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E-mail Management
Topics <ul><li>Organising your Inbox </li></ul><ul><li>Keeping your mail file small and manageable </li></ul><ul><li>Searc...
Why is it important to organise your inbox? <ul><li>If you don’t then you run the risk of letting email  </li></ul><ul><li...
Monitoring Your Mailbox Size
Organising Your Inbox – One Method <ul><li>Create folders for filing </li></ul><ul><li>Create Working Folders – Answer, Re...
Organising Your Inbox – One Method <ul><li>Handling the Four Different Types of e-mails </li></ul><ul><li>1.    Emails req...
How to keep your Inbox small <ul><li>Delete emails that require no action or you’ve acted on within 2 mins </li></ul><ul><...
Filing <ul><li>Many hours lost searching across multiple locations for information </li></ul><ul><li>File the most importa...
Another Approach – using Outlook Calendar <ul><li>Schedule a time to act  </li></ul><ul><li>on a complex e-mail: </li></ul...
Used to automate the filing of emails based on Sender, Recipient, DL or subject Click on  Tools-Rules & Alerts Using the R...
More Tips on E-mail Management <ul><li>Unsubscribe from all the mailing lists that you plan on reading …. but never do  </...
Replying to Emails <ul><li>Don’t use Reply to All unless all parties can benefit  </li></ul><ul><li>from your response </l...
Deleting Mail <ul><li>Deleting your Inbox is not sufficient </li></ul><ul><li>You must empty your “Deleted Items” folder <...
Attachments <ul><li>Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Send an email alert to presence of a large file (e.g. “…latest </li></ul><ul><l...
Viewing by File Size
Searching in Outlook <ul><li>Basic Search </li></ul><ul><li>Click on Tools - Find </li></ul><ul><li>Creating Your Own Sear...
Demonstration <ul><li>Using the Contacts and Global Address List </li></ul><ul><li>Outlook Calender: Booking Resources </l...
And Finally… <ul><li>Do not check email continually – Work Offline helps if you need to focus </li></ul><ul><li>Check your...
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Managing your e-mail

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  • Basic rules of processing: Creating Folders rules - 1.    Process the items in order 2.    Process them one at a time 3.    Never put anything back into your inbox With each email ask yourself: 1.    What is this? 2.    What’s the next action? Handling the Four Different Types of e-mails: 1.    Emails requiring no action 2.    Emails requiring actions that take less than two minutes 3.    Emails requiring actions that take longer than two minutes 4.    Emails containing information you need to keep Emails requiring no action: Delete Emails requiring actions: Act and then delete. Emails requiring actions longer than 2 mins: 1. If someone sends you an email that you are going to need to write a detailed response, and you don’t have time to do that right now, put it into the “Answer” folder 2. If you get an email containing reading material that will take you more than 2 minutes, such as a project plan or a lengthy article, put it in the “Read” folder. Again, if you can read it right away, please do so. 3. Sometimes you get an email on which you need to wait for an answer from someone else before you can respond, forward on or write a todo on Next Action list, then put into Follow Up folder Creating a Next Action list: If an action from one of your emails is that you need to “Call Fred,” and you don’t want to do it right then (it will take more than two minutes), then write “Call Fred” on your next action list, and delete the email. Filing: Only the most important emails should be filed. Further, they should be filed in with the rest of your document files — on your H: drive’s “Documents” folder. So when you need to keep an email for future reference, go up to the File &gt; Save As command and save it into the relevant section of your “Documents” folder. You should have to search for personal documents (including emails) in one place. This particularly helps reducing the size of your mail files when you file away mails containing attachments.
  • Basic rules of processing: Creating Folders rules - 1.    Process the items in order 2.    Process them one at a time 3.    Never put anything back into your inbox With each email ask yourself: 1.    What is this? 2.    What’s the next action? Handling the Four Different Types of e-mails: 1.    Emails requiring no action 2.    Emails requiring actions that take less than two minutes 3.    Emails requiring actions that take longer than two minutes 4.    Emails containing information you need to keep Emails requiring no action: Delete Emails requiring actions: Act and then delete. Emails requiring actions longer than 2 mins: 1. If someone sends you an email that you are going to need to write a detailed response, and you don’t have time to do that right now, put it into the “Answer” folder 2. If you get an email containing reading material that will take you more than 2 minutes, such as a project plan or a lengthy article, put it in the “Read” folder. Again, if you can read it right away, please do so. 3. Sometimes you get an email on which you need to wait for an answer from someone else before you can respond, forward on or write a todo on Next Action list, then put into Follow Up folder Creating a Next Action list: If an action from one of your emails is that you need to “Call Fred,” and you don’t want to do it right then (it will take more than two minutes), then write “Call Fred” on your next action list, and delete the email. Filing: Only the most important emails should be filed. Further, they should be filed in with the rest of your document files — on your H: drive’s “Documents” folder. So when you need to keep an email for future reference, go up to the File &gt; Save As command and save it into the relevant section of your “Documents” folder. You should have to search for personal documents (including emails) in one place. This particularly helps reducing the size of your mail files when you file away mails containing attachments.
  • The point is have SOME system
  • The point is have SOME system
  • Transcript of "Managing your e-mail"

    1. 1. E-mail Management
    2. 2. Topics <ul><li>Organising your Inbox </li></ul><ul><li>Keeping your mail file small and manageable </li></ul><ul><li>Searching for mails </li></ul><ul><li>Using the Outlook Calendar </li></ul>
    3. 3. Why is it important to organise your inbox? <ul><li>If you don’t then you run the risk of letting email </li></ul><ul><li>dominate your working day </li></ul><ul><li>Every email sent or received is stored on the email server, </li></ul><ul><li>including attachments </li></ul><ul><li>Ultimately requires increased storage and server capacity </li></ul>
    4. 4. Monitoring Your Mailbox Size
    5. 5. Organising Your Inbox – One Method <ul><li>Create folders for filing </li></ul><ul><li>Create Working Folders – Answer, Read, Follow up </li></ul><ul><li>Create a ‘Next action’ list resulting from your emails </li></ul>Ask Yourself – “What is this? What’s the next action?”
    6. 6. Organising Your Inbox – One Method <ul><li>Handling the Four Different Types of e-mails </li></ul><ul><li>1.    Emails requiring no action </li></ul><ul><li>2.    Emails requiring actions that take < 2 mins </li></ul><ul><li>3.    Emails requiring actions that take > 2mins </li></ul><ul><li>4.    Emails containing information you need to keep </li></ul>
    7. 7. How to keep your Inbox small <ul><li>Delete emails that require no action or you’ve acted on within 2 mins </li></ul><ul><li>File your responses to the emails you’ve acted upon </li></ul><ul><li>Put the rest in working folders (Answer, Read, Follow Up) </li></ul><ul><li>Clear out the working folders once a day, preferably first thing </li></ul><ul><li>Review your next action and project list once a day and take action </li></ul><ul><li> This system may not work for you – if not, </li></ul><ul><li> devise your own system! </li></ul>
    8. 8. Filing <ul><li>Many hours lost searching across multiple locations for information </li></ul><ul><li>File the most important emails and those with big attachments </li></ul><ul><li>on your H: drive rather than in your Inbox </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li>This system may not work for you – if not, </li></ul><ul><li> devise your own system! </li></ul>
    9. 9. Another Approach – using Outlook Calendar <ul><li>Schedule a time to act </li></ul><ul><li>on a complex e-mail: </li></ul><ul><li>1. Estimate when and for </li></ul><ul><li>how long you want to </li></ul><ul><li>act on an email </li></ul><ul><li>2. Highlight the email </li></ul><ul><li>from your Inbox folder </li></ul><ul><li>3. Drag the mail </li></ul><ul><li>to your Calendar </li></ul>
    10. 10. Used to automate the filing of emails based on Sender, Recipient, DL or subject Click on Tools-Rules & Alerts Using the Rules Wizard to manage your mail
    11. 11. More Tips on E-mail Management <ul><li>Unsubscribe from all the mailing lists that you plan on reading …. but never do </li></ul><ul><li>If you use folders within your e-mail: you may want to consider sub-folders. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: for the APAC conference - </li></ul><ul><li> APAC.speakers, APAC.staff, APAC.logistics </li></ul><ul><li>Do a weekly, monthly, annual spring clean </li></ul>
    12. 12. Replying to Emails <ul><li>Don’t use Reply to All unless all parties can benefit </li></ul><ul><li>from your response </li></ul><ul><li>Be careful of the BCC function </li></ul><ul><li>Scenario </li></ul><ul><li>The project lead asks for feedback on a project </li></ul><ul><li>that several people are working on, </li></ul><ul><li>including you. </li></ul><ul><li>Reply or Reply All? </li></ul><ul><li>You determine </li></ul>
    13. 13. Deleting Mail <ul><li>Deleting your Inbox is not sufficient </li></ul><ul><li>You must empty your “Deleted Items” folder </li></ul><ul><li>You should empty your Sent Items folder </li></ul><ul><li>(after filing) </li></ul>
    14. 14. Attachments <ul><li>Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Send an email alert to presence of a large file (e.g. “…latest </li></ul><ul><li>presentation is on S:Common”) rather than attach the file </li></ul><ul><li>Consider whether it’s more appropriate to paste from an application </li></ul><ul><li>into the body of your e-mail if the proposed attachment is small </li></ul><ul><li>(depends on formatting) </li></ul>
    15. 15. Viewing by File Size
    16. 16. Searching in Outlook <ul><li>Basic Search </li></ul><ul><li>Click on Tools - Find </li></ul><ul><li>Creating Your Own Search Folder </li></ul><ul><li>Allows you to define your own query which will check all folders </li></ul><ul><li>e.g. &quot;Mail from specific people” </li></ul><ul><li>How to find text in an email </li></ul><ul><li>Open the email in its own Window </li></ul><ul><li>Click on F4 or Edit-Find </li></ul>
    17. 17. Demonstration <ul><li>Using the Contacts and Global Address List </li></ul><ul><li>Outlook Calender: Booking Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Using Outlook To Assign Tasks </li></ul>
    18. 18. And Finally… <ul><li>Do not check email continually – Work Offline helps if you need to focus </li></ul><ul><li>Check your email once an hour throughout the day for urgent matters </li></ul><ul><li>Each time that you check your email, process all of it according to the </li></ul><ul><li>rules you’ve developed </li></ul><ul><li>Choose the time of day that you’re least productive to focus on responding </li></ul><ul><li>to and clearing e-mail </li></ul>
    19. 19. Handouts available Questions?
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