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The Soap Making Process
1. MIXING 2. ROLLING 3. FINAL REFINING &EXTRUSION  4. CUTTING 5. DRYING 6. STAMPING
 
Home Soap Making <ul><li>Selecting Oils </li></ul><ul><li>Coconut Oil gives big, fluffy bubbles  </li></ul><ul><li>Olive o...
Other Ingredients <ul><li>Sugar can be used in soap recipes for making clear soap  </li></ul><ul><li>Salt: It may be of in...
The Basic Formula <ul><li>Fatty acid (oil) + Base (lye) = “A Salt” (soap) </li></ul>
Methods <ul><li>Cold Process Method:   This process is widely used by home-based soap makers. The neutralization stage tak...
Calculate the amount of lye you need by multiplying the amounts of each fat (including superfatting oil) in your recipe by...
1. Saponifying the fatty acids with ‘Lye” 2. Mixing and inserting additives 3. Pouring 4. Allowing to dry and taking out o...
 
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The soap making process

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The soap making process

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Transcript of "The soap making process"

  1. 1. The Soap Making Process
  2. 2. 1. MIXING 2. ROLLING 3. FINAL REFINING &EXTRUSION 4. CUTTING 5. DRYING 6. STAMPING
  3. 4. Home Soap Making <ul><li>Selecting Oils </li></ul><ul><li>Coconut Oil gives big, fluffy bubbles </li></ul><ul><li>Olive oil gives very fine, silky bubbles </li></ul><ul><li>Palm oil, something in-between </li></ul><ul><li>Avocado Oil feels very soft to the skin and makes an excellent shaving soap </li></ul>
  4. 5. Other Ingredients <ul><li>Sugar can be used in soap recipes for making clear soap </li></ul><ul><li>Salt: It may be of interest to know that the commercial soap makers use salt to separate out the glycerin which is a natural byproduct of soap making and curdle a batch of soap </li></ul><ul><li>Ammonia is an emulsifying agent that helps a mixed batch of impure oils to get together closely enough to saponify readily. As the soap cures the ammonia evaporates, leaving your bar ammonia free </li></ul><ul><li>Borax is an emulsifying agent that helps a mixed batch of impure oils to get together closely enough to saponify readily. When the soap is used the borax acts as a water softener. </li></ul>
  5. 6. The Basic Formula <ul><li>Fatty acid (oil) + Base (lye) = “A Salt” (soap) </li></ul>
  6. 7. Methods <ul><li>Cold Process Method: This process is widely used by home-based soap makers. The neutralization stage takes place during the molding stage. Our kits follow this method. </li></ul><ul><li>Semi-boiled Method: After the soap mixture traces, heat is added using a double-boiler to cause the soap to neutralize before being molded. </li></ul><ul><li>Full-boiled Method: This method is where all ingredients are prepared in one large container. Heat is added causing neutralization. Large commercial manufacturers use this method to achieve the by-product called glycerin. </li></ul><ul><li>Transparent Soap: This soap is made clear by adding solvents such as alcohol to prevent crystals from forming as the soap cools. Transparent soap is often referred to as Glycerin Soap. </li></ul>
  7. 8. Calculate the amount of lye you need by multiplying the amounts of each fat (including superfatting oil) in your recipe by the number intersected by the fat and your desired excess fat column. Then add the different lye amounts for the different fats in your recipe together. Example: You want to calculate the amount of lye for a recipe that calls for for 16 oz. of lard as it's only fat. You want your finished soap to have 5% excess fat. Intersecting the Lard row with the 5% column, you find the number 0.132 . Multiply 16 (fat wt) by 0.132 = 2.1 oz. of lye. Animal Fat Desired Excess Fat In Finished Soap 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% 8% 9% 10% Goat Fat Lanolin Lard Mutton Fat Tallow 0.138 0.075 0.139 0.138 0.140 0.137 0.074 0.137 0.137 0.139 0.136 0.073 0.136 0.136 0.138 0.134 0.073 0.135 0.134 0.136 0.133 0.072 0.133 0.133 0.135 0.131 0.071 0.132 0.131 0.133 0.130 0.070 0.130 0.130 0.132 0.129 0.070 0.129 0.129 0.131 0.127 0.069 0.128 0.127 0.129 0.126 0.068 0.126 0.126 0.128 0.125 0.067 0.125 0.125 0.126 Vegetable Fat 0% 1% 2% 3% 4% 5% 6% 7% 8% 9% 10% Canola Oil Castor Oil Coconut Corn Oil Cottonseed Olive Oil Palm Oil Peanut Oil Safflower Soybean Sunflower 0.137 0.129 0.184 0.136 0.138 0.136 0.142 0.136 0.136 0.136 0.137 0.136 0.127 0.182 0.134 0.137 0.134 0.141 0.134 0.134 0.134 0.135 0.134 0.126 0.180 0.133 0.136 0.133 0.139 0.133 0.133 0.133 0.134 0.133 0.125 0.178 0.131 0.134 0.131 0.138 0.131 0.131 0.131 0.132 0.131 0.123 0.177 0.130 0.133 0.130 0.136 0.130 0.130 0.130 0.131 0.130 0.122 0.175 0.129 0.131 0.129 0.135 0.129 0.129 0.129 0.130 0.129 0.121 0.173 0.127 0.130 0.127 0.133 0.127 0.127 0.127 0.128 0.127 0.120 0.171 0.126 0.129 0.126 0.132 0.126 0.126 0.126 0.127 0.126 0.118 0.169 0.125 0.127 0.125 0.131 0.125 0.125 0.125 0.126 0.125 0.117 0.167 0.123 0.126 0.123 0.129 0.123 0.123 0.123 0.124 0.123 0.116 0.166 0.122 0.125 0.122 0.128 0.122 0.122 0.122 0.123 Weight of water needed = Total weight of fat in recipe times 0.38
  8. 9. 1. Saponifying the fatty acids with ‘Lye” 2. Mixing and inserting additives 3. Pouring 4. Allowing to dry and taking out of molds
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