Staff awards 2013 - winners gallery

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Murdoch University 2013 Staff Awards

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Staff awards 2013 - winners gallery

  1. 1. Congratulations!Barbara Holland2012 Senate Medalfor exceptional service to the UniversityBarbara HollandChair, Rockingham EducationDevelopment GroupPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?My first small involvement with the university was before theRockingham campus was created and it looked like it mightbe located in Kwinana. My late husband Gary and I foughthard to have the university located in Rockingham. Beforehis death in 2008, Gary asked a packed function room tofight to keep Murdoch at Rockingham to enable students tofurther their tertiary education in their local community.After meeting with Murdoch, a group of like minded peoplecame together and the Rockingham Education DevelopmentGroup was formed in 2010. Our aim was to lift the profile ofthe campus and help to raise the aspirations of our studentsby raising money to provide scholarships.
  2. 2. Congratulations!Barbara Holland2012 Senate Medalfor exceptional service to the UniversityEven great individuals usually have a team behind them. Isthere anyone from your team and the Murdoch communityyou’d like to acknowledge for your success? What havethey done to help you?Absolutely, without the support of the members of theRockingham Education Development Group and AndrewTaggart and Jennifer Turner of Murdoch we could not haveachieved our goals and raised sufficient funds to be able to offerscholarships to students this year. Andrew and Jennifer put theprocesses in place and the REDG have worked tirelessly toraise the funds.What kind of achievements would you like to see from theMurdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?I‘d like to see the Rockingham campus grow and reach itsmaximum potential in regard to student numbers, class sizes,student activities and community engagement activities. I wouldlike to see it become a vibrant university campus.You’ve won a 2012 Senate Medal. Please tell us whatinspires you to go beyond the call of duty in your role atMurdoch?Primarily it was to improve the aspirations of the Rockinghamcommunity. Murdoch had already made a contribution by itsvery presence and so it was important to support Murdoch inany way I could.
  3. 3. Congratulations!Karen Olkowski2012 Senate Medalfor exceptional service to the UniversityKaren OlkowskiAcademic Support OfficerSchool of Veterinary and Life SciencesPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I joined the University in 1987, initially in the AdmissionsOffice. For the majority of my years at Murdoch my majorrole has been to assist our HDR students and supervisors innegotiating the administrative matters that go withundertaking a higher degree.I strive to ensure that our higher degree students, and theirsupervisors, can spend their time concentrating on theirprimary concern – their research project. I believe thatdedicated help with administrative matters gives students theopportunity of more time to concentrate on the task at handresulting in quicker completion times.
  4. 4. Congratulations!Karen Olkowski2012 Senate Medalfor exceptional service to the UniversityEven great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?There are two important people I would like to acknowledge.Anne Randell, my supervisor for 10 years in the GraduateCentre. The skills I have today are thanks to Anne‘s carefuland supportive mentoring during the many years we workedtogether; and Carolyn Jones, whose kindness andconfidence in my abilities allowed me to continue working atwhat I love doing most.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?I would like to see Murdoch continue as a University thatcares about people. A place where students and staff aretreated as individuals and not simply as numbers. Where toplevel teaching and research is underpinned by helpfulness,kindness and warmth.You’ve won a 2012 Senate Medal. Please tell us whatinspires you to go beyond the call of duty in your role atMurdoch?I have a great emotional attachment to Murdoch and its peopleand I am passionate about assisting our higher degreestudents in achieving their goal. Many undertake higherdegrees at a time in their life where study is one of manycompeting priorities. I thrive on the people interaction my rolebrings, learning about the projects our researchers areundertaking and being able to help solve problems when it isneeded most.
  5. 5. Congratulations!Michael Calver2012 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Teaching(General Teaching Excellence)Michael CalverAssociate ProfessorSchool of Veterinary and Life SciencesPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?With the exception of some time off to play research scientistand schoolteacher in the 1980s, I have been at Murdoch asa student or staff member since 1975. In my current positionI run the biology building Happy Hour, serve as a researchassistant for Honours and graduate students and giveundergraduates critical commentary on the quality of theirexplanations for skipping class. Or, in more conventionallanguage, I see myself as an all-round academic,contributing to university administration, research andteaching at all levels of the curriculum.
  6. 6. Congratulations!Michael Calver2012 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Teaching(General Teaching Excellence)Even great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?My academic colleagues are the most inspirational bunch oftalented, patient, good-humoured eccentrics ever collected inone place in Australia since 1788. Without them, I wouldsurely quit. I must also thank the dedicated technicians,especially Claudia Mueller, Scott Munro and Michael Taylor,whose planning and attention to detail underpin everysuccessful laboratory class and field trip.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?We have lost our sense of priority and attempt to doeverything at once and too quickly, to the detriment of eachindividual endeavour. Shakespeare put it neatly:Although I joy in thee,I have no joy of this contract tonight.It is too rash, too unadvised, too sudden,Too like the lightning, which doth cease to beEre one can say ―It lightens.‖Id like to see us set priorities and devote our energies toachieve them one by one, instead of chasing after everythingat once and risking achieving nothing. Which, to return toteaching, is drawing boundaries around open-ended tasks sothat they do not swallow everything and then ask for more.You’ve won an award for Excellence in Teaching. Pleasetell us what you enjoy most about helping people tolearn?The pleasure of teaching comes from meeting challenges.The two biggest challenges are (i) presenting material that Ivetaught before with the freshness and vibrancy thatcharacterised the first presentation (after all, it is the first timefor the students - well, most of them) and (ii) surviving -teaching is open-ended, so I must draw a line in what I give orthe demands of teaching will engulf my whole working life.
  7. 7. Congratulations!Robert Mead2012 Vice Chancellor’s Awardfor Excellence in Teaching(General Teaching Excellence)Robert MeadAssociate ProfessorSchool of Veterinary and Life SciencePlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I first joined Murdoch University 32 years ago, in 1981. I amAssociate Professor of Biochemistry and Head of theMolecular and Biomedical Sciences AOU in the School ofVeterinary and Life Sciences. I am currently the AcademicChair for the Forensic Biology and Toxicology and MolecularBiology majors and have been an Academic Chair for over20 years.In 2004 I initiated the Forensic Biology and Toxicologycourse and have enjoyed developing its professionalexperience components and its core units, particularlyForensic Toxicology and Bodies of Evidence which give thestudents a real life, hands-on CSI experience. I have, overthe past 30 years, also developed a Clinical Honoursprogram involving the major hospitals and medical researchcentres in Perth, which has assisted more than 100 of ourgraduates to develop careers in medical research or asmedical practitioners.
  8. 8. Congratulations!Robert Mead2012 Vice Chancellor’s Awardfor Excellence in Teaching(General Teaching Excellence)Even great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?I have been fortunate to have been awarded 3 ViceChancellor‘s Teaching Excellence Awards, a ViceChancellor‘s Citation for Excellence in Enhancing Learning,a National Carrick Citation for Outstanding Contributions toStudent Learning and to have been presented with an ALTCNational Teaching Excellence Award by Julia Gillard in 2009.Receiving the National Award was a particularly humblingexperience. I contribute much of this recognition to mycolleague, Emeritus Professor Max Cake, with whom I haveworked for some 40 years. He has been a role model for meand his professionalism and meticulous attention to detailhas taught me a great deal. The climate of student and staffsupport, which characterized the School of BiologicalSciences and Biotechnology, has also been a major factor.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?I would like to see the Murdoch Community fully embrace thenew opportunities that the School re-alignments, therevisions to our degree structures and the presence of thenew Fiona Stanley Hospital offer us. In a parochial sense, Iwould like to see our already substantial involvement inmedical research blossom further and for us to maintain andcontinue to develop our strong links with WA Police, theState Forensic Pathologists, PathWest and the DPP so thatwe continue to be recognized as the major provider offorensic education in Western Australia.You’ve won an award for Excellence in Teaching. Please tellus what you enjoy most about helping people to learn.I particularly enjoy contextual teaching and illustratingbiochemical and toxicological principles with case histories sothat students identify with the concepts and become inspired bytheir direct relevance to medicine or forensics. I enjoy drawingupon my 10 years of experience in the health system and usingthat as a scaffold upon which to assemble practical examples. Ithen like to apply my experience in radio and television toarticulate each scenario with humour and dramatic flair toenable me to develop the complexities in an engaging way, fromthe ―ground up.‖ I particularly enjoy one-on-one teaching in myoffice to assist and support students who are struggling withdifficult areas, but my ultimate pleasure is derived from seeingour graduates build exciting careers as medical specialists,medical researchers and as forensic investigators.
  9. 9. Congratulations!Wendy Cumming-Potvin2012 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Teaching(General Teaching Excellence)Wendy Cumming-PotvinSenior LecturerSchool of EducationPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I joined Murdoch University in 2001. As a Senior Lecturer inthe School of Education, I have taught in a wide range ofundergraduate and postgraduate units, especially in theareas of literacies and research methods. Dual aspects ofmy role involve supporting pre-service teachers to becomeeffective graduate teachers and assisting postgraduatestudents to become rigorous and creative researchers.
  10. 10. Congratulations!Wendy Cumming-Potvin2012 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Teaching(General Teaching Excellence)Even great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?I would like to acknowledge the inspiration and positive rolemodeling from four senior academics in the School ofEducation at Murdoch University - Professors Barry Down,Jan Herrington and Simone Volet, and Adjunct ProfessorWayne Martino. Ms. Tania Corbett, Academic SupportOfficer/Administrative Assistant in the School of Education,has also provided valuable support. On a personal note, Iwould like to thank my husband, Yves Potvin, for his on-going support of my teaching and research activities overmany years.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?I would like to see the development of cross-disciplinaryresearch centers in the areas of social justice, education,health and applied science. It would be wonderful to haveMurdoch University‘s strengths in equity, teaching andresearch increasingly acknowledged on the local, state,national and international fields.You’ve won an award for Excellence in Teaching. Pleasetell us what you enjoy most about helping people tolearn?I enjoy scaffolding students to understand complex ideas,which can be related to everyday life. Taking a step back fromtraditional teaching, I enjoy being guided by students as theymanage their own learning and critique a variety of texts. Ilove the buzz of exploring books, magazines, films, articles,the Web, etc. to try out new ideas with my students. Mostimportantly, helping people to learn allows me to develop asan individual and contribute productively to the community.
  11. 11. Congratulations!Living and Learning withTechnology Team2012 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Teaching(Team Teaching)Jan Herrington, Daniel Boase-JelinekHelen Kosniowska, Jenni ParkerValerie PattonSchool of EducationPlease tell us when each of you first joined the Murdochcommunity and what contribution your team makes tothe university as a whole?Our team is relatively new to the University, apart from Helenwho has been at the University since 1996 when sheenrolled as a higher degree student. Jan commenced aProfessorial appointment in March 2009, then Jenni andDaniel came in 2010, and Val joined the community in 2011.Our team‘s contribution extends out from the learningenvironment we have created for our students, to ourcolleagues, to the university and beyond—through ourscholarly contributions based on our research on ourteaching practice. We enjoy sharing our teaching methodswith others!
  12. 12. Congratulations!Living and Learning withTechnology Team2012 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Teaching(Team Teaching)Is there anyone outside of your team in the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?Our team members have complementary skills that help ussupport each other incredibly well. But we could only functionwith the support of the School Dean, Judy MacCallum andthe IT support provided in the School by Annette Jessett.You’ve won an award for Excellence in Teaching. Pleasetell us what your team enjoys most about helping peopleto learn?Without doubt the aspect teaching Living and Learning withTechnology that gives us the most joy is seeing the studentsgrow in confidence in their use of technology in personal,research and teaching contexts. Their learning in this unitimpacts on their daily lives, and it is so gratifying toexperience their learning journey, often moving from fear andtrepidation to confidence and achievement. It is a journey ofquestioning, problem solving, collaboration, sharing,mentoring and creating, not only with technology and tools butthe ways students approach a problem and the strategies theydevelop to solve it. We learn as much as they do in ourcollaborative efforts.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?Many of our students study with us externally. We go outof way to ensure that the external study experience isevery bit as challenging and fulfilling as the on-campusexperience. Our team would like to see the Murdochcommunity celebrated for its excellence in distancelearning across all the disciplines, offering externalstudents the same quality learning experiences as internalstudents, and being recognised nationally and internallyfor this effort.
  13. 13. Congratulations!Yingchi Chu2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningYingchi ChuSenior LecturerSchool of Management and GovernancePlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I started at Murdoch University as a lecturer in 2002 andhave taught Media and Chinese Studies since then in theSchool of Arts and in the School of Management &Governance. I have contributed to curriculum developmentand taught many units across disciplines of media studies,film studies and Asian studies from the perspective ofresearch-informed teaching.I have always aimed to create a pleasant and productivelearning environment for my students. I see myself as aknowledge creator and transmitter, a cultural broker whobridges cross-cultural divides and encourages interculturalunderstanding.
  14. 14. Congratulations!Yingchi Chu2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningEven great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?There are too many to fit into this box. I single out all myguest lecturers for FDN110 Australia in Asia, in particular,Professor Richard Higgott, Dr Jane Hutchison, AssociateProfessor Jan Gothard, and Professor David Hill, who haveshown me what counts as a brilliant standard for researchinformed lectures. I also like to acknowledge ProfessorGarry Rodan and Associate Professor Carol Warren asinspirational researchers, Murray Brennan as a mostsupportive colleague, and Associate Professor AndrewWebster as a most admirable leader of staff. I thank mystudents for spurring me on.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?The evolution of a fully collegiate environment, optimizing thenurturing of students, and the encouragement of scholarlyactivities. I would like to see that the University form moreand closer links with Asian societies and foster theenhancement of ‗Asia Literacy‘. I would be particularlypleased if some of our Media students were able to go toChina to write and make films about China.You’ve won an award for Excellence in EnhancingLearning. Please tell us what you enjoy most abouthelping people to learn?The most rewarding feeling in teaching is witnessing mystudents growing into well-skilled critical individuals whoare capable and willing to challenge their teachers at theirown game. It is particularly pleasant when during theirlearning trajectory students have encouraged what I amdoing, especially by helping me discover more effectiveteaching techniques. I have found that a friendly and yetdisciplined teaching and learning environment is a veryspecial treat in my professional life.
  15. 15. Congratulations!Wayne Greene2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningWayne GreeneAssociate ProfessorSchool of Veterinary and Life SciencesPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I joined Murdoch in late 1998 and currently contribute to theUniversity in three major ways. As Academic Chair of theBiomedical Science major, I play a multi-faceted role thatincludes providing day-to-day help and advice to students. Ialso teach molecular genetics and aspects of developmentand cancer biology to Biomedical and Veterinary Sciencestudents.Last, but not least, I conduct biomedical research intolymphoid cancers, specifically human leukaemia and caninelymphoma. I also have a strong theoretical interest in themolecular basis of evolution, which has recently yieldedseveral publications in both peer-reviewed and popularscience journals.
  16. 16. Congratulations!Wayne Greene2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningEven great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?The innovative unit ―Advances in Medical Science‖ that Icoordinate would not be possible without the tremendousteaching contributions provided by academic colleagueswithin the School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, as well asfrom scientists from various medical research institutesaround Perth. In addition, the laboratory and workshopsessions in all my teaching units receive excellent technicalsupport within the School.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?I would like to see continued emphasis on high qualityteaching and research, because if we get those things right,everything else will look after itself. Being in the Biomedicalfield, I would also like to see a strong nexus developbetween Murdoch and the Fiona Stanley hospital, both fromthe perspective of teaching and research. Eventually, I wouldlike to see the establishment of a Murdoch Medical School,which I believe would provide manifold benefits andopportunities to the University.You’ve won an award for Excellence in EnhancingLearning. Please tell us what you enjoy most abouthelping people to learn?I‘m a firm believer in the adage that ―Education is not fillinga bucket, but lighting a fire‖. Thus, the thing I most enjoyabout teaching is wowing students with amazing andrelevant examples that illustrate the scientific conceptsbeing covered in class. It brings great satisfaction toobserve how initially reluctant students can becomeintensely interested in the subject matter once theyappreciate its inherent beauty and applicability.
  17. 17. Congratulations!Philip Evans andLorraine Finlay2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningPhilip Evans and Lorraine FinlaySchool of LawPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?Lorraine Finlay joined Murdoch University in 2010 from theOffice of the Director of Public Prosecutions (WA), where sheworked as a State Prosecutor. She has also previouslyworked at the High Court of Australia, initially as the LegalResearch Officer and then as an Associate to The Hon.Justice J D Heydon. Phil Evans joined the University in 2010from the University of Notre Dame where he was Head of theGraduate School of Law.Lorraine has made a significant contribution to thedevelopment of our Criminal Law program, as well ascoordinating the Law School Moot Program. Phil Evans hasmade a significant contribution to the development ofGraduate Programs through the authorship, and coordinationof the Post Graduate Certificate in Construction Law and wellas the mooting programs.
  18. 18. Congratulations!Philip Evans andLorraine Finlay2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningEven great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?Without the encouragement and support of the former Deanof the School of Law, Professor Gabriel Moens, we would nothave been able to individually participate in the mootingprograms. Immediately upon joining the University in 2004,Professor Moens established the Moot Court Bench andinitiated participation in a wide range of mooting programs.These programs have not only assisted in creatinginvaluable research and advocacy training for our studentsbut also has established an international reputation for theMurdoch School of Law which aspires to be a truly global lawschool. We would also like to acknowledge the dedicationand commitment of our moot students who continuallyinspire us to maintain our personal involvement in mooting.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?We would like to see the maintenance of the current level ofmooting in the Law School. Our mooting activities andsuccesses currently distinguish us from all other law schoolsin Western Australia. Mooting provides an opportunity forour students to develop both research and advocacy skills.As we aspire to be a research university this is an importantaspect of our future. We would also like to see theestablishment of a strong research culture in the Law Schoolwhilst still maintaining a commitment to excellence inteaching.You’ve won an award for Excellence in EnhancingLearning. Please tell us what you enjoy most about helpingpeople to learn?We both hold the philosophy that there is no greater callingthan to assist students, be they school leavers or lifelonglearners, to enjoy the learning experience. It is not entirelyaltruistic as the pleasure we receive in watching our studentsgraduate or participate in an international mooting competitionis so personally rewarding. We both have had experience inlegal practice but the satisfaction that we have gained byassisting in some small way in making the law both apleasurable and rewarding experience cannot be measured inmonetary terms.
  19. 19. Congratulations!Danny Toohey2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningDanny TooheyLecturerSchool of Engineering and Information TechnologyPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I joined Murdoch as an Information Technology Academic in2000, and have lectured in Databases and BusinessIntelligence. I have had several other roles in that timeincluding Academic Chair of Information Systems. I havealso been a member of several committees and workingparties including the Learning and Teaching Committee andwas Chair of the Committee on University Entrance from2010 – 2012. The IT Discipline has a significant transnationalcohort in Singapore and Dubai, and I am the first point ofcontact for students studying at those campuses.You’ve won an award for Excellence in EnhancingLearning. Please tell us what you enjoy most abouthelping people to learn?I really enjoy the opportunities for interaction with studentsfrom many different backgrounds and life experiences thatmy lecturing role provides; similarly, I have had theopportunity to develop long term relationships with severalcolleagues in Singapore who have brought a differentperspective to the units in which we teach. I believe that asound grounding in databases is essential for any ITgraduate; I enjoy hearing from many of our graduates oncethey are in the workplace, that this belief is true!
  20. 20. Congratulations!Danny Toohey2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningEven great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?I have been very lucky to work with so many wonderfulpeople from the Academic and Professional staff of all partsof the University during my time at Murdoch. So many ofthese colleagues are extremely committed to the Universityand the students, and work hard to achieve the bestoutcomes possible; I find this degree of commitment to beinspiring and it is this that motivates me in my work.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?In three years time, we will have just about completed thefirst complete iteration of the new MUCC courses. It will begreat if are able to achieve what we have set out to as aresult of the MUCC. Similarly, we are about to enter a periodof radical change to the way we do transnational education(TNE). I hope, that as a result of these changes, we will beable to be regarded as an exemplar of quality TNE and growin this regard because of a reputation for high quality courseofferings in TNE.
  21. 21. Congratulations!Jonathan Whale2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningJonathan WhaleSenior LecturerSchool of Engineering and Information TechnologyDr Jonathan Whale is a successful recipient of a 2013 ViceChancellor‘s Citation for Excellence in Enhancing Learningfor innovative design of curriculum and resources in EnergyStudies and Engineering, conveyed to students bysuccessful involvement in scholarly communities withacademia and industry.
  22. 22. Congratulations!Lisa Young2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningLisa YoungAssociate ProfessorSchool of LawPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I joined Murdoch law school in 1993, having previouslypractised as a lawyer and taught at UWA. I am an all roundacademic. I teach across all years of the degree in bothcompulsory and elective subjects, with family law being myspecialty; I write extensively in that area.I have held many administrative positions, including ChairingUniversity committees (eg. Student Appeals, PromotionsAppeals), Academic Chair and until recently the SchoolTeaching and Learning co-Dean.In relation to teaching, my practice background, coupledwith my commitment to quality teaching, has meant I haveplayed a significant role in skills development within the lawschool; at the University level, particularly as Chair ofStudent Appeals, I have had significant input into thedevelopment of teaching related policies and providedassistance to other schools in dealing with assessmentrelated difficulties.
  23. 23. Congratulations!Lisa Young2013 Vice Chancellor’s Citations forExcellence in Enhancing LearningEven great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?I would like to thank Professor Ralph Simmonds, our firstDean, who gave me a chance at Murdoch, and allowed meto take the time at the start of my career to put time intodeveloping both my teaching and research. I have also hadincredible support from a number of colleagues who alwayshave time to talk about my teaching, and give invaluablefeedback and also inspire me with their own dedication toteaching; in that regard I would particularly like to mentionSonia Walker, Jo Goodie and Neil McLeod. I am alsograteful to Bev Thiele and Dave Holloway, who as part of theSenior Executive of this University have always shownappreciation for my efforts and entrusted me withconsiderable responsibility as a result.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?Murdoch has a wealth of wonderful staff, willing to workincredibly hard to advance the reputation of the University. Ihope that over the next few years we can find more internalcohesion, and foster respect for what we all bring to thisendeavour, so that we can focus our energies on what reallymatters: delivering stimulating and inspiring courses andadvancing knowledge in our different areas.You’ve won an award for Excellence in EnhancingLearning. Please tell us what you enjoy most abouthelping people to learn?I don‘t think there is anything more important thaneducation, but it has to be about engaging students tothink deeply about issues. I don‘t actually like having torank students, so for me I enjoy trying to find ways tomake all parts of the course interesting, includingassessments. I love it when I can help students discoverthat even subjects considered to be boring – and I havetaught many of those – have their interesting aspects;you just have to find a way to engage them. I love that inteaching I can open students‘ eyes to looking at issuesfrom a different perspective; challenge their intuitiveresponse to issues by helping them to see thecomplexity of life and introduce them to a range of waysof understanding an issue.
  24. 24. Congratulations!Mark P McHenry2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Research(Early Career Development and Achievement)Mark P McHenryResearch FellowSchool of Engineering & Information TechnologyPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I joined Murdoch as a ‗mature age‘ undergrad student in2003 studying physics (energy studies) and sustainabledevelopment. My subsequent postgrad research focused onenergy systems, and how climate change mitigation andadaptation may occur in parallel in rural WA.My studies honed my skills in ‗late nighters‘ and nurtured aproductive caffeine habit, fitting in seamlessly within Murdochculture. My roles revolve around being pulled in at the lastminute to ‗get things done yesterday‘. My various part-timepositions and remote work habits (I‘m also on the farm)enabled a productive approach of cross-pollinating disparateresearch areas.
  25. 25. Congratulations!Mark P McHenry2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Research(Early Career Development and Achievement)Even great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?Firstly, big thanks to Katrina O‘Mara, Philip Jennings, DavidDoepel, August Schlapfer, Jonathan Whale, NavidMoheimani, Karne de Boer, Parisa Bahri, Trevor Pryor,among many others. Also, having so many part-timepositions and associated forms over the years, thanks to theMurdoch administrative staff who help wade through it all.The ability of our staff and committees to ‗bend rules withoutbreaking them‘ is one of our most productive attributes,giving us a competitive advantage in so many areas. Thanksfor supporting an army of us academics with various levels ofpeople skills, day after day ;)You’ve won an award for Excellence in Research. Pleasetell us what you enjoy most about research?I like to research a variety of topics that I find intrinsicallyinteresting, yet practical, and (presently) enjoy the challengeof working out how to make a living doing it. My ruralbackground and Murdoch training enabled me to jump in thedeep end by using fundamentals and first principles. I havemy teeth into some really varied and fun stuff, including newenergy technologies, renewable energy, bioenergy, socialwellbeing, genetics, Indigenous subsistence, forestry,economic development, mathematical frameworks, electricvehicles, distributed power, desalination, human rights, waterand sanitation, microalgae and macroalgae culture,agricultural productivity, etc.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?I‘d like to see the Murdoch community make more from thecream of the work that our students produce, from PhD,Masters, Honours, to special projects. Much has manyelements of raw world-class thinking and professional-levelresearch. By selectively leveraging and refining productiveindividuals and their work into our conventional research canopen doors at many levels. Many of these individuals willbecome good mates, excellent Murdoch ambassadors, andgenuinely great people. Becoming embedded within a widernetwork of collaborative relationships within various sectorsmake tackling some great challenges more interesting,useful, productive, and fun.
  26. 26. Congratulations!Chun-Yang Yin2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Research(Early Career Development and Achievement)Chun-Yang YinLecturerSchool of Veterinary and Life SciencesPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I have been a Lecturer with Murdoch University since 2010. Ihave been involved in undergraduate teaching (extractivemetallurgy and chemistry), tutoring, unit coordination andpostgraduate supervision.Teaching at Murdoch University is a very fulfilling endeavordue to the close-knit nature of student-lecturer relationshipsand the steadfast support provided by a cohesive Murdochcommunity. I am currently representing Chemistry andAnalytical Sciences as a Research Committee member forthe School of Veterinary and Life Sciences.
  27. 27. Congratulations!Chun-Yang Yin2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Research(Early Career Development and Achievement)Even great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?I would like to sincerely acknowledge my close collaborator,Dr Zhong-Tao Jiang from the School of Engineering andInformation Technology. This award would not have beenpossible without his support and collaboration. I am alsoindebted to the technical and administration staff fromchemistry and minerals science, namely, Linda Morton (nowat School of Education), Andrew Foreman, Ken Seymour,Sue Farr, Martelle Chamberlain, Stewart Kelly, Tina Oteri,Peter Fallon (Vet School), Kris Parker, David Zeelenbergand Dr Marc Hampton for their unwavering and unconditionalsupport. Finally, I would like to thank Dr David Ralph as wellas Professors Peter May and Glenn Hefter for theirmentorship.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?I would like the Murdoch community to continue to developits strengths of research excellence while at the same time,maintaining high quality teaching.You’ve won an award for Excellence in Research. Pleasetell us what you enjoy most about research?There are many aspects that I enjoy about my research.Since my research is highly-interdisciplinary encompassingapplied chemistry, minerals/materials engineering andenvironmental science, it affords me the opportunity tocollaborate with other well-regarded scientists. Since 2010, Ihave co-authored research publications with 10 Murdochacademics with expertise in chemistry, minerals engineeringand physics. In addition, I have established close researchlinkages and published journal articles with activeresearchers from the United States, Australia, France, SaudiArabia, Malaysia and Indonesia.I also like the fact that research elements can be readilyincorporated into lectures and students mentoring. Thisaspect is quite rewarding, not just to the lecturers concerned,but it also provides students with invaluable and criticalresearch experience that complements traditional classroomknowledge that they acquire during lectures.
  28. 28. Congratulations!Bonnie Barber2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Research(Outstanding Research Development)Bonnie BarberAssociate Dean Research/Chair In PsychologySchool of Psychology and Exercise SciencesPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I arrived at Murdoch in 2004, when I was hired to enhancethe research culture in the School of Psychology. Mentoringis one of my priorities – working with colleagues andstudents to build research capacity and increase researchproductivity in the School. I see my role as including bothleading by example and supporting colleagues in theirresearch efforts. In more recent years, after serving on theARC College of Experts, I have broadened my focus tohelping increase our ability to win national competitive grantfunding across the university, through grant writingworkshops and feedback on proposals.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?I am excited about the emerging strategic focus on qualitytranslational research. In particular, training our researchstudents about the interface between their empirical studies,the need for public dissemination of results, and the focus onpolicy implications is important. As we work to increase theimpact of our research, and the engagement of stakeholders,I would like to see more focus on winning competitive grantfunding to facilitate those endeavors.
  29. 29. Congratulations!Bonnie Barber2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Research(Outstanding Research Development)Even great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?My success in research is attributable to my team. My PhDstudents have been central to all of the research I haveconducted here at Murdoch, and I am very grateful to BreeAbbott and Corey Blomfield, who together helped me tolaunch the 9-year ARC-funded Youth Activity ParticipationStudy. Karina Annear, Cathy Drane, Gaynor Edwards, LynVernon, and Stuart Watson have also been vital to itssuccess, along with my colleagues Helen Davis and KathyModecki.I could not imagine a more supportive school context inwhich to conduct research, and my colleagues SuzanneDziurawiec, Laurence Hartley, and Ngaire Donaghue wereessential supports during my transition to Murdoch and oftensince, encouraging me to aim high, helping to solveproblems, and offering invaluable peer coaching. Finally, Iam grateful to Eric von Dietze and the Human ResearchEthics team, whose facilitative philosophy has helped us toovercome seemingly insurmountable obstacles in thecomplex dance that is research with young people.You’ve won an award for Excellence in Research.Please tell us what you enjoy most about research?Our research is focused on the health and wellbeing ofyoung people. Being able to learn from teenagers whatmakes them feel happy, included, and motivated isfascinating. I enjoy bringing the voices of young people intodiscussions about policies designed to improve their lives,and through the work in our Healthy Adolescent Pathwayslab here at Murdoch, we have had a number ofopportunities to do just that.I also enjoy being a member of the broader researchcommunity – networking with those studying similarquestions about youth around the world. Research givesme the opportunity to maintain collaborations withoutstanding international mentors, including JacquelynneEccles, my long time collaborator.
  30. 30. Congratulations!Rudolf Appels2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Research(Outstanding Research Development)Rudolf AppelsProfessorSchool of Engineering and Information TechnologyPlease tell us when you first joined the Murdochcommunity and how would you describe your role?What contribution does your role make to the universityas a whole?I joined Murdoch University staff in September 2001, after 27years in CSIRO-Plant Industry in Canberra, to establish theagriculture biotechnology laboratory for molecular markers tobe used in wheat and barley breeding.This role combined classical genetic analyses with cuttingedge genome sequencing and analysis, and in establishingthis expertise at Murdoch it was utilized in animal systems. Inparticular, a collaboration with Jackie Phillips and JohnMcCooke led to the identification of the gene underpinning anew polycystic kidney disease mutation in rats (anexperimental model for understanding the disease inhumans).
  31. 31. Congratulations!Rudolf Appels2013 Vice Chancellor’s Award forExcellence in Research(Outstanding Research Development)Even great individuals usually have a team behind them.Is there anyone from your team and the Murdochcommunity you’d like to acknowledge for your success?What have they done to help you?Murdoch has a strong community of researchers in theagriculture and bioinformatics space, particularly in the highend technology for translating research findings to industry.The top ratings in Crop Science, Agriculture Biotechnologyand Animal Science as well as Australia-China Centre forWheat Improvement (a joint research centre fundedfederally) recently awarded to Murdoch University reflectsthe depth of commitment and support an individual such asmyself gains.What kind of achievements would you like to see fromthe Murdoch community in the next 3 -5 years?My focus is wheat from both the molecular and industry sidesand as the analysis of the entire complement of genes inwheat matures, I would like to see the post-genomic periodof wheat deliver fundamental discoveries underpinning theunique features of wheat as well as new and noveldiagnostics and breeding lines to the industry.You’ve won an award for Excellence in Research. Pleasetell us what you enjoy most about research?Research is an activity that is both creative and demanding,and provides a personal challenge which can sometimeslead to significant contributions to society. In the Universitysystem great emphasis is placed on publications and I viewthese as works of art as well as careful science, and thusprovide an enormous amount of enjoyment and satisfactionto produce.

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