bridge collapsed several years ago, so the children have towade or swim with their belongings above their heads. There is a ferry across the river but most familiescannot afford to pay for it.Taken from Primary Upd8 www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  14. 14. 14 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe children investigated the properties of a range of possible materials for building a raft. They worked ingroups, sharing their results in the table provided and completing an investigation sheet.Following the investigation the children selected different potential materials for their rafts, decided howthey were going to propel them, and measured how far they travelled. They were asked to considerwhether their tests were fair.The evidenceTaken from Primary Upd8 www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  15. 15. 15 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  16. 16. 16 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesDuring the initial discussions Joshua suggested that the children wear a life jacket so they are safe if theycan’t swim.He predicted that the metal would sink because it was heavy. He was unsure about the wood as it was alsoheavy, but other children in his group said they knew wood floats. Joshua chose to test the fabric sheet as itis soft and the polystyrene sheet because it is very light. He observed what happened and then sorted thematerials into those that floated and those that did not.Joshua could make observations and report the outcome of the investigation, but showed littleunderstanding of fair testing.Next steps Consideration of how things can be done differently in investigations to improve the evidence. Consideration of other variables that might be important when choosing materials to make a raft.Assessment commentaryJoshua suggests that all the sample materials need to be tried out in the water tray to test them, and heuses his senses to make observations, talking about them in everyday terms. He makes simplecomparisons between different materials and he can group them accordingly. He can share his ideas andlistens to others. He is able to respond to questions to describe events and can make some simplepredictions based on previous observations, but does not show evidence of how the group could have donethings differently.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  17. 17. 17 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Investigating ‘ice balloons’Assessment focusesAF3, AF4, AF5ContextAs part of a role-play with the theme ‘polar explorers’, the children were allowed to examine two ‘iceballoons’ (coloured water was frozen inside a balloon and the rubber was then removed).They shared their ideas with their partner about how they were made. The children sprinkled salt over oneof the balloons and left them in the classroom, making time to observe them throughout the day.Independently, the children made sketches to predict what each balloon might look like by the afternoon.The adults in the class talked to the children about their ideas and annotated the drawings wherenecessary.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  18. 18. 18 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  19. 19. 19 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesJoshua knew that the balloons had come from the freezer, but didn’t know how they could be that shape.He predicted that the balloon with salt would melt and that the other would stay frozen although hisdrawings didn’t show this and so were annotated. Joshua said that the salt made the ice crack, and that hecould see cracks on the surface and hear it crack when he added more salt.Next steps Opportunities to make standard measurements in investigative work, such as length, mass, time, etc.Assessment commentaryJoshua uses his senses to make simple observations, describing them in everyday terms, and states thechanges that he notices.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  20. 20. 20 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyThe evidence shows statements of simple features of objects and Joshua is beginning to compare and sortobjects on the basis of his observations. In investigations he responds to suggestions to identify keyobservations for answering questions, and can draw on his everyday experience.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceJoshua shows a developing understanding of useful aspects of science and makes links between simplenew observations and familiar settings.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceJoshua is confident in sharing ideas with other children, and he is able to listen to the ideas of others. Heuses everyday terms and can present evidence using a template or, albeit crudely and with guidance, in asimple table.AF4 Using investigative approachesHe responds to prompts about finding things out, and is beginning to be able to make his own suggestionsthat are based on a specific question or idea. He uses his senses and simple equipment.AF5 Working critically with evidenceJoshua can provide some reporting on science activity, although in written form this remains very simple.He states some expectation of outcomes of events, but sometimes merely guesses. He can moreconfidently say what does happen, especially when prompted in a dialogue with the teacher.Overall assessment judgementJoshua is just beginning to touch on achievements at level 2, but there is not yet sufficient consistency toshow low level 2 achievement. His work is at high level 1. This sample of evidence draws from work duringtwo terms. Over the course of the rest of the year Joshua should encounter further opportunities todemonstrate his skills and understanding within other areas of science, particularly attainment target 2. Thiswould provide a greater range of evidence to make a judgement against.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  21. 21. 21 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 1 and 2 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the applications AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically and implications of science collaborating in science approaches with evidence L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 2 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Draw on their observations and  Express personal feelings or opinions about  Present their ideas and evidence in  Make some suggestions about how  Say what happened in their ideas to offer answers to scientific or technological phenomena appropriate ways to find things out or how to collect experiment or investigation questions data to answer a question or idea  Describe, in familiar contexts, how science  Respond to prompts by using simple texts  Say whether what happened they are investigating  Make comparisons between basic helps people do things and electronic media to find information was what they expected, features or components of  Identify things to measure or acknowledging any  Identify people who use science to help  Use simple scientific vocabulary to describe objects, living things or events observe that are relevant to the unexpected outcomes others their ideas and observations question or idea they are  Sort and group objects, living  Respond to prompts to suggest  Identify scientific or technological  Work together on an experiment or investigating things or events on the basis of different ways they could have phenomena and say whether or not they are investigation and recognise contributions what they have observed  Correctly use equipment provided to done things helpful made by others make observations and  Respond to suggestions to measurements identify some evidence (in the form of information, observations  Make measurements, using or measurements) needed to standard or non-standard units as answer a question appropriate  L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 1 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Ask questions stimulated by their  Identify a link to science in familiar objects  Use everyday terms to describe simple  Respond to prompts by making  Respond to prompts to say exploration of their world or contexts features or actions of objects, living things some simple suggestions about how what happened or events they observe to find an answer or make  Recognise basic features of  Recognise scientific and technological  Say what has changed when observations objects, living things or events developments that help us  Present evidence they have collected in observing objects, living things simple templates provided for them  Use their senses and simple or events  Draw on their everyday equipment to make observations experience to help answer  Communicate simple features or questions components of objects, living things or events they have observed in appropriate  Respond to suggestions to forms identify some evidence (in the form of information, observations  Share their own ideas and listen to the ideas or measurements) that has been of others used to answer a question    BL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 1 Secure 1  High 1  Low 2 Secure 2 High 2 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009
  22. 22. 22 of 22 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgementsPrimary Upd8, www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education. Used with kindpermission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-04 © Crown copyright 2009

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