If they leave we're stuffed! - Succession Planning
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If they leave we're stuffed! - Succession Planning

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Terry MacKenzie, South Lanarkshire Leisure and Culture ...

Terry MacKenzie, South Lanarkshire Leisure and Culture
Justin Parkes, Culture NL
Chantal Knowles, National Museums Scotland

Presentation from the Museums Galleries Scotland 'Fortune Favours the Brave' conference, September 2013.

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  • Terry has served in museums in the Hamilton area since 1974 and has a sizable collection of past job titles. <br /> Access and learning <br /> Curatorial and management <br /> Documentation and information <br /> Succession planning since 2007 <br /> See my Linkedin profile for the detail. <br />
  • This is what you should gain an understanding of from this presentation: <br /> Bullet points as slide. <br />
  • The project grew out of a symposium at Hamilton where MGS managers and SLC staff met to discuss our service and where we were headed. From that came an invitation by MGS for me to be a case study in succession planning for museums in Scotland. <br /> Catherine Cartmell and her then colleague, Gill Findley met Terry to first of all see if there was, in fact, potential for a project. We agreed that there was and it should be in 3 stages each about a year long and widening out from me as the longest serving museum employee with SLC. <br /> In the long term we wanted to start a sea change in Scotland about succession planning, knowledge and skills sharing, not just in museums but across the wider local government sector. <br />
  • We identified that there were 2 main areas of collections knowledge that only I know about: <br /> About objects that I collected or heard stories about from first or 2nd hand sources <br /> About the huge amount of collections data held in hard copy format ranging from archive catalogues to reception desk diaries; from MOD files to public enquiries about the collection. <br /> We needed to add these to our CMS so that not only colleagues but the public through our online Collections Browser could access them at the click of a mouse button. <br /> Very early on I realised that this was a colossal task that I couldn’t do on my own in any reasonable timescale. I wanted to be able to achieve this and employee development at the same time. <br /> I discussed with MGS and our Regimental Trustees about funding our FOH team members to work extra hours on inputting data and digitising paper sources where appropriate. <br /> In the end between them they funded this process to the tune of more than £58,000. A huge thank you! <br /> At the same time we wanted to devise an improved system for our paper files from all the former museum services (matching the rationalisation of the digital files by Sharon Paton) <br /> Inventory of Cameronian archive <br /> Digitise Cameronian archive <br /> Knowledge harvesting with Sharon Paton from the objects. <br />
  • The team <br /> Jo Bremner: front of house (FOH) <br /> Divya Devadas : FOH <br /> Peter Kerr: FOH <br /> Terry F Mackenzie: project leader and evaluation facilitator <br /> Liz Malone: FOH <br /> Alex Moore: FOH <br /> Anna Moore: temp. assistant museum officer (AMO) (funded post) and evaluation facilitator <br /> Stewart Moore: FOH <br /> Sharon Paton MO: Project support and development and Knowledge Harvesting <br /> Lee Stower: FOH <br /> Janet West: FOH <br /> The evaluation process <br /> Our principal aim here was to find out how far each team member’s experience on the project matched the training plan submitted as part of our successful funding bid. <br /> Anna and I developed a questionnaire based on the training plan. Where possible, we planned a full day for the evaluation process with the morning spent at our stores and the afternoon on the remainder of the interview process. <br />
  • What we’ve learned <br /> Improved selection interview process <br /> SP structural re-alignment of information management systems. Need to build in staff time to work on this. <br /> AM – working with collections – going on line – importance of structuring data <br /> Employee development <br /> TM <br /> project development <br /> Best way to get extra hours folks’ job-share contract better option <br /> Improved funding skills <br /> Quality control methodology <br /> Project team members (see slide 8) <br /> As we went along I’ve been offering advice and tips to other museums usually through MGS or the MA putting me in touch. From this process we’ve learned things, too. <br />
  • Jo Bremner: her work adding data to the CMS from archive object donation letters and my handwritten notes on collection objects <br /> Divya Devadas : added or created 1,733 records in CMS <br /> Peter Kerr: digitising the 80 volumes of The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) regimental magazine: The Covenanter and the 4 volumes of the Regimental History (With Alex Moore). <br /> Liz Malone: adding data to CMS from object files about conservation reports and work carried out on objects. <br /> Alex Moore: digitising the 80 volumes of The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) regimental magazine: The Covenanter and the 4 volumes of the Regimental History (With Peter Kerr). <br /> Anna Moore: major contributor to the project for 2 years in helping shape the project, delivering outcomes and outputs and sharing in the evaluation process. <br /> Stewart Moore: his work with matching up archive views of old museum displays was important in helping Anna deliver her PCF objectives (A public UK art database) <br /> Sharon Paton: Knowledge Harvesting: a presentation on its own! <br /> Lee Stower: adding object data to CMS from archive museum reception diaries. <br /> Janet West: added or created data in CMS for 1,142 records <br />
  • Divya Devadas: “From being a casual worker [at the start of the project] I got my present permanent post at SLLC HQ due to my CMS experience as a transferable skill. I was the only candidate without experience of Plus2 system [a computerised leisure management system used by SLLC].”” <br /> Peter Kerr: “Pride in my work – I can see the digitised Covenanter magazine on the public touch screen at Low Parks Museum and can say ‘that’s my work!’” <br /> Liz Malone: “I got to see the amount of work involved in caring for the collection” <br /> Alex Moore: “ While on front of house duties at Low Parks Museum I have been able to help the public more with their enquiries about names of Cameronians events, places, dinner dances and so on…also gives me a role in passing on information to FOH colleagues about the museum building’s past” <br /> Anna Moore: “I have been able to be involved in a lot of the general duties of the collection team. I have gained experience of accessioning, digitisation, exhibition work and answering public enquiries. I have also developed a good understanding of succession planning, and what the benefits of this could be in a museum setting.” <br /> Stewart Moore: “I can now also train others and troubleshoot at work with Plus2 system” <br /> Janet West: Got additional part time job in the private sector. <br />
  • Divya Devadas: “From being a casual worker [at the start of the project] I got my present permanent post at SLLC HQ due to my CMS experience as a transferable skill. I was the only candidate without experience of Plus2 system [a computerised leisure management system used by SLLC].”” <br /> Peter Kerr: “Pride in my work – I can see the digitised Covenanter magazine on the public touch screen at Low Parks Museum and can say ‘that’s my work!’” <br /> Liz Malone: “I got to see the amount of work involved in caring for the collection” <br /> Alex Moore: “ While on front of house duties at Low Parks Museum I have been able to help the public more with their enquiries about names of Cameronians events, places, dinner dances and so on…also gives me a role in passing on information to FOH colleagues about the museum building’s past” <br /> Anna Moore: “I have been able to be involved in a lot of the general duties of the collection team. I have gained experience of accessioning, digitisation, exhibition work and answering public enquiries. I have also developed a good understanding of succession planning, and what the benefits of this could be in a museum setting.” <br /> Stewart Moore: “I can now also train others and troubleshoot at work with Plus2 system” <br /> Janet West: Got additional part time job in the private sector. <br />
  • Embedding succession planning into our everyday work through <br /> Developing a museum succession planning project policy <br /> Awareness of the importance of succession planning <br /> Weekly round table sharing of information about project and other work <br /> Office layout open plan. <br /> Integral part of each employee’s PDR process <br /> Offering outreach support to other museums and individuals including a presentation to ICOM in Poland by our senior museum officer, Gareth Hunt; supporting AMA work, Monument Fellows and volunteer managers. <br /> Offering work placements. <br /> Encouraging others at SLLC outwith museums to do the same: <br /> From my briefing the Company’s training manager has been developing a pilot scheme in succession planning with the Libraries & Museums senior management team <br /> The Health & Fitness Team with 30 managers is following a succession planning project sparked of by my networking discussions in the HQ kitchen which led to formal meetings with me and now they are taking this forward themselves. <br />
  • Succession planning project external funding totals: <br /> MGS: £23,955 <br /> Trustees The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles): £34,893 <br /> Total: £58,848 <br /> Without you we couldn’t have done it! <br />
  • Finally, in the style of the Two Ronnies -Thank you! <br /> Photo of Terry Mackenzie by Hamilton Burgh Public Relations, in his first week in museums, June, 1974. <br />
  • These are the strategic objectives of the new National Programme, which I will explore in depth <br /> Essentially we want to develop opportunities to widen access to Scotland’s collections as a whole and share knowledge and expertise as our current resources allow. <br /> We recognise the expansion possibilities that there are and know there is keen interest across the sector for more collaborative working. <br /> We must think strategically, and we will endeavour to derive the widest benefit from the projects we involve ourselves in. We will also actively seek external funding to fulfil our interests and try to develop benefits from such projects more widely as is possible. <br /> Partnership working will be critical to this. Today is just one of many opportunities to expand this potential. <br /> Obviously we are aware of the work currently underway to develop a new National Strategy for Scotland’s Museums and Galleries. We are openly participating in this. The new National Programme and the information we have provided you with today will hopefully help you understand currently what NMS can offer and what we are interested in developing in partnership. <br />
  • Project outline and aims: <br />
  • Partners <br />
  • Background <br />
  • Top Left and clockwise <br /> 1st – Glasgow <br /> Ceremonial turtle post, Torres St, Glasgow Life. Collected by Robert Bruce, a Scottish missionary in late 19th century. One of only two known in the world – both on display at Glasgow. <br /> 2 and 3 Aberdeen William McGregor’s collection from all over the world but important to the Pacific Fiji and Papua New Guinea. <br /> The Melanesian collection has benefitted extensively from the donation of a collection gathered by William MacGregor (1846 - 1919). MacGregor served the British Colonial Office for 14 years in Fiji, primarily as Chief Medical Officer. The Melanesian collection contains an impressive selection of weaponry and associated items such as dance shields. A number of human remains are part of this collection, which have been taken as colonial &apos;curios&apos;. The human remains include a skull cap of &apos;Fijian&apos; cannibal warrior, which is noted to have been used by the principle chief as a drinking cup. The collection has a large number of ornaments for the body used by warriors in battle and as decorative items such as a collar or necklace made from crocodile teeth and polished shells. The collection is accompanied by a group of photo albums taken by the Reverend F G Bowie. These albums are rich resources for placing Marischal&apos;s collection of Melanesian items into context. Fijian examples of free standing figure sculpture are rare and have an uncertain purpose. The collection holds a number of figure sculptures an example of which is a wooden carved figure, seated on a stool, and decorated with zigzag, wavy and spiral carvings each filled in with lime. <br /> 4 – Perth <br /> Maori Cloak of kakapo feathers <br /> Scotland’s Perth Museum is the only museum worldwide known to have a cloak fully covered with feathers from kākāpō (night parrot). The cloak is a reminder of the cultural significance of this rare bird for Māori. The large flightless kākāpō (Strigops habroptilus) - with its striking green feathers and mysterious nocturnal habits - held great cultural and spiritual value for Māori. A kākāpō-feather cloak would only have been woven for a person of high status. This bird is now one of the rarest parrots in the world, saved from extinction only by an intensive programme of care and management. This cloak includes around 11,000 kākāpō feathers, with a few from kākā hidden among them - possibly only two. The feathers are attached to a foundation of muka (flax fibre). <br /> This cloak was acquired by Scotsman David Ramsay, a natural-history collector and ship&apos;s surgeon who settled in Sydney in 1822. Over the next 20 years, he collected ‘curiosities’ - perhaps from ships&apos; captains or from auction rooms - and sent them back to Scotland. In 1842, Ramsay&apos;s collection was gifted to the Perth Museum. <br /> 5- NMS <br /> A.1939.164Rectangular wooden house panel carved with two grotesque human figures in relief, with eyes inlaid with haliotis shell: New Zealand, Ngati Porou Territory, Maori, c. 1870 Production place Ngati Porou Territory, New Zealand, Polynesia, OCEANIA Production date c. 1870EXCHANGE Otago Museum <br /> Two further panels from the same house are in the Perth Collection, this has only come to light since the project began and so we hope to discover more connections like these – not just donor connections. <br /> 6 – Perth <br /> Tahitian Mourners Costume <br /> This remarkable costume once worn by the Chief Mourner at a high-ranking Tahitian&apos;s funeral, was acquired by David Ramsay (1794-1860), a native of Perth in Scotland, who sailed to Australia as a ship&apos;s surgeon in the early 1820s. He settled in New South Wales, sending back a collection of &apos;curiosities&apos; to the museum of the Literary and Antiquarian Society of Perth in 1825. The costume in Perth is one of only a handful of examples surviving worldwide, the two other examples in Britain, at the British Museum and the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford, were both acquired on the Second of the Voyages of Captain Cook in 1772-4. <br /> 7,8,9 - NMS <br /> Papuan Gulf material <br /> Drum, Mask, Shell valuable all Papuan Gulf, Papua New Guinea <br /> The Papuan Gulf and its trade connections with Torres Straits will form one of the likely areas of focus. This area will also look towards the McLean Museum and Art Gallery in Greenock as they too have material related to the British Colonial Officers resident in this region. <br />
  • Methodology <br />
  • Staff <br /> What you can expect <br />

If they leave we're stuffed! - Succession Planning If they leave we're stuffed! - Succession Planning Presentation Transcript

  • If they leave we’re stuffed! – Succession Planning Terry MacKenzie, South Lanarkshire Leisure & Culture Justin Parkes, Culture NL @nlcpeople Chantal Knowles, National Museums Scotland @NtlMuseumsScotland #MGSConf @MuseumsGalScot
  • Building succession planning By Terry Mackenzie Museum Officer South Lanarkshire Leisure & Culture Ltd T: 01698-476179 E: terry.mackenzie@southlanarkshireleisure.co.uk 2
  • Succession planning •Genesis •What we did •How we did it •What we learned •Applying the lessons •Acknowledgements 3
  • Genesis •In the beginning •The plan •Longer term 4
  • What we did •The challenge •The funding 5
  • How we did it • The team • The work 6
  • What we’ve learned • Improved selection interview process • Realignment of information management systems • Importance of structuring data • Employee development – TM – Project team members (slide 8) 7
  • What we’ve learned • Each team member made at least one important project contribution. Without them we couldn’t have done it: 8
  • What we learned • Each team member drew useful skills or experience from the project 9
  • What I would do differently • I would share more of the mentoring of extra hours folk to members of the collections team to further widen the employee development benefits 10
  • How we’re applying the lessons Embedding succession planning into our work – Developing a museum succession planning project policy • Outreach to other museums which we will continue to offer • Missionary work outwith museum sector 11
  • Acknowledgements • Funders: – MGS – Trustees The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) • Team members Thank you! 12
  • It’s thank you from me and it’s thank you from him! 13
  • Collecting & Preserving Collections Knowledge The Monument Fellowship Scheme at Summerlee Museum
  • Summerlee Museum • • • • • • 1980s: mass unemployment Job creation scheme Summerlee Heritage Trust Opened 1988 Late 1990s: North Lanarkshire Council Exhibition Hall redevelopment, 2005-2008
  • The Collections • 24,000 museum objects • Approx 8,000 accessioned industrial objects • Approx 1,000 unaccessioned • North Lanarkshire Council Archives: photographs, business archives
  • The Monument Fellowship Scheme • 2007 to 2011 • Museums Association with funding from the Monument Trust • Paying retiring and retired curators to share their knowledge • Nominated successors • Knowledge sharing activities
  • Dan Mackay
  • Project Aims 1. To capture the Fellow’s knowledge in three areas: • The provenance of objects in the North Lanarkshire Council Industrial History Collection • How these objects were used, and should be handled and conserved in the future • Background information on British, particularly Scottish, industrial history 2. To disseminate this knowledge to the current staff and volunteers and archive it in formats that ensure it will be accessible to future curators
  • Project Aims 3. To disseminate this information to the wider curatorial community and to the general public 4. To assist the Curatorial team in making informed decisions with regard to the rationalisation and conservation of the collection and future collecting 5. To consider our collections in the wider context of Scottish industrial museums
  • How the Project Evolved • Move from written and audio recording to video • Collaboration with NMS • Project extension: a further 50 days • Staff changes • Project on forging sparked by a set of unaccessioned photographs • Temporary exhibition • Archives
  • summerlee-engineering.blogspot.com Planing Machine
  • Collaboration with NMS James Wood, NMS Monument Fellow
  • Outside Visits Learning Recording Advising Scottish Maritime Museum Dalmellington Iron Works site Watermill, Clyde Valley
  • Discoveries
  • What We Have Learned • Make best use of expert’s time • Be selective • Written & audio good for recording general information • Video much better for explaining an object • Video: sound is as important as picture • Plan for editing, storing and sharing media • Corroboration/verification important • Be flexible, but don’t lose sight of your goals • Knowledge or skills?
  • “Well, it’s a nice object… …but what does it tell us?”
  • Sharing Knowledge
  • Improved Labelling of Objects
  • Caring for the Collection Dan Providing Guidance on Lubricating a Slotting Machine
  • Engineering Pavilion
  • Oral History Interviewees
  • ParkesJ@culturenl.co.uk summerlee-engineering.blogspot.com stickssn.org
  • Pacific Collections review project Chantal Knowles Principal Curator, Oceania, Americas and Africa www.nms.ac.uk/connections
  • Background SSN
  • National Programme 2011-15 • Take the National Collections to the widest audience possible • Ensure sustainable frameworks exist to share and retain sector expertise • Be a leading, future-focussed National Museum for our sector www.nms.ac.uk/connections partnerships@nms.ac.uk
  • Pacific Collections Review Project for collections knowledge •Develop and implement a new methodology transfer between a new curator, current collections staff and subject experts (18 months) •The new curator will produce a ‘Review of Pacific Collections in Scottish Museums’ and ‘Introductory Guidance to Pacific Collections’ •We believe both of these products are essential tools for the future development of these collections and the project aims to combine producing these via a new methodology to develop subject expertise.
  • Partners
  • Building on previous work and refining information
  • Collections
  • Methodology • • • • • • • • • Project Curator will keep a learning diary throughout Initial introduction to curatorial practice and required reading Knowledge transfer sessions with each of the 4 Partners Project Curator will produce CLDs for each Partner Sector Knowledge Exchange event to widen scope of Review Review published (online CLDs and highlights) Guidance for Future Curators based on learning diary (online) ‘Sharing the learning ‘ events to curators, researchers Career Development support strand for the Project Curator
  • The People Chantal Knowles Mark Hall Eve Haddow Neil Curtis Pat Allan
  • Pacific Collection Review project Chantal Knowles Principal Curator, Oceania, Americas and Africa www.nms.ac.uk/connections
  • If they leave we’re stuffed! – Succession Planning Terry MacKenzie, South Lanarkshire Leisure & Culture Justin Parkes, Culture NL @nlcpeople Chantal Knowles, National Museums Scotland @NtlMuseumsScotland #MGSConf @MuseumsGalScot