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    Uganda's statistical  abstract 2009 Uganda's statistical abstract 2009 Document Transcript

    • UGANDA BUREAU OF STATISTICS 2009STATISTICAL ABSTRACT
    • FOREWORDThe 2009 Statistical Abstract is this year’s major annual publication from the UgandaBureau of Statistics. The abstract is part of Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS)efforts to support data user needs. The Bureau provides relevant, reliable and timelyofficial statistics needed to support evidence-based policy formulation and monitordevelopment outcomes. Statistical Abstracts present information derived fromsurveys, censuses and administrative records from Ministries, Departments andAgencies (MDAs). The statistics are compiled based on agreed standards,definitions and classifications in accordance with international principles andguidelines.Information contained in this year’s abstract covers socio-economic governmentsectors including, but not limited to, Environment, Population, Education, Health,Agriculture, Labour, Income and Expenditure, Energy, Business, National Accounts,Banking and Currency, Prices, Trade, Migration and Tourism, Transport andCommunication and Government Finance. This year, statistics on Informal Cross-Border Trade (ICBT) are also included. Presentations in this publication are in theform of tables, graphs and charts with explanatory text therein. Detailed tables on allchapters are appended. In addition, data from these tables may also be used forfurther analysis.UBOS appreciates the continued cooperation of MDAs in availing the requisite datain time to produce this publication. Special thanks go to UBOS technical staff whocompiled the 2009 Abstract.Copies of this publication are available at the Statistics House, Plot 9, Colville Street,Kampala. Further information can be obtained from the official UBOS website:www.ubos.orgWe sincerely hope that our stakeholders will find the information in this publicationuseful. UBOS continues to appreciate comments from stakeholders that are aimed atimproving the quality of our future publications.J. B. Male-Mukasa June 2009Executive Director
    • LIST OF ACRONYMSASL Above Sea LevelBATU British American Tobacco, UgandaBill.Shs Billion ShillingsBOP Balance of PaymentsCAA Civil Aviation AuthorityCBR Crude Birth RateCDO Cotton Development OrganisationCDR Crude Death RateCG Central GovernmentCFR Central Forest ReserveCOMESA Common Market for Eastern and Southern AfricaCPI Consumer Price IndexCSI Construction Sector IndexCY Calendar YearDDA Decentralised District AdministrationDRC Democratic Republic of CongoEAC East African CommunityEEC European Economic CommissionEPS Express Penalty SchemeEU European UnionFY Fiscal YearGDP Gross Domestic ProductGIR Gross Intake RateGO Gross OutputGFS Government Finance StatisticsGWh Giga Watt hoursH/C Health CentreHFO Heavy Fuel OilHSSP Health Sector Strategic PlanIoP Index of ProductionIC Intermediate ConsumptionIHS Integrated Household SurveyIPT Intermittent Presumptive TreatmentISCO International Standard Classification of OccupationISIC International Standard Industrial ClassificationKCC Kampala City CouncilKWh Kilo Watt hoursLFR Local Forest ReserveLPG Liquefied Petroleum GasMAAIF Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and FisheriesMbps Mega bits per secondMFPED Ministry Finance, Planning and Economic Development i
    • MGLSD Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social DevelopmentMoES Ministry of Education and SportsMOH Ministry of HealthMill.Shs Million shillingsMm MillimetresMRH Mean Relative HumidityMt Metric tonnesMTN Mobile Telephone NetworkMW Mega Wattsn.a Not Availablenes Not elsewhere statedNSDS National Service Delivery SurveyNUSAF Northern Uganda Social Action FundOPI Occupational Permits IssuedPPI Producer Price IndexPPI-M Producer Price Index- ManufacturingPS Plans SubmittedRH Relative HumiditySADC Southern African Development CommunitySACU Southern African Customs UnionShs ShillingsSITC Standard Industrial and Trade ClassificationSq.Kms Square KilometresTFR Total Fertility RateTT TetanusUA Urban AuthoritiesUBI Uganda Business InquiryUBOS Uganda Bureau of StatisticsUCDA Uganda Coffee Development AuthorityUDHS Uganda Demographic and Health SurveyUEDCL Uganda Electricity Distribution Company LimitedUETCL Uganda Electricity Transmission Company LimitedUHSBS Uganda HIV/AIDS Sero-Behavioural SurveyUNDP United Nations Development ProgrammeUNEPI Uganda National Expanded Programme on ImmunisationUNHS Uganda National Household SurveyUPE Universal Primary EducationURA Uganda Revenue AuthorityUSE Universal Secondary EducationUTA Uganda Tea AuthorityUTL Uganda Telecommunications LimitedVA Value AddedCommon Symbol“-“ Not Applicable/Nil ii
    • EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe Statistical Abstract is an annual publication from Uganda Bureau of Statistics.The abstract gives a statistical summary of socio – economic data for Uganda. Somefigures in this edition may be different from those in the earlier editions due to regularupdates. Note that most of the 2008 data presented in this edition is provisional.The publication is divided into four major chapters which are preceded by a glossaryof definitions and general information on Uganda. It ends with a set of sequentiallyarranged appendix tables for the readers’ information. All the tables in the StatisticalAppendix are serialised using a combination of numbers and alphabets like Table1.1A, Table 2.3 B and so on. The reader should refer to the tables while reading thetext.The number of districts has been increasing due to sub-divisions of some districts.This issue has population data for the 80 districts as of June 2008. Some district datatables however still show data for the original 56 districts, while others show data forthe onetime 76 districts.Chapter one (1) presents Environmental statistics covering land, climate, forestryand rural water supply with the following high lights:Land • Area of Uganda is about 241,550.7 sq. km. • Land area is 199,807.4 sq. km. • Open water and swamps cover about 41,743.2 sq. km.Rainfall • The rainfall trend during 2008 was in line with the long term average for most centres. • Kampala and Jinja recorded rainfall below the long term average after May 2008. • Mbarara recorded a very sharp increase in rainfall between July and September 2008.Humidity • Monthly mean relative humidity at 06.00 and 12.00 hours for 2008 was in line with the long term average for most of the selected centres.Temperature • Maximum and minimum temperatures for all selected centers showed similar patterns with the long term average in 2008.Rural water supply • The largest source of water for the rural population is spring water followed by boreholes. iii
    • Forestry • Total nominal value for household consumption of firewood and charcoal increased by 81.6 percent from Shs. 18.0 bill to Shs. 32.7 bill. between 1996/97 and 2005/06.Chapter two (2) covers Socio-economic statistics which include Population,Education, Labour Force, Employment and Earning, Income and Expenditure,Prices, Public Health and Crime. Below are the highlights of the Chapter:Population statistics • According to the 2002 census: o 2002 Population was 24.2 million persons. o Annual Population growth rate between 1991 and 2002 censuses was 3.2 percent. o 2002 population density was 123 persons /Sq.Km. o 49 percent of the population was below 15 years. o The overall life expectancy was 50.4 years in 2002. • Total population (2009 mid year projected) is 30.7 million persons. • Total Fertility Rate (UDHS 2006) was 6.7 Births per woman. • Infant Mortality Rate (UDHS 2006) was 75 Per 1,000 Live births.Education • Primary enrollment was 7.4 million in 2008. • The ratios of primary pupils to teachers and pupils to classrooms were 57 and 72 respectively in 2008. • The enrollment of orphans in primary and secondary schools decreased by 4 and 19 percent respectively in 2008. • The secondary school gross enrollment rate was 21 percent in 2008 • Overall literacy rate for 2005/06 was 69 percent among persons aged 10 years and above.Labour force, employment and earnings • Total labour force increased by 11 percent between 2002/03 and 2005/06. • By occupation, 70 percent of the working population was in agriculture. • The average size of civil service increased by 6 percent in 2008. • In real terms, the labour cost index increased by 22 percent in 2008. • Food processing dominated the industry with a 65 percent share of total employment in 2008. • Numbers of employees for selected manufacturing establishments decreased by 2 percent while the wage bill increased by 16 percent in 2008.Income and expenditure • 11 percent increase in monthly Household expenditure was recorded between 2002/03 and 2005/06. • A 10 percent real increase in per capita expenditure was recorded in 2005/06. • 45 percent of the Household expenditure was on food, beverage and tobacco. • Nearly 8.4 million Ugandans lived in poverty in 2005/06. • The proportion of the poor population reduced from 39 percent in 2002/03 to 31 percent in 2005/06. iv
    • • Nationally, on average, income inequality decreased from 0.428 in 2002/03 to 0.408 in 2005/06.Consumer Prices • High food prices were registered in 2008 resulting to inflation rate of 15.8 percent. • Energy, fuel and utilities’ prices increased by 9.1 percent during 2008. • The annual headline inflation rate for 2008 doubled to 12 percent from 6.1 percent recorded in 2007.Health • Immunization coverage declined over the period 2004 to 2008 for all types of vaccines. • Malaria has remained the leading killer disease over the period 2006-2008. • Latrine coverage at national level improved from 58 percent in 2006 to 63 percent in 2008. • HIV prevalence was reportedly higher among women in the age group 15 – 49 years, at 7.5 percent, compared to their male counterparts in the same age bracket, at 5.0 percent.Crime • The number of cases reported to Police increased by 21 percent in 2008. • Between 2006 and 2008, there was a significant 42 percent decrease in the number of road accidents. • In 2008, serious crimes reported decreased by 17 percent. • There was an 18 percent reduction in the offences reported under the Express Penalty Scheme.Chapter three (3) presents statistics on production, which include Business,Agriculture and Fisheries, Industry, Producer Prices, Energy, Building andConstruction, Transport and Communications, Tourism and Migration. Below are thehighlights of the Chapter:Turnover • Total registered turnover in the business sector was Shs. 4,506 trillion in 2008.Agriculture • Share of agriculture, forestry and fishing to total GDP at current prices is 23.7 percent in 2008/09. • Both beef and milk production increased by 8.0 percent in 2008. • Coffee procured increased by 20.8 percent in 2008. • Banana production increased by 1.5 percent in 2008. v
    • Industry • Metal production significantly increased by 20.4 percent in 2008 while textiles, clothing and footwear decreased by 19.3 percent.Producer prices • PPI-M (Combined) recorded the highest increase of 21.2 percent in 2008 due to increased prices in all industry groups. • Significant price changes were registered in chemicals, paint, soaps and foam products and metal products.Energy • Trend of petrol sales increased by approximately 31.0 percent in 2008 • Sales of diesel and LPG increased by 10.8 and 13.7 percent respectively in 2008. • Electricity power generation increased by 14.2 percent in 2008. • Electricity units sold in Uganda increased by 30 percent in 2008.Building and construction • Overall, prices in the construction sector rose by 15.2 percent in 2008. • Prices of inputs for both residential and non-residential construction rose by an average of 14.0 percent in 2008. • Domestic cement consumption decreased by 3.3 percent in 2008.Transport and communications • Newly registered vehicles increased by 31.0 percent in 2008. • The volume of cargo handled at Entebbe airport declined by approximately 7.0 percent in 2008. • Total international bandwidth increased by 47.5 percent in 2008. • The volume of both ordinary and registered letters handled by Posta (U) Ltd decreased by 11.0 percent in 2008. • Total number of cellular phone subscribers increased by 65.7 percent in 2008.Tourism and Migration • Generally, tourism contributed 3.7 percent to GDP in 2008. • Total arrivals and departures increased by 32 and 30 percent respectively in 2008. • Tourist arrivals through Entebbe Airport increased by 52 percent in 2008. • National park visitors increased by 9 percent in 2008.Chapter four (4) presents, statistics on Money Related Issues including NationalAccounts, External Trade, Public Finance, Banking and Currency and Insurance.Below are the highlights of the Chapter:National Accounts • GDP annual growth rate for 2008/09 was 7.0 percent. • The GDP per capita annual growth rate for 2008/09 was 3.6 percent. • Private consumption expenditure share of GDP increased to 80.3 percent in 2008/09. • Between 2007/08 and 2008/09 the following sectors registered the indicated growth rates; o Agriculture: 2.6 percent. vi
    • o Industry: 3.8 percent. o Services: 9.4 percent.External Trade • Trade balance worsened during 2008. • COMESA and the European Union regional blocs were the main destinations for Uganda’s exports in 2008. • The Asian continent remained the main source of Uganda’s imports recording US $ 1,574 mill. in 2008. • Uganda’s informal export earnings increased to US $ 1.3 bill. in 2008. • Sudan was the main final destination for Uganda’s informal exports in 2008.Government Finance • Tax revenue had the largest share of 81.2 percent of total revenue in 2008. • Recurrent expenditure increased to Shs.2,070 bill. in 2007/08 from Shs.1, 820 bill in 2006/07. • The education sector expenditure remained the largest in Local Government recurrent expenditure in 2007/08.Banking and currency • Net foreign assets increased by 33 percent in 2008. • Currency in circulation increased to 1,074 bill. in 2008. • Commercial banks lending rates increased by 0.8 percent. • Commercial banks assets increased by 39.1percent. • Uganda currency deposits in commercial banks increased by 31.6 percent in 2008. • Trade & Commerce sector still takes the largest share of commercial banks’ loans.Insurance • Life insurance policies issued increased by 23.1 percent in 2007. • Life insurance gross premium income increased by 93 percent in 2007. • Insurance companies’ claims paid and outstanding for non life category increased by 25.8 percent in 2007. • Life insurance paid and outstanding claims registered an increase of 79.2 percent in 2007. vii
    • GLOSSARYAgriculture This term is used to describe crops, livestock, and poultry and fishing activities.Assets Assets are the property of a business. They may be classified as: Current assets; consisting of cash, stock and book debts; Fixed assets; consisting of buildings, plant and machinery; and intangible assets being the value of goodwill or patents.Aviation fuel This is more purified kerosene fuel used in aviation gas-turbine engines.Base period The reference period, to which a series of index numbers relate, this is usually expressed as 100.BCG This is a vaccine against Tuberculosis(Bacillus Camete Guerin)Bio mass – energy This is energy that is obtained from fuel wood, charcoal and crop residues.Broad money – (M2) This consists of currency in circulation, demand, time and savings deposits. The deposits are held by the private sector and exclude those held by the central government.Broad money - (M2) A This is equivalent to (M2) plus certificates of deposit.Broad money - (M3) This is equivalent to (M2) A plus foreign currency deposits.Crime An offence for which one may be punished by lawDiesel fuel This is fuel used for internal combustion in diesel engines and as a burner fuel in heating installations such as furnaces. Another name for this product is automotive gasoil.DMBs It stands for Deposit Money Banks. It refers to commercial banks in our institutional settings.DPT This is a vaccine against three diseases namely: Diphtheria, Pertusis (whooping cough) and Tetanus.Economic activity Covers all market production and certain types of non-market production, including production and processing of primary products for own consumption, own-account construction (owner occupied dwellings) and other production of fixed assets for own use.Employment This includes all wage and salary earners and managers in all businesses, and directors actively working in incorporated businesses. It includes those working full-time or part-time and those who are permanent or temporary.Employed Persons Persons in paid employment who work for wage or salary in cash or in kind or both and have a formal job attachment.Employment status Refers to the status of an economically active person with respect to his/her position at his/her place of work and his/her mode of remuneration.Enterprise This is a single legal entity or a combination of legal entities. It may also be a sole legal unit carrying out one or more activities at one or more locations. It may also be several establishments.Establishment This is an economic unit engaged in one or predominantly one viii
    • kind of economic activity under single ownership or control and is situated at a single physical location.Exports Outward flows comprising goods leaving the economic territory of a country to the rest of the world.Foreign reserves They consist of those external assets available to and controlled by central banks for direct financing of balance of payments imbalances, for indirectly regulating the magnitude of such imbalances through intervention in exchange markets to affect the currency exchange rate, and/or for other purposes. Included are monetary gold, Special Drawing Rights (SDRs), reserve position in the fund, foreign exchange assets (consisting of currency, deposits and securities) and other claims.Heavy Fuel Oil This is residual fuel obtained after refinery of petroleum products. It is used in ships and industrial large-scale heating installations as a fuel in furnaces or boilers.Gross Domestic Product The value of goods and services produced within the economic territory of the country.Gross Enrolment Rate The ratio of pupils in primary school (regardless of age) to the country total population aged 6-12 years.Gross Intake Rate The ratio of the pupils enrolled in primary one regardless of age to the country total population aged six years.Gross Output The production value as compiled from total receipts from industrial and non industrial goods and services in an economy, adjusted for stock changes but excluding Excise Duty and Indirect Taxes. This is Gross Output at factor cost.Health Centre II Out-patient clinics treating common diseases and offering antenatal care. According to the Ugandan governments health policy, every parish is supposed to have a Health Centre II.Health Centre III Health centres with facilities which include an operation room and a section for minor surgery headed by a clinical officer. Every county should have this facility.Health Centre IV The Health Centre IV is a mini hospital with the kind of services found at Health Centre III. It serves a county or a parliamentary constituency.Imports Inward flows of goods from the rest of the world into the economic territory of a country.Index Number A number that shows relative change in price or volume between the base period and another period.Industry This is an economic activity undertaken by a business establishment as specified in the ISICIntermediate Consumption This is the value of goods and services that are used in the process of production of other goods and services rather than final consumptionKerosene This is fuel used as an illuminant for lighting and in some cases for cooking.Large Business Business establishment employing 100 or more personsLabour force Currently active population aged 14 to 64 years who were “employed” or “unemployed” during the last 7 days ix
    • Labour force participation Ratio of all economically active persons aged 14-64years to therate total number of persons aged 14-64 yearsLiquid Petroleum Gas Liquid Petroleum Gases (LPG’s) are hydrocarbons, which are gaseous under conditions of normal temperature and pressure but are liquefied by compression or cooling to facilitate storage, handling and transportation.Loan A loan may be money or securities supplied by one party (the lender) to a second party (the borrower) in a transaction in return for a promised future payment by the borrower. Such transactions normally include the payment of interest due to the lender as per agreed repayment schedules between the two parties.Net Enrolment Rate The ratio of pupils in primary school aged 6 – 12 to the country total population aged 6 -12 years.Net Intake Rate The ratio of the pupils aged six in primary one to the country total population aged 6 years.Non-traditional exports Refers to commodities other than traditional exports that have recently featured in Uganda’s export trade.Occupation Refers to the nature of task and duties performed during the reference period preceding the interview by persons in paid employment, unpaid family work or self-employment jobs.Overdraft A type of a short-term loan particularly used to supply short-term working capital to tide over the production cycle or finance for seasonal requirements.Passengers Travellers in a car, bus, train, plane or ship who are not driving or part of the crew. These also include those embarked and disembarked.Petrol This is a light hydrocarbon fuel used in positive ignition engines. Another name used for this type of fuel is premium motor spirit.Prison Place where people are kept as a punishment for crimes they have committed or while awaiting trial.Prisoner A person kept in prison as a punishment for a crime or while waiting for trial.Proportional morbidity ratio This is the proportion attributable to a given cause of illness. It is a proxy for the prevalence of sickness in a population.Residents Persons whose usual residence is Uganda including those whose nationality is not Ugandan.Retained Reserves This is the increase in value of a currency or the increase in value of fixed assets consisting mainly of freehold land and buildings.Revaluation reserves These kinds of reserves arise due to the revaluation of fixed assets but cannot be paid out as dividends because they are not realised profits. They merely restate the value of an asset.Teaching Service Teaching Service comprises of teachers of primary schools, secondary and technical schools, commercial and technical colleges and institutions.Traditional Civil Servants These are employees of line ministries and self accounting government departments.Trade Balance This is the difference in value between the country’s visible imports and exports. x
    • Traditional Exports Refers to long-term export cash crops introduced to Uganda long time ago. That is Coffee, Cotton, Tea and Tobacco.Treasury Bill These are short-term bearer securities with maturities of 91 days, 182 days, 273 days or 364 days issued by Bank of Uganda.Underemployment Refers to persons who work less than 40 hours per week, but were willing and available to work additional hours within the 7 last seven days.Value Added The value of outcome when factors of production interact to avail goods and services. Value added technically is the difference between the value of gross output and the value of intermediate inputs and comprises the following: (a) Compensation of employees (b) Consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) (c) Licenses (d) Rent (e) Interest (f) Operating surplus (usually) net profit or loss and other small itemsVAT Tax levied on goods and services consumed within a country.Wage Bill All cash payments made by employers in return for labour provided by the employees. The payments include salaries and wages, overtime, holiday pay, bonuses, commissions, sick leave and any other allowances paid in cash to the employees. xi
    • GENERAL INFORMATION ON UGANDAGeographical IndicatorsLatitude 4o12’N & 1o29’SLongitude 29o34’E & 35o0’WAltitude (minimum ASL) 620 metres (maximum ASL) 5,110 metresTotal surface area 241,550.7 km2Area under land 199,807 km2Area under water and swamps 41,743 km2Temperature 15-31oCRainfall 735 -1863 mm/year2008 Economic IndicatorsGDP at current market prices 28,340 billion ShsPer capita GDP at current market prices 956,081 ShsGDP growth rate at constant (2002) market prices 8.3 percentPer capita GDP growth rate at constant (2002) market prices 4.9 percentContribution of agriculture to GDP at current market prices 21.5 percentBalance of payments surplus 29.0 million US$Inflation rate 12.1 percentBudget deficit as a percentage of GDP (2008/09) 7.2 percentDemographic and socio-economic indicatorsTotal population (2009 mid-year)* 30.7 millionPercentage urban (2009 mid-year)* 14.8 percentPopulation of Kampala district (2009 mid-year)* 1.53 millionSex ratio of total population (2002 census) 95 males per 100 femalesPopulation density (2002 census) 123 persons/km2Infant Mortality rate (2002 census)* 76 per 1000 live birthsLife Expectancy at birth (2002 census)* 50.4 years Male 48.8 years Female 52.0 yearsPupil Teacher ratio (Primary 2008) 57Pupil Classroom ratio (Primary 2008) 72Student Teacher ratio (Secondary 2008) 21Student Classroom ratio (Secondary 2008) 36Note: * Demographic estimates were based on the Census 2002 final results.Only population of gazetted city, municipalities and towns was considered as urban population. xii
    • MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS, UGANDA COUNTRY PROFILE Goal/Indicator Progress Target 2000 2003 2005/06 2015 Goal 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger1 Poverty head count (P0) 33.8 37.7 31.1 28.02 Poverty gap - (P1) 10.0 11.3 8.73 Underweight moderate and severe 22.8 20.4 12.5 Goal 2: Achieve universal primary education4 Net enrolment ratio in primary education 84.0 90.0 84.0 100.05 Literacy rate of 15-24 year-olds 78.8 80 84.0 Goal 3: Promote gender equality and empower women6 Ratio of girls to boys in primary education 0.99 0.99 0.96 1.07 Ratio of girls to boys in secondary education 0.79 0.82 1.08 Ratio of girls to boys in tertiary education 0.55 1.09 Ratio of literate women to men 15 -24 years. 0.84 0.9 0.92 1.010 Proportion of seats held by women in parliament 19.0 25.0 50.011 Share of women in wage employment in the non-agricultural sector 39.2 28.2 50.0 Goal 4: Reduce child mortality12 Under – five mortality (per 100,00 live births) 152 137 5613 Infant mortality rate 88.4 76.0 31.014 Proportion of 1 year old children immunized against measles 56.8 68.1 90.0 Goal 5: Improve maternal health15 Maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000 live births) 505 435 13116 Proportion of births attended by skilled health personnel 39.0 41.1 90.0 Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases17 HIV/AIDS orphans (thousands) 884.018 HIV/AIDS prevalence among 15-24 year pregnant women 4.9*19 Condom use at last higher-risk sex among 15-24 year olds 49.8 55.1 52.9 Male 65.3* Female 27.1*20 Contraceptive prevalence rate among women 15-49 years 23.0 64.5 23.6 Proportion of 15-24 year olds who have comprehensive knowledge of21 28.0 32.1 HIV/AIDS Goal 7: Ensure environmental sustainability22 Proportion of land area covered by forest 21.3 18.323 Proportion of population with access to improved water source (urban) 87.0 84.0 100.024 Proportion of population with access to improved water source (rural) 57.0 53.5 58.5 62.025 Proportion of population with access to improved sanitation 82.0 87.0 Goal 8: Develop a global partnership for development26 Unemployment rate of 15-24 year olds 6.3 3.427 Debt relief committed under the HIPC initiative $69.7M $86.6M28 Debt service as a percentage of exports of goods and services 20.4 15.8Note: More indicators exist but are not listed above because of absence of data*- The figure is for 2002 Figures in blue are from the HIV/AIDS Sero-Behavioural Survey, 2004-05 Figures in red are from the UDHS 2005/06Source: Indicator; 1,2,4,6,7,8,9,11,23,24,25, 26 –UNHS, Uganda Bureau of Statistics 3,5,12,13,14,15,16,18,19,20 - UDHS, Uganda Bureau of Statistics 27, 28-Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development 10-Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development 22- Uganda Forestry Authority 19- 2006 UDHS, Uganda Bureau of Statistics xiii
    • xiv
    • Table of contentsFOREWORD........................................................................................................................................ 2LIST OF ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................ iEXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................................................................... iiiGLOSSARY ....................................................................................................................................... viiiGENERAL INFORMATION ON UGANDA .......................................................................................... xiiMILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS, UGANDA COUNTRY PROFILE ........................................ xiii1 Environment Statistics ................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Land ................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Rainfall ............................................................................................................................... 2 1.3 Temperature ....................................................................................................................... 3 1.4 Humidity.............................................................................................................................. 4 1.5 Rural Water Supply............................................................................................................. 4 1.6 Forestry .............................................................................................................................. 5 1.6.1 Local and Central Forest Reserves ............................................................................ 5 1.6.3 Wood production ........................................................................................................ 5 1.6.4 Consumption of charcoal and firewood....................................................................... 62 Demographic Statistics ................................................................................................................ 7 2.1 Population........................................................................................................................... 7 2.1.1 Fertility ........................................................................................................................ 7 2.1.2 Mortality ...................................................................................................................... 8 2.1.3 Life Expectancy .......................................................................................................... 9 2.2 Education.......................................................................................................................... 10 2.2.1 Primary School Education ........................................................................................ 10 2.2.2 Secondary School Education.................................................................................... 12 2.2.3 Higher Education Institutions .................................................................................... 14 2.2.4 Literacy ..................................................................................................................... 15 2.3 Labour Force, Employment and Earnings ......................................................................... 16 2.3.1 Key Labour Market Indicators ................................................................................... 16 2.3.2 Demand for labour .................................................................................................... 17 2.3.3 The Civil Service....................................................................................................... 18 2.3.4 Employment and annual wage bill for selected manufacturing establishments ......... 18 2.3.5 The Labour Cost Index ............................................................................................. 19 2.3.6 Employment and earnings survey ............................................................................ 20 2.4 Income, expenditure and poverty rates ............................................................................. 22 2.4.1 Consumption expenditure per household ................................................................. 22 2.4.2 Real Consumption Expenditure Per Capita .............................................................. 22 2.4.3 Share of Household Expenditure by Item Group ...................................................... 23 2.4.4 Poverty Trend Estimates .......................................................................................... 24 2.4.5 Inequality in Household Consumption ...................................................................... 25 2.4.6 Summary of Findings................................................................................................ 26 2.5 Prices ............................................................................................................................... 27 2.5.1 The Headline Consumer Price Index ........................................................................ 27 xv
    • 2.5.2 The Core Index ......................................................................................................... 27 2.5.3 Food-crops Index...................................................................................................... 27 2.5.4 The Energy, Fuel and Utilities (EFU Index) .............................................................. 27 2.5.5 Major Inflation Drivers over the past two years (2007- 2008) .................................... 27 2.6 Health ............................................................................................................................... 29 2.6.1 Health Units .............................................................................................................. 29 2.6.2 Immunisation Coverage ............................................................................................ 29 2.6.3 Morbidity ................................................................................................................... 29 2.6.4 Health Sector performance indicators....................................................................... 30 2.7 Crime ................................................................................................................................ 32 2.7.1 Police cases ............................................................................................................. 323 Production Statistics .................................................................................................................. 38 3.1 Turnover ........................................................................................................................... 38 3.1.1 Number of businesses with turnover by sector ......................................................... 38 3.1.2 Turnover in Businesses ............................................................................................ 39 3.2 Agriculture and fisheries ................................................................................................... 40 3.2.1 Cash crops ............................................................................................................... 40 3.2.2 Food crops ............................................................................................................... 40 3.2.3 Fish catch by water body .......................................................................................... 40 3.2.4 Livestock .................................................................................................................. 40 3.2.5 Production of Livestock products (2005-2008).......................................................... 41 3.3 Industry ............................................................................................................................. 43 3.3.1 Index of Production................................................................................................... 43 3.4 Producer Price Index ........................................................................................................ 45 3.4.1 PPI-M (Combined) Annual Changes......................................................................... 45 3.5 Energy .............................................................................................................................. 47 3.5.1 Petroleum products sales ......................................................................................... 47 3.5.3 Petroleum products imports ...................................................................................... 47 3.5.4 Electricity .................................................................................................................. 48 3.5.5 Lake Victoria Levels ................................................................................................. 49 3.5.6 Number of electricity consumers by type, 2004-2008 ............................................... 50 3.5.7 Electricity tariffs ........................................................................................................ 51 3.6 Building and Construction ................................................................................................. 52 3.6.1 Construction ............................................................................................................. 52 3.6.2 Cement Consumption ............................................................................................... 53 3.6.3 Building Statistics ..................................................................................................... 53 3.7 Transport and Communication .......................................................................................... 56 3.7.1 Transport .................................................................................................................. 56 3.7.2 Communication ........................................................................................................ 57 3.8 Migrations and Tourism .................................................................................................... 59 3.8.1 Total arrivals ............................................................................................................. 59 xvi
    • 3.8.2 Departures from 2004 - 2008.................................................................................... 59 3.8.3 Tourist arrivals in Uganda ......................................................................................... 60 3.8.4 National Parks ......................................................................................................... 61 3.8.5 Net Migration ............................................................................................................ 62 3.8.6 Accommodation Statistics......................................................................................... 624 Macroeconomic Statistics .......................................................................................................... 63 4.1 National accounts ............................................................................................................. 63 4.1.1 Gross Domestic Product ........................................................................................... 63 4.1.2 Agriculture, forestry and fishing ................................................................................ 63 4.1.3 Industry .................................................................................................................... 64 4.1.4 Services.................................................................................................................... 65 4.1.5 Expenditure on Gross Domestic Product .................................................................. 67 4.1.6 GDP by expenditure at 1 digit level basic heading .................................................... 67 4.1.7 Balance of payments ................................................................................................ 68 4.2 External Trade .................................................................................................................. 69 4.2.1 Trade balance .......................................................................................................... 69 4.2.2 Exports ..................................................................................................................... 70 4.2.3 Imports ..................................................................................................................... 71 4.2.4 The Informal Cross Border Trade Survey (ICBT)...................................................... 72 4.3 Government Finance Statistics ......................................................................................... 76 4.3.1 Introduction............................................................................................................... 76 4.3.2 Coverage .................................................................................................................. 76 4.3.3 Government revenue, 2007/08 ................................................................................. 76 4.3.4 Central Government recurrent expenditure, 2006/07 and 2007/08 ........................... 76 4.3.4 Local Government recurrent expenditure, 2007/08 ................................................... 76 4.4 Banking and currency ....................................................................................................... 77 4.4.1 Monetary Survey.......................................................................................................... 77 4.4.2 Structure of interest rates............................................................................................. 77 4.4.3 Commercial banks’ assets and liabilities ...................................................................... 77 4.4.4 Commercial banks’ outstanding loans and advances .................................................. 77 4.4.5 Annual foreign exchange rates and volumes ............................................................... 78 4.5 Insurance .......................................................................................................................... 79 4.5.1 Policies issued .......................................................................................................... 79 4.5.2 Insurance companies’ income and expenditure ........................................................ 79 4.5.3 Insurance companies’ paid and outstanding claims by class .................................... 80 xvii
    • 1 Environment StatisticsThis section presents statistics on land, climate and rural water supply.1.1 LandUganda has an area of 241,550.7 square kilometres (sq. km) of which 41,743.2 sq km are open water andswamps, and 199,807.4 sq km is land. The altitude above sea level ranges from 620 metres (Albert Nile)to 5,111 metres (Mt. Rwenzori peak). Uganda is located within the Great Lakes region of East andCentral Africa. It shares Lake Victoria with Kenya and Tanzania and Lakes Albert and Edward withthe Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Within its boundaries are lakes Wamala, Bunyonyi, Katwe,Nakivale, Mburo, Kyoga, George and Bisina.The three major rivers in Uganda are Aswa, Kagera and the Nile. There are many other smaller rivers andstreams which drain into wetlands and then lakes or form tributaries and sub-tributaries to the major rivers.The vegetation is mainly composed of savannah grassland, woodland, bush land and tropical highforest.Table 1.1 below shows the national land cover in sq. km. by type. The cultivated land cover being thelargest increased from 84,010 sq. km. in 1990 to 99,018.4 sq. km. in 2005. The second in size are thegrasslands. Those remained constant at 51,152.7 sq km for the same periods. Notably, the bush landsand woodlands decreased from 14,223.9 sq. km. and 39,740.9 sq. km. in 1990 to 11,893.6 and 29,528.1sq. km. in 2005 respectively. Similarly, plantations (hard and soft woods), tropical high forest (depletedand normal) have decreased over the period.Table 1.1: National Land cover statistics (sq km) 1990 2000 2005Built-Up Areas 365.7 365.7 365.7Bushlands 14,223.9 12,624.5 11,893.6Commercial Farmlands 684.5 684.5 684.5Cultivated Lands 84,010.0 94,526.7 99,018.4Grasslands 51,152.7 51,152.7 51,152.7Impediments 37.1 37.1 37.1Plantations - Hardwoods 186.8 153.3 138.8Plantations - Softwoods 163.8 80.0 192.0Tropical High Forest 2,740.6 2,248.2 2,036.3Tropical High Forest Normal 6,501.5 5,333.5 4,830.7Water Bodies 36,902.8 36,902.8 36,902.8Wetlands 4,840.4 4,840.4 4,840.4Woodlands 39,740.9 32,601.4 29,528.1Total 241,550.7 241,550.7 241,550.7Note: The figures indicated in the above table are based on projections. Actual vegetation studies were undertaken in 1994 based on1992 satellite imagery.Source: National Forestry Authority 1
    • 1.2 RainfallFigure 1.2.1 below shows Long Term Average and Monthly rainfall trends for the year2008 for the selected centres, that is, Gulu, Kampala, Jinja and Mbarara.In the 1st and 2nd quarter of 2008 rainfall was generally below the long term averagetrend while in the 3rd quarter rainfall was above the long term average trend. In the 4thquarter however the rainfall figures for Gulu fell slightly below the long term average trend. In 2008,the lowest rainfall was recorded in February.For Kampala centre, during the 1st half of 2008 the rainfall level was higher for some months thanthe long term average. However, the long term average was higher than the rainfall received in the2nd half of 2008. There was a drop in the December 2008 rainfall as compared to rainfall of theprevious month of November 2008.In Jinja, most months showed minimal differences between the long term average and 2008 rainfalltrends, except for September 2008 which recorded 90 mm of the long term average trendcompared to 13 mm of the rainfall of the same month. It can also be observed that both the longterm average and 2008 rainfall have generally similar movements.The rainfall movements for Mbarara for 2008 were similar to that of the long term average for mostof the months, although the 2008 rainfall was generally higher than the long term average rainfallfor the most months. The highest difference between the long term average (147.7 mm) and the2008 rainfall was recorded in September (298.5 mm). (See Statistical Appendix Table 1.2 A)Figure 1.2.1: Rainfall in selected centres, 2008Monthly Rainfall Gulu in millimeters 2
    • Monthly Rainfall Kampala in millimetersMonthly Rainfall Jinja in millimetersMonthly Rainfall Mbarara in millimeters1.3 TemperatureFor all the selected centres, mean, maximum and minimum temperature trends showedsimilar patterns to that of the long term average. However, temperature for Arua, Gulu, Kampala,Lira, Masindi and Tororo was slightly higher than the long term average. (See Statistical AppendixTable 1.3A). 3
    • 1.4 HumidityMonthly mean relative humidity at 06.00 and 12.00 hours was generally in line with the long termaverage for all the selected centres (Gulu, Jinja, Kampala and Mbarara), except for Mbararawhere the patterns differ.1.5 Rural Water SupplyThe Directorate of Water Development has the responsibility of supplying water to the ruralpopulation. Table 1.5.1 shows that above 50 percent of the rural population is served withwater although there was a slight decline of 2.3 percent in 2006 compared to 2005.Table 1.5.1: Rural water supply by source, 2003-2006 (Type and number of sources)Source 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006Spring 20,224 21,477 22,869 23,696 23,327Borehole 17,846 18,873 19,001 19,717 19,054Shallow Well 5,998 7,432 8,721 9,872 8,420Gravity Flow System 138 183 238 257 naGravity Flow System (Taps) 4,233 4,803 5,768 6,182 7,765Rural Population % coverage 51.2 53.5 56.9 60.8 58.5Source: Directorate of Water Development 4
    • 1.6 ForestryThis section presents statistics on forestry which include area on Local and Central ForestReserves, production of forestry products and values of the output for the period 2003 to 2007.Forestry products are of extremely high economic importance to Uganda due to their household,small and medium scale industrial uses. The energy sector is characterised by heavy dependenceon bio-mass resources which provide more than 90 percent of the national total energy needs. Bio-mass is the dominant energy resource for households, small and medium scale industries such aslime, brick and tile making and a number of agro-based industries.1.6.1 Local and Central Forest ReservesIn Table 1.6.1, the area in hectares under forests for both the Central Forest Reserve(CFR) and Local Forest Reserve (LFR) was determined under the National Bio-mass Study(1995). In all the regions, the proportion of land under Central Forest Reserves (CFR) was higherthan the Local Forest Reserves. Of the four regions, Eastern had the largest proportion (2.6percent) under Local Forest Reserves, followed by Central (0.5 percent), Northern (0.3 percent)and Western (0.1 percent). For more information on Local and Central Forest Reserves seeTable 1.6 A in the Statistical Appendix.Table 1.6.1: Share of total area under forests by region, 1995 CFR Percent of LFR Percent of Total Forest Reserve Region CFR (1) Hectares Total LFR (2) Hectares Total AreaCentral 303,358 99.5 1,576 0.5 304,934Eastern 56,479 97.4 1,531 2.6 58,010Northern 556,825 99.7 1,447 0.3 558,272Western 356,037 99.9 431 0.1 356,468Uganda 1,272,699 99.6 4,985 0.4 1,277,684Note: (1) CFR – Central Forest Reserve (2) LFR – Local Forest ReserveSource: National Forestry Authority.1.6.3 Wood productionUganda has been registering a steady increase in the total wood production over the last five yearsand this trend is likely to continue into the future. The booming construction industry andinadequate supply of the alternative sources of fuel has pushed up the demand for woodconsumption in commercial, industrial and other use sectors which in 2007 surpassed woodused as fuel by households as shown in Table 1.6.2 below.Table 1.6.2: Wood fuel and other wood uses by percentage of total, 2003 - 2007Category 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007Wood used as fuel by Households 60.8 60.5 60.2 59.8 45.0Wood for other uses 39.2 39.5 39.8 40.2 55.0Total 100 100 100 100 100Source: National Forestry Authority 5
    • 1.6.4 Consumption of charcoal and firewoodTable 1.6.3 shows the value of household expenditure on firewood and charcoal in both monetaryand non-monetary terms as reported in the Household Expenditure Surveys. For a period ofabout 10 years, the total nominal value increased by 81.6 percent, from Shs. 18.0 billion in 1996/97to Shs 32.7 billion in 2005/06. The value of charcoal consumption more than doubled, whilethe value of firewood consumption increased by 67.7 percent for the same period.Table 1.6.3: Household consumption of firewood and charcoal (million Shillings)Item 1996/97 2002/03 2005/06Charcoal 4,076 6,936 9,345Firewood 13,967 20,677 23,425Total 18,043 27,613 32,770Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 6
    • 2 Demographic Statistics2.1 PopulationUganda’s population has continued to grow over a period of time from 9.5 millions in 1969 to 24.2millions in 2002. Population increased at an average annual growth rate of 3.2 percent between1991 and 2002. The projected 2009 mid-year population stands at 30.7 millions as shown in figure2.1.1. More than half of Uganda’s population (51 percent) are females. The general population isincreasingly becoming younger with a proportion of the children (under 18 years) having increasedfrom 51 percent in 1969 to 56 percent in 2002. The proportion of the elderly persons (60 years andabove) on the other hand decreased from 5.9 percent in 1969 to 4.6 percent in 2002.Figure 2.1.1: Census population, 1969, 1980, 1991 and 2002 and mid year (2009) projection 35 30.7 30 24.2 25 20 Million 16.7 15 12.6 9.5 10 5 0 1969 1980 1991 2002 2009 Year2.1.1 FertilityThe fertility levels have remained high over the past 3 decades, with the Total Fertility Rate (TFR)of about 7 children per woman. According to the 2006 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey,the TFR has slightly reduced to 6.7 children per woman. The TFR is higher in the rural compared tothe urban areas. Figure 2.1.2 below shows the trend of TFR over the period 1991 to 2006. 7
    • Figure 2.1.2: Fertility Trends, 1991- 2006 7.2 7.1 7.1 7.0 Births per 1000 6.9 6.9 6.9 6.9 6.8 6.7 6.7 6.6 6.5 1991* 1995 2000 2002* 2006 YearNote: 1991 and 2002 data is from population and housing censuses while data for 1995, 2000 and 2006 is from UDHS2.1.2 MortalityThere has been a general improvement in mortality levels. The infant mortality rate declined from122 to 75 deaths per 1,000 live births between 1991 and 2006 while the under five mortalitydeclined from 203 to 137 deaths per 1,000 live births over the same period. Figure 2.1.3 showsthe trend of IMR and Under Five Mortality over the period 1991 to 2006Figure 2.1.3: Infant and Under Five Mortality Trends, 1991- 2006 250 203 200 162 152 156 Deaths per 1000 150 137 122 97 100 89 87 76 50 0 1991* 1995 2000 2002* 2006 Year Infant Under FiveNote: 1991 and 2002 data is from population and housing censuses while data for 1995, 2000 and 2006 is from UDHS 8
    • 2.1.3 Life ExpectancyLife expectancy at birth is an estimate of the average number of years a person is expected to liveif a particular pattern of mortality is maintained. Table 2.1.1 shows that the over-all life expectancyat birth from 2002 Census was 50.4 years for both sexes. Males registered a lower life expectancyof 48.8 years compared to their female counterparts at 52 years. There was a gain of 2.3 years inlife expectancy between 1991 and 2002 for both sexes.Table 2.1.1: Life Expectancy at Birth by Census Year 1969- 2002Census Year Male Female Total1969 46.0 47.0 46.51991 45.7 50.5 48.12002 48.8 52.0 50.4 9
    • 2.2 EducationEducation is perhaps the most important component in any country’s development. It empowersthe population with necessary skills, widens their knowledge of the general public and enlightensthem about their wellbeing. Proper and evidence-based planning for Education is vital forimprovement of the sector. The main source of Education statistics are the returns from schools,submitted to Ministry of Education and Sports. However, not all schools submit regularly, and thismay cause some inconsistencies in data published in this Statistical Abstract. The response ratetherefore determines the data available.The statistics presented in this section include total number of education institutions, enrolment inthose institutions, orphans, students with special needs, levels of adult literacy and the number ofpersons in the teaching profession.2.2.1 Primary School EducationThe introduction of the Universal Primary Education (UPE) programme in 1997 has improvedaccess to primary education for a large proportion of the population particularly in the rural areas.The implementation of this programme has caused tremendous changes in primary enrolmentwhich has grew from 3.1 millions in 1996 to 7.4 millions in 2008.Table 2.2.1 indicates that there was a 0.9 percentage decrease in the number of pupils enrolledbetween 2007 and 2008. (Details of enrolment by class and sex can be found in Appendix Table2.2A). Between 2007 and 2008, there was a 3.7 percentage decrease in the number of primaryschools. It is significant that the number of primary teachers reduced by 13.8 percent between2007 and 2008.This was as a result of streamlining the teachers’ ceiling.The pupil-teacher andpupil-class room ratios remained the same at 57 and 72 respectively between 2007 and 2008.(Details are in Appendix 2.2 C).Table 2.2.1: Primary School Education Indicators in Uganda 2003 – 2007Year 2005 2006 2007 2008Enrolment (‘000) 7,224 7,362 7537 7,471Number of Primary Teachers (‘000s) 145 150 152 131Number of Primary Schools 13,576 14,385 14,728 14,179% Annual change in Enrolment -2 1.9 2 -1Pupil Teacher Ratio 50 48 57 57Pupil Classroom Ratio 74 72 72 72GER 107 114 113 108GIR 152.8 129 129 128NER 93 92 93 89NIR 66 56 57 55Source: Planning Unit, Ministry of Education and Sports.The Gross Intake Rate (GIR) in 2007 and 2008 was 129 and 128 respectively. Since the GIR isslightly more than 100, this means that more pupils enrolled in primary school before the age of 6years or lasted beyond 12 years in primary school. Details of the GIR and other primary educationaccessibility indictors are shown in Appendix Table 2.2 B. 10
    • 2.2.1.1 Primary School OrphansOrphans refer to children who have lost either one or both of their parents. Table 2.2.2 shows thatthe number of orphans enrolled in primary schools reduced from 1.33 to 1.27 million childrenbetween 2007 and 2008, giving a 4 percentage point decrease. Among the orphans enrolled in2008, males had a higher percentage, of 51, compared to the females.On average, a comparison of the percentage of ophans to the total enrolment indicates thatorphans have remained within the same range of about 17 percent since 2004.Table 2.2.2: Primary school orphans by sex (2002 - 2008) Year/Sex 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Male 636,284 641,930 642,088 677,867 644,974 Female 616,294 619,623 628,980 657,062 629,025 Total 1,252,578 1,261,553 1,271,068 1,334,929 1,273,999 % to total enrollment 17 17.5 17.3 17.7 17.1Source: Ministry of Education and Sports2.2.1.2 Primary School Pupils with disabilitiesPrimary school pupils with disabilities decreased by 5.8 percent in 2008 and their percentage tototal enrollment also decreased from 24.3 in 2007 to 23.1 in 2008. Details on number of disabledpupils by class are shown in the table below.Table 2.2.3: Primary school pupils with special needs, 2007- 2008 Class 2007 2008 Male Female Total Male Female Total P1 21,982 17,858 39,840 19,713 15,565 35,278 P2 15,349 13,617 28,966 14,235 12,391 26,626 P3 16,262 14,590 30,852 15,281 13,564 28,845 P4 14,754 13,768 28,522 14,495 13,409 27,904 P5 12,706 11,651 24,357 11,965 11,634 23,599 P6 9,756 3,143 18,899 9,491 9,228 18,719 P7 6,332 5,310 11,642 6,385 5,071 11,456 Total 97,141 85,937 183,078 91,565 80,862 172,427Source: Ministry of Education and Sports.2.2.1.3 Primary school education facilitiesAt the national level, about three in every five pupils enrolled in primary school had adequate sittingspace. Provision of adequate infrastructure for the children enroled in primary school is key andremains a challenge to the Education sector.Table 2.2.4 shows that a lower proportion of pupils inlower classes had adequate space compared to those in upper classes for the period 2007 to2008. Pupils in lower classes are at a disadvantage compared to those in upper classes. 11
    • Table 2.2.4: Primary school pupils with adequate sitting space by class (2007-2008) Class 2007 2008 Pupils with Pupils with adequate % to total adequate % to total Enrolment space Enrolment Enrolment space Enrolment P1 1,832,129 880,304 48 1,767,399 874,483 49.5 P2 1,213,486 678,050 56 1,234,443 701,644 56.8 P3 1,224,812 774,757 63 1,200,289 777,113 64.7 P4 1,096,256 755,357 69 1,096,760 762,496 69.5 P5 939,804 699,225 74 936,924 697,200 74.4 P6 761,212 606,210 80 749,733 599,742 80.0 P7 470,272 414,068 88 485,726 430,197 88.6 Total 7,537,971 4,807,971 64 7,471,274 4,842,875 64.8Note: Adequate sitting space refers to three pupils per standard deskSource: Ministry of Education and Sport2.2.1.4 Primary School CompletionThe Uganda National Household Survey (UNHS), 2006 collected information on the completionrates to establish the number of pupils who had continous primary education from Primary 1 toPrimary 7. Comparing the number of pupils enrolled to Primary 1 in 2000 and those enroled inPrimary 7 in 2006, Table 2.2.5 shows that one in every three children who started Primary 1 in2000 was likely not to complete Primary 7 in 2006.Table 2.2.5: Primary school completion 2000-2006 (‘000)Currently attending Attending P.1 in 2000 Attending P.7 in 2006Region Male Female Uganda Male Female UgandaKampala 53 39 92 16 15 31Central, Excluding Kampala 251 226 477 80 85 165Eastern 177 187 364 94 74 168Northern 176 203 379 90 47 137Western 251 244 496 98 86 184Uganda 908 899 1,808 378 307 685Source: UNHS, 2006, Uganda Bureau of Statistics2.2.2 Secondary School EducationFollowing the introduction of UPE in 2006, the number of pupils enrolling in secondary school hasbeen on the increase, leading to an increase in the demand for more secondary schools. Table2.2.6.shows that between 2007 and 2008, secondary school enrolment declined by 13 percentwhich, explains the reduction in the student teacher ratio from 39 to 21 over the same period.Detailed breakdown on these indicators are in Appendix Tables 2.2 H and 2.2 I 12
    • Table 2.2.6: Trend of key secondary school education indicators 2004– 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Enrolment 697,507 728,393 814,087 954,328 827,504Number of Schools 3,645 1,961 2,286 2,644 1,907Number of Teachers 37,313 37,607 42,673 24,548 40,352Student teacher ratio 19 19 19 39 21Gross Enrolment rate n.a. 18.6 22.1 25.0 21Net Enrolment rate n.a. 15.4 18.6 21.3 17.9Source: Ministry of Education and Sports.2.2.1.5 Education facilities in secondary schoolsAdequate sitting space refers to three students per standard desk. Table 2.2.7 shows that studentswho lacked adequate writing and sitting space were reducing as the classes advanced. However,in 2008, the total number of students without adequate sitting space increased by about 93 percentcountrywide.Table 2.2.7: Secondary school students who lack adequate space Year/Class 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 S.1 30,781 23,927 26,153 33,892 30,566 S.2 22,141 19,461 18,299 12,870 28,787 S.3 17,468 15,400 16,193 10,239 12,446 S.4 11,881 9,501 9,286 4,434 7,262 S.5 6,101 3,453 2,450 847 4,202 S.6 4,430 3,325 278 512 3,014 Total 92,802 51,140 46,506 28,902 55,711Source: Ministry of Education and Sports2.2.1.6 Secondary school students with Special NeedsTable 2.2.8 indicates a reduction in the number of disabled students who enrolled in differentclasses in 2008, right from Senior One to Six. Overall, the number of secondary school studentswith Special Needs declined by 25 percent between 2007 and 2008.Table 2.2.8: Secondary school students with special needs Year/Class 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 S.1 2,667 2,057 2,364 2,990 2,245 S.2 2,555 2,028 2,283 2,555 2,135 S.3 2,402 1,949 2,130 2,533 1,794 S.4 1,894 1,752 1,931 2,125 1,405 S.5 666 878 859 1,054 726 S.6 709 813 669 846 783 Total 10,893 9,477 10,236 12,103 9,088Source: Ministry of Education and Sports. 13
    • 2.2.1.7 Secondary school Orphans by classTable 2.2.9, indicates that the number of orphaned students has been increasing steadily over theyears with the exception of 2008 where a decline was realised. The total number of secondaryschool orphans reduced by 19 percent between 2007 and 2008.Table 2.2.9: Secondary school orphan students by class, 2004 - 2008Class/Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008S.1 42,903 43,355 51,366 68,757 51,215S.2 36,825 38,658 43,096 50,793 46,984S.3 31,822 33,721 38,811 43,775 34,642S.4 27,333 29,937 33951 39,647 30,387S.5 10,565 11,218 12,590 14,983 12,306S.6 9,410 10,693 11334 13,808 11,568Total 158,858 167,582 191,148 231,763 187,102Source: Ministry of Education and Sports2.2.3 Higher Education InstitutionsThe government policy to liberalise the education system has led to an increase in the number ofprivate higher learning institutions. The number of universities has been increasing in the last fewdecades and, in addition, more courses have been introduced, hence widening the labour market.Table 2.2.10 below indicates that 67 percent of the tertiary enrolment in 2006 was fromuniversities. Male students’ enrolment was the highest, with 58 percent, compared to the females.See details in Appendix Table 2.2.ITable 2.2.10: Higher Institutions Enrollment, 2006 EnrolmentInstitutions Number Male Female TotalUniversities 26 52,507 40,098 92,605National Teachers Colleges 9 7,316 3,681 10,997Technical Colleges 6 1,848 132 1,980Commercial Colleges 48 9,348 8,832 18,180Co-operative Colleges 209 119 328Management Institutions 8 2,000 2,156 4,156Health/ Medical Institutions 15 2,108 1,024 3,132Agricultural & Forestry Institutions 6 1,370 281 1,651Theological Colleges 2 850 248 1,098Media & Communication Institutions 2 900 576 1,476Hotels & Tourism institutions 1 81 62 143Law Dev. Centre 1 500 300 800Study Centres 2 416 188 604Grand Total 79,453 57,697 137,150Source: Ministry of education and sports 14
    • 2.2.4 LiteracyLiteracy is defined as the ability to write meaningfully and read with understanding in any language.The 2005/06 Uganda National Household Survey revealed an overall literacy rate of 69 percentamong persons aged 10 years and above. Table 2.2.11 indicates that more men were found to beliterate (76 percent) than women (63 percent). Among regions, in 2005/06, the Central regionexcluding Kampala had the highest literacy rate (80 percent), while the Northern had the lowest (59percent). Kampala had a total literacy rate of 91 percent, bearing in mind its special characteristics.The literacy rates were higher for urban dwellers (86 percent) than their rural counter parts (66percent).Table 2.2.11: Literacy rates for population aged 10 years and above 1999/00 2002/03 2005/06 Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female TotalUganda 74 57 65 77 63 70 76 63 69ResidenceUrban 92 82 86 90 84 87 89 83 86Rural 72 54 62 74 60 67 74 58 66RegionCentral exc. 81 74 77 82 74 79 82 78 80KampalaEastern 72 52 62 72 54 63 71 56 64Northern 64 33 47 72 42 56 74 45 59Western 74 61 67 79 69 74 74 60 67Kampala - - - 94 91 92 92 90 91Source: UNHS 2005/06, Uganda Bureau of Statistics 15
    • 2.3 Labour Force, Employment and EarningsEmployment generates incomes, which enable individuals and their dependants to purchase goodsand services necessary to meet their basic needs. Availability of productive employmentopportunities greatly reduces poverty.Data on labour market (jobs, job seekers, employment levels, desired skills etc) in both public andprivate sectors is important in order to have accurate information about the quantitative andqualitative aspects of the labour force. This section presents information on key labour marketindicators, employment in the civil service, employment and the wage bill for selectedmanufacturing establishments. In addition, the information on jobs advertised in newspapers givesan insight on the most demanded occupations in the country.2.3.1 Key Labour Market IndicatorsThe Labourforce Market Indicators in Uganda are based on the population in the working agebracket of 14 to 64 years. These are presented in Table 2.3.1.The total labour force in Uganda increased from 9.8 million persons in 2002/03 to 10.9 millionpersons in 2005/06. The labour force participation rate was 82 percent. The rate was slightly higherfor males than for their female counterparts during 2005/06.The unemployement rate was about 2per cent in 2005/06 while the total urban unemployment rate was about 7 percent. The time relatedunderemployment rate was about 12 percent. Thus underemployment and unemploymentaccounted for 14 percent of the labour force and 16 percent of the urban labour force.Table 2.3.1: Selected Labour Market Indicators 2002/03 2005/06Indicator Male Female Total Male Female TotalUganda labour force (Millions) 4.6 5.1 9.8 5.3 5.6 10.9Labour force participation rate 80.3 79.9 80.1 83.5 80.9 82.0Employment to population ratio 78.2 76.6 77.4 82.0 79.0 80.0Uunemployment rate 2.6 4.2 3.5 1.7 2.1 1.9Urban unemployment rate 7.6 17.0 12.2 3.5 9.5 6.9Time related underemployment rate 18.9 15.1 16.9 n.a n.a 12.1Urban time related underemployment rate 9.7 11.1 10.4 9.0 7.3 8.7Median monthly wages 60,000 32,000 54,000 48,000 20,000 36,000Source: Uganda National Household Surveys 2002/03 and 2005/06In 2005/06, the majority of the working population (70 percent) was engaged in agriculture andmainly as self-employed. By industry, agriculture employed 73 percent of the working population,while by occupation, 70 percent of the working population were agriculture and fishery workers.(Appendix Tables 2.3 A, 2.3 B and 2.3 C).Among the paid employees, the majority were temporary (mainly casual) constituting 12 percent ofthe working population. Only about 5 percent of the working population was in permanent paidemployment. 16
    • 2.3.2 Demand for labourJob/vacancy advertisements portray the demand side of the labour market and act as an indicatorof the expanding sectors in the economy. The information on jobs advertised presented here isbased on two major English Newspapers: The New Vision and Daily Monitor. A job is captured onlyonce even if it is advertised in more than one newspaper or more than once in the samenewspaper. In 2007, the number of jobs advertised was 9,998, reflecting a decrease of 36 percentfrom the previous year.Figure 2.3.1 below shows the trend in the number of jobs advertised between 2003 and 2007.Figure 2.3.1: Number of advertised vacancies by year 40,000 29,462 Number of Vacancies 30,000 20,000 15,535 14,051 9,648 9,998 10,000 0 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 YearsThe majority of the jobs advertised in 2007 were in the public administration sector (See StatisticalAppendix Table 2.3 D) although its share has been fluctuating since 2003. The InternationalOrganisations1 constituted 14 percent of the total advertisements in 2007. Only about 5 percentand about 3 percent of the advertisements were in social sectors of health and educationrespectively.During the year 2007, the other professionals’ category (which includes accountants, businessadministration, mathematicians, statisticians, system designers, computer programmers, legalprofessionals, librarians, biologists, zoologists, etc.) constituted the largest proportion (18 percent)of occupations advertised. (See Statistical Appendix Table 2.3 E). This category combined with thehealth professionals constituted 22 percent of the total newspapers advertisements during 2007.In the past, the “Primary and other education teaching associate professionals” was the singlelargest occupation group advertised, though its share was decreasing from about 43 percent in2003 to about 22 percent in 2006. In 2007, it was the second highest attracting 13 percent of theadvertised jobs. The ranking for other occupations flactuated from year to year.2.3.2.1 Number of Vacancies Advertised by Education LevelDuring the year 2007, 35 percent of the jobs advertised required degree holders while 30 percentrequired certificate holders. (See Table 2.3.2). Less than 5 percent of the jobs advertised did notrequire any formal education, while 2 percent required a PHD degree. There are variations in thedistribution of jobs advertised by qualifications during the years 2005 and 2004.1 Includes International Organisations like ILO, UNICEF, UNDP, WFP, FAO etc. as well International NGOs. 17
    • Table 2.3.2: Percentage Distribution of Vacancies by Education LevelEducation level 2005 2006 2007No formal education 5.6 3.4 4.3Certificate 27.9 36.1 30.1Diploma 13.6 21.5 20.7Degree 41.5 33.0 35.3Masters 8.5 5.0 7.7PHD 2.8 0.9 2.0Not stated 0.1 0.1 0.0Total 100 100 100Source: New Vision, Monitor, East African and UBOS2.3.2.2 Re-advertised jobsIn 2007, out of the 9,998 jobs advertised, 288 (about 3 percent) were re-advertised. The majority ofthe re-advertised jobs were for professionals (74 percent). This was followed by the associateprofessional category with 14 percent during 2007. There were fewer jobs re-advertised for otheroccupations during 2007 compared to 2006. The trend is similar for other years except for 2003when the majority of the re-advertised jobs were for associate professionals.2.3.3 The Civil ServiceThe civil service is composed of those persons in the traditional civil service, teaching service(primary and secondary), police, prisons, public universities and the local governments’ staff.Theaverage size of the civil service in 2008 was at 274,237 persons as indicated in Table 2.3.3 below.This was an increase from 259,524 persons (6 percent) in the previous calendar year.Table 2.3.3: Size of Uganda civil service, 2004 – 2008Year Size of Civil Service Percentage change2004 240,1192005 243,338 1.32006 239,318 -1.72007 259,524 8.42008 274,237 5.7Source: Uganda Computer services2.3.4 Employment and annual wage bill for selected manufacturing establishmentsThe information given here is based on major manufacturing industries selected for the compilationof the Index of Production (IoP) as well as the Producer Price Index (PPI). A total of 123establishments that have data for both number of employees and labour costs between 2004 and2008 have been considered since they provide consistent data for the given period.Wage employment information in the big manufacturing industries covers the number of employeesand the wage bill for workers who are directly involved in production. For example, the wage bill forsugar production covers factory workers and the management team but excludes agriculturallabourers or plantation workers. 18
    • In 2008, the number of employees decreased by about 2 percent, while the wage bill increased by16 percent as indicated in Table 2.3.4. During the same period the monthly average earnings forthe employees increased by 18 percent.Table 2.3.4: Employment and wage bill for selected manufacturing establishments Number of Wage bill Average monthly Establishments earnings Year Employees Number % change Mill. Shs. % change Shs. % change 2004 123 29,885 7,099 237,542 2005 123 31,787 6.4 7,809 10.0 245,679 3.4 2006 123 32,238 1.4 8,843 13.2 274,291 11.6 2007 123 32,743 1.6 10,348 17.0 316,029 15.2 2008 123 32,125 -1.9 11,994 15.9 373,341 18.1Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsFood processing was the most dominant industry with one third of the selected manufacturingestablishments, 65 percent share of the total employment and 43 percent share of the monthlywage bill during 2008. The “Beverages and tobacco” industry with the 6 percent share of themonthly average employment but with about 23 percent share of the monthly wage bill as indicatedin Statistical Appendix Tables 2.3 F, and 2.3 G.Employers in the “Manufacture of textiles, clothing and footwear” industry earned the least averagemonthly income of shs, 129,700. Those in “Manufacture of bevarages and tobacco” industry hadthe highest average income of shs. 1,419,000 as indicated in Statistical Appendix Tables 2.3 H.2.3.5 The Labour Cost IndexA Labour Cost Index is a measure of the rate of change in the total labour cost. It shows also thelabour costs relative to the base period in the selected manufacturing establishments. It provides abetter understanding of how specific labour markets adjust to changes in the demand and supplyand is a timely measure of wage pressure.The indicators presented here are based on statistics of average wages in manufacturing, whichgenerally cover the formal or “modern” sector of an economy. They do not include data on self-employment income or informal sector activities. The base year is 2004.The real wages index measures the relative labour costs after deflating the labour costs with theConsumer Price Index (CPI 2004=100). The Consumer Price Index (CPI), used to calculate realwages, measures the average change over time of the cost of a fixed basket of goods and servicesof constant quality and quantity 19
    • Figure 2.3.3: Trend in labour costs – nominal and real wages 180 168.9 160 154.8 Labour Cost index (%) 140 124.6 120 122 118 110 106.9 100 100 101.3 80 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Years Nominal Real termsIn the year 2005, the labour cost index rose by 10 percent, and then by 25 percent between 2005and 2006. Between 2006 and 2007, there was a relatively high growth from 25 percent to 46percent in the employment compensation. (See Statistical Appendix Table 2.3 I)Amongst the manufacturing sectors, beverages and tobacco had the fastest labour cost indexincrease in nominal terms (94 percent), and the lowest increase was for the manufacture of metal(1 percent). The manufacture of beverages and tobacco wages index in real terms had the highestincrease of 40 percent in relation to 2004. The manufacturing of metal products wages indexdeclined by 27 percent in real terms during the same period.2.3.6 Employment and earnings surveyThe Employment and Earnings Survey was intended to cover all establishments employing 15persons or more. These were selected from the Uganda Business Register of 2006. The studycovered only six types of industries namely Manufacturing, Construction, Hotels, Education (privateschools), Health (private health institutions) and Horticulture.A total 655 establishments with a total employment of 38,812 persons were covered. The overallmonthly income was shs. 140,000, with those employed in hotels earning the lowest although theyworked for the longest number of hours a week (60 hours). 20
    • Table 2.3.6: Employment, median earnings and weekly average hours of workIndustry Establishments Employment Median earnings Average hour per weekConstruction 19 4,061 265,000 50.5Health 28 1,269 219,155 48.1Manufacturing 160 14,329 200,000 49.5Agriculture 8 6,036 120,685 47.9Education 352 10,668 120,000 53.7Hotels 88 2,449 100,000 60.8Total 655 38,812 140,000 53.2Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.3.7 shows the distribution of the most common first 20 occupations by mean and medianmonthly income. The results indicate that the cleaners followed by the security guards andmanufacturing labourers received the least median monthly income of shs 58,000, shs 65,000 andshs 65,200 respectively. These were followed by the agricultural labourers who constitute the bulkof the work force, who received a median monthly income of shs 69,940. In addition, cooks/chefs,waiters/waitresses, matrons and casual labourers earned a median monthly income of less thanshs. 100,000.Table 2.3.7: Selected occupations by number, mean and median wages, hours worked a weekOccupation Wage rate per month Hours worked Number Mean Median a weekCasual laborers 5,225 127,079 84,739 54.9Agricultural, Fishery and Related Laboures 5,179 73,099 69,941 48.2Teachers – secondary education 3,764 209,658 140,000 39.9Teachers – primary education 2,391 150,030 136,000 48.5Cooks/chef 1,517 94,715 70,000 61.4Semi skilled 1,373 211,592 128,500 43.9Machine operators 1,174 158,143 120,000 50.1Security guards 1,075 85,626 65,000 72.0Support staff 975 118,322 75,000 50.1Supervisors 809 304,422 200,000 51.6Waitress/Waiters 668 98,543 80,000 62.7Cleaners 590 77,938 58,000 47.4Motor Vehicle Drivers 582 177,956 132,212 50.3Technician 566 280,690 225,960 45.3Manufacturing Laborers 537 77,783 65,200 54.4Production Manager 462 537,820 400,000 51.1General Manager 427 572,656 300,000 58.4Matron 393 99,226 80,000 74.5Nurses 384 176,666 150,000 57.1Cashier 370 312,168 123,350 54.3Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 21
    • 2.4 Income, expenditure and poverty ratesIncome and expenditure data have been useful in monitoring the living standards of Ugandans.However, household consumption expenditure is usually preferred over income in assessingpoverty incidence as it is more accurately reported by the households/individuals. The 2005/06Uganda National Household Survey collected information on consumption expenditure on food,beverages and tobacco and non consumption expenditure of households among others2.2.4.1 Consumption expenditure per householdThe Figure 2.4.1 presents the monthly consumption expenditure per household for the 2002/03and 2005/06 after adjusting for inflation. Uganda’s average household monthly expenditure rosefrom Shs. 136,468 in 2002/03 to Shs. 152,068 in 2005/06, representing a real increase of 11.4percent within a period of three years. The increase was mainly driven by the rural areas (of 14.4percent) while the urban areas registered an increase of only 4.2 percent over the same period.Refer to Table 2.4A in appendix.All regions experienced a positive change between the two surveys. While the increase inexpenditure per household was more pronounced in Western region (19 percent), Central regionexcluding Kampala registered the lowest increase (around 10 percent). Kampala recorded thelowest change in per household consumption of only 1.5 percent over the two surveys.Figure 2.4.1: Monthly Consumption Expenditure per Household (1997/98=100) Per Hh Monthly Expenditure(000 Shs) 400 350 2002/2003 2005/2006 300 250 200 150 100 50 0 la * a rn n rn al nd er pa te e tr st ga th am es en Ea or U W C K N Region2.4.2 Real Consumption Expenditure Per CapitaIn real terms, the results revealed that, on average, the per capita consumption expenditureincreased from Shs. 26,663 in 2002/03 to Shs. 29,280 in 2005/06, representing a real increase ofabout 9.8 percent (Appendix Table 2.4B). The Central region (without Kampala city) had thehighest real per capita expenditure increase from Shs. 32,455 to Shs. 37,281 (about 15%).Proportionately the Western region also registered a 15 percent real increase. On the contrary, areal decline of 10 percent is observed for Kampala, from Shs. 88,152 to Shs. 78,798 per month percapita.2 For details of items covered , refer to the Uganda Bureau of Statistics: 2005/06 Socio-economic report 22
    • On average, the urban areas recorded a 6 percent decline in real per capita consumptionexpenditure while the rural areas recorded a 14 percent increase.Figure 2.4.2: Mean Per Capita Consumption Expenditure (1997/98=100) Mean Per capita Expenditure (000 Shs) 100 90 2002/03 2005/06 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 n * da rn la rn al er pa he te n tr st ga es en am t Ea or U W C K N Region2.4.3 Share of Household Expenditure by Item GroupThe trends in the share of each item group in the total household expenditure including non-consumption expenditures are presented in Table 2.4.3.In 2005/06. The share of food, drinks andtobacco in total household expenditure remained the highest at 45 percent, followed byexpenditure on rent, fuel and energy at 16 percent. The slight increase in the share of food, drinkand tobacco was driven by urban areas. The share remained at 50 percent in rural areas. Worthnoting was the increase of about 3 percentage points in the share of education, and a similarpercentage point rise in the share of health expenditures in overall total household expenditures3.The increase in education share was more pronounced in urban areas whereas rural areasregistered a higher increase in the share of health.Table 2.4.3: Share of Household Expenditure by Item Groups (%) 2002/03 2005/06Item Group Rural Urban Uganda Rural Urban UgandaFood, drink & tobacco 50 33 44 50 34 45Rent, fuel & energy 17 23 19 15 20 16Education 6 10 7 8 13 10Transport & communication 6 12 8 6 10 7Health 5 3 4 8 4 7Household & personal goods 7 7 7 5 6 5Clothing & footwear 4 5 4 4 4 4Other consumption expenditure 2 3 2 2 4 3Non-consumption expenditure 3 5 3 3 5 4Total 100 100 100 100 100 100Source: Uganda Bureau of Statsitics3 Total private expenditure on education increased from Shs. 51.9bn in 2002/03 to Shs. 81.7bn in 2005/06; whereas privateexpenditures of health increased from Shs. 29.3bn in 2002/03 to Shs. 53.8bn in 2 005/06, in real terms (1997/98=100). 23
    • 2.4.4 Poverty Trend EstimatesThe Table 2.4.4 presents the poverty statistics for the 2005/06 and 2002/03 surveys. Three povertyindicators: namely P0, P1 and P2 (see Foster, Greer and Thorbecke, 1984) are reported. The P0indicator is “headcount”: the percentage of individuals estimated to be living in households with realprivate consumption per adult equivalent below the poverty line for their rural or urban sub-region.The P1 indicator is the “poverty gap”. This is the sum over all individuals of the shortfall of their realprivate consumption per adult equivalent from the poverty line, divided by the poverty line. Oneway to interpret the P1 is that it gives the per capita cost of eradicating poverty, as a percentage ofthe poverty line, if money could be targeted perfectly.The P2 indicator is the “squared poverty gap”. This is the sum over all individuals of the square ofthe shortfall of their real private consumption per adult equivalent and the poverty line divided bythe poverty line. The reason to square the shortfall is to give greater weight to those who are livingfar below the line. Thus, whereas P0 measures how widespread poverty is, P1 measures how poorthe poor are and, by giving more weight to the poorest of the poor, P2 gives an indication of howsevere poverty is.Using the full sample of 2005/06, 31.1 percent of Ugandans were estimated to be poor,corresponding to nearly 8.4 million persons. Table 2.4.4 provides more detailed statistics, brokendown by region and rural-urban areas. However, excluding districts not covered in UNHS 1999/00,the headcount stands at 29 percent4.Table 2.4.4: Poverty Statistics in the UNHS 2002/03 and 2005/06Residence Pop. Mean Poverty estimates Contribution to: share CPAE P0 P1 P2 P0 P1 P22005/06Rural/UrbanRural 84.6 33,900 34.2 9.7 3.9 93.2 93.8 94.1Urban 15.4 71,800 13.7 3.5 1.4 6.8 6.2 5.9RegionCentral 29.2 57,600 16.4 3.6 1.3 15.4 12.1 10.7Eastern 25.2 32,300 35.9 9.1 3.4 29.0 26.1 24.6Northern 19.7 22,600 60.7 20.7 9.2 38.5 46.8 51.3Western 25.9 39,900 20.5 5.1 1.8 17.0 15.1 13.4National 100.0 39,746 31.1 8.7 3.5 100.0 100.0 100.02002/03Rural/UrbanRural 86.2 29,500 42.7 13.1 5.7 94.9 95.5 95.7Urban 13.8 74,800 14.4 3.9 1.6 5.1 4.5 4.3RegionCentral 29.6 52,700 22.3 5.5 1.9 17.0 13.7 11.3Eastern 27.4 28,500 46.0 14.1 6.0 32.5 32.6 32.0Northern 18.2 21,600 63.0 23.4 11.5 29.6 36.0 40.9Western 24.7 33,800 32.9 8.5 3.3 21.0 17.7 15.8National 100.0 35,736 38.8 11.9 5.1 100.0 100.0 100.0Source: Uganda Bureau of Statsitics4 To evaluate poverty trends, the results of the UNHS 2005/06 were compared with those of UNHS 2002/03. Thecomparisons are for the entire country. As previously mentioned, the UNHS 1999/00 survey data point was omittedfrom this trend comparison as the survey did not cover Kitgum, Gulu, Bundibugyo and Kasese due toinsurgences at the time of the survey. 24
    • The results in Table 2.4.4 revealed that the percentage of the people living in absolute povertydeclined by 7.8 percentage points, corresponding to a reduction of 1.4 million persons in absoluteterms. This decline is statistically significant. The other poverty indicators (P1 and P2 measures)follow a similar trend as the headcount index. Thus, the main finding is that, the incidence ofincome poverty declined significantly between UNHS 2002/03 and UNHS 2005/06 for Uganda as awhole, whichever poverty indicator (P0, P1 or P2) is used. The percentage of the population livingbelow the poverty line reduced from 38.8 percent to 31.1 percent between the two survey periods.At national level, poverty remained the same in urban areas. However, a significant decline wasobserved in rural areas between UNHS 2002/03 and UNHS 2005/06. The percentage of people inpoverty reduced from 42.7 percent to 34.2 percent, corresponding to a decline in the number ofrural people in poverty from 9.3 million to 7.9 million in rural areas. In urban areas, thecorresponding decline was from 14.4 percent to 13.7 percent, recording a slight increase in theabsolute number of the poor from 0.5 million to 0.6 million reflecting the effect of the rapid urbanpopulation growth rate. Other income poverty estimates (P1, P2) mirror a similar trend as observedfor P0.The decrease in poverty between the surveys is most marked in the Western region where theheadcount declined from 32.9 percent to 20.5 percent (that is, from 2.1 million to 1.4 millionpersons in poverty, respectively). In relative terms, this suggests 12.4 percentage points drop in thepoverty headcount well above the nation-wide average of 7.7 percentage points. This reduction isdriven by trends in the western rural areas from 34.3 percent to 21.4 percent. The proportion ofpeople in poverty in Eastern region declined from 46 percent to 35.9 percent (that is, from 3.2million to 2.5 million persons, respectively). The decline in Eastern region is driven by the ruralareas, which experienced a 10.8 percentage point drop. In Central region, the decline in theheadcount (P0) indicator from 22.3 percent to 16.4 percent is statistically significant at conventionallevels. The Northern region registered a slight and insignificant fall in the headcount from 63percent to 60.7 percent. In absolute terms, the persons living in poverty increased from 2.9 millionin 2002/03 to 3.3 million in 2005/06. While the regional rankings of P1 and P2 are identical to theheadcount index, there are some differences in the magnitudes. A case in point is theproportionately growing difference in the poverty gap index between Northern region and otherregions (especially Eastern and Western regions).Furthermore, while no significant reduction in the headcount index was observed for NorthernUganda, the region experienced a significant drop in the poverty gap (by about 12 percent). Thiscan be explained partly by the various humanitarian interventions and other governmentinterventions such as the Northern Uganda Social Action Fund (NUSAF). Strong growth inconsumption in other regions explains the declines in the poverty gap. One noticeable point is howmuch the poverty gap has reduced vis-à-vis the headcount index over the two year period.Regardless of geographical location, we find that the percentage drop in the poverty gap is higherthan that of the headcount index, indicative of rising mean consumption of Uganda’s poor.2.4.5 Inequality in Household ConsumptionTable 2.4.5 reports the Gini coefficients as a measure of inequality in household consumption peradult equivalent. Between the 2002/03 survey and the 2005/06 survey, the Gini coefficientdropped, and hence inequality declined. The observed decrease was driven by a decline ininequality of income in urban areas. Income inequality remained the same in rural areas betweenUNHS 2002/03 and UNHS 2005/06. 25
    • Table 2.4.5: Gini Coefficients for UgandaResidence 1992/93 2002/03 2005/06Rural/UrbanUrban 0.396 0.483 0.432Rural 0.328 0.363 0.363RegionCentral 0.395 0.460 0.417Eastern 0.327 0.365 0.354Northern 0.345 0.350 0.331Western 0.319 0.359 0.342National 0.365 0.428 0.408Source: Uganda Bureau of StatsiticsSince the distribution of income became less unequal between the 2002/03 and 2005/06 surveys,and growth in consumption was positive and strong, it is not surprising that poverty declined duringthe period.2.4.6 Summary of FindingsThe 2005/06 survey showed strong growth in per household and per capita expenditure, especiallyin rural areas. The growth between the two recent surveys seems to have benefited the majority ofUgandans. As a result, the proportion of people living in poverty has declined and so has, inabsolute terms, the number of poor persons. The reduction in poverty is particularly marked forsome sub-groups of the population – including rural areas as a whole and those residing in Easternand Western regions. Over the entire period, the poverty headcount index changed little inNorthern Uganda. However, the slight drop was not enough to prevent a rise in the number ofpersons living in poverty in the region. A noticeable improvement was a significant drop in thepoverty gap index between UNHS 2002/03 and UNHS 2005/06, indicating that the poor in 2005/06were not as poor as their counterparts in 2002/03. Another improvement was a decline in inequalitybetween the two surveys. 26
    • 2.5 PricesThis section presents statistics on price indices for household consumer goods and services. Thefigures included average market prices for selected goods in eight urban centres. The eight centresare Kampala High Income, Kampala Middle and Low Income (including Entebbe), Jinja, Mbale,Masaka, Mbarara, Gulu and Arua. Kampala was demarcated into two areas basing on theconsumption pattern of households and their points of purchase. In addition there is a CompositeConsumer Price Index, which is the combined index for the eight centres.The price indices are compiled using the Modified Lasperyers Index formula. This formulacompares the current month’s prices of a basket of consumption goods and services over theprices of the same basket of goods and services in the previous month.2.5.1 The Headline Consumer Price IndexThe Headline Index is the measure of the relative changes in prices of all the goods and servicesof the consumption basket. The 2008 calendar year registered a double digit inflation rate twicethat for 2007.The rate of 12.0 percent recorded for 2008 compared to 6.1 percent during 2007 wasdue to higher prices of most food items which was attributed to seasonal factors as well as to highlocal and foreign demand. The financial year 2007/08 however registered a stable inflation rate of7.3 percent compared to the 7.4 percent registered in 2006/07 (see statistical Appendix: Table2.5A).2.5.2 The Core IndexThe core index is the measure of the relative changes in prices of all the goods and services in theconsumption basket excluding food crops, electricity, fuel and metred water. The index rose by11.5 percent for 2008 from the 6.6 percent registered in 2007. The increase is attributed to higherprices of manufactured foods and to higher fish, charcoal, firewood, house repair and maintenanceprices as well as to increased transport charges caused by high fuel prices (see statisticalAppendix: Table 2.5B).2.5.3 Food-crops IndexThe year 2008 registered very high prices of food crops and related items compared to 2007. Foodcrop prices registered an inflation rate of 15.8 percent in 2008 compared to a reduction of 3.8percent recorded in 2007. The increased prices in 2008 were attributed to seasonal factors and thehigh local and foreign demand for food items (see statistical Appendix: Table 2.5B).2.5.4 The Energy, Fuel and Utilities (EFU Index)In 2008, the local market registered increases in the prices of fuel, propane gas, metred water andelectricity. The EFU Index increased by 9.1 percent over the period compared to the 21.7 percentrecorded for 2007. (see statistical Appendix: Table 2.5B)2.5.5 Major Inflation Drivers over the past two years (2007- 2008)2.5.5.1 Rising food pricesOver the two years, food prices rose by 12.2 percent on average due to scarcity, seasonal factorsand the rising local and foreign demand for food. The European Union for instance consumesUgandan fish in large quantities. In addition, Southern Sudan, Eastern Congo and Kenya were 27
    • major markets for most Ugandan food items, leading to scarcity and higher prices in the localmarkets.2.5.5.2 House Maintenance, Fuel and Utilities These registered significant increases in prices, amounting on average for 14.5 and 12.0 percentrespectively. High international oil prices per barrel, axle load restrictions and the oil pipelinebreakdown in Kenya caused scarcity on the local market, thus pushing up fuel prices. As a result,higher costs of production for cement, paint, iron sheets and nails pushed up house repair andmaintenance costs.2.5.5.3 High transport faresThese went up by an average of 13.5 percent over the past two years, thus impacting negativelyon other sectors in the economy. Communication costs however went down by 0.36 percent overthe same period due to increasing competition within the industry.2.5.5.4 Depreciation of local currencyThe global financial crisis that started August 2008 pushed up the exchange rates, thus pushing uplocal prices in most sectors of the economy. Most affected were those that use imported goods andservices as inputs in their production processes or as final consumption items. 28
    • 2.6 HealthThis section presents statistics on some of the key aspects of public health for the period 2004-2008. The aspects covered in this section include the status of health facilities and staffing levels,immunisation coverage, morbidity and selected health sector performance indicators.2.6.1 Health UnitsHealth Units include health facilities such as Hospitals and Health Centres II, III and IV. A healthcentre is intended to cover a given administrative area. Through the National Health System, thegovernment set up a number of Health Sub-District facilities with the intention of building andstrengthening the capacity of health facilities in order to improve health service provision.Table 2.6 A in the Appendix shows the distribution of health units by district. It shows that in 2006,a total of 114 hospitals were in place, and 60 of these were public hospitals, 46 others Private-Not-for-Profit and 8 were private practitioner hospitals.2.6.2 Immunisation CoverageThe World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends that new borns should be vaccinated againstall the vaccine- preventable diseases by the age of 12 months. The antigens given include BCG(against tuberculosis), DPT-HepB-Hib (against Diphtheria, Pertusis, Tetanus, Hepatitis B, andHeamophilus influenzae), Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) (against poliomyelitis and a measles).Immunisation coverage in children declined in 2008.Table 2.6.1: Immunisation coverage, 2004-2008Vaccine 2004 2005 2006 2007* 2008BCG 101 94 85 90 86Measles 91 87 89 87 77DPT-HepB+Hib 3 88 85 80 86 79OPV3 86 85 81 84 79TT2+(Pregnant) 54 56 48 58 50TT2+(Non-Pregnant Women) 11 14 12 12 11*- Values for 2007 are provisional and may differ from those published in the2008 AbstractSource: Uganda National Expanded Program for Immunisation2.6.3 MorbidityTable 2.6.2 shows that Malaria has been the highest ranked cause of morbidity in Uganda over thelast three years while cough or cold without pneumonia has been the second leading cause ofmorbidity. The selected diseases listed below appeared among the leading causes of morbidity inthe country. 29
    • Table 2.6.2: Proportion of Cases among the leading Causes of Morbidity, 2006-2008Disease 2006 2007 2008Malaria 38.0 33.6 26.1No Pneumonia- Cough or Cold 16.3 15.6 12.2Intestinal Worms 6.1 5.3 4.0Skin Diseases 3.4 3.3 2.7Pneumonia 3.4 2.9 2.2Others 32.8 39.3 52.8Source: Ministry of Health2.6.4 Health Sector performance indicatorsThere are various indicators that are used by the Ministry of Health to determine the Health Sectorperformance. These include Outpatients Department utilisation in Government and Private-Not-For-Profit (PNFP) health units, pit latrine coverage, TB cases notified as compared to thoseexpected and the number of pregnant women who reported receiving a 2nd dose of Fansidar forIntermittent Presumptive Treatment (IPT) of malaria.2.6.4.1 Out Patient Department UtilisationOut Patient Department (OPD) utilisation is a measure of usage of health services and is used as aproxy measure for both the quality and quantity of services and the health seeking behaviour of thepopulation. The target of the Health Sector Strategic Plan (HSSPII) is 0.9 by 2009/10. Out PatientDepartment per capita attendance below 0.6 is considered to be poor. OPD Per capita attendance(visits to a health unit per person per year) has stagnated at 0.9 at national level for the period2005 up to 2007. Details of the Districts performance can be seen in the appendix table 2.6F.2.6.4.2 Pit Latrine CoveragePit latrine coverage refers to percentage of households with pit latrines to total number ofhouseholds which are designed to have them. Pit latrine coverage is also an output indicator forthe PEAP and HSSP II. There has been an improvement in the pit latrine coverage at national levelfrom 58 percent in 2006 to 63 percent in 2008. Table 2.6 G in the appendix presents pit latrinecoverage by district.2.6.4.3 Deliveries in Health FacilitiesThe indicator “Deliveries in Health Facilities” measures the proportion of all expectant mothers whodeliver in health facilities. Between 2007 and 2008, this proportion stagnated at about 29 percent.2.6.4.4 Other Health Sector Performance IndicatorsIn addition to the above indicators, there are other indicators on the performance of the HealthSector. These include TB cases notified compared to those expected and the number of pregnantwomen who reported receiving a second dose of Fansider for Intermittent Presumptive Treatment(IPT) of malaria to the total number of expectant mothers. Table 2.6 I in the appendix shows that ahalf of expected TB cases in Uganda were notified. The proportion of pregnant women whoreported receiving a 2nd dose of Fansider for Intermittent Presumptive Treatment (IPT) of malariawas 39 percent. Table 2.6 I in the appendix gives the status of selected health sector performanceindicators by district for the year 2008. 30
    • Figure 2.6.4: Trend of Selected Health Sector Performance Indicators HIV/AIDS Service Availability Pregnant women Selected Health Indicators receiving 2nd dose Fansider for IPT Proportion of TB Cases notified compared to expected 2006 2007 2008 Deliveries in Health Facilities Pit Latrine Coverage 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Proportion2.6.5 HIV/AIDSTable 2.6.5 shows that 25 percent of the women and 21 percent of the men had ever tested for HIVand received their results. The proportion of persons who ever tested was higher among thewomen compared to the men across the various age groups, except in the 40 – 49 year age group.Likewise, among those who had been tested in the last 12 months that preceded the survey, theproportion of women out-numbered that of men.Table 2.6.5: Coverage of HIV testing among persons (15 – 49 years) Percentage who Age Received results from last HIV HIV Prevalence Rate Ever Tested and received test taken in the past 12 results months Men Women Men Women Men Women 15-19 3.7 7.2 1.9 2.9 0.3 2.6 20-24 13.1 14.8 5.2 4.7 2.4 6.3 25-29 14.4 16.8 4.5 3.9 5.9 8.7 30-39 13.8 14.0 4.4 4.1 3.2* 2.2* 40-49 11.5 11.0 3.7 4.8 15-24 7.3 10.8 3.2 3.7 1.1 4.3 Total (15 – 49) 20.7 24.8 10.4 12.0 5.0 7.5 Source: Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2006 & Uganda HIV/AIDS Sero-behavioural Survey 2004-2005* men or women who are positive and their partners are negative 31
    • 2.7 CrimeThis section covers statistics on crime cases reported to Police, investigated crimes, serious crimesand crimes under traffic and road safety. It also covers offenders and suspected offenders who areunder the custody of the Uganda Prisons Service, whether on remand or after conviction by theUganda courts of laws.2.7.1 Police casesThe trend of cases reported to police has been increasing over the years, as shown in figure2.7.1.The cases reported increased from by about 21 percentage points between 2007 and 2008.This is also emphasised by the upward growth in the trend.Figure 2.7.1: Trend of cases reported to Police (‘000) 12 10 Number of cases reported 9.7 8 8.1 8.3 6.7 6 4.5 4 2 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 YearFigure 2.7.2, below indicates that the highest increase in the number of reported crimes in 2008were thefts, with a 28 percent increase. It should be noted that out of the 287,900 cases reportedonly 119,072 (about 41 percent) were criminal in nature and thus investigated.Figure 2.7.2: Investigated crimes by category (2008) 50,000 45,000 40,000 32,958 N ber of crim investigated 35,000 30,000 21,186 es 25,000 16,890 20,000 13,162 12,236 10,362 15,000 um 10,000 4,258 2,753 3760 5,000 510 978 11 4 - es ia es es s es d sm s ry s ed lts im e fts te in rim w m im id be l/M au la ak ri he La cr ic ri ro cr .C re ob C om ss re T d ca er er er te R gs B no ex A T th H iti th la ru S co O ol re O D P E ld hi C Crim e s 32
    • 2.7.2 Serious crimesThe Uganda Police Force defines serious crimes to include murder, defilement, rape andaggravated robbery. Overall, serious crimes registered a remarkable decrease between 2006 and2008. Table 2.7.1 and the appendix Table 2.7 B indicates that defilement is the dominant seriouscrime, accounting for more than half of all the serious crimes between 2007 and 2008.Table 2.7.1: Serious crimes Reported, 2006-2008Serious Crimes 2006 2007 2008Murder 2,696 2,645 2,753Defilement 15,385 12,230 8,635Rape 750 599 1,536Aggravated Robbery 1,937 1,828 1,281Total 20,768 17,302 14,205Source: Uganda Police Force2.7.3 PrisonersA Convicted prisoner is a person proven guilty of a crime alleged against him/her after a trial in alaw court, while a prisoner on Remand is one whose case is on trial in the courts of law. Table2.7.2 indicates that between 2004 and 2008, the number of prisoners increased from 18,328 to21,942, a 20 percentage increase. The overall number of convicts increased by approximately 4percent between 2007 and 2008.The table further indicates that 55 percent of the prisoners wereon remand in 2008.Table 2.7.2: Number of prisoners, 2004 – 2008Status 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Convicted 6,938 7,402 8,151 7,645 7,934Remand 11,390 11,289 10,984 11,189 12,000Percentage Convicted 38 40 43 41 36Total 18,328 18,691 19,135 18,834 19,934Source: Uganda Prisons Department2.7.4 Traffic and Road Safety a) Reported road traffic accidentsTable 2.7.3 indicates a progressive decline in the number of road traffic accidents between 2006and 2008. About 11,758 road traffic accidents were reported in 2008 of which 8 percent were fatal,23 percent were serious and 69 percent were minor. Comparing 2007 and 2008, the number ofroad traffic accident dropped by 33 percent.Table 2.7.3: Reported road traffic accidents 2006 – 2008Nature 2008 Number Percent Number Percent Number PercentFatal 1,792 10 1,737 10 905 8Serious 6,614 37 6,732 39 2706 23Minor 9,686 53 8,959 51 8147 69Total 18,092 100 17,428 100 11,758 100Source: Uganda Police force 33
    • b) Casualties of traffic accidentsOut of the 13,432 road accident victims reported in 2008, majority (70 percent) had serious injuries;a trend similar to 2006.Table 2.7.4 further reveals that there was a slight decline of 7 percent in thetotal number of casualties reported between 2007 and 2008.Table: 2.7.4: Casualties of road traffic accidents 2006– 2008 2006 2007 2008 Number Percent Number Percent Number PercentKilled 2,171 15 2,334 16 2,035 15Serious injury 9,503 66 9,277 65 9,328 70Minor injury 2,655 19 2,779 19 2,069 15Total 14,329 100 14,390 100 13,432 99Source: Uganda Police forcec) Persons killed by road user typeTable 2.7.5 below shows that persons killed in road accident reduced by 6 percent over the threeyears from 2006 to 2008. Drivers constituted the least percentage of persons killed, whilepedestrians were the largest group of persons killed in the same period. Between 2007 and 2008,pedestrians registered the highest percentage decline (23 percent) of all persons killed by roaduser type.Table: 2.7.5: Persons Killed by road user type 2006 – 2008 2006 2007 2008 PercentagePersons killed Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent 2007-2008Drivers 112 5 125 5 111 5.45 -11Motor cyclist 198 9 198 8 365 17.94 84Pedal cyclists 296 14 296 13 242 11.89 18Passengers 665 31 712 31 547 26.88 23Pedestrians 900 41 1003 43 770 37.84 23Total 2,171 100 2,334 100 2,035 100 -Source: Uganda Police forced) Road Accident casesTable 2.7.6 shows a significant drop, of about 42 percent, in the number of road accident casesreported between 2006 and 2008. In 2008 about 12,000 road accident cases were reported, ofwhich 77 percent were still under investigations and 23 percent were prosecuted in courts of law.The rate of prosecution of traffic offences arising from road accidents is believed to be very low asindicated by the drop of 34 percent in the number of cases taken to court in 2008. However, casesunder investigation reduced by 52 percent between 2007 and 2008. 34
    • Table: 2.7.6: Status of road accident cases 2006 – 2008Progress of 2006 2007 2008Accident files Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent PercentageInvestigatedUnder investigation 9,804 68.0 9,648 68.0 4,587 60.9 -52.5Closed/put away 4,647 32.0 4,524 32.0 2,939 39.1 -35.0Sub-Total 14,451 - 14,172 - 7,526 77.5 -ProsecutedTaken to court 1,332 7.9 1,619 9.3 1,067 48.8 -34.1Pending in court 366 2.2 792 4.5 508 5.2 -35.9Convicted 681 4.0 752 4.3 546 25 -27.4Acquitted 34 0.2 93 0.5 65 3 -30.1Sub-Total 2,413 14.3 3,256 18.7 2,186 22.5 -National Total 16,864 100.0 17,428 100.0 9,712 100Source: Uganda Police forcee) Time of road accidentsThe highest number of road accidents (22 percent) occurred between 4:00 pm and 7:00pm for allcategories. This was mainly because of the heavy flow of traffic at that time. The lowest occurrencewas between 12:00 midnight and 3:00am (7 percent) as a result of less activity during that time asshown in figure 2.7.3 below.Figure 2.7.3: Time and number of accident by category, 2008 1800 1600 Number of crashes 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0 am am am am am pm 00 00 00 00 0 0 :0 :0 3: 1: 3: 1: -7 -7 0- 0- -1 -1 00 00 :0 00 :0 00 4: 4: 12 12 8: 8: Tim e of crashes Fatal Serious Minorf) Vehicles involved in accidents per registration/ownershipA total of about 22,700 vehicles were involved in road accidents in 2008 as compared to about20,600 in 2006. The majority of the vehicles involved in the accidents in 2008 were privately owned(88 percent). There was an increase of 14 percent in the number of private vehicles involved inroad accidents between 2007 and 2008. 35
    • Table: 2.7.7: Ownership of vehicles involved in road accidents 2006 – 2008 2006Registration 2007 2008 Number Percent Number Percent Number PercentPrivate 18,322 89.0 17,641 88.7 19,883 87.7Government 537 2.6 604 3.0 669 3.0Foreign Registration 428 2.1 394 2.0 419 1.8Diplomatic 126 0.6 115 0.6 120 0.5Army 128 0.6 113 0.6 53 0.2NGO 125 0.6 105 0.5 119 0.5Police 118 0.6 99 0.5 111 0.5Unregistered 64 0.3 91 0.5 144 0.6Prison 9 0.0 8 0.0 9 0.0Unknown 741 3.6 724 3.6 1,136 5.0Total 20,598 100.0 19,894 100.0 22,663 100.0Source: Traffic department, Uganda Policeg) Causes of road accidents.Of all the road accidents recorded in 2006, a majority were caused by careless andreckless/dangerous driving, 34 and 30 percent respectively. Although reckless/dangerous drivingaccidents were high, a 55 percentage point decrease was registered between 2005 and 2006.Table: 2.7.8: Causes of road accidents 2005 – 2006 2005 2006Causes of accident Number Percent Number PercentCareless Driving* - - 5,951 34.1Reckless/dangerous driving 11,353 66.5 5,153 29.6Hit & Run) 1,236 7.2 1,103 6.3Careless pedestrian 1,357 7.9 991 5.7Vehicle defect (DMC) 532 3.1 787 4.5Obstacle on carriage way* 0 0.0 677 3.9Over speeding* 0 0.0 505 2.9Passengers falls from MV 186 1.1 198 1.1Over/dangerous loading 192 1.1 116 0.7Influence of drink/drug 322 1.9 81 0.5Dazzled lights m/v 204 1.2 55 0.3Other causes 1,700 10.0 1,811 10.4Total 17,082 100 17,428 100.0*Not separately reported before 2006Source: Uganda Police force 36
    • 2.7.3 Express Penalty SchemeAbout 46,000 offences were reported in 2008 under the Express Penalty Scheme (EPS), which is areduction of 18 percent from 2007. This reduction was achieved as a result of the vigorousimplementation of a Traffic Operational Policing Plan (TOPP PLAN) which emphasizes publicawareness on road safety country wide.Figure 2.7.4: Express Penalty Scheme, 2007-2008 70,000 60,000 55,520 Number of cases reported 50,000 45,587 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 2007 2008 YearSource: Uganda Police Force 37
    • 3 Production Statistics3.1 TurnoverUganda Bureau of Statistics has initiated a sectoral analysis of turnover by industry based ondomestic Value Added Tax (VAT) returns compiled by the Uganda Revenue Authority. Turnover isthe sum of exempt sales, standard rated sales and zero rated sales as per the VAT classification.VAT is a tax levied on goods and services consumed within a country. The basis of selection forthe sample is the size of turnover of at least ten million shillings in a month as per the VATmonthly returns. It should be noted that the trends are still spatial due to the challenges of properestablishments’ classifications, consistency in returns and other data shortfalls. They, however,provide a fair presentation of sector activity performance.3.1.1 Number of businesses with turnover by sectorTrends indicate that the number of business establishments consistently increased during 2008with the second quarter registering an increase of 8.8 percent. Further increases of 10.6 percentand 0.2 percent were registered in the third and fourth quarters respectively. The Trade sector hadthe highest proportion of businesses (53.9 percent) followed by Real Estate and Business Services(15.3 percent) and manufacturing (12.6 percent).Table 3.1.1: Number of businesses with turnover by Sector, 2008 Quarter Quarter Quarter Quarter Annual PercentageIndustry Sector 1 2 3 4 Average shareAgriculture & Fishing 14 16 15 16 15 0.8Mining & Quarrying 3 3 5 6 4 0.2Manufacturing 226 239 259 269 248 12.6Electricity, Gas & Water 9 7 7 8 8 0.4Construction 58 69 75 79 70 3.6Trade 932 1,023 1,159 1,131 1,061 53.9Hotels & Restaurants 61 63 71 77 68 3.5Transport, Post and Telecommunications 89 95 97 103 96 4.9Finance & Insurance 18 19 20 21 19 1.0Real Estate & Business Services 270 296 316 319 301 15.3Public Administration and Defense 9 10 12 8 10 0.5Education, Health and Social Work Activities 6 6 6 6 6 0.3Community, Social and Personal Services 51 54 60 62 57 2.9Not known/Not Specified 4 4 4 6 4 0.2Grand Total 1,750 1,904 2,106 2,111 1,967 100.0 Percentage increase 8.8 10.6 0.2Source: Uganda Revenue Authority 38
    • 3.1.2 Turnover in BusinessesThe turnover in millions of shillings for these businesses is shown in Table 3.1.2, with 4,506 trillionshillings as total registered turnover under this category in 2008. The highest turnover wasregistered during the 4th quarter of 2008 and accounted for 31 percent of total annual turnover.Overall, the Trade sector had the highest turnover averaging 502.8 billion shillings per quarter, thiswas followed by the Manufacturing sector with an average of 272.6 billion shillings. Education,Health and Social Works sector registered the least quarterly turnover, averaging only 2.1 billionshillings.In the Transport, Post and Telecommunications sector despite having only an average of 96businesses in the sample, the sector registered a total turnover of 690.6 billion shillings.Table 3.1.2: Total quarterly turnover by Industry (million shillings), 2008 PercentageIndustries Quarter 1 Quarter2 Quarter 3 Quarter 4 Total shareAgriculture and Fishing 24,635 18,791 19,626 16,420 79,472 1.8Mining & Quarrying 1,821 2,741 1,837 8,821 15,220 0.3Manufacturing 264,043 248,801 262,139 315,356 1,090,338 24.2Electricity, Gas & Water 14,827 12,609 13,516 11,783 52,735 1.2Construction 20,154 23,098 28,956 27,469 99,677 2.2Trade 412,711 564,628 504,664 529,194 2,011,197 44.6Hotels & Restaurants 15,949 15,974 13,970 15,629 61,522 1.4Transport, Post and Telecommunications 109,434 125,917 125,556 329,658 690,564 15.3Finance & Insurance 28,342 34,833 35,371 40,688 139,234 3.1Real Estate & Business Services 50,087 42,416 44,502 63,649 200,655 4.5Public Administration and Defense 4,083 3,541 2,549 2,977 13,150 0.3Education, Health and Social Work Activities 1,781 2,084 2,047 2,391 8,302 0.2Community, Social and Personal Services 9,452 10,007 10,371 10,310 40,140 0.9Not known/Not Specified 1,695 1,271 581 758 4,304 0.1Grand Total 959,014 1,106,711 1,065,685 1,375,103 4,506,513 100% change 15 -3.7 29Source: Uganda Revenue Authority 39
    • 3.2 Agriculture and fisheriesThis section presents statistics for the period 2004-2008 on production of traditional cash crops,selected food crops, fish catch and livestock. The agricultural sector provides approximately 73.3percent (UNHS 2005/06) of employment and most industries and services in the country aredependent on this sector. The sector contribution to GDP has been declining in the last four years,and its contribution to the total GDP in 2008 was 21.5 percent.3.2.1 Cash cropsThere was an overall increase of 20.8 percent in coffee procurement between 2007 and 2008. Thisresulted from a substantial increase of 25.6 percent in Robusta coffee procured that offset adecline of 1.5 percent in Arabica coffee. Note that the quantities of coffee procured are used asproxy to production. Tea registered a reduction of 4.7 percent while tobacco registered anincrement of 10.1 percent between 2007 and 2008 as shown in Appendix Table 3.2A.3.2.2 Food cropsDespite the 0.1 percent increase in land area covered with bananas over the last three years,production has been fluctuating with a decline of 3.5 percent in 2006 followed by increments of 2.0percent and 1.5 percent in 2007 and 2008 respectively. Appendix Tables 3.2B and C provide dataon area under selected food crops as well as production for the period 2004 to 2008.3.2.3 Fish catch by water bodyLake Victoria is the largest water body by size in Uganda and remains the biggest contributor tofish catch. Its share of catch was 59.6 percent in 2007, and this was followed by Lakes Kyoga andAlbert with 16.0 percent and 15.1 percent respectively as shown in Appendix Ttable 3.2D.3.2.4 LivestockOn average, the population of cattle, sheep, goats and pigs increased by 3.0 percent while that ofpoultry increased by 2.1 percent in 2008 as shown in Figure 3.2.4 below and Appendix Table 3.2E. 40
    • Figure 3.2.4: Livestock numbers 2007- 2008 30,000 8 50 27,50 26,9 25,000 Livestock numbers (000s) 20,000 15,000 5 8,27 8,52 10,000 3 2 7,18 ,398 7 5,000 2 7 1,69 ,748 2,12 2,186 1 0 Cattle Sheep Goats Pigs Poultry 2007 20083.2.5 Production of Livestock products (2005-2008)Livestock products play a key role in raising incomes of households and providing a source ofprotein to many families. These include Milk, Beef, Pork, Goat/Mutton and Poultry meat amongothers. Milk Production increased by 8.0 percent in 2008. Generally, there has been an upwardtrend (besides 2006 slump) in milk production as seen in Figure 3.2.5 below.Beef production has progressively increased over the years since 2005 and registered an 8.0percent increment in 2008. Other livestock products which include Pork and Poultry productsrecorded up-ward trends in production as in the previous years. 41
    • Figure 3.2.5: Milk Production Trend (ltrs), 2005 – 2008 1,500 8 1,450 1,45 Milk Production (000,000 ltrs) 1,400 0 1,35 1,350 0 1,32 1,300 0 1,25 1,250 1,200 1,150 1,100 2005 2006 2007 2008 est Years 42
    • 3.3 Industry3.3.1 Index of ProductionThe Index of Production – Manufacturing (IoP-M) measures monthly trends in volume of themanufacturing sector in the country. Monthly data for the compilation of the index are collected ona quarterly basis. The number of establishments from which data is collected has increased fromabout 150 operational establishments (by 2006) to about 209 operational establishments in 2007.In addition, data on Coffee Processing, Tea Processing and Cotton Ginning is collected inaggregate form from Uganda Coffee Development Authority, Uganda Tea Association and theCotton Development Organisation respectively.Previously this index was computed using quantities to measure monthly changes in productionvolumes. But given the methodological problems associated with quantities, this practice has beenstopped (except for a few products such as coffee, tea and cotton). A new method using salesvalues to measure change has been adopted. It should be noted, however, that this is still avolume index. Secondly, this new index has been computed using 2002 as the new base period.This implies that care has to be taken when making comparisons between the new and old index..The establishments covered are those employing five or more persons. They are largely located inthe industrial belt of the country, which includes the districts of Mbarara, Bushenyi, Kasese,Masaka, Kampala, Wakiso, Mukono, Jinja, Bugiri, Tororo and Mbale. A few establishments in thedistricts of Hoima and Masindi are also covered.In the compilation of the index, the manufacturing sector is divided into eight groups: • Food Processing which includes grain milling, bakeries, sugar and jaggery, and the processing of tea, coffee, meat, fish, dairy products and other foods as well as manufacture of animal feeds; • Beverages and Tobacco; • Textile, Clothing, Leather and Footwear; • Timber, Paper and Printing; • Chemicals, Paint, Soap and Foam Products; • Bricks and Cement; • Metal Products; and • Miscellaneous group, which includes manufacturing of vehicle accessories, plastic products and electrical products.In this index, the Food Processing group has the biggest weight, of 400, followed by Beverages &Tobacco, and the Chemicals, Paint, Soap & Foam Products groups with weights of 201 and 97respectively. The new weights add up to 1,000 as shown in Table 3.3.1 below.Table 3.3.1 shows annual averages of the IoP at group level and All Items for the period of 2004 –2008. It also indicates that the All Items Index increased by 15.0 percent from 2006 to 2007. Theindex recorded a decrease of 1.3 percent in 2008. This was largely due to a combined decrease inproduction in food processing, drinks and tobacco, textiles and chemicals groups. For all thegroups that registered an increase in 2007, the Drinks and Tobacco group had the highestincrease, of about 25.8 percent. 43
    • Table 3.3.1: Index of Production, Annual Group Summary, 2004- 2008 ( Base 2002=100)Group Weight No. of 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Establ.Food Processing 400 74 106 121 125 142 138Drinks and Tobacco 201 10 123 139 159 200 191Textiles, Clothing and Footwear 43 21 161 145 135 176 142Sawmilling, Paper and Printing 35 22 120 124 131 148 166Chemicals, Paint, Soap & Foam Products 97 20 109 130 130 145 124Bricks & Cement 75 19 104 122 126 152 173Metal Products 83 20 109 124 123 108 130Miscellaneous 66 23 125 123 123 138 144Total Manufacturing (All Items) 1000 209 114 127 133 153 151Percentage Change 11 5 15 -1.3Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 44
    • 3.4 Producer Price IndexThe Producer Price Index for Manufacturing (PPI-M) measures changes in prices received byproducers for their outputs. The index measures price changes for goods sold in the local marketand those that are exported. The index is expressed in three levels, that is PPI-M (Local), PPI-M(Exports) and PPI-M (Combined). These price changes measured are factory gate prices thatexclude taxes but include subsidies. The index reflects price trends of a constant basket of goodsthat represent the output of selected business establishments.The coverage of the PPI-M has been restricted to businesses in the manufacturing sector. Thestructure of the PPI-M is such that goods produced for the local market represent 79.0 percent asopposed to 21.0 percent for goods produced for the export market.The index is presented in eight broad manufacturing industry groups thus: • Food Processing (includes meat, fish, oil, dairy, coffee, grain milling, animal feeds, bakery, tea and sugar); • Drinks and Tobacco • Textiles, Clothing and Footwear • Paper Products • Chemicals, Paint, Soap and Foam products • Bricks and Cement • Metals and Related products • Miscellaneous (includes Plastics and Furniture)3.4.1 PPI-M (Combined) Annual ChangesThe PPI-M (Combined) recorded the highest increase of 21.2 percent in 2008, due to increasedprices in all industry groups. Significant changes were registered in the Chemicals, Paint, Soap &Foam Products, in Metal Products and in Food Processing (34.5, 33.7, and 22.5 percentrespectively). On Financial Year basis, the highest increase of 13.4 percent in the last threefinancial years was registered in 2007/08. Significant changes were registered in Chemicals,Paint, Soap & Foam Products, in Bricks & Cement and in Metal Products (25.4, 20.2 and 16.7percent respectively) as shown in Table 3.4 A.Table 3.4 A: PPI-M (Combined) annual changes, CY 2006 – 2008Group Weight 2006 2007 2008Food Processing 419 14.2 8.5 22.5Drinks and Tobacco 185 0.0 1.0 16.2Textiles, Clothing and Footwear 42 7.3 4.9 5.9Sawmilling, Paper and Printing 48 15.4 12.5 3.5Chemicals, Paint, Soap & Foam Products 106 4.0 11.7 34.5Bricks & Cement 68 4.7 14.3 19.4Metal Products 91 19.0 8.4 33.7Miscellaneous 41 17.0 15.3 4.1PPI-M (Combined) 1000 10.4 8.5 21.2Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 45
    • Table 3.4 B: PPI-M (Combined) Annual Changes, financial years 2005/06-2007/08Group Weight 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08Food Processing 419 13.2 12.5 13.5Drinks and Tobacco 185 1.0 0.0 8.9Textiles, Clothing and Footwear 42 0.0 9.2 5.0Sawmilling, Paper and Printing 48 4.9 24.3 2.0Chemicals, Paint, Soap & Foam Products 106 0.0 9.0 25.4Bricks & Cement 68 5.8 9.2 20.2Metal Products 91 6.1 21.0 16.7Miscellaneous 41 9.7 19.5 8.4PPI-M (Combined) 1000 6.8 11.8 13.4Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 46
    • 3.5 EnergyThe energy sector in Uganda comprises of both traditional and conventional energy sources thatare either locally produced or imported. The convential energy sources that are in use in thecountry include petroleum products and renewable energy. However, the dominant locallyproduced energy sources at both the supply and demand levels are fuel wood and charcoal.3.5.1 Petroleum products salesFig. 3.5.1 below shows the volume of petroleum products sold and the annual percentage changesin sales. The trend of petrol sales has shown a large increase between 2007 and 2008 ofapproximately 30.5 percent. Diesel consumption shows a similar increase of 10.8 percent in 2008from the 2007 level, as a result of both public and private generators supplementing powershortages in the country. Similarly, Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) sales have shown a largerincrease of 13.7 percent, possibly due to the high electricity tariff rates, many households areswitching to LPG for cooking. However, aviation fuel and heavy fuel oil consumptions show adecrease in 2008 with aviation fuel showing a larger decline of 51.9 percent.Figure 3.5.1: Sales of Selected Petroleum Products 2004- 2008 600,000 500,000 400,000 M3 300,000 200,000 100,000 - 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year Petrol Aviation Fuel Diesel Fuel oil Kerosene LPG3.5.3 Petroleum products importsFigure 3.5.2 below shows that both Premium Motor Spirit (PMS) or Petrol and Automotive Gas Oil(AGO) or Diesel imports minimally increased with 1.3 and 2.3 percent respectively in 2008.However, Bulk Illuminating Kerosene (BIK) imports showed an insignificant increase of 0.5 per centin 2008. 47
    • Fig 3.5.2: Imports of Petroleum Products (M3): 2004 to 2008 700,000 600,000 500,000 Imports in M3 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 - 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year PMS BIK AGO3.5.4 ElectricityInstalled capacity of electricity suppliers to the main grid in Uganda is 527 MW as shown in theTable 3.5.4 below. However, usable capacity from both Kiira and Nalubale plants is 143.16 MW.There are other mini electricity plants that do not feed into the main grid but supply electricity to thesurrounding areas. These include Kisiizi Hospital, Kihihi and, for thermal power, West Nile RuralElectrification Company (WENRECO) among others.Table 3.5.4: Installed electricity capacity (MW), 2008Plant name Installed capacityInstalled capacity 527Hydro electricity 315 Kiira 120 Nalubale 180 Kasese Cobalt 10 Kilembe mines 5Thermal electricity 200 Lugogo 50 Kiira 50 Namanve 50 Mutundwe 50Bagasse electricity 12 Kakira 12Source: Uganda Electricity Transmission Company LimitedFor the main hydro plant, generation of electricity in 2008 was 2,176 Million kWh, while in 2007,1,905 Million kWh were generated, a 14.2 percent increase in power generation. As shown inFigure 3.5.3, units of electricity sold in Uganda increased by 30.0 percent between 2007 and 2008.The increase is due to installation of an additional thermal plant of 50 MW at Mutundwe. 48
    • Figure 3.5.3: Trend of generation in GWh, 2004 to 2008 2,500.00 2,000.00 1,500.00 GWh 1,000.00 500.00 0.00 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Years3.5.5 Lake Victoria LevelsFigure 3.5.4 below shows that the years 2004 to 2006 experienced substantial drop in water levelsfrom 11.33M in 2004 to 10.66M in 2006. However, the water level rose to 11.18 meters giving a4.88 percentage increase in 2007. It again rose slightly in 2008 by 0.31 percent. Hydro electricitygeneration from power plants varies with changes in the amount of water flowing in the river. 49
    • Figure 3.5.4: Trend of Lake Victoria water level at the Dam, 2004-2008 11.40 11.20 Waterr level in metres 11.00 10.80 10.60 10.40 10.20 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year3.5.6 Number of electricity consumers by type, 2004-2008Table 3.5.5 below shows that domestic annual electricity connections have decreased by a 0.4perecnt in 2008. This also applies to other categories of consumers as shown in the Table 3.5.5below.Table 3.5.5: Number of consumers by type, 2004 – 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Domestic Tariff 237,830 244,169 271,984 277,393 276,255Percentage Change (%) 7.83 2.67 11.39 1.99 (0.41)Commercial Power and Heating 23,231 24,179 24,718 24,602 20,484Industrial Power: Standard Tariff 733 107 139 161 159Street Lighting 326 327 315 334 291Source: UMEME LimitedHowever, during the period 2004-2007, the number of electricity connections had been increasingannually as shown in Fig. 3.5.5. In percentage terms, there was a small percentage increment inthe rate of connections by the end of 2007, approximately 2.0 per cent as shown in Table 3.5.5. 50
    • Figure 3.5.5: Number of consumers in the domestic electricity tarrif group, 2004 - 2008 290,000 280,000 number of Connections 270,000 260,000 250,000 240,000 230,000 220,000 210,000 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year3.5.7 Electricity tariffsAs shown in Table 3.5.6, there has been stability of the tariff rates between 2007 and 2008.Table 3.5.6: Electricity tariffs, (UGX/kWh)Tariff category 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Domestic 171.4 216.9 298.2 426.1 426.1Commercial 164.8 208.3 286.8 398.8 398.8Medium Industrial 150.3 182.8 261.5 369.7 369.7Large Industrial 60.4 73.6 120.8 187.2 187.2Street lighting 162.5 205.3 282.8 403.0 403.0Percentage changeDomestic 26.5 37.5 42.9 0.0Commercial 26.4 37.7 39.1 0.0Medium Industrial 21.6 43.1 41.4 0.0Large Industrial 21.9 64.1 55.0 0.0Street lighting 26.3 37.7 42.5 0.0Source: Umeme Limited 51
    • 3.6 Building and Construction3.6.1 ConstructionDwelling places, business establishments and social service delivery centres for education, health,among others all require buildings. Another construction dimension covers roads which are a majorchannel for transport and marketing of both inputs and outputs from production.3.6.1.1 Construction Sector Indices (CSI): DefinitionThe Construction Sector Price Indices are numbers that show the relative level of prices inconstruction sector relative to the base period. They measure the cost of a given basket ofconstruction goods and services, relative to their cost in the base period. The first quarter (i.e.,January-March) of 2006 is the base period for the CSI. The numbers in other periods thereforeindicate the level of prices relative to this period.3.6.1.2 CSI CompositionCSI is composed of basic heading and composite indices. Basic headings (inputs) are the smallestsets of goods or services for which the index numbers are compiled. They are the componentsused to build up composite indices which are referred to as sub-sector indices of the whole sector.Each basic heading covers a reasonably homogeneous set of goods or services which includematerials, labour and equipment. For example, items within a basic heading are likely to be madefrom the same material. A list of basic headings is given in Statistical Appendix Table 3.6B.3.6.1.3 Annual ChangesAnnual changes show that prices in the overall Construction sector rose by 15.2 percent in 2008.However, the main sub-sectors (Residential, Non-Residential and Civil works) had varied pricechanges. Civil works had the highest annual increase of approximately 19.5 percent in 2008.The changes in the prices of the inputs into both Residential and Non-Residential Sub-sectorsshow that prices rose by an average of approximately 14 percent for each sub-sector in 2008. (SeeAppendix Table 3.6 A). 52
    • 3.6.2 Cement ConsumptionThis section presents data and information on cement imports and local production and the netdomestic consumption in the country for the period 2004 to 2008. The data provide a usefulindicator of the level of construction activity in the country. Given the complexity that is experiencedin the measurement of the volume of construction in a given period, quite often the consumption ofcement is used as a proxy to show the trend of the volume of construction works.Table 3.6.1 shows that, cement consumption decreased by 3.3 percent in 2008 despite thesignificant increase of 19.8 percent in local production which was more than offset by the 247.5percent increase in exports.Table 3.6.1: Consumption of Cement ( Tonnes) 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Imports 125,518 316,735 267,120 295,992 309,878Local production 653,426 692,710 857,609 995,807 1,193,361Exports 15,489 20,659 38,717 101,116 351,339Domestic consumption 763,455 988,786 1,086,012 1,190,682 1,151,900%age Change inDomestic consumption - 29.51 9.83 9.64 -3.26Source: UBOS Trade Statistics Section3.6.3 Building StatisticsBuilding statistics has continued to be collected from 14 Municipal Councils. Complete data is inthe category of Plans Submitted, Plans Approved and Permits Issued. Hence, data and informationprovided refer to the capital city (Kampala) and the eight municipalities. The municipalities areEntebbe, Fort Portal, Jinja, Tororo, Gulu, Lira, Mbale and Soroti.Figures 3.6.1, 3.6.2 and 3.6.3 show the number of Plans Submitted to the nine Municipal Councilsfor approval, for the period 2004 to 2008. The three graphs show that residential structures formthe largest number in terms of Plans Submitted, Plans Approved and Permits issued during the2004 -2008. On average about 55 percent of plans submitted by the Municipalities in the year 2008were of residential category and 27 percent in the category of commercial as compared to 2007. 53
    • Figure 3.6.1: Plans Submitted to Municipal Councils 2,500 2,000 1,500 Plans 1,000 500 - 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Residential Commercial Industrial Institutional OthersFigure 3.6.2: Plans Approved by Municipal Councils in the Country, 2004- 2008 2,500 2,000 1,500 Plans 1,000 500 - 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Residential Commercial Industrial Institutional Others 54
    • Figure 3.6.3: Permits Issued by the Municipal Councils in the Country, 2004- 2008 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 Permits 800 600 400 200 - 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Residential Commercial Industrial Institutional Others 55
    • 3.7 Transport and Communication3.7.1 TransportTransport statistics cover information on roads, water, rail and air transport.3.7.1.1 Road transportData presented in this section includes information on newly registered vehicles, number ofvehicles estimated on the road as well as the national road network. Table 3.7.1 shows that newlyregistered vehicles increased by 31.0 percent in 2008 and the number of vehicles on the roadincreased by 22.9 percent in the same period. Table 3.7 C in the appendix shows the length ofroad network as of June 2008 by region.Table 3.7.1: Newly registered and estimated number of motor vehicles on the road, 2004- 2008Category 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Newly registered 35,538 51,107 59,617 77,305 101,240Percentage Increase 44 17 30 31Estimated number of vehicles 247,045 278,594 315,903 382,773 470,488Percentage Increase 13 13 21 23Source: Ministry of Works and Transport and Uganda Revenue Authority (URA)3.7.1.2 Air TransportFigure 3.7.1 below shows the trend of cargo (imports and exports) through Entebbe InternationalAirport. The volume of exports declined by 7.5 percent in 2008. Similarly, the volume of cargo thatentered the country through Entebbe declined by 6.9 percent.Figure 3.7.1: Volume of cargo through Entebbe International Airport, 2004 – 2008 56
    • Figure 3.7.2 below shows the trend of commercial aircraft movement through Entebbe InternationalAirport. The number of aircraft movement increased by approximately 8.4 percent in 2008compared to 2007 which experienced an increase of approximately 14.6 percent.Figure 3.7.2: Commercial aircraft movement at Entebbe International Airport, 2004-2008Source: Civil Aviation Authority3.7.2 CommunicationThe Telecommunications industry has, over the years, continued to experience substantialincreases in the number of both cellular and fixed telephone subscribers. By the end of December2008, the number of telephone connections had risen to 8,723,345, with 8,554,864 of the linesbeing cellular and 168,481 fixed. The number of cellular phone subscribers increased by more thanthree million between 2007 and 2008. This represents a 65.7 percent growth and a representationof about three (3) telephone lines per ten (10) residents by the end of 2008 as shown in Table 3.7.2below. (See also Statistical Appendix Table 3.7 B)Considerable usage growth has been recorded in regard to international outgoing traffic from 88million minutes in 2007 to 135 million minutes in 2008. This growth is attributed to innovativecampaigns, promotional offers and marketing strategies by the four existing telephone operatorswhich include Uganda Telecom, MTN, Zain, and Warid. The total talk time (traffic) increased from3,005 million minutes in 2007 to 4,269 million minutes in 2008 registering a 42.1 percent increase.Table 3.7.2: Telephone Subscribers and talk time, 2004-2008Service 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Subscribers 1,111,692 1,625,902 2,827,479 5,329,202 8,723,345 Fixed Telephone 82,495 100,777 129,863 165,788 168,481 Cellular Phone 1,165,035 1,525,125 2,697,616 5,163,414 8,554,864Talk time (traffic, million minutes) 1,559 1,724 2,307 3,005 4,269 of which International n.a n.a 61 88 135Source: Uganda Communications Commission 57
    • 3.7.2.1 Internet MarketA 41.9 percent growth has been realised in the fixed subscriber base with a total of 22,000 fixedinternet subscribers by the end of December 2008 from 15,500 registered by the end of 2007. Inaddition, the emergence of mobile wireless internet access has complemented the fixed internetaccess. By the end of December 2008, there were about 220,000 mobile wireless accounts using arange of technology media including GPRS, CDMA and WIMAX faciliated by the heavy capitalinvestment by network operators in high speed data networks.Table 3.7.3 Internet Users and subscribers, 2004 – 2008Subscribers &users 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Subscribers 8,000 9,500 15,000 15,500 22,000Estimated internet users 287,600 1,000,000 1,600,000 2,000,000 2,500,000Note: Internet subscriber figures exclude the mobile wireless accountsSource: Uganda Communications Commission3.7.2.2 International BandwidthSignificant infrastructure and capacity investment in 2008 have resulted in a 47.5% increase ininternational bandwidth, rising to a total of 508 Mbps by the end of 2008 of which 138.6 Mbps wasuplink while 369.4 Mbps was downlink.The eminent arrival of undersea cable systems like TEAMS and SEACOM is expected to furtherbolster international bandwidth capacity. SEACOM in particular is bound to land at the East AfricanCoast by the end of 2009.Table 3.7.4: Band width (Mbps), 2004-2008Band 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Uplink 10.6 26.1 56.3 86.9 138.6Downlink 24.1 60.5 188.7 257.5 369.4Total 34.7 86.6 245.0 344.4 508.0Source: Uganda Communications Commission3.7.2.3 Postal and Courier servicesDue to an increase of internet users in the country, the volume of both registered and ordinaryletters handled by Postal service decreased from 6,491,203 pieces in 2007 to 5,771,161 pieces in2008 (11 percent decrease). (See Statistical Appendix Table 3.7 A)By the end of December 2008, the postal network comprised of 329 permanent Post Offices, ofwhich 302 were manned by agents. There are 173 Post Offices accepting financial transactionssuch as money orders. At least 50 percent of these postal outlets have daily pick up and collectionschedules facilitated by the Post Bus. By the end of 2008, there were a total number of 75,015private letter boxes countrywide.To date there are 21 licensed courier operators other than Posta Uganda Ltd, of these 9 areDomestic, 7 are Regional and 5 are International operators. The south eastern Africa regionalcourier services on the other hand are dominated by the regional bus operators. 58
    • 3.8 Migrations and TourismThis section covers the movement of persons with valid travel documents from other countries intoUganda through the main points of entry. The section also presents statistics on persons whodepart from the country, as well as those who visit national parks and accommodationestablishments irrespective of whether they are resident or non-resident.3.8.1 Total arrivalsThe total arrivals in the country in the year 2008 were 1.2 million as compared to 883,000 in theyear 2007, which is a 32 percent increase.Figure 3.8.1: Total arrivals from 2004 - 2008 1400 1163 1200 1000 883 No. of arrivals 738 770 800 662 600 400 200 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year3.8.2 Departures from 2004 - 2008The international travellers out of the country increased in 2008 by 30.0 percent from the previousyear. Figure 3.8.2 shows an upward trend for the total departures from 2005.Figure 3.8.2: Total Departures from 2004 – 2008 1400 1200 1143 No. of arrivals (000s) 1000 879 755 800 696 578 600 400 200 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year 59
    • 3.8.3 Tourist arrivals in UgandaThe year 2008 recorded a total of 844,000 tourists to the country compared to about 642,000tourists that were recorded in the previous year, a 31.5 percent increase.Figure 3.8.3: Total Visitor Arrivals in Uganda (000’s) 900 844 800 700 642 600 No. of tourists (000) 539 500 512 468 400 300 200 100 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 YearOut of about 844,000 tourist arrivals in Uganda in the year 2008, about 347,000 travelled to thecountry to visit friends and relatives. Business visitors accounted for about 163,000 persons andabout 144,000 persons declared their purpose of visit as leisure and holidays.Figure 3.8.4: Percentage Distribution of Tourist arrivals by purpose of visit Holidays, 17% other, 22.5% Business, 19.3% Visiting Friends, 41.1% 60
    • Figure 3.8.5 below shows continuous increase in the number of visitor arrivals through EntebbeAirport. On average the Airport received about 219,000 visitor arrivals per year during the period2004 to 2008.Figure 3.8.5: Tourist arrivals through Entebbe Airport (000’s) 400 350 358 300 No. of visitors (000s) 250 235 200 200 172 150 131 100 50 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Year3.8.4 National ParksThe information provided on the national parks was collected from 10 main parks within thecountry, namely Murchison Falls, Bwindi Impenetrable, Queen Elizabeth, Rwenzori Mountains,Elgon Mountain, Kibale National Park, Mgahinga Gorilla, Lake Mburo, Kidepo and Semliki.The above mentioned national parks offer different tourism activities that include Gorilla tracking,nature guided walks, village walk, butterfly watching, bird watching and rare fauna species.Figure 3.8.6: Visitors (Citizens and Foreigners) to National Parks (000’s) 160 138 140 124 129 127 120 110 No. of visitors 100 80 60 40 20 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 YearAbout 138,000 persons visited the national parks in 2008 compared to 127,000 in 2007, reflectingan increase of about 9.0 percent as shown in Figure 3.8.6 above. 61
    • 3.8.5 Net MigrationTable 3.8.1 shows that for the years 2004 – 2008 total arrivals, exceeded total departures for allthe years.Table 3.8.1: Net arrivals/departures (‘000’s) from 2004 – 2008Period Arrivals Departures Net migration2004 738 696 422005 662 578 842006 770 756 142007 883 879 042008 1,163 1,143 20Source: Immigration Department, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of Statistics3.8.6 Accommodation StatisticsAccommodation statistics cover the operational characteristics of the accommodation sector for theselected hotels in the country. Included here are characteristics for room and bed occupancies andguests. Generally, Appendix Table 3.8 L reveals that the room and bed occupancies for the hotelssampled are below 50 percent since the year 2005. 62
    • 4 Macroeconomic Statistics4.1 National accountsThis section presents statistics on the series of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and theExpenditure on GDP, by production and expenditure approaches. It also presents statistics on theBalance of Payments (BoP). Some revisions have been made on the figures that were previouslypublished in the 2008 Statistical Abstract. Note that additional information is given in the StatisticalAppendix Tables 4.1 A to 4.1 P.4.1.1 Gross Domestic ProductIn the Financial Year 2007/08 the Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) rebased the GDP seriesfrom the 1997/98 base year to 2002 base year. This rebasing exercise involved a completerevision of, and improvement in, the methodology used for GDP compilation.During the Financial Year 2008/09 the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at market prices increasedby 7.0 as compared to 9.0 percent growth recorded in the previous year 2007/08. This relativelyhigh growth rate attained in 2008/09 was mainly due to the good performances in themanufacturing, wholesale and retail trade, construction, and, transport and communicationsactivities.Table 4.1.1: Total and per capita GDP at current prices and total population: fiscal years, 2004/05 – 2008/09 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP (Billion shs) 16,026 18,172 21,187 24,709 29,824Total Population (000) 6,495 27,357 28,247 29,167 30,116Per capita GDP (shs) 604,859 664,269 750,039 847,166 990,314Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics.Following are brief explanatory notes on tables 4.1 A to 4.1 P in the Statistical Appendix.4.1.2 Agriculture, forestry and fishingThe agricultural sector output that includes cash crops, food crops, livestock, forestry and fishingactivities grew by 2.6 percent in 2008/09 compared to an increase of 1.3 percent in 2007/08. Theperformance of this sector has been partially boosted by the good performance of the forestry andlivestock activities.The percentage contribution of agriculture, forestry and fishing to the total GDP at current priceswas 23.7 percent in 2008/09.4.1.2.1 Cash cropsThe growing of cash crops activity covers coffee, cotton, cocoa, tea, tobacco, sugarcane andexported horticulture. In 2008/09 the output of this activity increased by 1.7 percent compared tothe 9.0 percent growth registered in 2007/08. 63
    • Growth was registered in cotton and sugarcane while declines were registered in tea, coffee andtobacco.4.1.2.2 Food cropsThe growing of food crops activity is estimated to have grown by 2.9 percent in 2008/09 comparedto a 2.4 percent growth in 2007/08. The improved performance of this activity is attributed to thenormalization of agricultural activities in the northern and north eastern parts of the country as theformer internally displaced persons continued to return to their respective farmlands and openingup of new farmlands. The resulting increase in output offset the effects of the dry spell andintermittent rainfall experienced in 2008 in many parts of the north eastern and northern Uganda.4.1.2.3 FishingThe fishing activity performance slightly declined further in 2008/09 by 0.1 percent following anearlier drop of 11.8 percent in 2007/08. Fishing activities have been hampered by the continueddepletion of fish stocks from the lakes as a result of over fishing and use of illegal fishing gears thatend up catching immature fish.4.1.3 IndustryThe industrial sector is estimated to grow by 3.8 percent in 2008/09 down from the 9.1 percentgrowth rate for 2007/08.The percentage contribution of industry to the total GDP at current prices was 24.2 percent in2008/09. The major activity under industry is construction.4.1.3.1 Mining and quarryingThere was a remarkable improvement in the performance of mining and quarrying activities during2008/09. In the year 2008/09 the mining and quarrying activities output increased by 9.2 percentcompared to a 3.0 percent growth for 2007/08.The contribution of the activities in mining and quarrying to total GDP at current prices was thelowest at 0.3 percent in 2008/09.4.1.3.2 ManufacturingThe preliminary estimates indicate that total manufacturing grew by 7.2 percent in 2008/09 ascompared to a 7.6 percent growth for 2007/08. This growth was mainly attributed to the goodperformance of formal manufacturing which grew by 8.3 percent in 2008/09.The contribution of manufacturing to the total GDP at current prices was at 7.5 percent in 2008/09.4.1.3.3 Electricity SupplyElectricity output is estimated to increase by 4.2 percent in 2008/09. This is mainly due to theinclusion of Kakira Sugar Works generated power on the national grid. The contribution ofelectricity supply to the total GDP at current prices was 1.7 percent in 2008/09. 64
    • 4.1.3.4 Water SupplyWater output is estimated to grow by 4.1 percent in 2008/09 up from a growth of 3.8 percent in2007/08. The growth in this activity is mainly due to the increased investments in the sector and theexpansion of water supply.Water supply contribution to the total GDP at current prices was 2.4 percent in 2008/09.4.1.3.5 ConstructionThe Construction activities cover public and private construction. The output from this activity grewby 2.2 percent in 2008/09 compared to the 10.8 percent growth for 2007/08.In 2008/09 construction had a share of 12.3 percent of the total GDP at current prices.4.1.4 ServicesThe services sector grew by 9.4 percent in 2008/09 compared to 10.2 percent growth in 2007/08.The major contributors to this growth were the financial services, and transport and communicationwhich grew by 21.1 percent and 20.0 percent respectively in 2008/09. With a contribution of 46.4percent services contributed almost half of the total GDP at current prices in 2008/09.4.1.4.1 Wholesale and retail trade; repairsWholesale, retail trade and repairs activities are estimated to grow by 7.6 percent in 2008/09 downfrom a 14.7 percent growth in 2007/08.Wholesale and retail trade and repairs contributed 12.2 percent to the total GDP at current prices in2008/09.4.1.4.2 Hotels and restaurantsHotels and restaurants activities grew by 7.9 percent in 2008/09 compared to the growth rate of10.7 percent in 2007/08.Hotels and restaurants contributed 4.2 percent to the total GDP at current prices in 2008/09.4.1.4.3 Transport and communicationsThe output of transport and communication activities were estimated to have increased by 20.0percent in 2008/09 compared to an increase of 21.3 percent in 2007/08.Road, rail and water transport activities are estimated to grow by 12.4 percent in 2008/09compared to a growth rate of 20.8 percent in 2007/08. Road freight transport output is mainlydriven by the wholesale and retail trade activities. A growth in the latter is therefore reflected in theroad, rail and water transport trends.The posts and telecommunications activities registered a growth rate of 32.2 percent in 2008/09which is higher than the 22.6 percent growth rate achieved in 2007/08.The contribution of the transport and communication activities to the total GDP at current prices in2008/09 was 6.8 percent. 65
    • 4.1.4.4 Financial ServicesThis includes activities of commercial banking, the Central Bank, insurance, foreign exchangebureaus and other activities auxiliary to financial intermediation. The financial services werepreviously included in the miscellaneous category in the old structure of the GDP by activity tables.In the preliminary GDP estimates, the financial service activities registered a growth rate of 21.1percent in 2008/09 compared to a 24.1 percent growth achieved in 2007/08.This sector contributed 3.5 percent to the total GDP at current prices in 2008/09.4.1.4.5 Real estate activitiesReal estate activities include rental and owner occupied outputs which grew by 5.7 percent in2008/09 slightly higher than the growth rate of 5.6 percent that was attained in 2007/08.The contribution of these activities to the total GDP at current prices in 2008/09 was 6.2 percent.4.1.4.6 Other business servicesThe Other business service activities comprise of all other business activities that were classifiedunder miscellaneous (excluding finance) in the old GDP tabulation. Such activities include rentingof transport equipment, machinery and other equipment, household and other personal goods, anddata processing and computer related consultancy. Other activities included are: research andexperimental development, legal, accounting, book keeping and auditing, tax consultancy,business and management consultancy activities, architectural and engineering activities includingconsultancy, investigation and security activities, photographic activities and other businessservices.With a contribution of 1.6 percent to the total GDP at current prices in 2008/09, the other businessservice activities are estimated to increase by 8.8 percent in 2008/09 which is lower than the 14.3percent growth for 2007/08.4.1.4.7 Community servicesThese services include public administration and defence, education and health.Public administration grew by 4.7 percent in 2008/09, down from a 13.3 percent change recordedfor 2007/08. Public administration contributed 2.9 percent of the total GDP at current prices in2008/09.Education activities registered a growth of 4.8 percent in 2008/09. This was a recovery from the 6.5percent decline recorded for 2007/08. The sector contributed 5.6 percent to the total GDP atcurrent prices in 2008/09.Health activities grew by 8.1 percent in 2008/09, compared to a 4.8 percent decline in 2007/08.The contribution of these activities to the total GDP however remains relatively low at only 1.1percent in 2008/09.4.1.4.8 Other personal and community servicesOther personal and community service activities include services of theatres, cinemas, drycleaning, houseboys and house girls, barbers and beauty shops. 66
    • These activities grew by 12.3 percent in 2008/09 which was lower than the 12.8 percent growth in2007/08. Other personal and community service activities contributed 2.2 percent to the total GDPat current prices in 2008/09.4.1.4.9 FISIMFinancial Intermediation Services Indirectly Measured (FISIM) is the difference between interestincome received and interest paid by the commercial banks. It therefore portrays the changes inthe net interest income of the commercial banks.In 2008/09 FISIM is estimated to increase by 14.3 percent with a contribution of -2.0 percent of thetotal GDP at current prices.4.1.5 Expenditure on Gross Domestic Product4.1.5.1 Private consumption expenditureAn increase of 10.5 percent in real terms was estimated for household final consumptionexpenditure in 2008/09, compared to an increase of 5.2 percent in 2007/08. Its share of the totalGDP at current prices also increased from 76.2 percent in 2007/08 to 80.3 percent in 2008/09.4.1.5.2 Government consumption expenditureGovernment final consumption expenditure in real terms increased by 9.6 percent in 2008/09compared to a 2.2 percent decrease in 2007/08.The share of government final consumption expenditure of the total GDP at current prices in2008/09 was 10.1 percent down from an 11.0 percent share for 2007/08.4.1.5.3 Gross capital formationGross fixed capital formation is estimated to have grown by 9.2 percent in 2008/09 compared to agrowth of 6.5 percent in 2007/08. The gross fixed capital formation contributed 21.7 percent to thetotal GDP at current prices in 2008/09 which share was split between construction with a 15.9percent share, and machinery and equipment with a 5.8 percent share of the total GDP.4.1.5.4 Exports of goods and serviceExports of goods and services grew by 13.2 percent in 2008/09. This sector contributed 21.3percent to the total GDP at current prices in the same period with goods and service exportscontributing 17.6 percent and 3.6 percent of the total GDP respectively.4.1.5.5 Imports of goods and servicesImports of goods and services are estimated to increase from Uganda shillings 5,294 billion in2007/08 to Uganda shillings 6,514 billion in 2008/09, an increase of 23.0 percent. The share ofimports of goods and services of the total GDP in 2008/09 was -33.7 percent.4.1.6 GDP by expenditure at 1 digit level basic headingTable 4.1 N gives GDP by expenditure at one digit basic heading level. This table is a summary ofthe 200 basic headings of expenditure on GDP, necessary for the computation of the Purchasing 67
    • Power Parities (PPPs). This breakdown gives the weights used in the International ComparisonProgramme (ICP) for PPP computations. The total expenditure on GDP at current prices in 2008was shilling 28.1 trillion.In 2008 the individual consumption expenditure by households (24.1 trillion shillings) isapproximately 85.9 percent of the total expenditure on GDP. The biggest portion of the individualconsumption expenditure by households was on food and non-alcoholic beverages (9.3 trillionshillings), followed by housing, water, electricity, gas and other fuels (4.7 trillion shillings). Thesecond largest component of the basic heading level one grouping expenditure series in 2008 wasgross fixed capital formation (20.1 percent of the total expenditure). The balance of exports andimports contributed to -4.1 trillion shillings.4.1.7 Balance of paymentsThe overall balance of payments projected for 2008/09 revealed a deficit of 43.2 million US dollarsin 2008/09 compared to a surplus of 691.0 million US dollars in 2007/08.4.1.7.1 Current accountThe current account continued to worsen from a deficit of 482.9 million US dollars in 2007/08 to adeficit of 1,102.3 million US dollars in 2008/09. The deficit was mainly due to the negative tradebalance and big deficits on services and income accounts.4.1.7.2 Trade balanceThe trade balance worsened from a deficit of 912.6 million US dollars in 2007/08 to a deficit of1,353.7 million US dollars in 2008/09. The deficit in 2008/09 is mainly due to the low value ofexport earnings, estimated at only 2,811.6 million US dollars, compared to the high value ofimports, projected at 4,165.3 million US dollars in 2008/09.4.1.7.3 Services and incomeThe net inflow of services and income for the year 2008/09 was projected at negative 1,035.8million US dollars compared to negative 844.6 million US dollars in 2007/08. The service accountand income account were projected at negative 656.7 million US dollars and negative 379.1 millionUS dollars respectively for 2008/09.4.1.7.4 Capital and financial accountThe capital and financial account was projected to increase by 1,059.1 million US dollars in2008/09 compared to US dollars 1,173.9 million realized in 2007/08, a decrease of 9.8 percent. 68
    • 4.2 External TradeThis section presents a summary of external trade statistics on imports and exports, in value andquantity, based on actual flow of goods as recorded by the Customs Department of the UgandaRevenue Authority (URA) and augmented by Non-URA sources. The section further presents thedirection of trade in goods with respect to Uganda and the rest of the world. In this sectionUganda’s trading partners have been classified according to continent, regional blocs and selectedindividual countries.The compilation of external trade statistics from 2004 onwards was based on the General TradeSystem. Also, the recording of commodities follows the Harmonised Coding and DescriptionSystem commonly known as the HS nomenclature and the Standard International TradeClassification (SITC) nomenclature.4.2.1 Trade balanceDespite increases in the exports earnings during the year 2008, the country has continued toexperience an unfavourable trade balance. From Table 4.2.1, the trade deficit has more thandoubled from US $ 1,061.1 million in 2004 to US $ 2,801.6 million in 2008. This is attributed toexports that increased at a lower pace than could off-set the imports expenditure bill. During 2008the exports revenue increased by 29.0 percent compared to the imports bill of 29.5 percent.The widening unfavourable trade balance could be attributed to the continued exportation ofunprocessed agricultural products which form the bulk of Uganda’s exports.The government has continuously pursued market diversification strategies and export basewidening and more effort has been directed towards processing of specific crops that havepreviously contributed considerably to the total export value of Coffee, Tea, tobacco, Cotton, Maizeand fish. These commodities have been targeted under the National Export Strategy (NES) forvalue addition which could improve on the foreign exchange earnings.Table 4.2.1: Summary of external trade statistics: 2004 – 2008 (million US $)Trade flows 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Imports 1,726.2 2,054.1 2,557.3 3,495.4 4,525.9Exports 665.1 812.9 962.2 1,336.7 1,724.3Trade Balance -1,061.1 -1,241.2 -1,595.1 -2,158.7 -2,801.6% change (Imports) 25.5 19.0 24.5 36.7 29.5% change (Exports) 24.5 22.2 18.4 38.9 29.0Note:2008 figures are provisionalBOP figures includes estimates of unrecorded trade which are excluded from the above tableSource: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsFigure 4.2.1 below show that both imports and exports maintained an upward trend with thehighest values registered in 2008. The trade balance on the other hand, continued to deteriorate,reaching its worst levels in 2008. This has been the trend for the last decade, which calls for strongvalue addition and quality control by observing Phyto-sanitary regulations to increase on foreignexchange earning in order to reverse the unfavourable trade balance. 69
    • Figure 4.2.1: Imports, exports and trade balance 2003 – 2008 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 -1,000 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 -2,000 -3,000 -4,000 Imports Exports Trade Balance4.2.2 ExportsThe exported commodities are categorised into Traditional Exports (TE) and Non-TraditionalExports (NTE). The traditional exports include Coffee, Cotton, Tea and Tobacco while Non-Traditional Exports (NTE) includes commodities other than the four listed above.The contribution of TE to total exports foreign exchange earnings started to decline in 2005 whentheir share dropped from 36.8 percent in 2004 to 32.9 percent in 2005, but stabilised at about 30percent in the last 3 years as shown in table 4.2C. However, in 2008 there was a marginal increaseof 0.8 percent compared to the previous year. This could be attributed to the increased valuefetched by coffee as compared to the other crops in the TE category. Also, the quantities exportedfor coffee, tea, and tobacco increased significantly in 2008 except for cotton which registered amore than 50 percent decline in the quantity exported.For the period under review, coffee remained the main foreign exchange earner for the country. Itscontribution to the total export earnings increased from 19.9 percent in 2007 to 23.4 percent in2008. This could be accounted for by the increased volume of coffee exported of 200,640 toneswhich fetched US $ 403.2 million in 2008 as compared to 164,540 tones valued at US $ 265,853million as shown in tables 4.2 A and 4.2 B.Tobacco and tea also registered some increases in the volume and value exported. Although thevolume of tobacco increased considerably from 26,384 tones in 2007 to 29,042 tones in 2008 itsvalue increased marginally from US $66.3 million in 2007 to US $66.5 million 2008. On the otherhand, whereas the volume of tea exported increased, its value reduced due to low prices for tea onthe world market.The contribution of the NTE to the total export earnings stabilised in 2006 and 2007 at 70.1percent, while in 2008, the share declined marginally to 69.3 percent. The decline in NTEs was feltmore in fish and maize whose shares dropped. The decline in fish share could be attributed to the 70
    • reduction in the volume exported and closure of some fish factories. For instance, the contributionof fish and fish products alone to the total foreign exchange earnings reduced from 9.3 percent in2007 to 7.2 percent in 2008.Despite considerable decline in fish exports, it remained as the highest foreign exchange earnerunder the NTE category and ranked second after coffee. The other NTEs that contributedsignificantly to the total export earnings were; maize with 1.1 percent, roses and cut flowers (1.7percent), cocoa beans (1.3 percent), cobalt (1.2 percent), soap (1.0 percent) and hides and skinswith 0.7 percent. It should be noted that the reduction in the contribution for maize could beattributed to increased trade in informal maize exports. Meanwhile, for hides and skins the taxesimposed by government to discourage exportation of raw hide and skins before value addition andunder declaration could have reduced the export earnings and volume exported.4.2.2.1 Direction of tradeCOMESA and the European Union (EU) member states remained the major destinations forUganda’s exports. From table 4.2 H, COMESA region registered the highest market share of 42.1percent in 2008 as compared to 37.9 percent in 2007. This was followed by the European Unionwhose market share increased slightly from 24.3 percent in 2007 to 26.7 percent in 2008.Meanwhile, Asia market accounted for 5.7 percent and the Middle East saw a significant reductionin its market share to 8.1 percent in 2008 compared to 14.3 percent registered in 2007. The drasticfall in the value of exports to the Middle East could be explained by increased market share for theCOMESA region.The value of exports to COMESA increased remarkably by 43.2 percent from US $ 506.5 million in2007 to US $ 725.2 million in 2008 (see table 4.2 G). Among the COMESA partner states thatregistered remarkable increase was Sudan accounting for the highest share of 14.3 percent. It wasfollowed by Kenya (9.5 percent), Rwanda (7.9 percent) and the D. R. Congo with (7.2 percent).The figures show a significant shift from past trends where Kenya took the lead as the main exportdestinationThe total export value to the EU region increased from US $ 324.4 million in 2007 to US $ 460.2million in 2008. This led to a shift in market shares from 24.3 percent to 26.7 percent in 2007 and2008 respectively. The Countries that contributed to this increment were United Kingdom (6.9percent), Netherlands (4.7 percent), Germany (4.4 percent) and Belgium with 3.7 percent (seetable 4.2 H).On the other hand, exports to the Middle East, Asia, and North America were valued at US $139.1million, US $ 98.2 million and US $ 19.8 million in 2008 respectively.The Other African countries outside COMESA region that contributed significantly to Uganda’sforeign exchange earning included Tanzania, Congo BR and South Africa whose market sharesstood at 1.8 percent, 1.3 percent and 0.9 percent respectively.4.2.3 ImportsThe Asian continent maintained its position as the leading source for Uganda’s imports. In 2008,the share of the imports bill to the Asian countries increased marginally to 34.8 percent from 33.6percent during 2007. The total expenditure bill to the region in 2008 was US $1,574.0 million ascompared to US $ 1,175.0 million in 2007. The main countries that contributed significantly wereIndia, China, Japan and Malaysia with market shares estimated at 10.4 percent, 8.1 percent, 5.9percent and 3.2 percent respectively.The import bill for the African continent grew from US $803.3 million in 2007 to US $971.6 million in2008. However, in terms of proportion to the overall imports bill, its market share reduced from 23.0percent to 21.5 percent in 2008. Countries that were among the major sources of imports to 71
    • Uganda were Kenya (11.3 percent), South Africa (6.7 percent) and Tanzania with 1.2 percentmarket share.During the year 2008, a total of US $878.0 million was spent on imports from the European Union.The Union ranked third after the African continent although with a slight reduction in the marketshare recorded at 19.4 percent as compare to 20.5 percent in 2007 (refer to tables 4.2 D and 4.2M).Overall, the imports expenditure bill increased from US $3,495.4 million in 2007 to US $ 4,525.9million in 2008. The products that accounted for this increment included petroleum products (18.5percent), road vehicles (7.5 percent), iron and steel (6.8 percent) telecommunications and soundrecording apparatus, and, medical and pharmaceutical products; see tables 4.2 E and 4.2 F.4.2.4 The Informal Cross Border Trade Survey (ICBT)This section presents findings and analysis of survey results in line with the survey objectives. Theindicators derived from the survey data include levels of imports and exports. The section alsoincludes information on trade balance, direction of trade, comparative values of recorded andunrecorded trade in informally imported and exported commodities. The results for 2008 areestimates based on eleven months of border monitoring with June excluded. In each month, twoweeks were monitored continuously while the remaining two were estimated.4.2.4.1 Informal trade flows, 2005-2008From Table 4.2.2 below, Uganda’s informal (unrecorded) export earnings in 2008 were estimatedat US $ 1.3 billion compared to US$ 776.5 million recorded in 2007. During 2008, informal exportsincreased substantially by 69.4 percent on account of goods mainly destined to Southern Sudan.Meanwhile, informal imports were estimated at US $ 73.5 million in 2008 compared to US $ 57.2million in 2007. Informal imports increased by 28.4 percent in 2008. The increase in informalimports was on account of increased imports from Kenya and Rwanda. The informal imports arestill low compared to exports due to the vigilance of the tax authorities to collect duties on allimported goods, even on small items. Apart from hides and skins, other informal exports do notattract any taxes.Overall, Uganda recorded a trade surplus of US $ 1.2 billion in 2008 compared to US $ 719.3million in 2007. These developments underscore the comparative advantage Uganda enjoys withinthe Eastern Africa region on commodity exports.Table 4.2.2: Informal Trade Flows (‘000 US$) from 2005 to 2008Trade Flow/Years 2005 2006 2007 2008Exports 200,307 231,741 776,509 1,315,936Imports 65,872 80,633 57,239 73,493Trade Balance 134,435 151,108 719,270 1,242,443Note: 2008 figures are still provisionalSource: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 72
    • 4.2.4.2 Direction of TradeIn 2008, Sudan remained the main final destination for Uganda’s informal exports, from whichreceipts amounting to US$ 909.9 million were realised compared to the US $ 465.0 millionrecorded in the previous year. The resultant trade surplus on informal trade in goods wasestimated at US$ 902.4 million compared to a surplus of US $ 447.7 million recorded in 2007.During 2007, informal exports to Sudan amounted to US $ 456.4 million (58.8 percent) while theexpenditure on imports was estimated at US $ 8.7 million or 15.1 percent of the total imports. Theincrease in trade with Sudan could be attributed to the relative political stability in both NorthernUganda and Southern Sudan, and, the recovery efforts being pursued by the Government ofSouthern Sudan that increased the demand for consumer and producer goods.The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) maintained its second position with informal exportearnings estimated at US $ 195.2 million while imports were valued at US $ 19.7 million. Thiscompares with informal exports and imports estimated at US $ 156.5 million and 18.2 million in2007 respectively. During 2008, the total informal trade was estimated at US $ 214.8 million with atrade surplus of US $ 175.5 million.Kenya ranked third as the final destination of Uganda’s informal exports estimated at US $ 105.8million with the imports amounting to US $ 39.7 million. In 2008, the total informal trade betweenUganda and Kenya was estimated at US $ 145.6 million with a trade surplus of US $ 66.1 million.Meanwhile informal exports to Rwanda and Tanzania stood at US $ 53.3 million and US $ 51.7million respectively. Overall, Uganda recorded a trade surplus with all her neighbours underinformal trade. The above scenario in individual country trade flows is similar to the previous year,although estimates derived from surveys conducted in 2006, and 2005 showed Kenya and DRC asthe main export destinations of Uganda’s products under informal trade.Table 4.2.3: 2008 Informal Exports and Imports by Country and Trade Balances (000’ US$)Country Exports Imports Total Trade Trade BalanceDRC 195,167 19,671 214,838 175,496Kenya 105,831 39,748 145,579 66,083Rwanda 53,263 1,137 54,401 52,126Sudan 909,938 7,504 917,443 902,434Tanzania 51,736 5,433 57,169 46,304Overall 1,315,936 73,493 1,389,429 1,242,443Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsAs shown in figure 4.2.4.2 below, informal exports to Sudan doubled the main reason being theincreased demand mainly for consumer and industrial goods to meet the ever increasingpopulation of returnees. The inclusion of Nimule/Bibia crossing point and the bus terminals(Arua/Juba and Kampala/Juba) improved the recording of Sudan’s trade flows considerably. Theincreases in exports to Kenya could be attributed to the increased demand for food items in thatcountry following the agricultural failure due to drought and electoral violence that displaced a goodnumber of people in western Kenya.In 2008, total informal imports into Uganda amounted to US$ 73.5 million, of which, Kenyaaccounted for US$ 39.7 million (54 percent). Kenya remained the leading source of Uganda’sinformal imports during the period under review although significant reductions were registered in2007 on account of the ban on imports of polythene paper which constituted a big proportion ofinformal trade.During 2008, Uganda’s informal imports from all neighbouring countries registered increases withDRC maintaining its second position after Kenya. Informal imports from Tanzania more than 73
    • doubled from US $ 2.8 in 2007 to US $ 5.5 million in 2008 while that from Sudan slightly droppedfrom US $ 8.7 million in 2007 to US $ 7.5 million in 2008. The increase in trade with neighbouringcountries could be attributed to relative political stability and the liberalized trade regime which hasattracted goods like coffee into the Ugandan market.Figure 4.2.2: A comparison of 2006, 2007, and 2008 Informal Exports by Destination (million US $) 1,000 900 Informal Exports value (million US$) 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 - DRC Kenya Rwanda Sudan Tanzania Country of destination 2006 2007 20084.2.4.3 A Comparison of Formal and Informal Trade Flows, 2005-2008From Table 4.2.4.3 below, during 2008 Uganda’s informal merchandise exports amounted to US $1.3 billion compared to formal merchandise exports worth US $ 1.7 billion. This brings the overallcombined (formal and informal) export earnings to US $ 3.0 billion in 2008 compared to US $ 2.1billion in 2007 indicating an increase of 29.2 percent from both trading arrangements. Meanwhile,the combined import bill for both informal and formal trade stood US $ 3.6 billion and US $ 4.6billion in 2007 and 2008 respectively. The overall merchandise trade deficit was estimated at US $1.5 billion in 2008 compared to a deficit of US $ 1.4 billion recorded in 2007.Table 4.2.3: Formal and Informal trade flows (000’ US$) from 2005 to 2008 Trade Flow/Years 2005 2006 2007 2008Informal Exports 200,307 231,741 776,509 1,315,936Formal/Official Exports 812,857 962,193 1,336,668 1,724,300Total Exports 1,013,164 1,193,934 2,113,177 3,040,236Informal Imports 65,872 80,633 57,239 73,493Formal/Official Imports 2,054,137 2,557,308 3,495,391 4,525,859Total Imports 2,120,009 2,637,941 3,552,630 4,599,352Overall Trade balance -1,106,845 -1,444,007 -1,439,453 -1,480,945Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 74
    • The proportion of informal exports to overall/total merchandise trade from both tradingarrangements stood at 19.8 percent, 19.4 percent, 36.7 percent and 43.2 percent in 2005, 2006,2007 and 2008 respectively. On the other hand, the proportion of informal imports to formal importswas marginal at 3 percent in 2005 and 2006, and reduced to 1.6 percent in both 2007 and 2008.This underscores the significance of informal export trade to overall merchandise trade whoseshare has continued to increase during the period under review. 75
    • 4.3 Government Finance Statistics4.3.1 IntroductionGovernment Finance Statistics (GFS) measure financial activities of government and the impact ofthese activities on the sectors in the economy. The statistics enable policy makers and users toanalyse the financial operations and financial position of the public sector at either the level of agovernment, institutional sector or set of transactions.4.3.2 CoverageThe GFS compilation focuses on the General Government sector. This sector consists of thecentral government and local government sectors including non-profit institutions that arecontrolled and mainly financed by government units. It excludes public corporations or quasi-corporations.4.3.3 Government revenue, 2007/08The FY 2007/08 registered total revenue of Shs. 4,152.5 billion, which was a slight increase of only0.15 percent from FY 2006/07. Revenue obtained from taxes had the largest share of 81.2percent, compared to 18.8 percent from non-tax revenue. The non-tax revenue includes: grants,property income, sale of goods and services, fines and penalties and miscellaneous (includingunidentified revenue (See Table 4.3 B (a).4.3.4 Central Government recurrent expenditure, 2006/07 and 2007/08Functional classification of expenditure measures the purpose for which transactions areundertaken. It is generally used to measure the allocation of resources by government in order topromote government objectives and various services rendered to the community. There was anincrease in the recurrent expenditure from shs 1,820.2 to shs 2,070.5 billion shillings between FY2006/07 and 2007/08. General public administration recorded the highest government expenditureof shs 764.4 billion shillings (36.9 percent). There was a slight reduction the education sectorexpenditure from 267.3 to 266.7 billion (-0.2 percent). The highest expenditure increase was inAgriculture were a 68.1 percentage was recorded. See appendix tables 4.3C (a) and (b).4.3.5 Local Government recurrent expenditure, 2007/08The education sector maintained its dominance in local government recurrent expenditureregistering Shs. 423.0 billion in 2007/08. General public administration followed with Shs. 171.9billion while the health sector spent Shs. 109.1 billion. A large share of the education and healthsectors was attributed to government’s strategy which focuses more on investment in socialservice sectors with the aim of increasing levels of employment and incomes (See appendix tables4.3 J (a) and 4.3 J (b). 76
    • 4.4 Banking and currencyBanking and currency statistics include figures on monetary survey, interest rates, commercialbanks’ assets and liabilities, commercial banks’ outstanding loans and advances to the privatesector, exchange rates and volumes of foreign exchange transactions.4.4.1 Monetary SurveyAs shown in statistical appendix 4.4 A, the monetary survey indicates a 32.7 percent increase inNet Foreign Assets between June 2007 and June 2008 from Shs 3,835.4 Bill to Shs 5,090.7 Bill.Unlike the previous financial year which registered a drop in the net total domestic credit of thebanking system, the period between June 2007 and June 2008 registered an increase of 71.4percent. In the same period, net claims on the Central Government decreased by 29.4 percent,claims on the private sector increased by 56.1 percent while foreign currency loans to residentsincreased by 56.3 percent.Between June 2007 and June 2008, Money supply (M2) increased by 30.3 percent from Shs2,993.9 Bill to Shs 3,901.6 Bill with an increase of 24.4 percent in currency in circulation, 26.5percent in private demand deposit and 39.7 percent in private time and saving deposits. In thesame period, money supply (M3) increased by Shs 1,220.9 Bill (31.8 percent).4.4.2 Structure of interest ratesIn the period June 2007 to June 2008, the average lending rates of BoU to commercial banksdropped from 16.6 percent to 16.2 percent. Commercial banks’ deposit rates dropped from 2.8percent to 2.7 percent in the same period; as demand deposit rates increased from 1.2 percent to1.3 percent and savings deposit rates reduced from 2.8 percent to 2.1 percent. Time deposit ratesalso increased from 9.8 percent to 10.9 percent while all lending rates to Agriculture, Export andManufacturing and Commerce increased from 19.4 percent to 20.2 percent in the same period.(See table 4.4 B)4.4.3 Commercial banks’ assets and liabilitiesTable 4.4 C shows that total assets of commercial banks increased by 39.1 percent from Shs4,819.5 Bill in June 2007 to Shs 6,705.7 Bill in June 2008. In the same period, Uganda currencyincreased from Shs 117.5 Bill to Shs 156.0 Bill, while advances and discount increased from Shs1,823.4 Bill to Shs 2,850.9 Bill (an increase of 56.4 percent).Local currency deposits increased from Shs 2,217.7 Bill to Shs 2,918.1 Bill between June 2007and June 2008, an increase of 31.6 percent, while borrowing from Bank of Uganda increased byShs 1.2 Bill from Shs 38.9 Bill to Shs 40.1 Bill in the same period. (See table 4.4 D in the statisticalappendix.)4.4.4 Commercial banks’ outstanding loans and advancesIn table 4.4 E, local currency commercial banks’ outstanding loans and advances went up from Shs1,362.3 Bill in June 2007 to Shs 2,100.8 Bill in June 2008. Trade and commerce continued toregister the largest share of the total from 65.5 percent to 67.3 percent in the above period. 77
    • Table 4.4 F shows that foreign currency commercial banks’ outstanding loans and advancesincreased by Shs 240.3 Bill from June 2007 to June 2008. Trade and commerce maintained thelargest share, although a decline from 60.4 percent to 56.5 percent from June 2007 to June 2008.4.4.5 Annual foreign exchange rates and volumesTable 4.4 G shows that between the year 2007 and 2008, the inter-bank mid rate appreciated byless than 1 percent from 1,723.5 to 1,720.40 per US dollar. In the same period, according to table4.4 H, total purchases of foreign exchange through bureaux and inter-bank increased by 5.8percent from US $ 8.8 Bill in 2007 to US $ 9.3 Bill in 2008, while sales increased by 8.0 percentfrom US $ 8.7 Bill in to US $ 9.4 Bill during the same period. 78
    • 4.5 InsuranceStatistics on insurance services include both the number of life and non-life policies issued,premium supplements, as well as claims paid and outstanding. Also included is the Non-lifebusiness consolidated balance sheet of insurance companies.4.5.1 Policies issuedIndividual, Group, and Deposit Administrative Plan (DAP) are the life insurance policies issuedwhile, the non-life insurance policies include fire, marine/aviation, motor, and miscellaneousaccidents. The number of life polices issued in 2007 increased by 23.1 percent as compared to thenumber of policies issued in 2006. On the other hand, the non-life insurance policies issuedincreased by 22.8 percent in 2007 compared to the non-life policies issued in 2006.Table 4.5.1: Insurance policies issued 2003 -2007Policy 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007Non-Life 159,256 151,111 182,768 176,451 216,664Life 1,879 1,981 1,888 556 1,210Total 161,135 153,092 184,656 177,007 217,874Source: Uganda Insurance Commission4.5.2 Insurance companies’ income and expenditureFrom table 4.5 C, life insurance gross premium incomings increased by 93.7 percent between2006 and 2007. There was a general increase in gross premium incomings in all the categoriesalthough life group recorded the highest.Life insurance for the reinsurance outgoings category increased from 1,125 million in 2006 to 1,914million in 2007, an increase of 70.1 percent. The increment was due to increase in the life groupcategory (see statistical Appendix table 4.5 D).An increase of 22.0 percent in non-life insurance gross premium incomings was registered in 2007compared to 2006. Although there was a general increase in the non-life insurance gross premiumincomes, the fire category recorded declines in the incomes (See Appendix table 4.5F).The miscellaneous accidents recorded the highest increase in reinsurance in the non-life categoryof 34.9 percent in the period of 2007 compared to 2006 while motor class registered a reduction of12.4 percent during the same period. The outgoings in form of reinsurance increased by 16.2percent in 2007 as compared to 2006 (see Statistical Appendix table 4.5 G).The percentage of life insurance gross premium paid out in reinsurance was only 17.0 percent with83.0 percent of retained as net premium in 2007 (See statistical Appendix table 4.5 C and table 4.5D). In 2006, the gross premium paid out in reinsurance was 19.4 percent where 80.6 percent wasretained as net premium. 79
    • 4.5.3 Insurance companies’ paid and outstanding claims by classThe insurance companies claims paid and outstanding for non-life category increased by 25.8percent in 2007 as compared to 2006. Throughout the period of 2003 – 2007 motor class ofbusiness remained the highest compensated in terms of paid and outstanding claims as indicatedin the appendix table 4.5 I. There was a general increase in Paid and Outstanding Claims in 2007as compared to 2006 with exception of fire business category which recorded a drop in 2007 ascompared to 2006.The life paid and outstanding claims registered an increase of 79.2 percent in 2007 as compared to2006. The increase was due to the life group as the other categories registered drops. (Seeappendix table 4.5.J) 80
    • STATISTICAL APPENDIX 81
    • Table of contents1.0 Environment Statistics ............................................................................................................................................. 86 1.1 Land ........................................................................................................................................................................ 86 Table 1.1 A: Area under water and land by region and district, 1995 ............................................................................... 86 Table 1.1 B: National land-cover statistics (sq km), 1995 ................................................................................................. 88 Table 1.1 C: Summary of Land cover statistics by region and district (sq. kms), 2005 ..................................................... 90 1.2 Climate .................................................................................................................................................................... 94 Table 1.2 A: Monthly rainfall statistics for selected centres (mm), 2004- 2008 ................................................................. 94 1.3 Temperature ........................................................................................................................................................... 96 Table 1.3 A: Temperature for selected centres (degrees centigrade), 2005-2008............................................................ 96 1.4 Humidity .................................................................................................................................................................. 99 Table 1.4 A: Monthly relative humidity for selected centers (percent), 2005 – 2008......................................................... 99 1.5 Rural Water Supply ............................................................................................................................................... 102 Table 1.5 A: Rural water supply service levels, June 2006 ............................................................................................. 102 1.6 Forestry ................................................................................................................................................................. 104 Table 1.6 A: Value of output of round-wood timber at current prices, 2003 - 2007 (Mill. Shs) ........................................ 104 Table 1.6 B: Total production of round-wood timber, 2003 – 2007 (‘000 tonnes) ........................................................... 1042.0 Demography Statistics .......................................................................................................................................... 105 2.1 Population Projections .......................................................................................................................................... 105 Table 2.1 A: Mid-year population estimates and projections for Uganda, 1992 – 2009 .................................................. 105 Table 2.1 B: Projected mid year Population ( 000) for 5 year age groups, 2007 – 2009 ................................................ 105 Table 2.1 C: Census population (1991 and 2002) by region and district and projected 2009 mid-year population ........ 107 Table 2.1 D: 2009 mid-year projected population for Town Councils .............................................................................. 109 2.2 Education .............................................................................................................................................................. 111 Table 2.2 A : Primary school enrolment by class and sex 2004- 2008 ............................................................................ 111 Table 2.2 B: Primary education accessibility indicators by district, 2007 – 2008 ............................................................ 112 Table 2.2 C: Primary education quality enhancement indicators by district, 2005– 2008 ............................................... 114 Table 2.2 D: Primary school teachers by highest qualification and sex (2007 - 2008) .................................................... 116 Table 2.2 E: Secondary school enrolment by class (2004- 2008) ................................................................................... 116 Table 2.2 F: Secondary education accessibility indicators by district (2006– 2007) ....................................................... 117 Table 2.2 G: Secondary education quality enhancement indicators by district (2005- 2008) .......................................... 119 Table 2.2 H: Secondary school teachers by highest qualification and sex (2006– 2008) ............................................... 121 Table 2.2 I: Tertiary school enrolment by institution and year, 2006 ............................................................................. 122 2.3 Labour force, Employment and Earnings ............................................................................................................. 125 Table 2.3 A: Percentage distribution of working population by status in employment .................................................... 125 Table 2.3 B: Percentage distribution of working population by industry .......................................................................... 125 Table 2.3 C: Percentage distribution of working population by occupation ..................................................................... 125 Table 2.3 D: Percentage distribution of jobs Advertised by major industrial divisions, 2003 – 2007............................... 126 Table 2.3 E: Percentage distribution of jobs advertised by occupation, 2003 – 2007 ..................................................... 127 Table 2.3 F: Percentage distribution of monthly employment by selected manufacturing establishments .................... 128 Table 2.3 G: Percentage distribution of monthly wage bill (millions) for selected manufacturing establishments ........... 128 Table 2.3 H: Average monthly employee earnings for selected manufacturing establishments, 2004 – 2008 ............... 128 Table 2.3 I: Trends in the labour cost index in nominal and real terms, 2004- 2008 (2004 = 100) ................................ 129 2.4 Income and expenditure ....................................................................................................................................... 130 Table 2.4 A: Consumption expenditure per household, shs (1997/98=100) ................................................................... 130 Table 2.4 B: Mean per capita consumption expenditure, shs (1997/98=100) ................................................................. 130 2.5 Consumer prices ................................................................................................................................................... 131 82
    • Table 2.5 A: Composite consumer price index, Uganda (base 2005/06=100) ................................................................ 131 Table 2.5 B: Composite CPI by major groups, Uganda (Base 2005/06=100) ................................................................. 131 Table 2.5 C: Consumer Price Index, Kampala High Income (Base: 2005/06 =100) ....................................................... 132 Table 2.5 D: Consumer Price Index Kampala Middle & Low Income (Base: 2005/06 =100) ........................................ 132 Table 2.5 E: Consumer Price Index, Jinja (Base: 2005/06 =100) .................................................................................. 133 Table 2.5 F: Consumer Price Index, Mbale (Base: 2005/06 =100) ................................................................................. 133 Table 2.5 G: Consumer Price Index, Masaka (Base: 2005/06 =100) .............................................................................. 134 Table 2.5 H: Consumer Price Index, Mbarara (Base: 2005/06 =100) ............................................................................. 134 Table 2.5 I: Consumer Price Index, Gulu (Base: 2005/06 =100) ................................................................................... 135 Table 2.5 J: Consumer Price Index, Arua (Base: 2005/06 =100) ................................................................................... 135 Table 2.5 K: Average market prices for selected goods in Kampala Middle and Low Income ....................................... 136 2.6 Public health ......................................................................................................................................................... 138 Table 2.6 A: Number of Health Units by District .............................................................................................................. 138 Table 2.6 C: Countrywide routine immunization rates for measles, 2004-2008 .............................................................. 142 Table 2.6 D: Countrywide routine immunization rates for OPV3, 2004-2008 .................................................................. 144 Table 2.6 E: Countrywide routine immunization rates for DPT3, 2004-2008 .................................................................. 146 Table 2.6 F: Out Patient Department Utilisation in Government and PNFP, 2007-2008 ................................................ 148 Table 2.6 G: Pit Latrine Coverage, 2006-2008 ................................................................................................................ 150 Table 2.6 H: Deliveries in Health Facilities, 2007-2008 ................................................................................................... 152 Table 2.6 I: Selected health sector performance indicators, 2007- 2008....................................................................... 154 2.7 Crime Statistics ..................................................................................................................................................... 156 Table 2.7 A: Distribution of prisoners by District and category for the years 2006-2008 ................................................ 156 Table 2.7 B: Number of cases reported and prosecuted by category for the years (2007-2008) ................................... 157 Table 2.7 C: Distribution of prisoners by station from 2006- 2008 .................................................................................. 1593.0 Production Statistics .............................................................................................................................................. 160 3.2 Agriculture ............................................................................................................................................................. 160 Table 3.2 A: Procurement of main export cash crops (tonnes), 2004-2008 .................................................................... 160 Table 3.2 B: Area planted of selected food crops in thousand hectares, 2004-2008 ...................................................... 160 Table 3.2 C: Production of selected food crops in thousand tonnes, 2004-2008 ............................................................ 161 Table 3.2 D: Fish catch by water body (thousand tonnes), 2003 – 2007 ........................................................................ 161 Table 3.2 E: Livestock numbers (thousand animals), 2004 – 2008 ................................................................................ 161 3.3 Industry ................................................................................................................................................................. 162 Table 3.3 A: Index of Industrial Production, Annual (Calendar year) Summary 2004 – 2008, 2002 = 100..................... 162 Table 3.3 B: Index of Industrial Production, Annual (Fiscal year) Summary 2003/04 – 2007/08, 2002 = 100 ................ 163 3.4 Producer prices ..................................................................................................................................................... 164 Table 3.4 A: Producer Price Indices by major industry group (Combined) July- September 2004=100, CY .................. 164 Table 3.4 B: Producer Price Indices by major industry group (Combined) July- September 2004=100, FY .................. 164 Table 3.4 C: Average producer prices to wholesalers for selected manufactured products, shs 2004-2008.................. 165 Table 3.4 D: Average producer prices to wholesalers for selected manufactured products, shs 2004-2007.................. 166 3.5 Energy................................................................................................................................................................... 167 Table 3.5 A: Sales of petroleum products by type (cubic metres) 2004 – 2008 .............................................................. 167 Table 3.5 B: UETCL energy purchases (GWh), 2004 – 2008 ......................................................................................... 167 Table 3.5 C: Average Lake Levels (in Meters) from Jinja Pier Mechanical Recorder Chart ........................................... 168 3.6 Building and Construction ..................................................................................................................................... 169 Table 3.6 A: CSI Sector Price Indices, Jan-March 2006=100 ......................................................................................... 169 Table 3.6 B: Basic Heading Indices, 2006 – 2008, Jan-March 2006=100 ...................................................................... 169 3.7 Transport and Communication ............................................................................................................................. 170 Table 3.7 A: Estimated number of motor vehicles on road, 2004 – 2008 ....................................................................... 170 Table 3.7 B: New registration of Vehicles by type 2004 – 2008 ...................................................................................... 170 Table 3.7 C: National Roads Network Length in Kilometers (June 2008) ....................................................................... 171 Table 3.7 D: Commercial Traffic at Entebbe International Airport, 2004 - 2008 .............................................................. 172 Table 3.7 E: Postal statistics (Pieces), 2004 - 2008 ........................................................................................................ 172 Table 3.7 F: Telecommunications statistics as at December, 2004 – 2008 .................................................................... 173 83
    • 3.8 Tourism and migration .......................................................................................................................................... 174 Table 3.8 A: Total Arrivals and Departures in Uganda, 2004 – 2008 .............................................................................. 174 Table 3.8 B: Migration Statistics: Entebbe Arrivals, 2004– 2008 .................................................................................... 174 Table 3.8 C: Migration Statistics: Entebbe Departures, 2004 - 2008 .............................................................................. 175 Table 3.8 D: Migration Statistics: Malaba and Busia Arrivals, 2004 – 2008 .................................................................... 175 Table 3.8 E: Migration Statistics: Malaba and Busia Departures, 2004 – 2008 .............................................................. 176 Table 3.8 F: Migration Statistics: Mutukula, Western and Northern Borders Arrivals, 2004–2008 ................................. 176 Table 3.8 G: Migration Statistics: Mutukula, Western and Northern Borders Departures, 2004 – 2008 ......................... 177 Table 3.8 H: Visitor arrivals by country of usual residence, 2004 - 2008 ........................................................................ 178 Table 3.8 I: Tourism basic indicators, 2004 – 2008 ....................................................................................................... 179 Table 3.8 J: Visitors to the National Parks (Citizen and Foreigners) 2004– 2008 .......................................................... 179 Table 3.8.K: Monthly accommodation capacity for selected Hotels in Uganda, occupancy rates and guest nights ....... 1804.0 Macro Economic Statistics .................................................................................................................................... 181 4.1 National Accounts ................................................................................................................................................. 181 Table 4.1 A: Summary of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at market prices, 2000 - 2008 ..................................... 181 Table 4.1 B (i): GDP by economic activity at current prices,billion Shillings, calendar years ...................................... 182 Table 4.1 B (ii): Expenditure on GDP at current prices,billion Shillings, calendar years .............................................. 182 Table 4.1 B (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at current prices, billion Shillings, calendar years ........................ 183 Table 4.1 B (iv): Fixed capital formation at current prices, billion Shillings, calendar years .......................................... 183 Table 4.1 C (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, billion Shillings, calendar years ....................... 184 Table 4.1 C (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, billion Shillings, calendar years ............................... 184 Table 4.1 C (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, billion Shillings, calendar years .......... 185 Table 4.1 C (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings, calendar years ............................ 185 Table 4.1 D (i): GDP by economic activity at current prices, billion shillings, fiscal years ........................................... 186 Table 4.1 D (ii): Expenditure on GDP at current prices, billion shillings, fiscal years ................................................... 186 Table 4.1 D (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at current prices, billion shillings, Fiscal years ............................. 187 Table 4.1 D (iv): Fixed capital formation at current prices, billion shillings, fiscal years ................................................ 187 Table 4.1 E (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings. fiscal years ............................. 188 Table 4.1 E (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings, fiscal years ..................................... 188 Table 4.1 E (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings, fiscal years ................ 189 Table 4.1 E (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings, fiscal years .................................. 189 Table 4.1 F (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, calendar years ................ 190 Table 4.1 F (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, calendar years ........................ 190 Table 4.1 F (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, CY ..................... 191 Table 4.1 F (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, calendar years ..................... 191 Table 4.1 G (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, fiscal years ..................... 192 Table 4.1 G (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, fiscal years ............................. 192 Table 4.1 G (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, FY ...................... 193 Table 4.1 G (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, fiscal years .......................... 193 Table 4.1 H (i): GDP by economic activity: deflators, 2002=100, calendar years ....................................................... 194 Table 4.1 H (ii): Expenditure on GDP: deflators, 2002=100, calendar years ............................................................... 194 Table 4.1 H (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP: deflators 2002=100, Calendar Years .......................................... 195 Table 4.1 H (iv): Fixed capital formation: deflators, 2002=100, calendar years ............................................................ 195 Table 4.1 I (i): GDP by economic activity: deflators, 2002=100, fiscal years ............................................................. 196 Table 4.1 I (ii): Expenditure on GDP: deflators, 2002=100, fiscal years ..................................................................... 196 Table 4.1 I (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP: deflators 2002=100, fiscal years ................................................. 197 Table 4.1 I (iv): Fixed capital formation: deflators, 2002=100, fiscal years .................................................................. 197 Table 4.1 J (i): GDP by economic activity at current prices, percentage share, calendar years ................................ 198 Table 4.1 J (ii): Expenditure on GDP at current prices, percentage share, calendar years ........................................ 198 Table 4.1 J (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at current prices, percentage share, calendar ............................. 199 Table 4.1 J (iv): Fixed capital formation at current prices, percentage share, calendar years ..................................... 199 Table 4.1 K (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, percentage share, calendar years ................... 200 Table 4.1 K (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage shares, calendar years ......................... 200 Table 4.1 K (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage share, CY ........................ 201 Table 4.1 K (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, percentage share, calendar years ....................... 201 Table 4.1 L (i): GDP by economic activity at current prices, percentage share, fiscal years ..................................... 202 Table 4.1 L (ii): Expenditure on GDP at current prices, percentage share, fiscal years .............................................. 202 Table 4.1 L (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at current prices, percentage share, fiscal years ......................... 203 Table 4.1 L (iv): Fixed capital formation at current prices, percentage share, fiscal years ........................................... 203 Table 4.1 M (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, percentage share, fiscal years ........................ 204 Table 4.1 M (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage share ............................... 205 Table 4.1 M (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, percentage share, fiscal years ............................. 205 Table 4.1 N: GDP by basic heading at one digit level at current prices (Billion shillings) ....................................... 206 Table 4.1 O: Balance of payments statement, calendar years (Million US dollars) ................................................. 207 Table 4.1 P: Balance of payments statement, fiscal years (Million US dollars) ...................................................... 208 4.2 External Trade ...................................................................................................................................................... 209 Table 4.2 A: Exports by quantity, 2004 – 2008 ............................................................................................................... 209 Table 4.2 B: Exports by value (‘000 US $), 2004 - 2008 ................................................................................................. 210 84
    • Table 4.2 C: Exports by percentage value, 2004 – 2008 ................................................................................................ 211 Table 4.2 D: Imports by region and country of origin (‘000 US $), 2004 – 2008 ............................................................. 212 Table 4.2 E: Imports by value (‘000 US $), SITC groupings, 2004 – 2008 ..................................................................... 214 Table 4.2 F: Imports by percentage, SITC groupings, 2004- 2008 ................................................................................. 216 Table 4.2 G: Exports by region and country of destination (‘000 US $), 2004 - 2008 ..................................................... 218 Table 4.2 H: Exports by percentage, region and country of destination, 2004 - 2008..................................................... 220 Table 4.2 I: Exports by value (‘000 US $), SITC grouping, 2004 - 2008 ........................................................................ 222 Table 4.2 J: Re-exports by value (‘000 US $), SITC grouping, 2004 – 2008.................................................................. 224 Table 4.2 K: Re-exports by value (‘000 US $), 2004 - 2008 ............................................................................................ 226 Table 4.2 L: Re-exports by region and country of destination (‘000 US $), 2004 - 2008 ................................................ 227 Table 4.2 M: Imports by percentage, region and country of origin, 2004 – 2008............................................................. 2284.3 Government Finance Statistics ............................................................................................................................. 230 Table 4.3 A: Summary of Central Government Budgetary and Financial Operations 2004/05 - 2008/09 ) ............ 230 Table 4.3 B (a): Classification of Revenue 2004/05 – 2008/09 (Million shillings) ......................................................... 231 Table 4.3 B (b): Classification of Revenue 2004/05 – 2008/09 (by percentage) .......................................................... 232 Table 4.3 C (a): Function Classification of Central Government Recurrent Expenditure (Million shillings) .................. 233 Table 4.3 C(b): Function Classification of Central Government Recurrent Expenditure (by percentage) .................. 233 Table 4.3 D (a): Function Classification of Central Government Development Expenditure (Million shillings)............ 234 Table 4.3 D (b): Function Classification of Central Government Development Expenditure (by percentage) ............. 234 Table 4.3 E (a): Economic Classification of Central Government Recurrent Expenditure (Million shillings) ............... 235 Table 4.3 E (b): Economic Classification of Central Government Recurrent Expenditure (by percentage) ................ 236 Table 4.3 F (a): Economic analysis of Central Government Development (GOU) expenditure (million shillings)........ 237 Table 4.3 F (b): Economic analysis of Central Government Development (GOU) Expenditure (by percentage) ........ 237 Table 4.3 G (a): Function Classification Donor Funded Central Govt Development Expenditure (mil. shs)................. 238 Table 4.3 G (b): Function Classification Donor Funded Development Expenditure (by percentage) ........................... 239 Table 4.3 H (a): Function Classification of Urban authorities Recurrent Expenditure (million shillings) ...................... 240 Table 4.3 H (b): Function Classification of Urban authorities’ Recurrent Expenditure (by percentage) ....................... 240 Table 4.3 I (a): Function Classification of Districts Recurrent Expenditure (million shillings) ..................................... 241 Table 4.3 I (b): Function Classification of Districts Recurrent Expenditure (by percentage) ....................................... 241 Table 4.3 J (a): Functional Classification of Local Government Recurrent Expenditure. (million shillings) ................. 242 Table 4.3 J (b): Functional Classification of Local Government Recurrent Expenditure. (by percentage) .................. 2424.4 Banking and Currency .......................................................................................................................................... 243 Table 4.4 A: Net Foreign Assets 2004 – 2008 (Billion shillings)...................................................................................... 243 Table 4.4.B: Structure of Interest Rates (Annual percentage Rates), 2004 – 2008 ........................................................ 244 Table 4.4 C: Commercial Banks Assets (Billion shillings), 2004 – 2008 ......................................................................... 245 Table 4.4 D: Commercial Bank Liabilities (Billion shillings), 2004 - 2008 ........................................................................ 246 Table 4.4.E: Commercial Banks Outstanding Loans and Advances to the Private Sector (Shs Denominated Loans), 247 Table 4.4.F: Commercial Banks Outstanding Loans & Advances to the Private Sector (Foreign currency), ................ 247 Table 4.4 G: Annual Foreign Exchange Rates (Uganda Shilling per US dollar), 2004 – 2008........................................ 248 Table 4.4 H: Volumes of Inter-Bank and Bureaux Foreign Exchange Transactions (Million U.S dollars), ..................... 2484.5 Insurance ................................................................................................................................................................... 249 Table 4.5 A: Number of Non-Life Insurance Policies 2003 – 2007 ................................................................................. 249 Table 4.5 B: Number of Life Insurance Policies 2003 – 2007 ......................................................................................... 249 Table 4.5 C: Life Insurance Premium Incomings 2003– 2007 (Million shillings) ........................................................... 249 Table 4.5 D: Life Insurance Reinsurance Outgoings 2003– 2007 (Million shillings) ....................................................... 249 Table 4.5 E: Life Insurance Net Premium Income 2003 – 2007 (Million shillings) ........................................................ 250 Table 4.5 F: Non-Life Insurance Premium Incomings 2003–2007 (Million shillings) .................................................... 250 Table 4.5 G: Non-Life Insurance Reinsurance Outgoings 2003–2007 (Million shillings)................................................. 250 Table 4.5 H: Non-Life Insurance Net Premium Income 2003 – 2007 (Million shillings) .................................................. 251 Table 4.5 I: Paid and Outstanding Claims, by Class: Non-Life 2003 –2007 (Million shillings)....................................... 251 Table 4.5 J: Paid and Outstanding Claims, by Class: Life 2003–2007 (Million shillings) ............................................... 251 85
    • 1.0 Environment Statistics1.1 LandTable 1.1 A: Area under water and land by region and district, 1995 Permane nt/seaso District Open nal area % water wetlands Area Exl. Open District of Total % of Permanent/s % of water & DistrictRegion and area (sq (Uganda open water distric easonal district Permanent/seaso PerimetDistrict km) ) (sq km) t Area wetlands Area nal wetlands er (km)CENTRALKalangala 9,068.3 3.8 8,600.0 94.8 0.3 0.0 468.0 387.8Kampala 197.0 0.1 16.8 8.6 16.3 8.3 163.8 68.6Kayunga 1,702.4 0.7 114.5 6.7 192.7 11.3 1,395.1 270.3Kiboga 4,045.5 1.7 0.2 0.0 142.5 3.5 3,902.8 354.6Luweero 5,693.9 2.4 1.3 0.0 250.8 4.4 5,441.8 418.3Masaka 4,691.7 1.9 1,129.7 24.1 413.3 8.8 3,148.7 410.8Mpigi 3,605.6 1.5 338.0 9.4 330.1 9.2 2,937.4 388.7Mubende 6,197.7 2.6 154.3 2.5 172.3 2.8 5,871.1 482.1Mukono 12,655.7 5.2 9,289.7 73.4 256.1 2.0 3,110.0 598.1Nakasongola 3,509.9 1.5 238.8 6.8 162.8 4.6 3,108.3 311.6Rakai 4,908.7 2.0 755.3 15.4 225.7 4.6 3,927.6 461.3Sembabule 2,319.2 1.0 0.8 0.0 37.0 1.6 2,281.4 280.6Wakiso 2,807.7 1.2 901.1 32.1 241.6 8.6 1,665.1 343.8Sub-Total 61,403.3 25.6 21,540.5 35.1 2,441.5 4.0 37,421.1 4,776.6EASTERNBugiri 5,670.9 2.3 4,101.7 72.3 117.7 2.1 1,451.6 497.6Busia 759.4 0.3 28.5 3.8 38.1 5.0 692.8 156.3Iganga 2,482.3 1.0 2.7 0.1 154.4 6.2 2,325.2 325.7Jinja 722.7 0.3 49.7 6.9 12.2 1.7 660.8 136.0Kaberamaido 1,623.9 0.7 269.4 16.6 143.8 8.9 1,210.7 202.9Kamuli 4,301.5 1.8 649.2 15.1 397.1 9.2 3,255.3 378.9Kapchorwa 1,731.7 0.7 0.0 0.0 20.7 1.2 1,711.0 245.5Katakwi 5,014.4 2.1 99.1 2.0 280.7 5.6 4,634.6 368.1Kumi 2,848.1 1.2 115.7 4.1 299.4 10.5 2,433.0 266.7Mayuge 4,638.5 1.9 3,556.0 76.7 59.4 1.3 1,023.1 477.0Mbale 1,372.8 0.6 0.0 0.0 27.3 2.0 1,345.5 199.3Pallisa 1,991.7 0.8 66.3 3.3 337.6 16.9 1,587.9 224.9Sironko 1,093.9 0.5 0.0 0.0 30.4 2.8 1,063.5 240.1Soroti 3,377.7 1.4 503.7 14.9 418.4 12.4 2,455.6 294.4Tororo 1,849.3 0.8 0.1 0.0 220.4 11.9 1,628.8 234.0Sub-Total 39,478.8 16.4 9,442.1 23.9 2,557.6 6.5 27,479.4 1,371.4 86
    • Table 1.1 A (Cont’d): Area under water and land by region and district, 1995 Permanent/ Area Exl. Open District Open seasonal water & District area % of Open water % of Permanent wetlands % Permanent / DistrictRegion and area (sq Total water (sq district / seasonal of district seasonal PerimeteDistrict km) (Uganda) km) Area wetlands Area wetlands r (km)NORTHERNAdjumani 3,087.0 1.3 56.1 1.8 94.3 3.1 2,936.6 293.3Apac 6,541.2 2.7 355.3 5.4 311.1 4.8 5,874.8 449.7Arua 5,476.2 2.3 37.4 0.7 89.9 1.6 5,349.0 490.9Gulu 11,715.5 4.9 96.6 0.8 73.9 0.6 11,544.9 670.5Kitgum 9,634.5 4.0 3.1 0.0 7.3 0.1 9,624.1 510.5Kotido 13,245.1 5.5 0.2 0.0 1.2 0.0 13,243.7 672.7Lira 7,200.7 3.0 783.3 10.9 301.5 4.2 6,115.9 676.8Moroto 8,517.6 3.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 8,517.6 585.5Moyo 1,890.7 0.8 90.0 4.8 105.0 5.6 1,695.8 248.6Nakapiripirit 5,833.8 2.4 0.0 0.0 23.8 0.4 5,810.0 446.3Nebbi 2,917.2 1.2 82.3 2.8 32.8 1.1 2,802.1 353.4Pader 6,929.2 2.9 5.8 0.1 37.4 0.5 6,886.1 533.0Yumbe 2,403.0 1.0 10.0 0.4 12.9 0.5 2,380.1 266.5Sub-Total 85,391.7 35.5 1,520.1 1.9 1,091.1 1.3 82,780.7 1,920.1WESTERNBundibugyo 2,261.7 0.9 180.2 8.0 102.9 4.5 1,978.6 375.8Bushenyi 4,292.5 1.8 369.8 8.6 98.7 2.3 3,824.0 356.0Hoima 5,932.8 2.5 2,268.7 38.2 61.3 1.0 3,602.8 399.4Kabale 1,729.6 0.7 50.6 2.9 48.5 2.8 1,630.6 251.9Kabarole 1,824.4 0.8 8.1 0.4 27.6 1.5 1,788.7 308.5Kamwenge 2,439.4 1.0 64.1 2.6 75.2 3.1 2,300.1 363.0Kanungu 1,292.1 0.5 18.1 1.4 22.2 1.7 1,251.8 289.1Kasese 3,389.6 1.4 409.7 12.1 68.7 2.0 2,911.2 289.5Kibaale 4,246.0 1.8 0.3 0.0 105.6 2.5 4,140.2 360.7Kisoro 729.6 0.3 28.3 3.9 21.5 2.9 679.9 153.0Kyenjojo 4,054.4 1.7 0.1 0.0 113.0 2.8 3,941.4 400.0Masindi 9,443.0 3.9 799.6 8.5 197.5 2.1 8,446.0 478.1Mbarara 10,019.1 4.1 79.4 0.8 208.8 2.1 9,730.9 623.0Ntungamo 2,055.5 0.9 4.1 0.2 70.0 3.4 1,981.4 258.1Rukungiri 1,566.8 0.6 118.8 7.6 14.0 0.9 1,433.9 300.0Sub-Total 55,276.5 22.9 4,399.9 8.0 1,235.5 2.2 49,641.5 1,634.0Uganda 241,550.7 100.0 36,902.6 15.3 7,325.7 3.0 197,322.7 2,798.00 87
    • Table 1.1 B: National land-cover statistics (sq km), 1995Region and District Plantation Conifer Fully Degraded Woodland Bush Grassland Papyrus/ stocked /SwampCENTRALKalangala 0 0 219.7 0.6 47.6 8.7 114.7 0.3Kampala 0.3 0 0 4.9 0.3 7.4 0.8 14.5Kayunga 5.9 1.4 0.6 4.3 139.2 135.8 281.5 184.1Kiboga 0 4.9 31.5 38.3 1612.1 108.2 907 122.8Luweero 0.8 0.3 1.4 55.7 2316.4 66.6 1230.7 240.1Masaka 12.5 0.1 60.1 96 51.2 90.6 898.3 83.3Mpigi 0.9 0 208.4 194.6 315.6 107.7 834.6 82.7Mubende 7.1 1.4 49.2 239.5 944.5 260.5 991.1 160Mukono 5 2.2 546.7 459.5 66.4 129.2 321.2 172.3Nakasongola 0 17.1 0 0 1270.5 488.6 780.9 158.1Rakai 7 0 182.9 32.1 141 305.5 1928.4 88.6Sembabule 0.9 0 0 0 157.5 546.4 852.1 36Wakiso 3.2 0.2 68.2 216.4 92.3 46.2 209.1 64.7Sub-Total 43.6 27.6 1368.7 1341.9 7154.6 2301.4 9350.4 1407.5EASTERNBugiri 0 0 14.3 16 230.9 50.9 53.9 105.4Busia 0.1 0.2 4.3 18.6 76.1 44.8 24.5 29.1Iganga 1.6 0 5.7 0 48.4 46.7 37.1 146.2Jinja 32.6 1.9 0.3 2.6 2.6 25 4.4 12.2Kaberamaido 0 0 0 0 175.5 22.5 195.8 61.5Kamuli 2. 0 0 0 276 104.4 337.8 396.8Kapchorwa 0.1 14.9 193.7 139.9 277.3 63.8 584.5 10.4Katakwi 0.1 0 0 0 177.2 2.8 2410 65.9Kumi 1.2 0 0 0 80.6 96.7 771.5 106.4Mayuge 1.3 1.4 12.8 144.9 69.6 38.6 70.2 57.1Mbale 5.6 0 47.6 105.4 99.9 15.7 73.8 5.1Pallisa 0.4 0 0 0 9.3 4.3 134.6 312.1Sironko 0.6 0 21 60.9 171.8 34.6 249.4 30.1Soroti 0.1 2.9 0 0 64.8 30.2 723.8 225.2Tororo 2.1 0 0 0.4 28.5 37.6 55.8 178.6Sub-Total 48.7 21.5 299.7 488.5 1788.5 618.6 5727.1 1742.1 88
    • Table 1.1 B (Cont’d): National land-cover statistics (sq km), 1995Region and District Plantation Conifer Fully Degraded Woodland Bush Grassland Papyrus/ReedNORTHERNAdjumani 0 0 12.7 0 1498.5 16.3 432.6 94.3Apac 1.8 0 0 0 689.1 100.5 927.5 114.6Arua 18.4 4 0 0 1766.1 265.3 339.6 80.6Gulu 2.7 4.8 0 0 4686.3 358.9 1623.8 71.6Kitgum 0 0 0 0 4753.1 288.3 1776.1 0Kotido 0.2 0 0 0 2321.2 2841.2 6864 0Lira 0.8 3 0 0 684.1 80.5 909.4 110.6Moroto 0 0 0 0 683.7 2519.6 4555.1 0Moyo 0.2 0 0 0 706.9 47.1 566.5 102.3Nakapiripirit 0 0 0 0 458.5 1953.7 3103.5 14.4Nebbi 1.6 20.6 1.9 0 243.6 229 627.5 31.8Pader 0 0 0 0 2527 13.8 673.5 0Yumbe 0.7 0 0 0 1,385.1 3.4 437 12.6Sub-Total 26.4 32.4 14.6 0 22,403.2 8,717.6 22,836.1 632.8WESTERNBundibugyo 0 0 375.4 19.1 346.3 22.5 849.6 102.9Bushenyi 10.7 0.2 678 32.6 173 145.1 629.3 92Hoima 0.5 4.3 484.4 267 848.9 85.6 715.6 58.2Kabale 18.1 18.7 81.4 3.4 4.7 5.6 164.5 15Kabarole 8.1 7.8 331.3 64.8 142.2 2.8 215.1 21.8Kamwenge 0.4 0 243.9 10.3 271.2 39.9 533.7 75.2Kanungu 2.2 14.9 190 3.3 141.2 26.8 115.1 7.4Kasese 2 0 394.4 22.5 668.7 183.6 553.1 65.8Kibaale 0.3 0 796.7 344.3 729.1 24.3 521.1 105.5Kisoro 2 0 102.9 2.9 0 0.9 28.3 9.8Kyenjojo 2.3 19.9 424 118.4 856 30 663.9 91.8Masindi 2.8 1.1 509.7 19.8 3930.6 270.9 2014.6 130Mbarara 10.5 12.3 37 1.7 178.4 1704.8 4930.9 203.1Ntungamo 2.9 3.3 0 0 19.3 3.1 971.1 70Rukungiri 5.7 0 169.3 0 85.5 40.6 333.1 9.3Sub-Total 68.5 82.5 4818.4 910.1 8395.1 2586.5 13239 1058.2Grand Total 187.2 164.0 6,501.4 2,740.5 39,741.4 14,224.1 51,152.6 4,840.6% of total 0.0 0.0 3.0 1.0 16.0 6.0 21.0 2.0Note: THF refers to Tropical High Forest.Source: National Forestry Authority, Ministry of Water, Lands and Environment 89
    • Table 1.1 C: Summary of Land cover statistics by region and district (sq. kms), 2005Region/District Built-Up Areas Bushlands Commercial Farmlands Cultivated Lands Grasslands ImpedimentsCENTRALKalangala 0.1 7.3 - 146.9 114.7 -Kampala 81.5 6.2 1.2 71.7 0.8 0.2Kayunga 2.8 113.5 3.3 890.1 281.5 -Kiboga 1.2 90.4 1.1 1,669.5 907.0 -Luweero 5.1 55.7 3.9 2,392.9 1,230.7 0.0Masaka 9.5 75.7 3.7 2,328.1 898.3 -Mpigi 3.8 90.0 10.6 1,711.2 834.6 -Mubende 4.7 217.8 28.8 3,718.1 991.1 0.4Mukono 14.4 108.0 151.4 1,795.6 321.2 0.8Nakasongola 7.9 408.6 0.7 958.2 780.9 0.0Rakai 3.3 255.5 1.6 1,605.1 1,928.4 1.2Sembabule 0.6 456.9 0.1 855.1 852.1 -Wakiso 30.8 38.6 24.0 1,256.2 209.1 0.6Sub-Total 165.8 1,924.2 230.3 19,398.5 9,350.5 3.3EASTERNBugiri 3.2 42.6 11.8 1,157.4 53.9 0.8Busia 3.3 37.5 1.6 561.2 24.5 0.1Iganga 5.5 39.1 0.9 2,209.5 37.1 0.2Jinja 18.3 20.9 81.9 505.6 4.4 -Kaberamaido 0.5 18.9 - 947.4 195.8 -Kamuli 5.9 87.3 2.4 2,613.7 337.8 1.0Kapchorwa 1.4 53.3 5.4 611.5 584.5 0.1Katakwi 4.7 2.4 - 2,300.1 2,410.0 0.5Kumi 3.8 80.9 3.7 1,704.9 771.5 0.4Mayuge 1.7 32.2 6.6 743.6 70.2 0.2Mbale 12.2 13.2 - 1,076.4 73.8 0.1Pallisa 2.7 3.6 2.1 1,463.0 134.6 0.3Sironko 1.8 28.9 2.3 592.5 249.4 -Soroti 13.5 25.3 4.3 1,831.6 723.8 -Tororo 10.1 31.5 36.9 1,513.1 55.8 0.1Sub-Total 88.4 517.4 159.9 19,831.5 5,727.0 3.8 90
    • Table 1.1 C (cont’d): Summary of Land cover statistics by region and district (sq. kms), 2005Region/District Built-Up Areas Bushlands Commercial Farmlands Cultivated Lands Grasslands ImpedimentsNORTHERNAdjumani 3.2 13.6 6.0 1,358.1 432.6 0.2Apac 4.6 84.1 12.6 4,527.2 927.5 2.0Arua 5.7 221.8 1.2 3,460.4 339.6 0.7Gulu 7.9 300.1 3.5 6,123.5 1,623.8 0.9Kitgum 3.3 241.0 - 4,079.0 1,776.1 0.4Kotido 1.2 2,375.7 - 2,276.3 6,863.9 3.0Lira 10.5 67.3 6.1 4,800.5 909.4 1.9Moroto 2.7 2,106.8 - 1,344.3 4,555.2 0.7Moyo 2.1 39.4 - 565.1 566.5 0.0Nakapiripirit 1.1 1,633.6 0.8 738.2 3,103.5 1.4Nebbi 0.8 191.5 1.2 1,783.2 627.6 -Pader 3.3 11.5 - 4,354.6 673.6 2.9Yumbe 0.1 2.8 - 909.6 437.0 1.2Sub-Total 46.5 7,289.3 31.3 36,320.1 22,836.2 15.2WESTERNBundibugyo 0.6 18.8 - 559.2 849.6 -Bushenyi 5.0 121.3 10.0 2,400.3 629.3 0.3Hoima 3.4 71.6 12.9 1,609.8 715.6 -Kabale 5.8 4.7 0.2 1,395.1 164.5 -Kabarole 6.3 2.3 52.7 1,106.3 215.1 -Kamwenge 0.7 33.3 0.7 1,341.0 533.7 0.0Kanungu 1.0 22.4 3.0 863.9 115.1 -Kasese 12.3 153.5 42.5 1,339.6 553.1 4.9Kibaale 2.7 20.3 - 2,203.4 521.1 3.0Kisoro 2.1 0.7 - 580.3 28.3 -Kyenjojo 1.6 25.0 29.1 2,182.6 663.9 4.9Masindi 9.4 226.5 108.9 2,836.7 2,014.6 0.1Mbarara 11.0 1,425.5 2.8 3,186.4 4,930.9 1.7Ntungamo 1.3 2.6 - 987.4 971.1 -Rukungiri 1.7 33.9 - 876.4 333.1 -Sub-Total 65.1 2,162.6 263.0 23,468.3 13,239.0 14.9Total 365.7 11,893.6 684.5 99,018.4 51,152.7 37.1 91
    • Table 1.1 C (cont’d): Summary of Land cover statistics by region and district (sq. kms), 2005Region/District Plantations - Plantations - Tropical High Tropical High Water Wetlands Woodlands Hardwoods Softwoods Forest Forest Bodies Depleted NormalCENTRALKalangala - - 0.4 163.3 8,600.3 0.3 35.3Kampala 0.2 - 3.6 - 16.8 14.5 0.2Kayunga 4.4 1.1 3.2 0.5 114.5 184.1 103.4Kiboga 0.0 3.6 28.4 23.4 0.2 122.8 1,197.8Luweero 0.6 0.2 41.4 1.0 1.3 240.1 1,721.1Masaka 9.3 0.0 71.3 44.7 1,129.7 83.3 38.0Mpigi 0.7 - 144.6 154.8 338.0 82.7 234.5Mubende 5.3 1.0 178.0 36.5 154.3 160.0 701.8Mukono 3.7 1.6 341.4 406.2 9,289.7 172.3 49.3Nakasongola 0.0 12.7 - - 238.8 158.1 944.0Rakai 5.2 - 23.8 135.9 755.3 88.6 104.8Sembabule 0.7 - - - 0.8 36.0 117.0Wakiso 2.4 0.1 160.8 50.7 901.1 64.7 68.6Sub-Total 32.5 20.4 996.9 1,017.0 21,540.8 1,407.5 5,315.9EASTERNBugiri 0.0 - 11.9 10.7 4,101.7 105.4 171.6Busia 0.1 0.1 13.8 3.2 28.5 29.1 56.5Iganga 1.2 - - 4.3 2.7 146.2 35.9Jinja 24.2 1.4 1.9 0.2 49.7 12.2 2.0Kaberamaido - - - - 269.4 61.5 130.4Kamuli 2.1 0.2 - - 649.2 396.8 205.1Kapchorwa 0.1 11.1 103.9 143.9 - 10.4 206.0Katakwi 0.0 - - - 99.1 65.9 131.7Kumi 0.9 - - - 115.7 106.4 59.9Mayuge 1.0 1.0 107.6 9.5 3,556.0 57.1 51.7Mbale 4.1 - 78.3 35.3 0.0 5.1 74.2Pallisa 0.3 - - - 66.3 312.1 6.9Sironko 0.4 - 45.3 15.6 - 30.1 127.6Soroti 0.1 2.1 - - 503.7 225.2 48.1Tororo 1.5 - 0.3 0.0 0.1 178.6 21.2Sub-Total 36.1 15.9 363.1 222.8 9,442.1 1,742.1 1,328.7 92
    • Table 1.1 C (cont’d): Summary of Land cover statistics by region and district (sq. kms), 2005Region/District Plantations - Plantations - Tropical High Tropical High Water Wetlands WoodlandsNORTHERNAdjumani - - - 9.4 56.1 94.3 1,113.4Apac 1.3 - - - 355.3 114.6 512.0Arua 13.6 2.9 - - 37.4 80.6 1,312.2Gulu 2.0 3.6 - - 96.6 71.6 3,482.0Kitgum - - - - 3.1 - 3,531.6Kotido 0.1 - - - 0.2 - 1,724.7Lira 0.6 2.2 - - 783.3 110.6 508.3Moroto - - - - - - 508.0Moyo 0.1 0.0 0.0 - 90.0 102.3 525.3Nakapiripirit - - - - - 14.4 340.7Nebbi 1.2 15.3 - 1.4 82.3 31.8 181.0Pader 0.0 0.0 - - 5.8 - 1,877.6Yumbe 0.5 - - - 10.0 12.6 1,029.1Sub-Total 19.5 24.1 0.0 10.8 1,520.0 632.9 16,645.9WESTERNBundibugyo - - 14.2 278.9 180.2 102.9 257.3Bushenyi 7.9 0.1 24.2 503.7 369.8 92.0 128.5Hoima 0.3 3.2 198.4 359.9 2,268.7 58.2 630.7Kabale 13.4 13.9 2.5 60.5 50.6 15.0 3.5Kabarole 6.0 5.8 48.1 246.2 8.1 21.8 105.7Kamwenge 0.3 - 7.6 181.2 64.1 75.2 201.5Kanungu 1.6 11.0 2.4 141.2 18.1 7.4 104.9Kasese 1.5 0.0 16.7 293.0 409.7 65.8 496.7Kibaale 0.2 - 255.8 592.0 0.3 105.5 541.7Kisoro 1.5 0.0 2.2 76.4 28.3 9.8 -Kyenjojo 1.7 14.8 88.0 315.1 0.1 91.8 636.0Masindi 2.1 0.8 14.7 378.7 799.6 130.4 2,920.5Mbarara 7.8 9.2 1.3 27.5 79.4 203.1 132.5Ntungamo 2.2 2.5 - - 4.1 70.0 14.3Rukungiri 4.2 - - 125.8 118.8 9.3 63.5Sub-Total 50.7 61.4 676.2 3,580.1 4,399.8 1,058.0 6,237.5Total 138.8 121.7 2,036.3 4,830.7 36,902.8 4,840.4 29,528.1Note: Figures are based on projections. Actual vegetation studies were undertaken in 1994 based on 1992 satellite imagery and the districts are as of 1995.Source: National Forestry Authority, Ministry of Water, Lands and Environment. 93
    • 1.2 ClimateTable 1.2 A: Monthly rainfall statistics for selected centres (mm), 2004- 2008TOWN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec AnnualARUALong term Average 28 31 125 94 136 144 178 158 238 244 98 19 1,495 2004 78 10 166 125 86 77 160 205 246 300 78 21 1,552 2005 0 87 67 47 225 299 81 82 308 266 96 9 1,567 2006 27 38 197 110 177 105 127 88 198 228 108 22 1,425 2007 8 17 110 126 74 116 298 284 156 199 151 31 1,571 2008 na 4 85 62 120 122 225 133 283 229 58 12 1,332ENTEBBELong term Average 102 65 147 245 181 115 52 108 106 121 140 109 1,490 2004 98 141 50 262 57 64 14 32 85 146 75 165 1,189 2005 41 6 137 155 201 34 156 165 109 36 74 22 1,136 2006 118 45 170 262 219 176 40 168 89 183 408 184 2,062 2007 125 32 55 165 225 179 20 128 177 56 65 126 1,352 2008 126 99 322 380 205 121 28 47 72 182 80 46 1,709GULULong term Average 24 14 70 145 144 128 171 257 162 178 77 26 1,395 2004 50 7 50 185 177 100 131 264 219 201 72 26 1,482 2005 6 28 80 102 162 233 79 186 79 214 82 2 1,253 2006 28 18 133 139 137 84 163 179 178 150 87 78 1,374 2007 1 12 16 142 95 116 232 351 282 126 90 16 1,478 2008 33 3 na 157 149 108 248 307 53 201 55 8 1,320JINJALong term Average 91 60 109 205 126 52 97 117 90 131 177 64 1,320 2004 90 56 91 281 44 12 47 132 176 118 246 41 1,334 2005 36 31 112 202 162 32 151 210 100 119 71 10 1,236 2006 142 112 102 144 171 49 110 100 83 119 398 171 1,701 2007 76 54 86 160 159 141 94 77 76 146 76 34 1,179 2008 113 49 153 240 97 26 83 68 13 154 92 na 1,086KABALELong term Average 68 104 134 115 111 29 42 40 89 108 122 71 1,032 2004 74 94 85 183 84 0 1 32 68 77 114 125 937 2005 26 122 170 123 121 41 Trace 29 84 108 66 41 931 2006 86 134 128 113 208 3 30 80 74 71 158 62 1,147 2007 55 103 80 104 88 34 114 24 141 112 163 25 1,042 2008 99 65 206 54 54 66 24 37 77 173 108 99 1,061KAMPALALong term Average 105 58 107 142 92 60 70 114 163 181 199 111 1,401 2004 132 96 56 217 25 64 16 87 173 206 207 179 1,458 2005 23 32 38 120 196 54 95 184 72 189 120 2 1,125 2006 81 29 94 132 137 19 46 143 86 96 380 218 1,461 2007 167 65 46 65 14 108 134 120 365 290 196 49 1,617 2008 124 65 302 174 89 52 61 36 120 123 90 106 1,342 94
    • Table 1.2 A (Cont’d): Monthly rainfall statistics for selected centres (mm), 2004- 2008TOWN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec AnnualKASESELong term Average 49 37 81 117 66 38 34 71 74 110 127 53 857 2004 64 36 92 180 43 7 23 45 89 147 181 67 974 2005 65 23 107 148 96 92 29 86 116 73 80 54 969 2006 23 76 64 107 65 6 17 80 40 73 168 61 780 2007 53 25 18 67 83 31 77 79 110 119 115 53 828 2008 42 27 126 84 42 54 23 66 15 138 90 28 735LIRALong term Average 43 54 59 146 154 110 160 219 193 176 91 37 1,444 2004 141 58 32 229 107 29 158 158 112 116 180 12 1,332 2005 10 13 102 175 198 145 184 175 203 176 60 Trace 1,441 2006 27 70 82 136 159 80 86 244 171 171 125 117 1,468 2007 34 99 68 92 161 192 220 298 268 170 57 14 1,672 2008 4 30 12 99 147 106 152 220 212 249 34 4 1,269MASINDILong term Average 20 51 101 147 157 76 91 138 141 145 98 37 1,202 2004 20 53 125 198 181 87 34 153 64 143 114 35 1,207 2005 4 36 69 112 191 43 148 151 197 89 40 36 1,116 2006 4 36 69 162 130 100 104 87 79 245 199 98 1,313 2007 21 62 84 116 127 60 80 112 180 93 82 13 1,030 2008 49 68 158 na na 88 89 189 186 155 55 4 1,042MBARARALong term Average 50 48 102 82 92 45 23 96 148 103 112 46 945 2004 78 65 90 105 131 0 3 63 132 135 64 30 896 2005 53 11 76 79 99 43 5 106 120 80 92 10 774 2006 35 54 81 78 98 10 19 64 46 54 133 50 722 2007 46 40 93 82 56 96 71 48 142 103 206 63 1,046 2008 40 70 169 63 76 75 15 199 299 144 65 75 1,288SOROTILong term Average 36 37 93 162 131 75 119 154 143 97 117 25 1,188 2004 79 50 45 179 120 99 15 129 121 48 138 35 1,058 2005 15 17 91 118 220 79 79 147 165 88 33 Trace 1,052 2006 11 29 149 166 114 40 200 101 161 163 150 62 1,346 2007 64 59 20 181 137 79 144 223 145 62 77 4 1,195 2008 9 32 159 164 64 76 157 171 121 124 188 0 1,264TOROROLong term Average 56 79 154 192 221 131 138 133 132 198 131 60 1,626 2004 33 49 77 163 137 70 65 189 204 127 90 62 1,266 2005 32 17 218 224 306 140 177 29 73 141 97 109 1,563 2006 47 99 238 236 223 240 90 174 130 280 na 60 1,817 2007 101 115 77 168 203 95 175 143 123 141 104 49 1,493 2008 68 114 162 171 237 110 185 131 132 299 234 20 1,863Source: Meteorology Department, Ministry of Water and Environment 95
    • 1.3 TemperatureTable 1.3 A: Temperature for selected centres (degrees centigrade), 2005-2008TOWN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov DecARUA Long TermA Mean Max 31.4 32.4 30.4 29.6 28.4 27.4 26.2 27.0 27.7 27.6 28.0 29.9 Mean Min 17.4 18.6 18.6 18.7 18.2 17.5 17.0 16.9 17.2 17.4 17.1 16.7 2005 Mean Max 31.7 33.8 30.8 30.5 27.8 27.5 26.8 27.4 28.0 27.7 28.5 31.3 2005 Mean Min 17.2 19.5 19.2 19.2 18.7 18.0 17.2 17.1 17.7 17.5 17.7 16.8 2006 Mean Max 32.2 32.8 29.3 29.2 27.7 27.9 26.7 27.0 27.8 28.0 27.2 28.3 2006 Mean Min 18.1 19.0 18.6 18.6 18.0 17.3 17.3 17.1 17.2 17.8 17.2 16.6 2007 Mean Max 31.0 31.7 31.0 29.8 29.3 26.8 25.1 26.5 27.0 27.4 27.7 29.2 2007 Mean Min 16.9 18.4 18.2 19.0 18.5 17.6 17.1 16.7 17.0 16.9 17.0 16.5 2008 Mean Max 30.6 31.2 30.6 28.8 28.8 27.2 26.3 26.9 27.8 27.3 28.6 30.7 2008 Mean Min 17.3 17.5 18.2 17.8 17.6 17.2 16.2 16.6 16.9 17.2 16.6 16.8ENTEBBE Long TermA Mean Max 27.4 27.7 28.3 27.3 26.4 26.4 25.6 25.7 26.3 26.5 26.4 27.3 Mean Min 19.0 19.3 19.5 19.1 19.0 18.6 18.3 17.8 18.2 18.5 18.4 18.8 2005 Mean Max 27.5 29.5 32.9 31.2 29.6 29.8 25.6 25.8 26.3 26.5 27.4 29.1 2005 Mean Min 18.5 19.8 20.1 20.2 19.1 18.8 18.4 18.2 18.5 18.4 18.7 19.3 2006 Mean Max 28.2 27.9 25.9 25.6 24.3 25.4 25.5 25.7 26.1 26.7 25.2 25.9 2006 Mean Min 19.3 19.1 19.6 18.1 18.7 18.7 18.6 16.6 18.3 18.8 17.9 18.4 2007 Mean Max 26.7 26.8 27.9 26.3 25.6 24.9 25.4 25.1 25.7 26.6 26.9 27.4 2007 Mean Min 19.1 19.3 19.8 19.4 19.4 18.4 18.3 18.2 17.7 18.3 18.6 18.5 2008 Mean Max 27.2 26.5 26.3 26.1 26.0 25.7 26.0 26.1 27.0 26.1 26.2 26.7 2008 Mean Min 19.2 18.8 18.5 18.6 18.9 18.5 17.7 18.0 18.2 18.3 18.4 18.9GULU Long TermA Mean Max 33.0 34.0 32.7 30.9 29.7 29.2 28.4 28.8 29.4 29.7 30.2 32.1 Mean Min 19.4 19.9 19.5 19.6 19.3 18.9 18.4 18.2 18.5 18.7 18.7 18.7 2005 Mean Max 33.2 35.5 32.9 31.7 29.6 29.8 29.1 29.4 30.2 30.2 31.5 34.1 2005 Mean Min 19.5 20.8 20.1 20.2 19.1 18.8 18.4 18.2 18.7 18.4 19.0 19.3 2006 Mean Max 34.1 34.5 31.9 30.2 29.4 29.7 29.0 29.0 29.9 30.0 29.0 29.2 2006 Mean Min 20.5 21.0 19.8 19.2 19.1 18.8 18.6 18.2 18.2 18.3 18.2 17.7 2007 Mean Max 32.0 32.6 33.2 31.7 30.0 28.2 27.6 28.2 28.3 29.4 30.0 na 2007 Mean Min 18.0 17.7 18.5 19.5 19.3 19.0 18.7 18.4 18.4 19.0 19.0 na 2008 Mean Max 32.6 33.4 na 30.1 29.7 29.1 28.0 28.5 29.2 29.0 30.3 33.0 2008 Mean Min 19.5 19.9 na 19.6 19.5 18.9 17.9 17.9 18.5 18.9 18.6 19.0JINJA Long TermA Mean Max 29.7 30.0 28.7 28.2 27.4 27.2 26.9 27.5 28.4 28.3 28.3 28.7 Mean Min 17.2 17.3 17.8 17.8 17.7 17.0 16.2 16.3 16.7 17.1 16.8 16.4 2005 Mean Max 29.5 31.8 29.4 28.7 26.3 27.4 27.0 27.7 28.4 27.8 29.0 30.0 2005 Mean Min 17.0 17.2 18.2 18.3 17.7 17.7 16.2 16.4 16.6 17.1 17.0 16.0 2006 Mean Max 31.3 30.3 28.0 27.5 27.0 28.0 27.2 27.9 28.5 29.0 27.0 27.1 2006 Mean Min 17.3 17.5 18.7 17.8 17.5 17.1 16.7 15.9 16.9 17.7 17.3 17.0 2007 Mean Max 28.3 28.7 29.4 28.7 28.7 26.5 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.2 28.3 29.1 2007 Mean Min 17.1 17.5 17.4 18.0 17.9 16.8 16.3 16.5 16.7 16.7 16.6 16.2 2008 Mean Max 29.8 29.1 27.8 27.8 27.7 26.8 26.7 27.4 28.8 28.2 28.7 na 2008 Mean Min 17.2 17.0 17.0 17.0 17.5 16.4 15.7 16.3 16.6 16.9 16.4 na 96
    • Table 1.3 A (cont’d): Temperature for selected centres (degrees centigrade), 2005 - 2008TOWN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov DecKAMPALA Long Term Mean Max 28.7 28.3 28.1 27.6 27.1 26.3 26.1 26.9 27.8 27.6 27.3 28.2 Mean Min 18.9 19.2 18.7 18.5 18.5 18.3 17.9 17.6 17.5 18.0 18.2 18.3 2005 Mean Max 28.8 29.1 na na na na na 27 29.1 28.1 28 29.8 2005 Mean Min 19 19.6 19.4 19.5 18.6 18.8 18 17.9 18.1 18.2 18.7 18.7 2006 Mean Max 29.8 28.6 27.6 27.1 26.7 26.7 26.9 27.5 27.8 28.1 26 26.5 2006 Mean Min 19.2 19.5 18.6 18.5 18.2 18.4 18.3 17.5 16.5 18.6 17.9 18.2 2007 Mean Max 27.8 28.2 29.1 28.4 27.5 26.1 25.2 26.2 27.1 27.1 27.6 28.1 2007 Mean Min 18.7 19.3 19.2 18 18.9 18 18.3 17.8 17.7 17.7 18.2 18.1 2008 Mean Max 28.3 27.3 27.6 27.4 27.0 26.2 26.1 26.7 27.2 27.0 27.6 28.3 2008 Mean Min 18.8 18.5 17.7 17.9 18.4 17.9 17.0 17.3 17.7 17.6 17.8 18.1KASESE Long Term Mean Max 31.6 32.7 30.6 30.7 30.9 30.5 30.4 30.3 30.9 30.4 29.6 30.6 Mean Min 17.8 18.4 18.4 18.8 18.9 18.3 18.3 18.6 18.3 18.2 17.8 17.6 2005 Mean Max 32.4 34.3 31.4 31.5 30.6 30.7 30.3 29.9 30.4 30.5 30.2 32.2 2005 Mean Min 17.7 18.1 19.5 19.1 19.1 18.5 17.4 18.5 17.9 17.9 17.5 17.6 2006 Mean Max 32.6 33.3 30.4 30.5 30.7 31.8 31.6 31.3 31.7 31.4 29.2 29 2006 Mean Min 17.8 19.7 18.2 18.7 19 18.1 19.5 18.8 18.6 18.8 17.8 18.3 2007 Mean Max 30.8 31.6 na 31.8 31.2 29.4 29.8 29.7 30.2 29.7 28.5 30.2 2007 Mean Min 17.8 18.2 17.5 19.2 19.2 18.6 18.5 18.5 18.4 17.6 17.9 17.1 2008 Mean Max 30.5 31.4 29.9 29.0 30.9 30.1 30.0 30.4 31.1 30.1 30.6 30.9 2008 Mean Min 17.8 17.6 18.2 18.1 18.1 18.1 17.6 18.5 18.4 18.3 18.1 17.2LIRA Long Term Mean Max 33.2 33.5 32.3 30.7 29.9 29.2 28.8 29.0 29.9 30.3 30.6 32.2 Mean Min 16.8 18.0 18.1 18.2 17.9 17.6 17.5 17.2 17.1 17.2 16.6 16.0 2005 Mean Max 33.3 36.2 32.2 31.4 29.3 29.5 28.7 29.6 30.4 30.4 32 33.6 2005 Mean Min 17.1 19.4 19.2 19.3 18.5 18.1 17.5 17.4 17.3 17.1 16.3 16.1 2006 Mean Max 34.8 34.3 32 30.5 29.6 29.9 29.5 29.2 30.3 31.2 29.2 29.3 2006 Mean Min 17.7 18.5 18.2 18.2 17.8 17.2 17.3 17 16.8 17.4 17.8 16.8 2007 Mean Max 30.9 30.2 33 31.6 30.3 28.2 28.1 28 28.9 30.3 30.8 32.5 2007 Mean Min 16.9 17.5 na 18.3 17.8 17.1 17.5 17 16.6 16.6 15.8 14.8 2008 Mean Max 33.8 33.4 32.1 29.4 30.2 29.3 28.8 29.1 29.9 29.1 30.5 33.4 2008 Mean Min 15.5 16.7 16.9 17.1 17.3 18.1 17.5 17.4 17.6 17.6 16.3 16.1MASINDI Long Term Mean Max 31.0 33.2 30.8 29.5 28.9 28.7 27.9 28.1 28.5 28.7 27.0 29.9 Mean Min 18.9 18.6 18.9 19.3 18.8 18.2 18.0 17.7 17.9 18.1 17.8 17.8 2005 Mean Max 32.2 34.6 31.3 31 28.3 28.9 28.3 28.5 28.9 29.5 30.4 32.2 2005 Mean Min 18.1 18.9 19.3 19.5 18.8 18.5 17.6 17.6 17.9 18.2 17.4 18.5 2006 Mean Max 32.2 34.6 31.3 29.6 28.5 29.2 28.4 28.3 28.4 28.8 27.1 27.4 2006 Mean Min 18.1 18.9 19.3 19.5 18.8 18.2 19.2 17.7 18.1 18.5 17.9 17.1 2007 Mean Max 29.9 na na 28 29.8 28.5 27.6 27.4 27.8 28.4 20.8 30 2007 Mean Min 17.7 na na 19 18.9 18.2 17.9 17.7 17.8 17.7 18 17.5 2008 Mean Max 29.8 30.3 29.9 na na 28.2 27.3 28 28.7 27.9 29.5 30 2008 Mean Min 21.7 18 18.2 na na 18 17.4 17.8 17.9 17.9 17.8 18.2 97
    • Table 1.3 A (cont’d): Temperature for selected centres (degrees centigrade), 2005-2008TOWN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov DecMBARARA Long Term Average Mean Max 27.9 29.0 27.9 27.1 26.9 29.7 27.8 27.5 27.2 26.6 26.2 27.2 Mean Min 15.8 15.9 15.7 15.8 15.9 14.4 15.3 15.6 15.6 15.8 15.7 15.6 2005 Mean Max 29.2 30.8 28.4 28.2 26.8 27.6 28.2 27.7 27.6 27.1 26.8 29.1 2005 Mean Min u/s u/s u/s u/s u/s u/s u/s u/s u/s 15.6 15.5 15.9 2006 Mean Max 27.8 29.6 27.0 26.5 26.9 28.1 28.3 28.0 27.6 27.0 25.2 25.5 2006 Mean Min 16.1 16.7 16.0 16.0 16.2 13.8 15.8 15.6 15.7 16.3 16.4 16.6 2007 Mean Max 27.6 28.3 28.2 27.6 27.1 36.5 27.1 27.1 26.7 26.2 25.7 26.9 2007 Mean Min 16.2 16.3 16.0 16.7 16.5 na 15.4 15.6 15.5 15.1 15.1 15.0 2008 Mean Max 27.0 27.3 27.8 26.2 26.7 26.8 27.4 27.0 26.9 26.0 27.1 27.2 2008 Mean Min 15.2 14.8 15.1 14.8 15.1 15.0 14.6 15.5 15.6 16.2 15.9 14.7SOROTI Long Term Average Mean Max 32.7 33.2 31.6 30.2 29.7 28.7 28.7 28.9 29.6 30.1 30.2 31.8 Mean Min 19.6 20.1 19.3 19.6 19.1 18.7 18.8 18.5 18.4 18.8 18.8 18.9 2005 Mean Max 32.9 35.2 32.3 29.4 28.7 29.1 28.5 29.5 29.9 30.3 31.4 33.8 2005 Mean Min 19.4 20.6 20.8 19.9 19.1 18.9 18.4 18.4 18.5 18.7 19.0 19.2 2006 Mean Max 34.0 33.9 30.3 29.7 30.8 29.3 29.1 29.0 30.1 30.5 28.6 28.3 2006 Mean Min 20.3 20.6 19.2 na 19.0 18.1 19.5 18.6 18.2 18.9 18.7 18.6 2007 Mean Max 31.0 31.0 32.8 31.9 29.9 27.8 na 28.3 28.5 30.2 30.6 32.1 2007 Mean Min 19.1 19.2 17.8 19.6 19.3 18.7 na 18.5 18.4 18.7 18.6 18.6 2008 Mean Max 32.8 32.8 30.9 29.8 29.5 28.7 28.6 28.8 29.9 29.2 30.1 32.9 2008 Mean Min 19.4 19.8 19.3 19.2 19.0 19.0 18.4 18.3 18.6 18.8 18.7 19.0TORORO Long Term Average Mean Max 31.5 32.1 30.9 30.0 29.2 28.4 28.2 28.7 29.3 29.5 30.1 31.0 Mean Min 17.5 17.8 18.0 18.1 18.0 17.4 17.0 17.1 17.4 17.3 16.9 16.8 2005 Mean Max 31.6 34.9 31.7 30.2 28.6 28.8 28.6 28.8 29.3 29.9 30.9 32.9 2005 Mean Min na 17.6 19.2 19.1 18.6 17.8 16.9 17.1 17.2 17.5 17.5 16.5 2006 Mean Max 33.0 32.8 29.8 28.8 29.1 28.7 28.8 29.4 29.6 29.9 n.a 28.1 2006 Mean Min 17.6 18.3 18.4 17.8 17.9 17.4 17.6 17.4 18.0 17.7 n.a 18.1 2007 Mean Max 29.8 29.9 31.8 30.9 29.6 27.8 27.4 28.0 28.4 29.5 29.6 30.9 2007 Mean Min 17.6 17.9 17.0 18.2 18.0 17.4 16.9 16.9 17.3 16.7 16.5 16.2 2008 Mean Max 31.4 30.7 30.1 30.0 29.3 28.4 28.0 28.4 29.7 28.6 29.8 32.2 2008 Mean Min 17.2 17.5 17.3 17.2 17.6 16.8 16.7 16.8 16.9 17.4 16.7 16.4Source: Meteorology Department, Ministry of Water and Environment 98
    • 1.4 HumidityTable 1.4 A: Monthly relative humidity for selected centers (percent), 2005 – 2008TOWN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov DecARUALong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 67 67 73 85 85 87 89 90 88 84 76 73 Mean R.H 12.00 38 36 44 56 60 63 66 66 62 60 52 462005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 56 49 69 69 81 83 84 85 81 81 68 592005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 25 26 43 47 60 58 56 58 58 54 46 262006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 55 61 74 78 81 81 87 86 84 76 79 692006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 25 28 46 50 61 54 62 59 60 56 56 462007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 58 63 63 75 75 85 86 86 84 81 76 662007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 33 33 39 49 49 65 62 63 64 57 54 412008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 68 56 70 78 77 82 87 86 83 79 71 632008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 37 31 44 52 48 57 63 61 60 59 51 36 ENTEBBELong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 88 86 86 86 86 85 87 87 86 83 84 87 Mean R.H 12.00 63 63 65 70 70 67 67 68 66 65 65 652005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 83 79 69 72 82 78 85 78 84 83 83 802005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 62 67 43 45 59 54 68 55 71 67 66 662006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 76 77 87 86 89 85 86 85 85 84 89 882006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 59 63 69 73 75 72 70 71 69 69 73 712007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 85 87 81 86 86 87 87 88 87 82 82 822007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 65 67 64 72 73 71 73 74 70 66 67 602008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 83 85 82 88 86 83 86 88 83 87 83 822008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 62 64 70 74 74 72 70 71 68 73 69 60GULULong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 65 67 74 83 85 82 88 88 84 80 74 71 Mean R.H 12.00 33 35 43 55 60 60 63 63 58 54 47 402005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 54 52 69 72 82 78 79 78 79 78 77 772005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 27 25 43 45 59 54 52 55 49 50 39 212006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 47 52 72 79 79 77 79 81 72 74 78 692006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 25 26 40 52 56 51 54 55 50 51 57 452007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 56 65 65 72 77 84 85 86 85 74 71 na2007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 35 34 32 45 52 60 63 59 60 53 48 na2008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 57 53 76 77 77 84 85 79 81 66 572008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 30 29 50 55 54 60 61 55 59 45 30JINJALong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 82 83 82 86 87 87 89 88 85 82 80 81 Mean R.H 12.00 53 54 57 64 66 63 60 60 57 58 57 562005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 75 61 79 79 85 84 82 82 81 81 76 682005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 46 39 56 57 62 60 54 55 58 54 52 392006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 63 71 84 82 86 83 84 84 79 75 86 852006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 41 47 58 62 66 60 53 53 54 56 66 612007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 84 79 74 77 83 84 85 84 86 78 75 512007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 59 58 51 58 62 62 64 65 60 55 56 492008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 77 80 78 82 83 84 86 84 83 83 81 752008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 49 52 57 59 61 61 66 62 55 59 55 48 99
    • Table 1.4 A (cont’d): Monthly relative humidity for selected centers (percent), 2005 – 2008TOWN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov DecKABALELong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 96 95 97 97 95 96 93 93 93 94 94 95 Mean R.H 12.00 57 59 63 69 68 60 52 51 57 62 66 632005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 95 91 98 97 98 97 90 91 93 93 95 732005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 57 53 64 65 67 58 47 53 56 56 65 532006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 93 94 97 97 96 94 90 93 88 94 95 942006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 58 58 67 70 68 56 53 55 55 62 72 712007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 97 94 96 97 96 95 93 93 95 96 98 962007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 65 58 61 65 67 62 58 59 63 67 71 652008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 96 96 97 96 96 95 93 95 97 95 94 962008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 64 61 67 71 66 61 57 61 62 67 64 58KAMPALALong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 78 80 82 88 89 87 89 89 87 83 81 81 Mean R.H 12.00 53 55 60 69 71 68 66 66 65 63 61 602005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 74 74 81 80 85 79 82 81 81 78 75 682005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 47 45 57 60 66 63 60 62 61 64 58 442006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 70 76 86 85 91 83 81 82 82 82 89 872006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 48 61 67 69 78 67 62 58 63 67 72 692007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 84 85 82 84 85 85 89 89 85 83 78 792007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 64 65 63 66 71 68 75 69 72 68 65 592008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 82 84 83 87 86 81 83 87 81 86 78 802008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 57 65 64 64 70 63 64 66 61 65 66 59KASESELong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 79 79 83 85 85 85 85 82 81 83 83 80 Mean R.H 12.00 50 51 54 60 57 51 49 48 51 58 61 542005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 77 69 85 85 86 86 80 85 83 82 81 712005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 44 37 53 52 55 48 49 55 54 54 56 432006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 73 74 83 83 85 76 76 80 77 79 86 842006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 47 42 53 55 56 45 43 47 51 52 68 642007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 85 81 na 76 81 85 86 87 84 84 85 762007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 53 48 44 49 55 58 56 55 57 58 62 512008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: na na na na na na na na na na na Na2008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: na na na na na na na na na na na naLIRALong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 70 73 78 84 89 86 90 89 86 83 79 74 Mean R.H 12.00 35 36 42 52 61 59 62 62 57 53 46 422005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 62 53 71 73 82 77 80 80 73 79 66 532005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 32 26 47 49 61 58 58 57 49 55 40 302006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 59 65 72 79 81 80 79 78 75 74 80 752006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 32 38 48 55 59 52 69 54 51 52 56 522007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 41 73 72 75 79 84 83 82 82 78 73 592007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 39 44 38 47 54 60 61 57 61 49 46 332008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: na na na na na na na na na na na na2008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: na na na na na na na na na na na Na 100
    • Table 1.4 A (cont’d): Monthly relative humidity for selected centers (percent), 2005 – 2008TOWN Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov DecMASINDILong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 73 73 77 80 81 82 86 87 84 82 78 76 Mean R.H 12.00 42 43 50 59 63 63 63 64 62 60 54 502005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 68 67 74 75 86 85 88 86 85 77 69 672005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 39 34 52 55 64 68 62 62 62 56 38 372006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 68 67 74 82 84 80 83 88 85 82 86 822006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 39 34 52 63 64 53 63 70 62 63 69 812007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 70 na na 81 84 83 92 91 89 86 84 762007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: na na na na na na na na na na na na2008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 76 73 81 na na 80 87 88 87 89 79 752008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 53 50 58 na na 60 64 64 68 72 58 45MBARARALong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 73 73 77 80 81 82 86 87 84 82 78 76 Mean R.H 12.00 42 43 50 59 63 63 63 64 62 60 54 502005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 85 75 85 85 88 83 78 83 85 87 90 812005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 45 39 58 54 61 49 39 51 55 66 62 462006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 85 82 89 90 87 74 73 78 76 81 90 902006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 51 49 57 62 62 45 39 44 57 59 66 652007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 87 82 87 86 82 86 83 83 85 85 88 852007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 50 52 49 54 54 52 48 50 59 64 68 532008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 86 85 90 86 81 79 83 88 85 87 84 852008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 55 51 56 62 54 48 43 53 64 62 57 53SOROTILong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 66 72 74 80 80 80 83 82 78 79 76 69 Mean R.H 12.00 35 37 42 51 57 57 57 57 52 47 43 392005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 57 57 73 77 79 78 79 77 72 75 65 512005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 38 29 46 49 57 55 54 52 49 48 41 292006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 57 60 81 81 82 75 79 79 77 72 81 762006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 32 40 52 55 59 51 53 53 49 49 59 512007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 69 77 73 77 80 84 na 84 81 72 69 622007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 43 49 40 45 55 62 na 58 59 48 45 362008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 69 67 80 80 81 78 80 82 78 83 70 662008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 39 39 50 51 57 55 54 58 53 58 47 40TOROROLong Term Average Mean R.H 06.00 66 68 74 78 81 80 81 81 77 74 72 71 Mean R.H 12.00 40 42 47 57 61 58 57 56 53 53 51 482005 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 73 61 77 77 84 82 83 83 81 79 74 632005 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 52 44 60 66 72 65 64 66 64 64 58 432006 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 61 66 83 84 84 82 85 82 82 80 na 852006 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 46 50 65 71 69 65 65 84 64 65 na 702007 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 83 77 75 77 83 85 86 87 85 78 79 692007 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 63 63 54 59 65 65 71 66 69 61 63 492008 Mean R.H. 06.00:: 72 74 79 82 83 82 85 82 80 82 76 622008 Mean R.H. 12.00:: 52 55 58 63 64 63 64 62 55 63 53 35Source: Meteorology Department, Ministry of Water and Environment 101
    • 1.5 Rural Water SupplyTable 1.5 A: Rural water supply service levels, June 2006 Population Protected Hand Shallow Gravity FlowRegion/District Dug wells Service Level Rural springs Pumps wells Schemes Deep Taps People Served Percentage Bore/holesCentralKalangala 43,165 15 1 63 0 11 23,984 55.6Kayunga 298,128 56 360 141 0 0 161,500 54.2Kiboga 256,694 122 152 187 53 38 147,700 57.5Luwero 310,104 7 464 0 326 0 237,261 76.5Masaka 714,664 578 406 903 0 0 505,464 70.7Mityana 262,130 127 133 87 294 0 165,422 63.1Mpigi 426,664 550 98 285 46 0 235,639 55.2Mubende 468,236 107 231 361 0 34 208,950 44.6Mukono 788,753 1525 367 380 0 33 521,690 66.1Nakaseke 155,955 0 211 7 288 0 134,272 86.1Nakasongola 127,341 2 146 54 17 0 64,612 50.7Rakai 481,318 133 299 412 25 0 245,788 51.1Ssembabule 194,826 0 142 0 83 0 67,536 34.7Wakiso 864,854 582 283 758 0 5 425,627 49.2Sub Total 5,392,832 3,804 3,293 3,638 1,132 121 3,145,444 58.3EasternAmuria 232,371 71 272 92 0 0 123,442 53.1Bugiri 488,870 60 333 0 80 0 136,378 27.9Bukwa 58,410 105 0 0 0 94 35,136 60.2Busia 211,375 187 312 2 18 0 137,234 64.9Butaleja 180,119 10 252 0 15 0 82,100 45.6Iganga 765,013 93 1043 233 389 0 512,582 67.0Jinja 351,255 304 195 267 0 0 199,400 56.8Kaberamaido 139,952 73 314 121 0 0 128,035 91.5Kaliro 173,326 0 289 1 0 0 87,000 50.2Kamuli 617,988 2 714 266 0 0 294,400 47.6Kapchorwa 158,003 396 27 0 0 91 96,677 61.2Katakwi 146,539 0 263 62 0 0 95,318 65.0Kumi 443,619 358 390 143 293 33 314,914 71.0Manafa 436,857 599 124 5 0 145 179,259 41.0Mayuge 361,502 82 253 120 0 13 129,908 35.9Mbale 294,125 174 226 15 0 180 134,166 45.6Pallisa 561,631 167 576 107 0 0 238,300 42.4Sironko 310,501 607 80 44 0 311 202,952 65.4Soroti 365,643 123 635 263 0 0 281,288 76.9Tororo 398,599 242 548 0 35 0 233,227 58.5Sub Total 6,695,697 3,653 6,846 1,741 830 867 3,641,718 54.4 102
    • Table 1.5 A (cont): Rural water supply service levels, June 2006Region/ Population Protected Hand Shallow Dug Gravity FlowDistrict Rural Springs Pumps wells wells Schemes Service level Deep Bore People holes Taps Served PercentageNorthernAdjumani 228,437 17 463 53 0 6 162,312 71.1Amolatar 109,843 0 151 19 0 5 51,750 47.1Apac 755,183 349 630 219 11 0 328,712 43.5Arua 784,076 1,177 792 140 0 73 530,227 67.6Gulu 393,882 331 440 157 28 1 250,226 63.5Kabong 534,288 0 161 23 2 0 55,854 10.5Kitgum 283,660 0 514 108 0 12 139,065 49.0Koboko 118,220 469 83 29 0 19 104,756 88.6Kotido 285,375 3 290 102 4 0 128,666 45.1Lira 651,495 752 298 404 0 13 362,950 55.7Moroto 194,681 3 318 19 0 28 106,647 54.8Moyo 249,516 32 264 0 38 66 107,044 42.9Nakapiripirit 188,506 7 294 25 0 0 96,980 51.4Nebbi 406,750 823 613 144 0 79 354,414 87.1Pader 330,110 8 465 83 0 0 160,251 48.5Yumbe 317,405 27 195 38 1 0 75,600 23.8Sub Total 5,831,428 3,998 5,971 1,563 84 302 3,015,456 51.7WesternBundubugyo 239,987 253 32 0 121 260 133,860 55.8Bushenyi 735,946 2,259 158 0 132 678 606,813 82.5Hoima 373,559 503 331 145 152 30 283,463 75.9Ibanda 194,458 175 43 44 0 294 106,994 55.0Isingiro 354,096 59 153 57 0 131 95,824 27.1Kabale 459,494 1,568 94 6 0 1,663 430,584 93.7Kabarole 337,615 373 86 383 0 34 220,688 65.4Kamwenge 317,573 416 64 142 0 81 164,296 51.7Kanungu 208,724 995 106 30 0 452 208,724 100.0Kasese 544,201 1,143 170 0 0 1,786 438,788 80.6Kibaale 497,596 620 356 0 583 0 373,390 75.0Kiruhura 235,485 1 189 54 0 15 74,461 31.6Kisoro 219,893 322 12 0 0 128 91,850 41.8Kyenjojo 419,016 325 188 315 0 54 224,180 53.5Masindi 534,516 353 474 205 174 11 329,292 61.6Mbarara 322,882 377 145 35 0 425 173,730 53.8Ntugamo 402,708 977 260 0 340 283 368,470 91.5Rukungiri 320,422 1,153 83 62 0 150 281,325 87.8Sub Total 6,718,171 11,872 2,944 1,478 1,502 6,475 4,606,731 68.6Total 24,638,127 23,327 19,054 8,420 3,548 7,765 14,409,349 58.5Note: The number of people served is estimated using a source-man ratio of 300 persons/hand pump; 200 persons/spring;150 persons /GFS tap. The functionality rate for point water sources is 83 percent, and if factored in, the service coverage drops to 51.6 percent.Source: Directorate of Water Development, Luzira. 103
    • 1.6 ForestryTable 1.6 A: Value of output of round-wood timber at current prices, 2003 - 2007 (Mill. Shs)Category 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007Monetary For sawn timber 33,062 35,280 37,648 40,174 42,870 For poles 4,399 4,575 4,758 4,948 5,280 For wood fuel- Household 5,398 5,592 5,794 6,002 6,405 " " - Commercial 4,660 4,771 4,884 5,001 5,336 " " - Industrial 10,812 11,048 11,290 11,537 12,311 For charcoal 31,908 34,148 36,545 39,111 41,735Gross output 90,239 95,414 100,919 106,773 113,937Non monetary For poles 9,633 10,018 10,419 10,835 11,269 For wood fuel - Household 98,159 101,664 105,323 109,115 113,480 " " - Commercial 15,299 15,668 16,041 16,423 17,080 " " - Industrial 2,393 2,446 2,499 2,554 2,656Gross output 125,484 129,796 134,282 138,927 144,485Total For sawn timber 33,062 35,280 37,648 40,174 42,870 For poles 14,032 14,593 15,177 15,784 16,549 For wood fuel - Household 103,557 107,256 111,117 115,117 119,885 " " - Commercial 19,959 20,439 20,926 21,424 22,416 " " - Industrial 13,205 13,494 13,789 14,091 14,967 For charcoal 31,908 34,148 36,545 39,111 41,735Total Gross output 215,723 225,210 235,202 245,701 258,422Note: Figures are based on projectionsSource: National Forestry Authority and Uganda Bureau of statisticsTable 1.6 B: Total production of round-wood timber, 2003 – 2007 (‘000 tonnes)Category 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007Monetary For sawn timber 791 845 902 962 1,027 For poles 234 243 253 270 288 For wood fuel - Household 747 774 802 855 913 " " - Commercial 645 660 676 721 770 " " - Industrial 1,496 1,529 1,562 1,596 1,631 For charcoal 5,308 5,681 6,080 6,506 6,963Total wood production 9,221 9,732 10,274 10,910 11,592Non monetary For poles 513 534 555 577 600 For wood fuel - Household 16,975 17,586 18,219 18,875 19,555 " " - Commercial 2,117 2,167 2,219 2,272 2,326 " " - Industrial 331 338 346 353 361Total wood production 19,936 20,625 21,339 22,077 22,842Total For sawn timber 791 845 902 962 1,027 For poles 747 777 808 847 888 For wood fuel- Household 17,722 18,360 19,021 19,731 20,468 " " - Commercial 2,762 2,827 2,895 2,993 3,096 " " - Industrial 1,827 1,867 1,908 1,949 1,992 For charcoal 5,308 5,681 6,080 6,506 6,963Total wood production 29,157 30,357 31,614 32,988 34,434Note: Figures are based on projections.Source: National Forestry Authority and Uganda Bureau of Statistics. 104
    • 2.0 Demography Statistics2.1 Population ProjectionsTable 2.1 A: Mid-year population estimates and projections for Uganda, 1992 – 2009 Mid Year PopulationYear Urban Rural Total1992 1,801,100 15,671,900 17,473,0001993 1,891,700 16,149,900 18,041,6001994 1,987,000 16,641,700 18,628,7001995 2,087,000 17,148,000 19,235,0001996 2,192,100 17,668,800 19,860,9001997 2,302,500 18,204,800 20,507,3001998 2,418,400 18,756,300 21,174,7001999 2,540,100 19,323,800 21,863,9002000 2,668,000 19,907,400 22,575,4002001 2,802,400 20,507,700 23,310,1002002 2,943,500 21,125,300 24,068,5062003 3,091,400 21,759,300 25,089,4002004 3,247,000 22,412,500 25,859,7002005 3,410,500 23,084,100 26,741,3002006 3,582,200 23,774,700 27,629,3002007 3,762,600 24,484,700 28,581,3002008 4,372,000 25,220,600 29,592,6002009 4,524,700 26,136,700 30,661,400Table 2.1 B: Projected mid year Population ( 000) for 5 year age groups, 2007 – 2009 2006 2007 2008 Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female0-4 6,195.27 3,072.48 3,122.79 6,387.42 3,170.79 3216.64 6,586.76 3,273.56 3,313.205-9 4,270.20 2,123.32 2,146.88 4,544.64 2,261.50 2283.14 4,846.41 2,413.35 2,433.0610-14 3,774.35 1,856.57 1,917.78 3,863.47 1,905.64 1957.83 3,949.71 1,953.97 1,995.7415-19 3,160.78 1,539.38 1,621.40 3,255.16 1,589.84 1665.33 3,354.51 1,643.44 1,711.0720-24 2,597.44 1,254.31 1,343.13 2,677.42 1,297.12 1380.3 2,760.84 1,342.23 1,418.6125-29 2,091.00 1,001.95 1,089.06 2,161.21 1,038.99 1122.22 2,235.32 1,078.64 1,156.6830-34 1,662.04 790.64 871.39 1,718.24 820.19 898.05 1,777.78 851.98 925.835-39 1,310.76 618.08 692.68 1,354.10 640.37 713.73 1,400.19 664.57 735.6340-44 1,025.03 478.38 546.65 1,057.92 494.58 563.34 1,092.82 512.19 580.6345-49 788.74 364.29 424.45 813.88 375.94 437.93 840.64 388.66 451.9850-54 591.99 270.7 321.29 610.36 278.74 331.62 630.04 287.56 342.4855-59 429.07 194.16 234.91 441.86 199.4 242.46 455.66 205.19 250.4760-64 296.42 132.32 164.1 304.86 135.46 169.4 313.92 138.95 174.9765-69 190.54 83.75 106.8 196.06 85.53 110.53 201.96 87.53 114.4370-74 110.88 48.24 62.64 114.47 49.3 65.17 118.27 50.47 67.875-79 56.3 24.56 31.74 58.61 25.29 33.32 60.91 26 34.9180+ 30.47 13.54 16.93 32.97 14.55 18.42 35.55 15.57 19.98Total 28,581.28 13,866.67 14,714.62 29,592.65 14,383.23 15209.43 30,661.29 14,933.86 15,727.44 105
    • Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 106
    • Table 2.1 C: Census population (1991 and 2002) by region and district and projected 2009 mid-year populationDistrict/ Census Population Sex Ratio Growth Mid-Year ProjectedRegion 1991 2002 2002 Rate 2002 Population 2009CentralKalangala 16,371 34,766 150 6.5 54,100Kampala 774,241 1,189,142 92 3.7 1,533,600Kayunga 236,177 294,613 94 1.9 336,600Kiboga 141,607 229,472 104 4.1 305,400Luwero 255,390 341,317 97 2.5 405,900Lyantonde 53,100 66,039 98 1.9 75,300Masaka 694,697 770,662 95 0.9 822,300Mityana 223,527 266,108 100 1.5 295,900Mpigi 350,980 407,790 100 1.3 447,000Mubende 277,449 423,422 100 3.6 544,000Mukono 588,427 795,393 99 2.6 952,300Nakaseke 93,804 137,278 100 3.3 172,100Nakasongola 100,497 127,064 101 2.0 146,300Rakai 330,401 404,326 95 1.7 456,800Sembabule 144,039 180,045 98 1.9 205,900Wakiso 562,887 907,988 94 4.1 1,205,100Sub Total 4,843,594 6,575,425 97 2.6 7,958,600EasternAmuria 69,353 180,022 93 8.2 315,500Budaka 100,348 136,489 93 2.6 164,000Bududa 79,218 123,103 102 3.8 159,900Bugiri 239,307 412,395 94 4.7 568,700Bukedea 75,272 122,433 92 4.2 163,300Bukwa 30,692 48,952 99 4.0 64,500Busia 163,597 225,008 92 2.7 272,100Butaleja 106,678 157,489 95 3.3 198,500Iganga 365,756 540,999 91 3.4 682,100Jinja 289,476 387,573 96 2.5 461,500Kaberamaido 81,535 131,650 95 4.1 174,800Kaliro 105,122 154,667 97 3.3 194,600Kamuli 380,092 552,665 94 3.2 690,300Kapchorwa 86,010 141,439 97 4.3 189,800Katakwi 75,244 118,928 93 3.9 156,000Kumi 161,422 267,232 92 4.3 360,000Manafwa 178,528 262,566 95 3.3 330,200Mayuge 216,849 324,674 94 3.5 412,600Mbale 240,929 332,571 96 2.8 403,100Namutumba 123,871 167,691 95 2.6 200,900Pallisa 257,308 384,089 93 3.4 487,100Sironko 212,305 283,092 98 2.5 336,300Soroti 204,258 369,789 95 5.1 524,800Tororo 285,299 379,399 95 2.4 449,900Sub Total 4,128,469 6,204,915 94 3.5 7,960,500 107
    • Table 2.1 C (cont’d): Census population (1991 and 2002) by region and district and projected 2009 mid-year populationDistrict/ Census Population Sex Ratio Growth Mid Year ProjectedRegion 1991 2002 2002 Rate 2002 Population 2009NorthernAbim 47,572 51,903 93 0.7 54,900Adjumani 96,264 202,290 98 6.4 313,200Amolatar 68,473 96,189 99 2.9 117,800Amuru 126,639 176,733 97 2.9 215,500Apac 277,451 415,578 96 3.5 528,200Arua 268,839 402,671 92 3.5 511,800Dokolo 84,978 129,385 95 3.6 166,000Gulu 211,788 298,527 97 2.9 366,200Kaabong 91,236 202,757 96 6.8 324,500Kitgum 175,587 282,375 98 4.1 374,100Koboko 62,337 129,148 98 6.2 198,300Kotido 57,198 122,442 99 6.5 192,800Lira 347,514 515,666 96 3.4 651,700Nyadri 206,971 302,109 93 3.2 378,300Moroto 96,833 189,940 93 5.8 282,700Moyo 79,381 194,778 104 7.7 330,200Nakapiripirit 77,584 154,494 99 5.9 232,300Nebbi 316,866 435,360 92 2.7 526,200Oyam 177,053 268,415 96 3.6 343,500Pader 181,597 326,338 98 5.0 461,200Yumbe 99,794 251,784 101 7.9 433,700Sub Total 3,151,955 5,148,882 96 4.2 7,003,100WesternBuliisa 47,709 63,363 96 2.4 75,100Bundibugyo 116,566 209,978 93 5.0 297,200Bushenyi 579,137 731,392 92 2.0 841,600Hoima 197,851 343,618 100 4.7 476,000Ibanda 148,029 198,635 95 2.5 236,800Isingiro 226,365 316,025 94 2.9 385,500Kabale 417,218 458,318 88 0.8 486,300Kabarole 299,573 356,914 100 1.5 397,000Kamwenge 201,654 263,730 93 2.3 309,700Kanungu 160,708 204,732 93 2.1 236,800Kasese 343,601 523,033 94 3.6 671,000Kibaale 220,261 405,882 97 5.2 582,000Kiruhura 140,946 212,219 102 3.5 270,500Kisoro 186,681 220,312 82 1.4 243,900Kyenjojo 245,573 377,171 98 3.7 486,400Masindi 213,087 396,127 100 5.3 571,000Mbarara 267,457 361,477 96 2.6 418,300Ntungamo 305,199 379,987 92 1.9 447,400Rukungiri 230,072 275,162 91 1.5 306,700Sub Total 4,547,687 6,298,075 94 2.8 7,739,200Uganda 16,671,705 24,227,297 95 3.2 30,661,400Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 108
    • Table 2.1 D: 2009 mid-year projected population for Town CouncilsDistrict Urban council 2009 mid year projected populationCentralKalangala Kalangala TC 4,600Kampala Kampala City 1,533,600Kayunga Kayunga TC 22,700Kiboga Kiboga TC 16,000 Bombo TC 19,900Luwero Luwero TC 28,000 Wobulenzi TC 22,400Lyantonde Lyantonde TC 8,600 Lukaya TC 15,000Masaka Masaka MC 72,300Mityana Mityana TC 38,000Mpigi Mpigi TC 37,600Mubende Mubende TC 20,600 Lugazi TC 33,500 Mukono TC 55,700Mukono Njeru TC 61,300 Nkonkonjeru TC 13,300Nakaseke Nakaseke TC 2,000Nakasongola Nakasongola TC 7,500 Kalisizo TC 31,400Rakai Kyotera TC 8,600 Rakai TC 6,700Ssembabule Sembabule TC 4,500 Entebbe MC 73,100 Kakiri TC 5,600Wakiso Kira TC 164,700 Nansana TC 82,400 Wakiso TC 19,400EasternAmuria Amuria TC 4,600Budaka Budaka TC 20,400Bududa Bududa TC 3,800Bugiri Bugiri TC 23,500Bukedea Bukedea TC 33,500Bukwo Bukwo TC 4,400Busia Busia TC 44,300 Busolwe TC 7,900Butaleja Butaleja TC 5,300 Busembatya TC 14,600Iganga Iganga TC 49,800 Bugembe TC 31,300 Buwenge TC 17,200Jinja Jinja MC 84,700 Kakira TC 8,100Kaberamaido Kaberamaido TC 3,200Kaliro Kaliro TC 12,700Kamuli Kamuli TC 14,200Kapchorwa Kapchorwa TC 11,700Katakwi Katakwi TC 7,700Kumi Kumi TC 11,900 LwakhakhaTC 10,000Manafwa Manafwa TC 14,800Mayuge Mayuge TC 11,100Mbale Mbale MC 86,200Namutumba Namutumba TC 10,000Pallisa Pallisa TC 30,000Sironko Sironko TC 13,300Soroti Soroti MC 59,200 Malaba TC 9,000Tororo Nagongera TC 11,200 Tororo MC 41,300 109
    • Table 2.1 D (cont’d): 2009 mid-year projected population for town councilsDistrict Urban council 2009 mid year projected populationNorthernAbim Abim TC 15,700Adjumani Adjumani TC 30,700Amolatar Amolatar TC 14,000Amuru Amuru TC -Apac Apac TC 12,900Arua Arua MC 55,800Dokolo Dokolo TC 16,900Gulu Gulu MC 146,600Kaabong Kaabong TC 20,900Kitgum Kitgum TC 55,400Koboko Koboko TC 45,700Kotido Kotido TC 20,300Lira Lira MC 102,200Moroto Moroto MC 11,000Moyo Moyo TC 20,500Nakapiripirit Nakapiripirit TC 2,400 Nebbi TC 27,500Nebbi Paidha TC 29,100 Pakwach TC 21,300Oyam Oyam TC 13,600 Kalongo TC 13,700Pader Pader TC 12,200Terego/Maracha Nyadri TC 7,100Yumbe Yumbe TC 26,500WesternBuliisa Buliisa TC 26,800 Bundibugyo TC 19,500Bundibugyo Nyahuka TC - Ishaka-Bushenyi TC 25,800Bushenyi Kabwohe-Itendero TC 17,700 Hoima TC 38,700Hoima Kigorobya TC 5,200 Ibanda TC 27,100Ibanda Kakinga TC 20,800Isingiro Isingiro TC 20,700Kabale Kabale MC 43,900Kabalore Fort Portal MC 45,600Kamwenge Kamwenge TC 15,700 Kanungu TC 14,900Kanungu Kihiihi TC 18,500 Bwera – Mpondwe TC 15,500 Hima TC 27,600Kasese Kasese TC 69,200 Katwe Kabatoro TC 7,400 Kagadi TC 19,500Kibaale Kibaale TC 6,800Kiruhura Kiruhuura TC 13,100Kisoro Kisoro TC 12,600Kyenjojo Kyenjojo TC 19,400Masindi Masindi TC 40,800Mbarara Mbarara MC 80,300Ntungamo Ntungamo TC 15,700Rukungiri Rukungiri TC 14,000Total 4,524,700Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 110
    • 2.2 EducationTable 2.2 A : Primary school enrolment by class and sex 2004- 2008Class/Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008P1 Male 923,180 859,343 883,827 918,399 885,897 Female 914,097 853,077 879,457 913,730 881,502 Total 1,837,277 1,712,420 1,763,284 1,832,129 1,767,399P2 Male 603,356 592,955 601,545 610,262 619,133 Female 591,121 582,077 597,780 603,224 615,310 Total 1,194,477 1,175,032 1,199,325 1,213,486 1,234,443P3 Male 580,411 583,126 602,708 614,896 604,501 Female 570,114 579,336 597,267 609,916 595,788 Total 1,150,525 1,162,462 1,199,975 1,224,812 1,200,289P4 Male 524,935 511,321 523,429 544,928 546,236 Female 520,879 507,969 530,859 551,328 550,524 Total 1,045,814 1,019,290 1,054,288 1,096,256 1,096,760P5 Male 462,529 457,249 452,566 466,769 464,069 Female 461,180 458,255 461,809 473,035 472,855 Total 923,709 915,504 914,375 939,804 936,924P6 Male 382,609 381,975 380,432 379,288 371,760 Female 369,399 377,245 382,821 381,924 377,973 Total 752,008 759,220 763,253 761,212 749,733P7 Male 255,908 256,599 247,735 244,796 249,419 Female 217,574 223,352 220,703 225,476 236,307 Total 473,482 479,951 468,438 470,272 485,726Total Male 3,732,928 3,642,568 3,692,242 3,779,338 3,741,015 Female 3,644,364 3,581,311 3,670,696 3,758,633 3,730,259 Grand Total 7,377,292 7,223,879 7,362,938 7,537,971 7,471,274Source: Ministry of Education and Sports 111
    • Table 2.2 B: Primary education accessibility indicators by district, 2007 – 2008 2007 2008 Gross Net Gross Net Gross Net Gross NetDistrict Intake Intake Enrolment Enrolment Intake Intake Enrolment Enrolment Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate RateCentralKalangala 45 22.4 39.3 31.1 56 25 41 31Kampala 37 20.2 50.7 42.7 34 17 46 38Kayunga 152 72.4 126.1 104.3 159 79 131 110Kiboga 118.6 51.8 100.3 80.6 121 47 96 75Luwero 170.6 86.8 143 122.1 157 77 132 111Lyantonde 168.2 67.7 102.7 82.6 154 62 93 76Masaka 146.5 66.7 120.5 100 139 63 114 96Mityana 111.5 48.9 100.1 81.1 89 41 79 65Mpigi 135 69.6 126.8 107 149 68 126 107Mubende 116.9 48.3 90.8 72.9 125 51 91 74Mukono 107.9 50.3 101.2 83.7 102 42 88 72Nakaseke 163.5 82.9 141.5 119 155 71 120 101Nakasongola 164.6 85.7 133.9 107.3 177 88 133 105Rakai 139.2 66.8 110.1 93.3 131 67 103 87Ssembabule 251.2 110.2 173.1 146.9 251 101 158 132Wakiso 54.1 24.5 71.5 58.3 53 23 71 58EasternBudaka 164.5 87.4 144.8 123.3 193 104 140 119Bududa 218.1 98.9 163.9 140.4 192 77 139 114Bukwo 204.1 123.6 204.7 179.8 203 109 209 181Bugiri 133.4 72 114.3 99.2 142 65 116 99Bukedea 148.6 71.7 122.3 104.2 154 65 124 99Busia 154.6 75.3 143 122.2 171 89 143 123Butaleja 204.7 121.8 150.9 133.5 199 107 143 128Iganga 115.7 65.3 118.9 102.5 120 59 120 102Jinja 75.8 45.4 94.8 82.8 83 49 91 79Kaberamaido 149.1 87.9 137.8 115.1 139 80 126 105Kaliro 150.7 78.1 125.4 105.7 159 78 121 103Kamuli 124.7 72 125.7 110.4 130 72 121 106Kapchorwa 121.3 70.3 118.6 97.6 120 69 119 97Katakwi 138.3 73.5 111 93.9 134 71 109 91Kumi 141 75.6 120.3 102.4 142 87 125 104Mayuge 121.3 59.5 107.9 93.8 151 65 121 105Manafwa 154.9 81.3 137.4 116.5 166 91 135 118Mbale 116.7 58.3 120.8 98.2 128 61 120 98Namutumba 165.3 95.4 147.7 128.3 217 123 149 127Pallisa 145.9 82.8 122.5 107.1 168 88 126 110Sironko 142.4 71.9 134.2 113.8 147 73 136 115Soroti 134.3 75.9 121.4 101.9 127 61 110 91Tororo 147 78 137.4 113.9 151 75 138 111 112
    • Table 2.2 B (cont’d): Primary education accessibility indicators by district, 2007 – 2008 2007 2008 Gross Net Gross Net Gross Net Gross NetDistrict Intake Intake Enrolment Enrolment Intake Intake Enrolment Enrolment Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate RateNorthernAbim 260.2 93.2 184.1 150.7 251 88 180 142Adjumani 68.6 14.9 66.5 42.6 65 11 62 41Amolatar 110.1 30 118.9 95.1 129 40 144 114Amuria 127.9 61.7 100.8 84.7 135 70 110 91Amuru 136.2 45.4 116.3 93.7 141 46 118 92Apac 120 41.1 134.4 112.7 123 41 131 109Arua 200.3 66.3 166.1 137.1 211 69 166 138Dokolo 121.7 38.2 129.5 106.4 128 39 133 108Gulu 133.4 54 142.1 116.7 122 54 130 104Kaabong 126 35.2 56.9 47.6 116 39 57 49Kitgum 144.6 64.7 145.8 120.7 135 53 134 109Koboko 187.3 55.3 146.9 118.4 171 54 138 110Kotido 75.9 19 34.2 27.4 87 19 34 27Lira 140 47.2 133.9 114.8 142 48 131 112Maracha-Terego 206.9 75 174.3 142.5 223 73 172 143Moroto 57.1 16.6 37.4 28.8 87 21 43 33Moyo 55.3 19.6 55.9 35.9 60 19 49 35Nakapiripirit 103.4 25.8 46.2 38.3 111 27 46 37Nebbi 177.9 64.5 136.3 110.2 180 62 130 106Oyam 139.1 51 138.6 119 142 55 138 121Pader 171.1 66 165.8 136.8 155 59 145 120Yumbe 141.9 49.7 100.9 82.4 108 34 74 59WesternBulisa 147.2 53.3 107.3 85.4 138 52 106 89Bundibugyo 107.8 50 85.5 70.6 110 51 80 66Bushenyi 144.1 63 118 96.3 115 46 104 83Hoima 95.2 43 95.6 75.9 102 38 92 72Ibanda 156.4 74.4 120.7 94.8 145 79 103 79Isingiro 152.3 58.5 106.3 83.9 146 57 96 74Kabale 143.9 78.4 129.9 106.3 157 70 125 100Kabarole 120.4 41.3 108.9 82.2 117 41 107 83Kamwenge 136.2 45.6 108.9 83.8 146 50 110 81Kanungu 145.3 62.5 116.9 88.7 127 54 108 86Kiruhura 170.6 62.7 115.9 91.5 139 53 91 72Kasese 123.6 54.2 109.6 90.8 142 61 117 97Kibaale 139.8 56.3 112.3 89.9 134 52 114 89Kisoro 152.6 74.4 117.9 100.3 177 81 124 100Kyenjojo 128.9 41 103.8 79.8 129 47 102 78Masindi 101.9 45.6 95.5 74.3 78 31 74 58Mbarara 126.4 50.8 108.3 82.5 97 40 90 69Ntungamo 159.9 63.7 121.4 90.1 156 67 115 88Rukungiri 122.4 55.9 118.5 91.2 128 55 111 83National 128.5 57.4 113.1 93.3 128 55 108 89Source: Ministry of Education and Sports 113
    • Table 2.2 C: Primary education quality enhancement indicators by district, 2005– 2008 2005 2006 2007 2008 Pupil Pupil Pupil Pupil Pupil Pupil Pupil PupilDistrict Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio RatioCentralKalangala 33 28 30 28 37 29 36 27Kampala 29 40 28 40 29 41 29 40Kayunga 46 57 48 69 53 66 53 66Kiboga 55 62 43 57 51 55 48 48Luwero 49 64 49 61 58 67 59 65Lyantonde n/a n/a 41 62 44 69 40 63Masaka 43 68 44 69 55 71 53 72Mityana n/a n/a 38 56 40 62 43 64Mpigi 50 69 50 69 56 66 57 65Mubende 49 68 46 71 61 75 60 73Mukono 39 58 41 58 51 57 48 59Nakaseke n/a n/a 50 62 62 70 58 62Nakasongola 39 50 41 47 40 46 41 48Rakai 40 66 41 64 47 64 45 65Ssembabule 40 73 31 74 50 77 46 72Wakiso 33 46 40 44 39 44 34 44EasternAmuria n/a n/a 54 81 68 86 67 98Budaka n/a n/a 61 84 69 85 72 87Bududa n/a n/a 59 93 71 107 60 93Bugiri 57 82 52 78 57 79 61 75Bukedea n/a n/a 53 84 62 85 68 86Bukwo n/a n/a 42 69 56 79 53 79Busia 49 72 49 72 59 73 65 80Butaleja n/a n/a 65 103 81 105 83 106Iganga 59 98 54 90 62 91 63 85Jinja 43 64 42 64 49 64 47 63Kaberamaido 57 76 57 71 74 74 84 83Kaliro n/a n/a 50 87 64 90 65 93Kamuli 65 93 55 91 66 93 67 88Kapchorwa 38 64 35 57 42 62 40 65Katakwi 53 84 52 76 61 78 65 77Kumi 52 81 52 79 64 83 65 84Manafwa n/a n/a 49 95 59 101 59 101Mayuge 55 104 58 96 64 90 71 95Mbale 50 90 45 77 52 67 54 79Namutumba n/a n/a 58 105 80 128 77 118Pallisa 61 93 59 88 69 87 70 93Sironko 51 72 48 73 53 82 59 88Soroti 51 72 54 77 67 86 63 77Tororo 59 90 59 86 68 87 70 86 114
    • Table 2.2 C (cont’d): Primary education quality enhancement indicators by district, 2005 – 2008 2005 2006 2007 2008 Pupil Pupil Pupil Pupil Pupil Pupil Pupil PupilDistrict Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio RatioNorthernAbim n/a n/a 55 76 76 78 53 81Adjumani 43 57 48 57 63 58 66 53Amolatar n/a n/a 63 90 72 92 69 93Amuru n/a n/a 70 107 88 104 87 91Apac 62 102 58 96 70 98 70 91Arua 59 117 59 115 75 114 78 118Dokolo n/a n/a 59 88 69 91 80 95Gulu 67 94 55 81 75 83 68 76Kaabong n/a n/a 90 99 130 111 127 115Kitgum 85 98 91 106 94 98 86 88Koboko n/a n/a 61 141 76 146 90 146Kotido 56 70 59 72 107 77 103 76Lira 62 88 65 85 73 82 70 88Maracha/Terego n/a n/a 59 130 75 144 77 145Moroto 46 53 51 52 54 48 67 54Moyo 54 66 47 61 63 62 73 60Nakapiripirit 62 72 83 78 88 67 93 66Nebbi 65 92 63 93 80 98 81 98Oyam n/a n/a 70 134 78 139 79 129Pader 90 137 88 156 114 149 98 129Yumbe 51 102 49 96 68 98 52 74WesternBuliisa n/a n/a 74 99 85 109 75 98Bundibugyo 50 75 47 74 48 62 58 62Bushenyi 45 59 45 56 48 51 46 50Hoima 49 67 46 68 63 69 55 68Ibanda n/a n/a 41 67 40 57 42 59Isingiro n/a n/a 40 61 49 65 49 61Kabale 39 59 37 56 43 56 44 54Kabarole 51 78 49 73 55 74 57 73Kamwenge 47 70 49 67 55 63 58 70Kanungu 46 57 43 59 46 53 51 56Kasese 44 84 43 76 51 74 46 66Kibaale 46 66 42 59 53 60 51 59Kiruhura n/a n/a 35 55 40 50 44 53Kisoro 48 54 45 55 54 55 59 61Kyenjojo 59 79 53 73 63 75 69 79Masindi 56 85 49 76 66 80 61 90Mbarara 41 61 35 50 39 42 40 42Ntungamo 49 63 44 60 48 53 46 53Rukungiri 41 52 41 50 39 45 40 46National 50 74 48 72 57 72 57 72Source: Ministry of Education and Sportsn/a-Not a separate district at that time and date, data included in mother district 115
    • Table 2.2 D: Primary school teachers by highest qualification and sex (2007 - 2008) 2007 2008 Male Female Total Male Female TotalPrimary 615 446 1061 432 311 743Primary +certificate/Diploma 3,366 2,905 6,271 2,842 2,555 5,397O level 23,434 15,450 38,884 20,506 13,627 34,133O level + certificate 53,773 36,277 90,050 47,095 31,409 78,504A level 4,605 1,557 6,162 2514 897 3,411A level + certificate 3,223 1,119 4,342 3,801 1,296 5,097Graduate 1,349 511 1,860 1,243 456 1,699Post Graduate diploma 98 73 171 61 27 88Masters Degree 52 28 80 43 22 65Doctorate 16 13 29 7 12 19Unknown 1,814 1,362 3,176 1,482 1,101 2,583Total 92,345 59,741 152,086 80,026 51,713 131,739Source: Ministry of Education and SportsTable 2.2 E: Secondary school enrolment by class (2004- 2008)CLASS/YEAR Sex 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008S1 Male 97,573 95,904 110,469 149,327 120,371 Female 82,494 82,902 98,392 128,623 104,541 Total 180,067 178,793 208,861 277,950 224,912S2 Male 85,421 89,033 96,168 106,114 116,451 Female 71,835 76,034 84,302 95,640 97,172 Total 157,256 165,081 180,470 201,754 213,623S3 Male 75,712 80,808 90,573 96,611 78,025 Female 64,549 67,428 77,669 83,775 69,092 Total 140,261 148,250 168,242 180,386 147,117S4 Male 67,125 72,690 79,016 88,139 72,270 Female 54,468 58,687 63,356 73,472 29,302 Total 121,593 131,266 142,372 161,611 131,572S5 Male 30,711 31,657 36,466 40,113 33,737 Female 21,879 21,816 25,600 29,114 23,482 Total 52,590 53,427 62,066 69,257 57,219S6 Male 27,110 30,722 31,024 36,950 31,781 Female 18,630 20,881 21,052 26,420 21,280 Total 45,740 51,576 52,076 63,370 53,061Total Male 383,652 400,758 443,716 517,254 452,636 Female 313,855 327,635 370,371 437,074 374,869 Grand Total 697,507 728,393 814,087 954,328 827,504Source: Ministry of Education and Sports 116
    • Table 2.2 F: Secondary education accessibility indicators by district (2006– 2007) 2006 2007 Gross Net Gross Net Gross Net Gross NetDistrict Intake Intake Enrolment Enrolment Intake Intake Rate Enrolment Enrolment RateCentralKalangala 8.4 2 9.7 7.7 10.5 2.3 11.1 9.2Kampala 27.8 9 31.9 26.6 32.9 11.6 35.6 29.4Kayunga 32.6 8 25.4 22.6 43 9.3 31.4 27.9Kiboga 24.6 5.5 17.8 15.9 32.9 5.5 20.4 17.8Lyantonde n/a n/a n/a n/a 30.4 4.6 20.3 17.9Luwero 41.3 10 40.1 32.5 50.1 12.1 45.9 38.1Masaka 27.0 5.7 24.4 21.4 34.2 7.3 27.3 24.1Mityana 26.8 3.8 24.9 20.9 34.8 6.1 29.9 25.0Mpigi 27.0 13.2 45.6 40.0 57.9 13.4 43.3 38.1Mubende 17.3 2.4 10.8 9.8 23.6 4.3 13.4 12.2Mukono 40.1 10.2 36.2 31.9 41.2 10.5 40.9 36.1Nakaseke 42.8 7.5 26.4 23.8 45.3 7.1 25.3 22.6Nakasongola 35.5 5.8 26.6 23.3 37.2 5.6 31.4 27.6Rakai 24.8 3.9 18.5 16.7 31.9 7.2 23.1 20.8Ssembabule 23.8 3.5 15.7 13.5 23.0 3.4 18.5 15.9Wakiso 40.1 14.1 42.7 36.3 51.6 17.0 55.2 46.5EasternBukwo 45.4 7.7 39.4 34.8 53.7 8.7 37.7 34.1Budaka n/a n/a n/a n/a 45.1 7.2 31.3 27.1Bududa n/a n/a n/a n/a 15.6 2.6 16.4 14.7Bugiri 30.2 3.7 18.0 15.9 29.6 3.6 18.9 17.1Bukedea n/a n/a n/a n/a 32.3 2.7 17.4 15.5Busia 41.9 5.0 30.0 25.4 50.5 4.7 33.9 27.8Butaleja 26.3 2.9 17.7 15.7 25.4 2.8 20.3 17.8Iganga 25.8 5.9 22.9 19.9 38.3 7.5 25.4 22.0Jinja 47.8 12.6 44.7 38.3 49.8 13.1 45.7 38.5Kaberamaido 17.8 2.2 12.4 10.2 36.3 2.9 13.6 12.5Kaliro n/a 5.5 28.9 24.6 39.5 6.6 27.9 24.1Kamuli 28.4 6.3 19.2 17.3 28.9 5.4 20.0 18.6Kapchorwa 37.8 7.5 29.6 24.2 51.5 8.0 34.6 29.3Katakwi 24.9 4.2 16.4 14.7 24.0 4.0 12.6 10.9Kumi 19.6 3.0 14.5 12.6 16.9 2.6 17.9 15.2Manafwa n/a 3.1 19.5 17.4 35.4 4.9 25.0 22.2Mayuge 17.4 2.9 12.1 10.6 23.9 3.1 13.5 11.7Mbale 42.9 7.4 44.3 35.1 43.0 7.4 48.6 39.2Namutumba 12.5 1.3 7.5 7.0 29.3 3.8 15.5 13.6Pallisa 34.0 8.3 25.8 22.6 21.5 6.5 18.4 16.0Sironko 30.4 4.4 18.7 16.4 32.7 4.4 18.4 16.0Soroti 24.8 2.7 20.8 17.1 36.0 3.6 23.9 19.4Tororo 29.1 5.2 25.5 19.0 40.7 5.9 31.4 24.9 117
    • Table 2.2 F(cont’d): Secondary education accessibility indicators by district (2006– 2007) 2006 2007 Gross Net Gross Net Gross Net Gross NetDistrict Intake Intake Enrolment Enrolment Intake Intake Enrolment Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate Rate RateNorthernAbim 27.4 2.1 13.8 9.9 26.5 2.0 18.2 14.1Adjumani 21.9 0.5 17.3 11.5 21.2 0.5 18.7 13.1Amolatar 15.2 1.0 12.5 11.8 26.9 1.2 14.2 13.3Apac 13.4 1.1 9.8 8.8 18.6 1.4 11.2 10.0Amuru 17.0 1.4 11.1 9.9 16.5 1.4 13.6 12.1Amuria 16.6 1.2 9.4 8.2 16.0 0.7 9.1 8.1Arua 30.8 4.5 27.0 21.3 48.3 5.8 30.0 24.2Dokolo 20.2 1.0 11.7 11.1 19.5 0.9 13.3 12.4Gulu 22.3 2.5 24.6 20.7 36.1 3.4 23.8 19.7Kaabong 3.4 0.0 1.7 1.4 3.3 n/a 3.0 2.6Kitgum 21.7 2.0 13.1 10.5 26.4 2.2 15.7 13.1Koboko 42.4 2.8 25.3 17.0 43.3 2.2 28.4 19.5Kotido 8.9 0.5 6.9 4.6 8.6 0.5 6.9 3.7Lira 22.0 4.3 16.9 14.7 27.7 3.1 17.8 15.1Maracha-Terego 17.6 1.2 13.9 11.4 29.8 2.1 18.6 15.2Moroto 7.2 0.5 6.8 5.3 6.9 0.4 6.9 5.3Moyo 20.3 0.7 17.0 11.1 25.8 1.2 17.2 12.4Nakapiripirit 5.4 0.2 3.2 2.3 5.4 0.0 3.5 2.5Nebbi 15.9 0.8 13.2 9.7 25.2 0.9 14.6 11.5Oyam 13.0 3.1 9.3 8.2 12.6 3.0 9.5 8.3Pader 14.0 0.8 8.0 6.8 14.8 0.4 8.3 7.0Yumbe 12.0 1.0 8.6 6.2 26.2 1.8 13.0 10.2WesternBulisa 28.6 6.2 9.6 8.7 27.7 6.0 11.2 10.3Bundibugyo 18.9 1.4 11.5 9.3 21.3 1.4 13.5 11.3Bushenyi 29.5 5.8 26.6 22.3 45.4 7.6 31.1 26.7Hoima 27.6 3.6 20.2 17.2 41.7 5.0 25.3 21.3Ibanda 33.7 6.2 25.3 22.8 44.5 4.6 30.5 26.9Isingiro 15.0 1.9 11.7 10.2 23.8 3.5 13.9 12.5Kabale 38.3 6.4 34.6 28.5 52.5 7.6 37.7 31.6Kabarole 31.5 5.4 23.2 20.1 38.8 5.2 26.3 22.8Kamwenge 20.0 2.1 12.4 10.7 22.2 2.2 15.6 13.0Kanungu 28.0 2.5 20.3 16.7 34.0 2.9 20.8 18.8Kasese 34.5 3.8 20.4 17.7 41.8 3.4 22.6 19.3Kiruhura 15.0 1.6 13.3 10.7 27.8 2.2 15.0 13.0Kibaale 23.8 3.1 15.9 14.0 35.4 4.4 18.5 16.3Kisoro 25.2 2.3 18.4 15.4 35.7 4.0 21.6 18.7Kyenjojo 14.0 1.1 9.6 8.0 16.5 1.6 11.0 9.6Masindi 21.9 2.9 17.2 14.0 29.0 3.6 17.9 14.4Mbarara 37.6 6.7 30.8 25.1 49.4 9.8 40.0 32.9Ntungamo 30.0 2.6 22.5 18.3 30.5 2.7 25.2 20.6Rukungiri 39.4 4.3 31.3 25.1 36.9 3.9 35.4 28.8National 26.9 4.9 22.1 18.6 33.4 5.6 25.0 21.3Source: Ministry of Education and Sports 118
    • Table 2.2 G: Secondary education quality enhancement indicators by district (2005- 2008) 2005 2006 2007 2008 Student Student Student Student Student Student Student StudentDistrict Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio RatioKalangala 16 45 11 44 43 29 20 32Kampala 20 54 20 50 28 43 20 42Kayunga 22 62 22 61 47 41 20 39Kiboga 17 36 17 35 36 28 18 34Luwero 19 50 20 52 35 35 20 34Lyantonde n/a n/a n/a n/a 84 39 19 44Masaka 21 51 19 46 33 32 21 33Mityana n/a n/a 20 53 34 33 18 40Mpigi 22 60 17 42 30 28 18 35Mubende 16 42 17 46 47 32 21 37Mukono 17 45 18 46 32 33 20 40Nakaseke n/a n/a 16 43 39 22 18 27Nakasongola 20 49 16 38 32 23 19 34Rakai 19 43 18 45 41 30 20 36Ssembabule 15 36 17 33 42 25 17 30Wakiso 19 47 17 43 30 36 18 36Amuria n/a n/a 25 60 39 30 19 30Budaka n/a n/a n/a n/a 44 42 23 43Bududa n/a n/a n/a n/a 64 32 25 46Bugiri 22 48 21 43 46 29 21 25Bukedea n/a n/a n/a n/a 43 32 24 34Bukwo n/a n/a 22 43 41 26 25 46Busia 24 55 23 59 51 44 26 48Butaleja n/a n/a 15 41 50 25 18 26Iganga 24 55 25 53 53 41 25 45Jinja 20 57 22 60 49 47 24 56Kaberamaido 16 44 17 46 35 21 16 27Kaliro n/a n/a 25 60 78 31 22 26Kamuli 22 51 24 60 55 39 26 40Kapchorwa 21 48 21 47 57 34 25 38Katakwi 24 51 26 56 52 15 15 40Kumi 20 57 18 53 56 38 24 44Manafwa n/a n/a 24 56 50 42 23 44Mayuge 21 57 18 46 51 30 23 37Mbale 20 59 19 73 30 44 20 46Namutumba n/a n/a 20 69 44 30 18 36Pallisa 22 60 25 62 52 30 21 35Sironko 18 55 18 48 33 28 18 27Soroti 21 58 19 49 53 36 23 35Tororo 20 54 21 59 40 35 22 38 119
    • Table 2.2 G (cont’d): Secondary education quality enhancement indicators by district, (2005- 2008) 2005 2006 2007 2008 Student Student Student Student Student Student Student StudentDistrict Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Teacher Classroom Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio Ratio RatioNorthernAbim n/a n/a 14 37 67 30 26 44Adjumani 19 47 22 45 63 39 22 31Amolatar n/a n/a 23 50 73 29 22 26Amuru n/a n/a 27 86 72 33 30 39Apac 19 56 20 56 40 35 22 30Arua 18 55 18 55 44 38 20 36Dokolo n/a n/a 18 58 46 32 21 25Gulu 22 59 25 60 56 33 22 36Kaabong n/a n/a 23 68 60 37 28 36Kitgum 24 53 20 60 41 48 32 61Koboko n/a n/a 17 67 59 38 20 111Kotido 25 67 37 103 66 108 61 39Lira 20 56 20 59 44 34 20 39Maracha/Terego n/a n/a 16 49 55 31 18 28Moroto 17 46 20 49 27 31 17 29Moyo 20 45 19 44 56 39 18 33Nakapiripirit 21 48 23 52 86 24 19 28Nebbi 17 46 17 46 38 34 19 34Oyam n/a n/a 21 72 61 31 23 37Pader 22 72 23 76 88 30 25 33Yumbe 15 48 13 50 48 32 15 35WesternBuliisa n/a n/a 23 45 28 30 25 33Bundibugyo n/a n/a 20 69 53 30 23 38Bushenyi 21 79 19 48 44 36 21 35Hoima 18 43 20 59 48 46 21 43Ibanda 19 57 17 42 45 39 20 37Isingiro n/a n/a 14 30 40 23 20 33 41Kabale n/a n/a 17 410 38 27 19 30Kabarole 18 41 18 45 40 35 21 36Kamwenge 19 49 16 38 40 27 16 26Kanungu 16 48 20 35 42 24 22 28Kasese 18 40 16 37 45 27 19 30Kibaale 17 41 18 40 38 28 20 33Kiruhura 19 42 16 38 29 20 17 24Kisoro n/a n/a 15 43 38 30 19 33Kyenjojo 17 37 18 44 42 31 20 34Masindi 16 43 19 42 59 31 18 38Mbarara 19 51 17 40 31 33 20 34Ntungamo 17 37 18 43 50 32 20 36Rukungiri 19 39 20 42 41 33 21 35National 19 49 19 48 39 34 21 36Source: Ministry of Education and Sports 120
    • Table 2.2 H: Secondary school teachers by highest qualification and sex (2006– 2008) 2006 2007 2008Qualification Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female TotalDoctorate 38 10 48 37 5 42 2 5 7Masters Degree 84 20 104 858 344 1202 239 116 355Post Graduate Diploma 250 57 307 1,384 363 1,747 361 121 482Graduate 2,032 662 2,694 10,315 3,420 13,735 6,604 2,257 8,861A’ Level + Cert./Dip. 3,318 801 4,119 13,741 3,779 17,520 8,099 2,241 10,340A’ Level 9,795 3,255 13,050 2,123 313 2,436 6,884 2,042 8,926O’ Level + Cert./Dip. 13,649 3,749 17,398 - - 6,651 1,873 8,524O’ Level 2,425 347 2,772 109 25 134 923 180 1,103Not stated 1,667 514 2,181 9,560 4,050 13,610 1,335 419 1,754Total 33,258 9,405 42,625 38,090 12,294 50,384 31,098 9,254 40,352Source: Ministry of Education and Sports 121
    • Table 2.2 I: Tertiary school enrolment by institution and gender, 2006 EnrollmentS/N Name of Institution Male Female TotalUniversities 1 Makerere University 17,197 13,884 31,081 2 Mbarara University of Science and Technology 1,130 660 1,790 3 Kyambogo University 6,233 4,333 10,566 4 Gulu University 1,304 533 1,837 5 Uganda Matyrs University Nkozi 1,597 960 2,557 6 Uganda Christian University 1,528 1,484 3,012 7 Islamic University in Uganda 1,492 976 2,468 8 Kampala International University 8,861 5,077 13,938 9 Aga Khan University Uganda 16 127 143 10 Bugema University 464 781 1,245 11 Nkumba University 2,095 2,358 4,453 12 Ndejje University 1,243 921 2,164 13 Busoga University 604 515 1,119 14 Kabale University 208 83 291 15 Kampala University 324 276 600 16 Kumi University 424 327 751 17 Mountains of the Moon University 157 137 294 18 Bishop Staurt University 785 621 1,406 19 Uganda Pentecostal University 140 59 199 20 Central Buganda University 110 77 187 21 Fairland University 375 446 821 22 Luwero University 25 22 47 23 Nile University 163 55 218 24 Namasagali University - - - 25 Makerere University Business School (MUK) 5,653 5,078 10,731 26 Bishop Barham University College (UCU) 379 308 687Colleges 1 National Teachers College Mubende 497 199 696 2 National Teachers College Kabale 1,435 697 2,132 3 National Teachers College-Kaliro 1,097 711 1,808 4 National Teachers College Nagongera 646 360 1,006 5 National Teachers College Muni 429 111 540 6 National Teachers College Unyama 687 214 901 7 Nkozi Teachers College 663 559 1,222 8 Ngetta Teachers College (Study Centre for UMU) 1,500 547 2,047 9 Masindi Teachers College 362 283 645Technical Colleges 1 Uganda Technical College Bushenyi 343 41 384 2 Uganda Technical College Elgon 527 22 549 3 Uganda Technical College Kicwamba 240 19 259 4 Uganda Technical College Lira 275 9 284 5 Uganda Technical Collegeg Masaka 364 33 397 6 Kitabi Community Polytechnic-Instructors College 99 8 107 122
    • Table 2.2 I (cont’d): Tertiary school enrolment by institution and gender, 2006 Enrolment Name of Institution Male Female TotalHealth Colleges 1 Butabika Sch. Of Psychiatric Nursing 181 155 336 2 Butabika School of Psychiatric Clinical Officers 24 4 28 3 Health Tutors College Mulago 23 17 40 4 Ernest Cook Ultra Sound Research Education Institute 38 29 67 5 Chemiquip International school for Labaratory training 94 45 139 6 School of Clinical Officers-Mbale 192 97 289 7 Soroti School of Comprehensive Nursing 77 57 134 8 Ophathalmic Clinical Officers Training School 11 3 14 9 Medical Labaratory Technicians School, Jinja 123 30 153 10 Machsu School of Clinical 108 50 158 11 International Institute of Health science 57 92 149 12 Kabale Institute of Health sciences 46 25 71 13 Paramedical School Mulago 771 317 1,088 14 School of Clinical Officers-Gulu 150 35 185 15 School of Hygiene Mbale 213 68 281Management/Social Dev Institutions 1 Uganda Management Institute 504 446 950 2 Management Training and Advisory Centre 75 44 119 3 Centre for Procurement Management 180 150 330 4 Nile Institute of Management Studies Arua 176 253 429 5 Rukungiri Institute of Management 15 60 75 6 Institute of Advanced Leadership 73 115 188 7 Institute of Management Science and Technology 139 165 304 8 Nsamizi Training Institute of Social Devt 838 923 1,761Commerce/Business Colleges 1 Uganda College of Commerce Aduku 373 295 668 2 Uganda College of Commerce Kabale 605 385 990 3 Uganda College of Commerce Pakwach 349 167 516 4 Uganda College of Commerce Soroti 308 232 540 5 Uganda College of Commerce Tororo 487 589 1,076 6 African College of Commerce 148 314 462 7 Aptech Computer Education Centre 322 173 495 8 Buganda Royal Institute of Business and Technical Education 624 400 1,024 9 Bridge Tutorial College 26 106 132 10 Bethel Training Institute 160 221 381 11 College of Business and Management Studies 29 21 50 12 College of Business Studies Uganda 12 48 60 13 Celak Vocational College 114 93 207 14 Fortportal Institute of Commerce 23 47 70 15 Higher Learning Institute of Business Masaka 23 54 77 16 Institute of Accountancy and Commerce 99 160 259 17 International College of Business and Computer Science 50 10 60 18 International Institute of Education Katwe 185 135 320 19 Institute of Accountants and Commerce 95 156 251 20 Kampala College of Business 49 58 107 21 Kabarole College of Commerce 21 43 64 123
    • Table 2.2 I (cont’d): Tertiary school enrolment by institution and gender, 2006 Enrolment Name of Institution Male Female Total 22 Kampala College of Commerce and Advanced Studies 40 37 77 23 Kyotera College of Business Studies 17 65 82 24 Light Bureau of Accountany College 98 112 210 25 Mbarara Business Institute 18 37 55 26 Mult- Tech Management Accountancy Programme 1,066 534 1,600 27 Management and Accontancy Training Company Limited 495 326 821 28 Makerere Business Institute 285 362 647 29 Makerere College of Business and Computer Studies Rukungiri 61 95 156 30 Maganjo Institute of Career Education 290 198 488 31 Mbarara Institute for Social Development 101 62 163 Makerere International Institute of Environmental Development and 32 Practical Skills 867 453 1,320 33 Makerere Institute for Social Development 495 716 1,211 34 Nile Management Training Centre 12 18 30 35 Team Business College 464 192 656 36 The College of Business Studies 21 70 91 37 Nyamitanga College of Business Studies 22 278 300 38 Tropical College of Commerce and Computer Studies 40 79 119 39 Nakawa Institute of Business Studies 153 166 319 40 Skills Resource Centre 11 16 27 41 Nkokonjeru Institute of Management and Technology 88 18 106 42 Rwenzori College of Commerce 36 81 117 43 Royal Institute of Business and Technical Education 90 120 210 44 Rosa Mystica Institute of Business and Vocational Training Fortportal - 281 281 45 United College of Business Studies 12 86 98 46 Visions Institute of Public Relations and Management 75 42 117 47 YMCA College of Business Studies 75 368 443 48 Zenith Business College 315 313 628Agricultural & Forestry Colleges 1 Arapai Agricultural College 459 96 555 2 Bukalasa Agricultural College 192 43 235 3 Busitema National College of Agriculture Mech. (Now University) 473 34 507 4 Nyabyeya Forestry College Masindi 170 83 253 5 Fisheries Training College 76 25 101 6 National Meteorological Training School 15 24 39Law Centre 1 Law Development Centre 500 300 800Other Study centers 2 IACE Makerere University-Fortportal 73 42 115 3 St Paul Regional Study Center Arua (UCU) 343 146 489Source: Ministry of Education and Sports 124
    • 2.3 Labour force, Employment and EarningsTable 2.3 A: Percentage distribution of working population by status in employment 2002/03 2005/06*Status in employmentSelf employment in agriculture 62.6 69.7Self employment in non-agriculture 22.3 13.4Permanent employees 4.8 4.6Temporary employees 10.3 11.6Total 100 100Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.3 B: Percentage distribution of working population by industryIndustry 2002/03 2005/06Agriculture, forestry and fishing 65.5 73.3Sale, maintenance, repair of vehicles and personal goods 12.5 8.1Manufacturing 6.5 4.2Education 2.8 2.6Transport storage and communications 2.1 2.0Others 4.7 9.8Total 100 100Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.3 C: Percentage distribution of working population by occupationOccupation 2002/03 2005/06Agriculture and fishery workers 63.4 70.0Service workers and shop and market workers 15.7 9.3Elementary occupation 9.4 9.6Crafts and related workers 4.5 3.5Legislators, managers, professionals and associate professionals 3.6 3.6Plant and machinery operators 1.9 2.2Clerks 1.4 1.1Total 100 100Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 125
    • Table 2.3 D: Percentage distribution of jobs Advertised by major industrial divisions, 2003 – 2007Industry (ISIC Rev 3) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007Public Administration 54.6 80.4 54.6 66.9 50.2Extra Territorial Organizations (International organizations) 5.7 2.8 14.2Manufacturing 1.5 1.0 5.2 2.9 7.4Other Community, Social and Personal Services 32.9 0 6.7 1.5 6.7Financial Intermediation 0.9 1.4 3.4 1.5 4.8Health and Social Work 0.4 3.5 4.7 7.6 4.5Education 5.6 2.6 7.6 2.7 3.2Real Estate, Renting and Business Activities 3.7 0.3 8 4 2.7Transport, Storage and Communication 0.3 10.4 0.8 1.7 1.3Electricity, gas and water 0.3 0.8Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 0 0.1 0.1 0.4 0.5Sales Maintenance and Repair 0 0.1 0.6 0.3 0.3Hotels and Restaurants 0 0.1 0.6 3.2 0.3Construction 0 0.1 0.3 0.7 0.3Mining and Quarrying 0 0.1 0 0.1 0.2Not stated na na 1.7 3.3 2.9Total 100 100 100 100 100Number of jobs advertisements’ 14,051 29,462 9,648 15,534 9,998Source: New vision, The Monitor, East African Newspapers and UBOSNote: A vacancy is entered only once even if it appears more than once in the same newspaper or different newspaper 126
    • Table 2.3 E: Percentage distribution of jobs advertised by occupation, 2003 – 2007Description 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007Primary and other education teaching associate professionals 43.1 36.7 26.8 22.2 13.0College, University, and higher education professionals 4.1 2.4 5.5 13.7 6.9 5Other professionals 6.6 14.3 12.5 10.1 18.2Nurses and Midwives (Associate Professionals) 5.3 5.8 7.1 4.6 2.8Secretaries and Keyboard Operating Clerks 9.5 5.7 1.4 4.3 3.1Health Professionals 2.7 3.0 4.6 3.9 3.9Protective Service Workers, Policemen, Prison Wardens, Securico 1.5 4.6 3.5 2.8 3.7Post Primary Education Teaching Associate Professionals 0.6 1.2 2.5 1.2Social Science and Related Professionals 5.2 4.6 6.6 1.8 8.9 6Other clerks 2.1 1.1 0.7 1.8 0.0Motor Vehicle Drivers 0.7 1.4 1.9 1.8 2.3Architects, Engineers, Cartographers, Surveyors, Town Planners 1.1 1.1 2.1 1.8 2.4Pharmaceutical Assistants, dispensers, medical assistants 1.6 1.4 2.6 1.8 0.0Messengers, Watchmen, potters 2.4 2.0 1.7 1.7 1.2Secondary Education Teaching Professionals 2.4 1.2 1.3 1.0 1.5Physical Science and Engineering Technicians 2.0 1.5 1.5 1.0 2.2 7Other associate professionals 11.6Others 9.1 13.2 19.0 22.5 17.1Not stated 0.8Total 100 100 100 100 100Number of job advertisements 14,051 29,462 9,648 15,535 9,998Source: New vision, The Monitor Newspapers and UBOSNote: A vacancy is entered only once even if it appears more than once in the same newspaper or different newspaper5 Includes accountants, business administration, mathematicians, statisticians, system designers, computer programmers,legal professionals, librarians, biologists, zoologists, etc.6 Includes cashiers, client information, numerical, material recording, tellers, recodes assistants clerks7 Includes finance and sales, social work, public and private administrative associate professionals 127
    • Table 2.3 F: Percentage distribution of monthly employment by selected manufacturing establishments, 2004 - 2008Activity 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Food processing 67.4 69.0 68.9 67.1 64.7Beverages and tobacco 5.6 5.4 5.6 5.9 6.1Textiles, cloth and foot wear 1.4 1.6 1.5 1.7 1.1Paper, publishing and printing 5.2 4.8 4.6 4.8 5.8Chemicals, paint, and soap 6.8 6.7 6.8 7.2 8.1Cement, clay and ceramic products 6.6 6.0 5.8 6.0 6.4Metal products 4.4 4.1 4.4 4.8 5.4 8Miscellaneous 2.6 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5Total 100 100 100 100 100Employment 29,885 31,787 32,238 32,743 32,125Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.3 G: Percentage distribution of monthly wage bill for selected manufacturing establishments, 2004 – 2008Activity 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Food processing 38.7 43.4 42.0 42.8 43.1Beverages and tobacco 20.2 20.8 17.0 23.9 23.2Textiles, cloth and foot wear 0.6 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.4Paper, publishing and printing 16.4 15.2 15.2 15.2 15.3Chemicals, paint, and soap 8.9 8.7 7.8 7.1 6.9Cement, clay and ceramic products 3.9 4.2 3.9 3.7 4.1Metal products 9.0 5.0 5.7 5.2 5.4Miscellaneous 2.1 2.1 1.8 1.6 1.5Total 100 100 100 100 100Wage bill 7,099 7,809 8,843 10,348 11,994Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.3 H: Average monthly employee earnings for selected manufacturing establishments, 2004 – 2008 (Shillings)Activity 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Beverages and tobacco 851,255 941,994 832,687 1,274,525 1,418,976Cement, clay and ceramic products 141,753 170,237 183,897 193,708 241,501Chemicals, paint, and soap 310,146 318,960 316,711 309,180 317,876Food processing 136,502 154,366 167,192 201,880 249,073Metal products 491,727 297,318 353,456 339,395 376,857Miscellaneous 196,134 218,253 210,925 213,714 225,292Paper, publishing and printing 747,838 777,042 902,947 991,199 983,814Textiles, cloth and foot wear 105,970 104,591 94,630 91,264 129,677Average monthly earnings 237,542 245,679 274,291 316,029 373,341Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics8 Miscellaneous includes manufacture of cables, furniture, mattresses as well as assembling bicycles 128
    • Table 2.3 I: Trends in the labour cost index in nominal and real terms, 2004- 2008 (2004 = 100)Activity 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008NominalFood processing 100 123.2 135.2 161.3 188.2Beverages and tobacco 100 113.2 104.5 171.9 193.8Textiles, cloth and foot wear 100 117.2 100.5 110.8 103.5Paper, publishing and printing 100 101.8 115.4 134.9 157.7Chemicals, paint, and soap 100 107.8 109.7 116.4 131.0Cement, clay and ceramic products 100 116.3 123.9 136.9 176.5Metal products 100 60.8 78.3 83.6 101.2Miscellaneous 100 108.4 106.1 111.8 119.3Total 100 110.0 124.6 145.8 168.9RealFood processing 100 113.4 116.0 130.5 136.0Beverages and tobacco 100 104.2 89.8 139.1 140.0Textiles, cloth and foot wear 100 107.9 86.3 89.7 74.8Paper, publishing and printing 100 93.7 99.1 109.2 113.9Chemicals, paint, and soap 100 99.2 94.1 94.2 94.6Cement, clay and ceramic products 100 107.0 106.4 110.8 127.5Metal products 100 56.0 67.2 67.7 73.1Miscellaneous 100 99.8 91.1 90.5 86.2Total 100 101.3 106.9 118.0 122.0 129
    • 2.4 Income and expenditureTable 2.4 A: Consumption expenditure per household, shs (1997/98=100) 2002/03 2005/06Residence Rural Urban Total Rural Urban TotalRegionKampala - 328,773 328,773 - 333,704 333,704Central* 151,526 248,962 165,916 168,688 276,635 183,112Eastern 103,933 184,014 112,084 120,176 212,255 129,099Northern 67,044 141,529 72,880 70,173 150,692 80,616Western 115,240 214,079 124,825 138,201 246,462 148,088Uganda 111,413 258,068 136,468 127,419 268,781 152,068Notes: * Estimates for Central region exclude KampalaSource: Uganda Bureau of Statistics.Table 2.4 B: Mean per capita consumption expenditure, shs (1997/98=100) 2002/03 2005/06Residence Rural Urban Total Rural Urban TotalRegionKampala - 88,152 88,152 - 78,798 78,798Central* 28,651 60,815 32,455 33,913 61,383 37,281Eastern 18,490 44,012 20,474 20,927 46,700 22,945Northern 13,199 27,472 14,332 13,722 26,337 15,525Western 22,024 46,106 24,119 25,454 55,369 27,732Uganda 20,929 62,605 26,663 23,930 58,768 29,280Notes: * Estimates for Central region exclude KampalaSource: Uganda Bureau of Statistics. 130
    • 2.5 Consumer pricesTable 2.5 A: Composite consumer price index, Uganda (base 2005/06=100) Rent H.hold Transport Health, Beverage Clothing Fuel and and enter All s and and foot and personal communic & Items Annual % Food tobacco wear utilities goods ation Education others Index changeWeights 27.2 4.7 4.4 14.8 4.5 12.8 14.7 16.8 100Calendar year2004 107.2 94.5 96.3 91.2 97.0 87.7 92.1 94.7 89.2 3.72005 99.8 98.7 98.0 97.9 98.1 95.1 97.5 98.3 96.9 8.62006 105.5 100.7 102.7 106.4 102.9 104.5 102.2 101.7 103.9 7.22007 108.2 103.3 107.3 124.1 109.2 111.1 107.1 106.3 110.2 6.12008 129.6 113.7 116.5 136.5 126.4 122.2 114.3 114.7 123.5 12.1Financial Year2003/04 111.6 92.1 98.4 89.9 95.9 86.8 86.7 89.6 86.9 5.02004/05 104.8 97.4 96.2 93.9 97.6 89.9 94.4 96.5 93.8 8.02005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 6.62006/07 107.9 101.1 104.5 117.1 105.5 107.7 104.3 104.6 107.5 7.52007/08 113.7 107.7 112.1 129.8 117.8 117.5 110.6 109.6 115.3 7.3Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.5 B: Composite CPI by major groups, Uganda (Base 2005/06=100) Annual Percentage Changes Electricity, All Food Fuel & All Items items Core Electricity, Crops Utilities Index index (EFU) Food Fuel & Core Crops Utilities (EFU)Weights 13.5 4.9 81.6 100.0Calendar year2006 104.7 112.9 103.2 103.92007 100.7 137.5 110.1 110.2 -3.8 21.7 6.6 6.12008 116.6 150.0 122.7 123.5 15.8 9.1 11.5 12.0Financial year2005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.02006/07 103.1 128.9 106.9 107.5 3.1 28.9 6.9 7.52007/08 103.5 144.0 115.4 115.3 0.4 11.6 8.0 7.3Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 131
    • Table 2.5 C: Consumer Price Index, Kampala High Income (Base: 2005/06 =100) Rent, H. hold Heath, Beverages Clothing All Annual Fuel and Transport and Edu- Entert. Food and and Items % and Personal Communication. cation & Tobacco Footwear Index change Utilities Goods OthersWeights 20.0 2.8 5.1 15.7 4.0 14.1 18.7 19.5 100.0Calendar year2006 105.0 100.0 102.5 107.0 101.5 103.8 101.5 101.0 103.32007 107.9 103.0 105.5 126.5 104.4 109.6 104.7 106.3 109.8 6.32008 126.5 115.9 112.5 137.3 116.6 122.9 108.5 118.5 121.3 10.5Financial year2005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.02006/07 107.9 100.3 103.6 118.7 102.1 105.6 102.8 103.2 106.7 6.72007/08 112.3 107.7 109.0 132.2 110.5 117.6 106.5 111.9 114.7 7.4Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.5 D: Consumer Price Index Kampala Middle & Low Income (Base: 2005/06 =100) Rent, H. hold Transport Beverages Clothing Heath, All Annual Fuel and and Food and and Education Entert.& Items % and Personal Commu- Tobacco Footwear Others Index change Utilities Goods nication.Weights 28.1 5.4 3.9 17.4 5.1 12.5 11.0 16.7 100.0 Calendar year2004 80.6 94.4 96.8 93.0 98.1 88.1 92.2 85.4 89.6 3.32005 94.4 98.9 98.0 98.6 98.3 94.8 97.2 95.8 96.9 8.22006 105.7 100.2 102.7 105.3 103.3 103.8 101.4 100.6 103.5 6.72007 107.6 102.3 106.8 119.6 109.4 110.2 104.3 105.2 109.0 5.42008 129.1 113.0 120.1 129.8 128.6 122.2 109.0 111.2 121.9 11.8 Financial year2002/03 70.3 87.8 97.8 88.8 91.3 82.8 86.3 76.5 83.6 4.72003/04 76.3 91.8 98.4 92.1 96.6 87.3 90.2 81.9 87.4 4.52004/05 90.1 97.5 96.4 95.3 98.7 89.8 94.5 92.4 93.9 7.42005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 6.52006/07 107.7 100.3 104.3 113.9 106.0 106.5 102.8 103.2 106.7 6.72007/08 113.6 107.6 113.0 123.9 118.9 116.6 106.5 106.8 113.8 6.7Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 132
    • Table 2.5 E: Consumer Price Index, Jinja (Base: 2005/06 =100) Rent, H.hold Heath, Beverages Clothing All Annual Fuel and Transport and entert. Food and and Education items % and personal communication. & tobacco footwear index change utilities goods OthersWeights 33.0 3.3 4.0 10.6 4.9 13.7 15.1 15.4 100.0 Calendar year2004 83.7 92.5 98.2 86.0 98.4 87.8 94.5 97.5 91.2 3.82005 96.5 95.9 98.7 96.7 99.2 95.2 98.3 97.4 97.1 6.42006 106.6 101.7 103.3 108.4 102.2 106.7 102.9 103.2 105.2 8.42007 109.1 103.2 113.7 127.9 111.9 111.5 114.1 108.7 112.2 6.72008 137.3 116.4 122.5 139.6 136.8 117.1 131.3 112.1 128.7 14.7 Financial year2003/04 75.9 93.6 102.1 86.2 97.2 88.9 94.7 96.2 88.8 4.52004/05 95.2 98.8 97.4 89.1 98.6 90.0 95.6 98.1 95.2 7.32005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 5.02006/07 108.2 102.2 108.0 121.7 106.3 110.5 107.1 106.8 109.2 9.22007/08 118.3 107.0 119.4 131.4 124.4 114.9 123.0 108.9 118.4 8.4Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.5 F: Consumer Price Index, Mbale (Base: 2005/06 =100) Rent, H.hold Beverages Clothing Heath, All Annual Fuel and Transport and Food and and Education entert.& items % and personal communication. tobacco footwear Others index change utilities goodsWeights 30.3 4.5 3.7 15.4 4.8 13.1 13.1 15.0 100.0 Calendar year2004 89.4 96.2 94.8 91.2 97.1 85.2 91.6 94.3 91.8 4.92005 98.2 97.5 98.2 98.1 98.5 94.7 101.7 96.7 97.3 6.02006 108.9 102.7 101.4 107.7 106.3 103.7 103.0 103.3 105.8 8.72007 114.2 104.0 106.3 124.5 115.8 106.1 113.3 107.4 112.9 6.82008 138.7 112.0 112.2 135.4 133.6 113.5 118.9 112.3 125.9 11.5 Financial year2003/04 81.3 95.6 96.0 90.5 96.2 84.1 90.9 93.7 89.5 6.32004/05 102.2 97.8 95.8 93.1 98.6 87.6 98.2 95.0 95.7 6.92005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 4.52006/07 111.1 102.5 102.4 119.4 112.8 105.3 109.0 105.3 109.9 9.82007/08 122.9 107.6 111.5 129.5 124.6 110.1 116.5 108.6 118.2 7.7Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 133
    • Table 2.5 G: Consumer Price Index, Masaka (Base: 2005/06 =100) Rent, H. hold Heath Beverages Clothing All Annual Fuel and Transport and ,entert. Food and and Education items % and personal communication. & tobacco footwear index change utilities goods OthersWeights 28.0 5.6 4.6 10.6 4.0 14.5 15.3 17.3 100.0 Calendar year2004 102.4 95.3 96.2 91.0 93.3 91.2 96.6 70.3 86.1 4.02005 98.0 99.2 97.7 98.5 96.3 95.9 97.7 95.2 96.6 12.32006 104.8 100.0 102.8 107.9 102.2 106.1 102.9 102.4 104.1 7.82007 103.3 103.7 106.3 132.1 109.4 111.0 113.8 104.2 109.7 5.32008 121.4 111.0 110.3 152.2 127.0 121.2 123.6 118.1 123.6 12.7 Financial year2002/03 89.8 87.6 96.2 80.1 88.8 81.1 88.2 67.3 78.9 8.32003/04 100.0 91.7 98.1 87.7 92.9 88.1 94.1 66.9 83.3 5.62004/05 101.3 98.8 96.2 95.5 93.9 92.8 96.0 81.6 92.3 10.92005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 8.32006/07 105.7 100.2 104.2 122.8 104.3 109.0 107.5 103.9 107.5 7.52007/08 105.4 107.8 108.5 140.4 118.4 117.0 119.5 109.5 114.5 6.5Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.5 H: Consumer Price Index, Mbarara (Base: 2005/06 =100) Rent, H. hold Beverages Clothing Fuel and Heath, All Annual and and and personal Transport and entert.& items % Food tobacco footwear utilities goods communication. Education Others index changeWeights 28.4 5.5 4.6 11.8 3.6 13.2 17.1 15.8 100Calendar year2004 67.7 95.4 98.3 87.5 93.5 83.6 87.2 98.6 85.7 0.82005 91.4 99.8 98.7 95.8 94.6 95.5 96.2 99.8 95.9 11.92006 106.1 100.2 103.3 107.5 104.5 106.6 103.1 104.2 105 9.52007 106.7 103.2 108.7 126.8 114.8 115.9 107.6 108.6 110.9 5.72008 123.8 108.4 118.7 142.7 132.8 121.2 117.1 115.8 122.5 10.4Financial year2003/04 66.9 93.6 100.8 85.7 93.4 83.6 84.4 96.5 84.3 4.12004/05 83.0 98.4 97.6 90.9 93.7 88.4 91.2 100.1 91.9 8.92005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 8.92006/07 108.4 100.4 105.5 119.9 109.0 113.4 105.1 107.0 109.1 9.12007/08 108.2 106.7 114.0 133.3 123.7 119.0 112.2 112.4 114.7 5.2Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 134
    • Table 2.5 I: Consumer Price Index, Gulu (Base: 2005/06 =100) All Rent, H. hold Transport item Annual Beverages Clothing Fuel and and Heath, s % and and and personal communic Educatio entert.& inde chang Food tobacco footwear utilities goods ation. n Others x eWeights 38 8.5 3.7 15.7 4.7 6 12.6 10.8 100Calendar year 2004 82.8 89.9 95.8 88.6 95.6 87.8 89.3 93.1 89.5 7.4 2005 96.2 95.4 99.0 96.8 97.3 96.4 95.3 96.6 96.5 7.8 2006 105.3 102.8 103.0 103.2 104.0 102.7 104.8 103.7 104.2 8 2007 111.5 106.4 107.0 119.8 113.2 110.9 111.1 107.7 111.8 7.3 2008 139.2 115.1 115.2 138.9 135.3 123.8 120.4 115.1 130.1 16.4Financial year2003/04 73.2 88.5 96.8 85.5 95.2 85.7 88.2 92.2 85.9 82004/05 93.2 92.6 97.1 92.3 96.3 91.7 90.9 95.3 94 9.42005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 6.42006/07 108.7 103.9 104.7 109.9 107.0 106.4 108.8 105.4 107.8 7.82007/08 119.3 108.3 111.6 131.3 125.3 118.6 114.7 111.0 118.7 10.2Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 2.5 J: Consumer Price Index, Arua (Base: 2005/06 =100) Rent, H.hold Heath, Beverages Clothing Transport All Annual Fuel and entert. Food and and and Education items % and personal & tobacco footwear communication. index change utilities goods OthersWeights 41.6 9.3 5.4 11.8 5.6 7.6 6.5 12.3 100.0 Calendar year2006 102.6 104.6 103.4 102.0 102.2 104.7 101.6 105.0 103.12007 112.2 109.8 113.1 114.5 107.2 121.8 105.6 104.3 111.3 8.22008 147.5 118.7 123.3 125.3 125.7 141.3 126.9 107.9 133.0 19.5 Financial year2005/06 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.02006/07 105.5 107.3 107.6 106.3 104.2 112.5 103.3 103.4 105.7 6.22007/08 126.3 113.0 119.6 119.8 116.4 133.6 114.3 104.1 120.4 13.4Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 135
    • Table 2.5 K: Average market prices for selected goods in Kampala Middle and Low Income, 2004 - 2008 (prices in shillings per unit indicated) Meat Cooking Washing Year Quarter Sugar Milk Bread Salt Charcoal Paraffin (beef) oil Soap Kg Liter Kg 500gm 500gm Kg liter 300 ml Kg 2004 1st 1,378 875 2,483 742 219 216 1,280 728 1,269 2nd 1,350 800 2,494 766 225 215 1,350 761 1,377 3rd 1,344 1,042 2,689 808 219 199 1,260 756 1,382 4th 1,283 919 2,811 791 208 210 1,377 761 1,325 2005 1st 1,272 1,000 2,733 799 203 233 1,397 744 1,333 2nd 1,453 1,000 2,772 837 203 229 1,567 750 1,329 3rd 1,611 1,081 2,783 847 200 226 1,600 767 1,295 4th 1,522 1,022 2,794 810 211 237 1,690 756 1,284 2006 1st 1,528 1,181 2,844 799 225 240 1,690 744 1,264 2nd 1,661 1,000 2,806 798 219 210 1,789 744 1,228 3rd 1,608 1,126 2,889 867 219 256 1,843 739 1,278 4th 2,192 1,000 2,956 926 201 253 1,747 744 1,464 2007 1st 1,922 1,000 2,978 961 233 299 1,660 789 1,476 2nd 1,942 1,200 2,961 1,001 250 293 1,661 789 1,513 3rd 1,806 1,246 2,978 989 276 293 1,623 861 1,673 4th 1,753 1,283 3,389 1,101 358 349 1,816 933 1,751 2008 1st 1,586 1,364 3,667 1,213 450 350 1,937 1,167 2,030 2nd 1,561 1,311 4,106 1,219 503 300 2,145 1,384 2,295 3rd 1,617 1,329 4,208 1,236 475 347 2,354 1,331 2,255 4th 1,663 1,350 4,563 1,254 468 365 2,263 1,301 2,201Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 136
    • Table 2.5 K (cont): Average market prices for selected goods in Kampala Middle and Low Income Centre, 2004 - 2008 (prices in shs. per unit indicated) Year Quarter Bananas Maize Gnuts Rice Dried Tomatoes Onions Cabbages Pineapples Oranges (Matooke) meal beans Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg Kg 2004 1st 167 744 1,592 1,078 711 488 742 313 318 505 2nd 175 750 1,617 1,200 783 475 848 306 381 518 3rd 171 744 1,628 1,161 853 675 1,126 358 366 518 4th 297 783 1,778 1,239 856 525 1,068 297 411 487 2005 1st 252 761 1,756 1,294 856 658 803 305 379 550 2nd 286 750 1,767 1,306 931 686 896 318 420 571 3rd 272 767 1,706 1,256 833 534 822 295 431 520 4th 337 778 1,606 1,222 761 614 843 321 575 571 2006 1st 286 783 1,844 1,280 1,039 876 1,166 428 439 922 2nd 333 931 2,178 1,533 1,228 559 1,459 277 484 658 3rd 297 872 1,828 1,486 889 579 965 274 498 583 4th 377 858 1,950 1,483 992 646 1,093 336 504 602 2007 1st 300 886 2,050 1,539 1,081 704 1,166 351 423 665 2nd 277 878 2,086 1,550 1,292 889 1,253 389 501 636 3rd 196 856 2,039 1,458 1,208 656 995 320 398 665 4th 266 831 2,161 1,417 1,361 853 1,148 301 631 625 2008 1st 242 869 2,167 1,519 1,411 736 1,145 300 475 788 2nd 235 1,078 2,300 1,942 1,683 1,019 1,339 377 550 792 3rd 237 1,267 2,603 2,019 1,669 1,224 1,201 416 545 774 4th 356 1,365 2,693 2,047 1,642 1,117 1,458 398 626 659Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 137
    • 2.6 Public healthTable 2.6 A: Number of Health Units by District 2006 2007Region/ District Hospital Health Centre Health CentreCentral Kalangala 0 11 11 Kampala 12 264 200 Kayunga 1 22 21 Kiboga 1 38 37 Luwero 1 54 57 Lyantonde 1 9 9 Masaka 3 77 80 Mityana 1 44 48 Mpigi 2 59 62 Mubende 1 45 51 Mukono 5 69 73 Nakaseke 2 18 19 Nakasongola 1 30 28 Rakai 2 85 65 Sembabule 0 24 21 Wakiso 4 94 95Eastern Amuria 0 32 17 Budaka 0 14 15 Bududa 1 11 12 Bugiri 1 66 66 Bukedea 0 11 11 Bukwa 0 11 10 Busia 1 23 20 Butaleja 1 19 17 Iganga 1 69 79 Jinja 3 66 66 Kaberamaido 1 18 16 Kaliro 0 16 17 Kamuli 2 68 61 Kapchorwa 1 29 29 Katakwi 0 18 13 Kumi 3 23 23 Manafwa 1 9 21 Mayuge 1 28 31 Mbale 1 22 32 Namutumba 1 30 33 Pallisa 2 37 40 Sironko 0 37 36 Soroti 1 43 47 Tororo 3 60 53 138
    • Table 2.6 A (cont’d): Number of Health Units by District 2006 2007Region/ District Hospital Health Centre Health CentreNorthern Abim 1 10 10 Adjumani 1 32 35 Amolatar 1 10 9 Amuru 1 27 24 Apac 1 36 37 Arua 2 40 38 Dokolo 0 12 10 Gulu 4 29 44 Kaabong 1 25 25 Kitgum 2 33 24 Koboko 0 9 8 Kotido 0 9 17 Lira 2 46 37 Moroto 2 15 16 Moyo 1 36 36 Nakapiripirit 1 17 9 +Nebbi 3 54 54 Nyadri 2 26 25 Oyam 1 14 15 Pader 1 34 39 Yumbe 1 21 14Western Bulisa 0 8 6 Bundibugyo 1 27 29 Bushenyi 3 101 84 Hoima 1 49 50 Ibanda 1 34 35 Isingiro 0 52 49 Kabale 1 83 97 Kabarole 3 51 50 Kamwenge 0 29 27 Kanungu 1 45 35 Kasese 3 94 78 Kibaale 1 45 44 Kiruhura 1 7 29 Kisoro 2 30 30 Kyenjojo 0 40 38 Masindi 2 49 48 Mbarara 1 48 53 Ntungamo 1 35 35 Rukungiri 2 58 60Uganda 114 3123 3045Note: Health Centre includes Health Centre II, III, & IVSource: Health Facilities Inventory, Ministry of Health 139
    • Table 2.6 B: Countrywide routine immunization rates for BCG, 2004-2008Region/ District 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Central Kalangala 82 76 125 82 70 Kampala 109 128 103 127 145 Kayunga 144 112 101 96 76 Kiboga 91 75 91 97 86 Luwero 65 68 61 65 50 Lyantonde 121 124 Masaka 92 90 141 89 73 Mityana 51 91 100 Mpigi 103 95 85 44 90 Mubende 84 70 68 86 75 Mukono 105 116 98 101 85 Nakaseke 90 87 75 Nakasongola 110 101 84 79 85 Rakai 103 94 68 84 75 Sembabule 104 97 97 91 74 Wakiso 69 81 80 88 80Eastern Amuria n.a n.a 85 82 61 Budaka n.a n.a n.a 76 99 Bududa n.a n.a n.a 138 132 Bugiri 160 137 105 64 87 Bukedea n.a n.a n.a 105 101 Bukwa n.a n.a 93 114 93 Busia 131 80 84 78 108 Butaleja 144 133 126 Iganga 119 101 95 89 97 Jinja 87 90 99 94 75 Kaberamaido 144 118 65 81 75 Kaliro 101 98 92 Kamuli 124 97 97 108 94 Kapchorwa 79 67 76 50 84 Katakwi 74 64 88 42 83 Kumi 117 113 73 97 85 Manafwa 77 125 134 Mayuge 118 139 91 105 91 Mbale 135 127 124 107 114 Namutumba n.a n.a n.a 132 121 Pallis 114 88 80 84 122 Sironko 129 86 117 105 73 Soroti 120 123 73 148 78 Tororo 111 99 109 96 85 140
    • Table 2.6 B (cont’d): Countrywide routine immunization rates for BCG, 2004-2008Region/ District 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Northern Abim 108 106 Adjumani 62 55 50 39 26 Amolatar 133 113 129 Amuru 85 91 Apac 147 120 84 82 83 Arua 98 85 59 57 43 Dokolo 110 96 Gulu 130 117 96 123 101 Kaabong 22 34 37 Kitgum 66 68 76 84 72 Koboko 59 83 90 Kotido 42 32 69 86 64 Lira 101 122 126 104 129 Moroto 88 65 52 60 40 Moyo 75 61 40 33 35 Nakapiripirit 73 63 62 65 24 Nebbi 125 117 121 115 116 Nyadri 63 0 Oyam 102 157 Pader 88 73 63 67 69 Yumbe 69 58 48 53 49Western Bulisa 88 114 Bundibugyo 109 102 89 77 78 Bushenyi 102 98 76 88 96 Hoima 91 77 70 65 58 Ibanda 84 118 81 Isingiro 106 110 115 Kabale 80 81 85 73 76 Kabarole 118 106 84 78 72 Kamwenge 80 85 77 96 112 Kanungu 109 108 100 153 75 Kasese 62 72 95 80 72 Kibaale 88 78 80 73 59 Kiruhura 42 70 100 Kisoro 77 85 70 152 76 Kyenjojo 98 81 78 73 57 Masindi 83 80 46 76 66 Mbarara 100 86 80 104 81 Ntungamo 111 122 82 105 93 Rukungiri 92 83 95 76 97Uganda 101 94 85 90 86Note: The National Percentage may differ from the one derived from district percentages becucase of cross boundaryimmunisation.Source: Uganda National Expanded Programme for Immunisation (UNEPI) 141
    • Table 2.6 C: Countrywide routine immunization rates for measles, 2004-2008Region/ District 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Central Kalangala 90 78 71 86 74 Kampala 87 100 109 135 134 Kayunga 104 81 80 79 72 Kiboga 57 55 68 81 67 Luwero 67 66 56 72 49 Lyantonde 108 100 Masaka 79 76 126 85 66 Mityana 56 68 86 Mpigi 99 88 81 50 90 Mubende 74 61 62 75 63 Mukono 90 103 95 102 74 Nakaseke 75 64 50 Nakasongola 96 93 140 76 73 Rakai 77 75 97 81 62 Sembabule 81 77 71 84 67 Wakiso 79 103 103 114 95Eastern Amuria 89 85 57 Budaka 85 85 Bududa 216 194 Bugiri 156 139 173 67 63 Bukedea 219 233 Bukwa 292 135 89 Busia 112 82 71 65 79 Butaleja 133 118 124 Iganga 82 76 65 71 64 Jinja 78 90 95 72 72 Kaberamaido 88 85 49 73 60 Kaliro 63 115 60 Kamuli 88 78 69 90 68 Kapchorwa 81 56 110 78 57 Katakwi 70 73 136 47 88 Kumi 163 167 100 184 96 Manafwa 108 97 132 Mayuge 88 125 88 85 64 Mbale 164 154 138 114 105 Namutumba 96 86 Pallisa 97 88 104 61 98 Sironko 153 97 122 140 95 Soroti 94 94 58 72 57 Tororo 95 96 151 88 74 142
    • Table 2.6 C (cont’d): Countrywide routine immunization rates for measles, 2004-2008Region/ District 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Northern Abim 169 144 Adjumani 71 56 53 44 23 Amolatar 96 94 115 Amuru 92 87 Apac 161 104 63 67 56 Arua 77 72 50 50 85 Dokolo 109 81 Gulu 128 99 105 126 111 Kaabong 30 124 61 Kitgum 65 69 92 91 79 Koboko 43 110 81 Kotido 54 65 458 102 68 Lira 82 100 116 95 84 Moroto 101 103 42 76 52 Moyo 63 58 38 38 36 Nakapiripirit 69 69 49 57 23 Nebbi 94 78 86 88 77 Nyadri 55 0 Oyam 72 105 Pader 93 104 82 90 85 Yumbe 61 55 39 58 44Western Bulisa 62 116 Bundibugyo 84 77 69 71 66 Bushenyi 97 95 80 82 85 Hoima 71 71 57 62 48 Ibanda 66 90 62 Isingiro 103 102 101 Kabale 88 84 86 78 71 Kabarole 94 92 76 64 61 Kamwenge 64 70 68 79 100 Kanungu 99 92 298 96 89 Kasese 71 68 94 78 71 Kibaale 74 67 74 57 47 Kiruhura 36 60 80 Kisoro 94 82 74 79 69 Kyenjojo 86 70 81 73 47 Masindi 60 59 33 57 48 Mbarara 84 64 69 78 61 Ntungamo 81 90 75 88 77 Rukungiri 88 71 82 61 86Uganda 91 87 89 87 77Note: The National Percentage may differ from the one derived from district percentages becucase of cross boundaryimmunisation.Source: Uganda National Expanded Programme for Immunisation (UNEPI) 143
    • Table 2.6 D: Countrywide routine immunization rates for OPV3, 2004-2008Region/ District 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Central Kalangala 97 85 85 97 79 Kampala 78 96 85 110 125 Kayunga 97 81 82 83 82 Kiboga 67 63 79 94 76 Luwero 62 66 55 66 48 Lyantonde 96 94 Masaka 80 79 123 82 66 Mityana 54 84 100 Mpigi 97 94 93 56 103 Mubende 80 72 63 86 69 Mukono 87 104 88 89 75 Nakaseke 66 63 47 Nakasongola 104 99 77 84 80 Rakai 94 83 56 76 67 Sembabule 74 77 73 84 67 Wakiso 74 91 93 102 88Eastern Amuria 94 97 60 Budaka 83 88 Bududa 171 163 Bugiri 128 133 109 49 59 Bukedea 131 129 Bukwa 62 96 88 Busia 103 68 69 68 75 Butaleja 92 107 97 Iganga 82 76 70 70 65 Jinja 83 94 99 93 81 Kaberamaido 92 98 52 81 62 Kaliro 62 65 67 Kamuli 88 72 74 93 68 Kapchorwa 61 50 112 64 64 Katakwi 70 67 109 52 94 Kumi 132 134 83 115 182 Manafwa 78 135 143 Mayuge 89 108 90 95 65 Mbale 136 113 111 92 85 Namutumba 99 92 Pallisa 93 77 71 72 94 Sironko 119 89 124 123 87 Soroti 102 112 71 83 55 Tororo 85 87 100 92 81 144
    • Table 2.6 D (cont’d): Countrywide routine immunization rates for OPV3, 2004-2008Region/ District 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Northern Abim 162 139 Adjumani 73 67 61 51 28 Amolatar 121 111 135 Amuru 87 87 Apac 102 84 61 65 61 Arua 80 72 55 61 31 Dokolo 95 79 Gulu 109 97 91 108 96 Kaabong 36 64 49 Kitgum 65 79 92 91 77 Koboko 50 99 105 Kotido 61 49 83 113 86 Lira 66 74 101 84 89 Moroto 89 78 55 73 52 Moyo 76 63 44 40 38 Nakapiripirit 54 67 53 58 29 Nebbi 92 86 95 98 91 Nyadri 54 0 Oyam 85 101 Pader 86 82 78 78 79 Yumbe 68 62 48 63 50Western Bulisa 66 90 Bundibugyo 91 93 84 82 62 Bushenyi 108 107 84 100 98 Hoima 75 75 72 64 53 Ibanda 91 92 74 Isingiro 103 106 114 Kabale 89 91 91 83 81 Kabarole 114 113 84 75 67 Kamwenge 73 80 77 88 112 Kanungu 83 94 194 88 88 Kasese 63 72 101 73 75 Kibaale 79 73 76 58 39 Kiruhura 36 61 82 Kisoro 95 89 74 90 69 Kyenjojo 87 74 86 79 52 Masindi 61 91 39 66 67 Mbarara 83 74 66 85 84 Ntungamo 83 90 73 96 84 Rukungiri 85 81 91 70 96Uganda 86 85 81 84 79Note: The National Percentage may differ from the one derived from district percentages becucase of cross boundaryimmunisation.Source: Uganda National Expanded Programme for Immunisation (UNEPI) 145
    • Table 2.6 E: Countrywide routine immunization rates for DPT3, 2004-2008Region/ District 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Central Kalangala 99 85 86 105 79 Kampala 79 95 84 110 123 Kayunga 96 82 83 85 84 Kiboga 68 63 80 95 78 Luwero 63 66 54 68 45 Lyantonde 96 97 Masaka 79 74 122 83 67 Mityana 58 77 97 Mpigi 99 95 96 56 104 Mubende 81 72 68 79 63 Mukono 87 105 89 89 75 Nakaseke 70 62 48 Nakasongola 102 103 82 88 84 Rakai 85 85 56 77 69 Sembabule 76 74 76 84 67 Wakiso 76 93 93 104 86Eastern Amuria 93 97 63 Budaka 86 86 Bududa 171 275 Bugiri 127 130 99 60 61 Bukedea 134 137 Bukwa 68 95 85 Busia 104 68 70 67 84 Butaleja 98 107 102 Iganga 86 82 69 73 66 Jinja 83 94 100 86 77 Kaberamaido 100 98 55 80 62 Kaliro 56 70 63 Kamuli 91 73 74 98 71 Kapchorwa 58 49 110 67 63 Katakwi 69 67 109 51 95 Kumi 136 136 82 113 99 Manafwa 79 135 130 Mayuge 98 105 98 150 67 Mbale 136 112 105 93 89 Namutumba 93 100 Pallisa 94 79 70 74 99 Sironko 121 89 123 125 84 Soroti 108 115 70 84 60 Tororo 89 93 101 92 86 146
    • Table 2.6 E (cont’d): Countrywide routine immunization rates for DPT3, 2004- 2008Region/ District 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Northern Abim 159 140 Adjumani 75 72 64 53 30 Amolatar 121 111 135 Amuru 87 112 Apac 109 80 64 63 63 Arua 86 78 55 56 32 Dokolo 94 79 Gulu 109 98 91 149 96 Kaabong 36 59 49 Kitgum 61 72 90 91 75 Koboko 49 97 112 Kotido 61 49 83 113 86 Lira 66 88 102 85 86 Moroto 89 78 56 73 52 Moyo 76 69 43 40 35 Nakapiripirit 49 67 51 58 28 Nebbi 95 86 97 106 94 Nyadri 57 0 Oyam 74 100 Pader 67 77 78 80 81 Yumbe 69 64 48 63 51Western Bulisa 66 92 Bundibugyo 93 94 83 82 78 Bushenyi 113 108 86 100 102 Hoima 77 71 63 65 50 Ibanda 73 89 75 Isingiro 104 97 118 Kabale 91 91 94 86 80 Kabarole 114 110 82 75 67 Kamwenge 73 80 78 92 114 Kanungu 91 89 92 88 84 Kasese 64 77 101 89 78 Kibaale 80 73 76 51 36 Kiruhura 36 56 83 Kisoro 95 90 72 91 76 Kyenjojo 92 83 87 82 50 Masindi 61 68 40 61 58 Mbarara 84 75 66 84 64 Ntungamo 83 93 72 95 86 Rukungiri 87 82 97 76 97Uganda 88 85 80 86 79Note: The National Percentage may differ from the one derived from district percentages becucase of cross boundaryimmunisation.Source: Uganda National Expanded Programme for Immunisation (UNEPI) 147
    • Table 2.6 F: Out Patient Department Utilisation in Government and PNFP, 2007- 2008Region/ District 2007 2008Central Kalangala 1 0.9 Kampala 0.7 1.1 Kayunga 0.8 0.7 Kiboga 0.1 0.6 Luwero 0.8 0.8 Lyantonde 1.6 2.1 Masaka 0.9 0.7 Mityana 1.3 1.2 Mpigi 0.7 0.9 Mubende 0.5 0.4 Mukono 0.7 0.6 Nakaseke 1.2 1.1 Nakasongola 1.2 1.1 Rakai 1.2 0.8 Sembabule 1.2 0.7 Wakiso 1 0.9Eastern Amuria 0.6 0.7 Budaka 0.9 0.8 Bududa 1.2 1.2 Bugiri 0.5 0.4 Bukedea 0.7 0.8 Bukwa 0.8 1 Busia 0.7 0.7 Butaleja 1.2 1.3 Iganga 0.8 0.6 Jinja 1.1 1 Kaberamaido 1.1 1 Kaliro 0.7 0.6 Kamuli 0.6 0.9 Kapchorwa 1.4 1.2 Katakwi 0.8 0.8 Kumi* 1.1 0.9 Manafwa 0.6 0.5 Mayuge 0.7 0.6 Mbale 1.1 1.4 Namutumba 0.7 0.9 Pallisa 0.8 0.7 Sironko 0.7 0.8 Soroti 1.1 0.7 Tororo 1.4 1.2 148
    • Table 2.6 F (cont’d): Out Patient Department Utilisation in Government and PNFP, 2007- 2008 Region/District 2007 2008 Abim 2.1 2.2 Adjumani 1.3 0.8 Amolatar 0.6 0.7 Amuru 1.3 1 Apac 0.8 0.7 Arua 1.2 1 Dokolo 0.7 0.7 Gulu 1.7 1.4 Kaabong 0.5 0.7 Kitgum 1.1 1.3 Koboko 0.5 0.7 Kotido 0.9 0.8 Lira 0.7 0.8 Moroto 0.6 0.5 Moyo 1 0.8 Nakapiripirit 0.6 0.7 Nebbi 1.2 1 Nyadri 0.9 0.1 Oyam 0.3 0.5 Pader 1 1.1 Yumb 0.6 0.5Western Bulisa 0.7 0.6 Bundibugyo 1 0.8 Bushenyi 1 0.9 Hoima 0.9 0.9 Ibanda 0.9 1 Isingiro 1 0.9 Kabale 1.4 1.1 Kabarole 1.2 1 Kamwenge 0.8 0.7 Kanungu 1 0.7 Kasese 1.1 0.5 Kibaale 0.6 0.5 Kiruhura 0.9 0.8 Kisoro 1.4 1.3 Kyenjojo 0.8 0.5 Masindi 0.8 0.8 Mbarara 1.1 0.8 Ntungamo 1 0.8 Rukungiri 1.7 1.6Uganda 0.9 0.8Source: District Health League Table, Ministry of Health 149
    • Table 2.6 G: Pit Latrine Coverage, 2006-2008Region/ District 2007 2008Central Kalangala 54 51 Kampala 94 94 Kayunga 59 59 Kiboga 58 58 Luwero 55 73 Lyantonde 71 80 Masaka 86 95 Mityana 72 85 Mpigi 52 55 Mubende 67 74 Mukono 86 81 Nakaseke 67 74 Nakasongola 70 71 Rakai 76 83 Sembabule 52 55 Wakiso 72 73Eastern Amuria 21 24 Budaka 50 60 Bududa 58 59 Bugiri 65 65 Bukedea 42 60 Bukwa 40 60 Busia 78 82 Butaleja 64 89 Iganga 57 65 Jinja 71 71 Kaberamaido 52 52 Kaliro 79 86 Kamuli 58 74 Kapchorwa 57 58 Katakwi 55 55 Kumi 53 56 Manafwa 64 62 Mayuge 51 68 Mbale 57 65 Namutumba 42 52 Pallisa 70 60 Sironko 64 57 Soroti 55 68 Tororo 73 82 150
    • Table 2.6 G (cont’d): Pit Latrine Coverage, 2006-2008Region/ District 2007 2008Northern Abim 2 2 Adjumani 61 63 Amolatar 48 49 Amuru 42 34 Apac 53 53 Arua* 57 57 Dokolo 49 49 Gulu* 42 42 Kaabong 2 2 Kitgum 19 19 Koboko 50 61 Kotido 2 2 Lira 45 52 Moroto 10 10 Moyo 71 74 Nakapiripirit 3 3 Nebbi 58 78 Nyadri 57 57 Oyam 53 53 Pader 38 38 Yumbe 65 63Western Bulisa 50 49 Bundibugyo 46 57 Bushenyi 91 92 Hoima 68 71 Ibanda 80 88 Isingiro 59 59 Kabale 89 91 Kabarole 86 88 Kamwenge 69 71 Kanungu 70 90 Kasese 80 81 Kibaale 68 65 Kiruhura 76 76 Kisoro 71 75 Kyenjojo 75 76 Masindi* 48 51 Mbarara 76 90 Ntungamo 86 91 Rukungiri 98 99Uganda 59 63Source: District Health League Table, Ministry of Health 151
    • Table 2.6 H: Deliveries in Health Facilities, 2007-2008Region/ District 2007 2008Central Kalangala 10 10 Kampala 73 94 Kayunga 26 31 Kiboga 28 24 Luwero 31 31 Lyantonde 39 53 Masaka 27 17 Mityana 34 39 Mpigi 30 40 Mubende* 15 21 Mukono 40 41 Nakaseke 51 51 Nakasongola 33 30 Rakai* 25 27 Sembabule 16 16 Wakiso 34 35Eastern Amuria 25 26 Budaka 25 25 Bududa 24 27 Bugiri 17 14 Bukedea 50 41 Bukwa 11 11 Busia 27 42 Butaleja 41 39 Iganga* 34 35 Jinja 59 56 Kaberamaido 27 31 Kaliro 26 18 Kamuli 31 34 Kapchorwa 16 19 Katakwi 33 21 Kumi* 61 54 Manafwa 15 22 Mayuge 21 22 Mbale* 40 41 Namutumba 28 31 Pallisa* 41 44 Sironko 22 25 Soroti 45 40 Tororo 28 45 152
    • Table 2.6 H (cont’d): Deliveries in Health Facilities, 2007-2008Region/ District 2007 2008Northern Abim 31 38 Adjumani 38 42 Amolatar 15 22 Amuru 27 23 Apac 26 16 Arua 39 49 Dokolo 14 16 Gulu* 61 37 Kaabong 4 4 Kitgum 45 35 Koboko 18 18 Kotido* 9 12 Lira* 24 26 Moroto 13 13 Moyo 27 21 Nakapiripirit 4 4 Nebbi 56 66 Nyadri 31 9 Oyam 11 19 Pader 27 32 Yumbe* 31 37Western Bulisa 18 28 Bundibugyo 26 23 Bushenyi 26 30 Hoima 35 34 Ibanda 28 34 Isingiro 9 15 Kabale 25 19 Kabarole 41 45 Kamwenge 10 11 Kanungu 24 24 Kasese 38 16 Kibaale 19 21 Kiruhura 33 10 Kisoro 46 60 Kyenjojo 22 17 Masindi* 23 28 Mbarara 40 33 Ntungamo 29 36 Rukungiri 43 47Uganda 32 33* - A new district was created out of itSource: District Health League Table, Ministry of Health 153
    • Table 2.6 I: Selected health sector performance indicators, 2007- 2008 Proportion of TB cases Pregnant women receiving HIV/AIDS Service notified compared to 2nd dose Fansider for IPT Availability expectedRegion/ District 2007 2008 2007 2008 2007 2008Central Kalangala 155 105 30 34 46 96 Kampala 152 143 26 72 65 75 Kayunga 38 20 43 32 49 96 Kiboga 43 43 60 49 43 70 Luwero 46 62 48 56 37 62 Lyantonde 40 88 40 48 68 83 Masaka 68 71 31 23 20 104 Mityana 74 75 34 49 85 78 Mpigi 47 64 35 35 28 83 Mubende 31 35 36 32 60 80 Mukono 41 41 55 53 58 91 Nakaseke 43 51 45 56 30 39 Nakasongola 37 31 37 42 51 65 Rakai 77 72 41 16 68 83 Sembabule 29 40 30 33 78 104 Wakiso 45 42 43 59 55 56Eastern Amuria 14 16 48 57 21 67 Budaka 22 35 17 30 12 3 Bududa 15 35 37 39 58 77 Bugiri 28 30 49 42 79 83 Bukedea 20 21 70 73 22 7 Bukwa 19 27 24 48 20 80 Busia 73 26 26 33 39 47 Butaleja 9 27 56 55 50 84 Iganga 30 27 43 35 60 71 Jinja 65 68 53 74 70 78 Kaberamaido 34 29 37 63 38 68 Kaliro 22 25 32 24 88 67 Kamuli 23 22 33 36 70 64 Kapchorwa 20 24 42 47 21 63 Katakwi 39 37 66 33 50 67 Kumi 29 31 33 55 39 71 Manafwa 35 29 45 58 30 100 Mayuge 40 44 38 62 51 94 Mbale 86 77 25 20 93 71 Namutumba 19 20 27 35 53 75 Pallisa 31 22 38 39 31 50 Sironko 41 31 35 24 24 63 Soroti 36 32 53 46 26 67 Tororo 65 55 49 46 62 91 154
    • Table 2.6 I (cont’d): Selected health sector performance indicators, 2007 – 2008 Proportion of TB cases Pregnant women receiving HIV/AIDS Service notified compared to expected 2nd dose Fansider for IPT AvailabilityRegion/ District 2007 2008 2007 2008 2007 2008Northern Abim 43 48 32 50 60 80 Adjumani 28 32 13 60 65 34 Amolatar 29 67 31 39 85 70 Amuru 24 63 38 40 58 91 Apac 69 56 52 28 59 91 Arua 61 58 43 46 30 30 Dokolo 23 73 31 39 65 70 Gulu 104 145 27 40 69 84 Kaabong 14 6 28 30 75 100 Kitgum 51 44 58 48 50 81 Koboko 25 22 14 54 47 70 Kotido 23 26 48 44 46 90 Lira 98 78 31 43 63 84 Moroto 50 53 62 63 65 75 Moyo 22 26 62 68 44 30 Nakapiripirit 32 42 55 90 53 60 Nebbi 44 41 52 48 49 67 Nyadri 7 21 51 11 39 65 Oyam 23 72 54 72 79 83 Pader 57 68 50 48 55 69 Yumbe 10 13 52 66 60 55Western Bulisa 10 25 34 44 65 20 Bundibugyo 26 22 90 49 87 92 Bushenyi 56 45 39 42 55 84 Hoima 45 51 50 52 68 66 Ibanda 42 47 25 28 43 96 Isingiro 29 39 34 35 9 28 Kabale 26 24 28 35 85 73 Kabarole 73 79 44 35 69 72 Kamwenge 43 51 30 31 71 74 Kanungu 50 47 33 29 48 93 Kasese 24 26 52 45 46 80 Kibaale 53 52 41 52 29 67 Kiruhura 24 22 33 25 40 115 Kisoro 23 13 18 13 17 76 Kyenjojo 52 48 34 17 76 65 Masindi 41 33 64 57 81 56 Mbarara 85 89 23 18 42 91 Ntungamo 47 45 29 22 30 74 Rukungiri 51 61 33 31 43 80 Uganda 49 50 40 39 87 75Source: District league table, Ministry of Health 155
    • 2.7 Crime StatisticsTable 2.7 A: Distribution of prisoners by District and category for the years 2006- 2008 2006 2007 2008District Prison Convicts On- Convicts On-Remand Convicts On-RemandKampala Upper 1,038 1,274 903 1,373 959 1,306 M/Bay 496 564 388 645 352 506 Kampala ( R) 34 994 94 734 47 827 Luzira (W) 106 105 99 107 117 106Kayunga Bulaula 131 0 162 - 182 -Masaka Masaka 124 533 119 653 163 538Mubende Muinaina 75 159 41 158 94 132Mukono Bugungu (YP) 187 40 173 17 187 40 Bugungu (YO) 187 0 133 57 159 -Nakasongola Nakasongola 42 67 65 133 227 178Rakai Mutukula 75 0 94 - 60 - Kitalya 310 0 236 - 329 -Wakiso Kigo 96 656 85 643 114 774 Kigo(W) 10 15 8 18 8 22Jinja Jinja (M) 340 69 504 97 771 31 Jinja (R ) 61 556 92 517 143 438 Jinja (w) 14 27 14 16 24 21Kamuli Kamuli 17 12 32 54 21 69Mayuge Bufulubi 290 11 298 11 290 10Mbale Mbale (M) 217 582 0 579 142 240 Mbale (W) 14 16 20 19 14 9Kumi Kumi 0 0 56 148 38 113Soroti Soroti 88 344 104 393 118 325Tororo Tororo 245 268 223 225 255 163Adjumani Adjumani 205 78 174 97 195 70Apac Apac 67 131 87 111 80 87 Loro 147 0 131 - 155 -Arua Arua 179 412 124 347 202 347 Gilgil 131 0 62 - 85 -Gulu Gulu 110 388 78 362 167 372 Patiko 34 0 33 - 76 -Kotido Kotido 30 28 16 58 31 78 Amita 60 8 82 4 64 13Kumi Kumi 56 101 - - 38 113Lira Lira 476 91 354 193 393Moroto Moroto 27 48 42 118 78 135Nakapiripirit Namalu 158 0 177 - 217 9Nebbi Ragem 100 0 95 - 145 5Bushenyi Bushenyi 113 408 61 433 37 593Kabale Ndorwa 76 158 85 173 64 187Kabarole Ruimi 355 12 469 8 500 16 Fort Portal 111 622 71 668 96 663Kasese Ibuga 259 0 243 - 353 - Mubuku 322 58 190 119 119 196Masindi Masindi 163 473 200 408 192 433 Masindi (W) 0 0 3 18 12 27 Isimba 546 0 403 - 402 -Mbarara Mbarara (M) 146 541 111 531 163 424 Mbarara (W) 22 51 13 36 Kakiika 88 460 84 442 66 523 Kiburara 404 0 427 - 308 -Rukungiri Rukungiri 67 290 73 324 80 297National - 8,151 10,984 7,577 11,223 8,945 10,865Source: Uganda Prisons Department, Note: Young offender (YO), Young Prisoner (YP), Women (W), Men (M), Remand ® 156
    • Table 2.7 B: Number of cases reported and prosecuted by category for the years (2007-2008) 2007 2008 Reported Prosecuted Reported ProsecutedHomicidesDeath (by shooting) 247 53 351 83Death (by mob action) 286 - 368 39Death (other than by shooting) 2,398 761 1,900 684Death(Fire Out Breaks) - - 48 8Infanticide 190 34 86 27Economic CrimesEmbezzlement 411 48 343 74Causing Financial losses 40 8 40 5Abuse of office 66 40 39 14Counterfeiting 1,267 237 1,396 305Forgeries & Uttering of Documents 897 139 1,011 192Issuing False Cheques 1,473 39 1,272 102Obtaining By False Pretences 11,823 1,340 8,926 1,435Land Frauds 0 0 89 40Prevention of Corruption Act 19 9 46 19 Sex Related OffencesRape 809 258 1,536 241Defilement 17,031 4,059 8,635 4,124Incest 51 7 79 28Unnatural Offences 56 28 115 30 Child Related OffencesChild Neglect 59 10 2,682 446Child Stealing 0 0 157 36Child Abduction 0 0 188 27Child Kidnap 0 0 25 10Child Abuse/Torture 61 5 660 57Abortion 0 0 48 14 BreakinsBurglaries 6,230 1,531 6,825 6,825House Breakins 2,632 752 2,898 2,898Shop Breaking 1,817 490 1,984 1,984Office Breaking 1,463 345 529 529 TheftsTheft of Motor Vehicles 1,375 197 1,172 191Theft of Motor Cycles 1,223 195 2,639 523Theft from M/Vs (Spares) 1,091 171 1,493 247Theft of Bicycles 3,650 1,003 3,451 1,152Thefts of Mobile Phones 1,231 133 15,264 2,163Thefts of Cash 67,601 12,755 8,123 1,448Theft of Cattle 6,274 5,594 190 55Theft of Railway Slippers/Material 0 0 51 16Theft of Telecoms, Electrical & Comm. Items 0 0 327 76Receiving & Retaining(Stolen Prop) 266 97 248 209Robberies Reported prosecuted Reported prosecutedAggravated Robbery(Motor Cycles) 1,828 279 151 42Aggravated Robbery(Motor Vehicles) 25,436 - 38 3Aggravated Robbery(Cash) - - 385 88Aggravated Robbery(general) 560 - 707 200Source: Uganda Police Force 157
    • Table 2.7 B(Con’t): Number of cases reported and prosecuted by category for the years (2007-2008) 2007 2008 Reported Prosecuted Reported ProsecutedSimple Robbery(general) 6,411 827 2,977 1,760AssaultsAggravated Assault(Acid cases) - - 57 57Aggravated Assaults(general) 6,189 1,821 2,795 1,909Common Assaults 39,545 5,796 18,334 6,945 Other Crimes in GeneralThreatening Violence 578 0 5,426 2,390Human Trafficking 5 0 2 -Abduction 0 0 578 106Kidnap 0 0 65 45Arson (General) 1,925 488 1,243 565Malicious Damage to Property 7,877 1,363 4,035 1,621Rescues from Lawful Custody 1,498 749 88 87Escapes from Lawful Custody 0 0 1,212 1,212Examination Leakage and Stealing 0 0 61 7Piracy 14 6 9 -Criminal Trespass 0 0 3,089 1,804Riot & Unlawful Assemblies 36 11 - -Idel & Disorderly persons 1,973 852 - -Att. Killing (by shooting) 140 33 886 125Att. Killing( other than shooting) 446 180 196 180TerrorismTerrorism 45 13 4 4Death By CBRN(Chemical,Nuclear Wpns) - -Political/Media OffencesPromoting Sectarianism 10 2 4 2Election Offences 5 3Treason 48 19 2 2Sedition 2 0 1 1Narcotics/DrugsHeroin 2,018 1,083 - -Cocaine 4386 114 - -Other Narcotics(general) 13 5 978 978Other lawsImmigration Act 288 194 211 211NEMA 11 0 38 38Firearms Act 210 71 140 84UWA Statute 146 93 118 118All other act 872 254 - -Local Government Act 0 0 3 -Total other laws 3,577 1,831 214 38GRAND TOTAL 238,124 46,422 119,072 46,943Source: Uganda Police Force 158
    • Table 2.7 C: Distribution of prisoners by station, 2006- 2008 2006 2007 2008District Prison Convicts On-Remand Convicts On-Remand Convicts On-RemandKampala Upper 1,038 1,274 903 1,373 959 1,306 M/Bay 496 564 388 645 352 506 Kampala ( R) 34 994 94 734 47 827 Luzira (W) 106 105 99 107 117 106Kayunga Bulaula 131 0 162 - 182 -Masaka Masaka 124 533 119 653 163 538Mubende Muinaina 75 159 41 158 94 132Mukono Bugungu (YP) 187 40 173 17 187 40 Bugungu (YO) 187 0 133 57 159 -Nakasongola Nakasongola 42 67 65 133 227 178Rakai Mutukula 75 0 94 - 60 -Wakiso Kitalya 310 0 236 - 329 - Kigo 96 656 85 643 114 774 Kigo(W) 10 15 8 18 8 22Jinja Jinja (M) 340 69 504 97 771 31 Jinja (R ) 61 556 92 517 143 438 Jinja (w) 14 27 14 16 24 21Kamuli Kamuli 17 12 32 54 21 69Mayuge Bufulubi 290 11 298 11 290 10 Mbale (M) 217 582 0 579 142 240Mbale Mbale (W) 14 16 20 19 14 9Kumi Kumi 0 0 56 148 38 113Soroti Soroti 88 344 104 393 118 325Tororo Tororo 245 268 223 225 255 163Adjumani Adjumani 205 78 174 97 195 70Apac Apac 67 131 87 111 80 87 Loro 147 0 131 - 155 -Arua Arua 179 412 124 347 202 347 Gilgil 131 0 62 - 85 -Gulu Gulu 110 388 78 362 167 372 Patiko 34 0 33 - 76 -Kotido Kotido 30 28 16 58 31 78 Amita 60 8 82 4 64 13Kumi Kumi 56 101 - - 38 113Lira Lira 476 91 354 193 393Moroto Moroto 27 48 42 118 78 135Nakapiripirit Namalu 158 0 177 - 217 9Nebbi Ragem 100 0 95 - 145 5Bushenyi Bushenyi 113 408 61 433 37 593Kabale Ndorwa 76 158 85 173 64 187Kabarole Ruimi 355 12 469 8 500 16 Fort Portal 111 622 71 668 96 663Kasese Ibuga 259 0 243 - 353 Mubuku 322 58 190 119 119 196Masindi Masindi 163 473 200 408 192 433 Masindi (W) 0 0 3 18 12 27 Isimba 546 0 403 - 402 -Mbarara Mbarara (M) 146 541 111 531 163 424 Mbarara (W) 22 51 13 36 Kakiika 88 460 84 442 66 523 Kiburara 404 0 427 - 308 -Rukungiri Rukungiri 67 290 73 324 80 297National 8,151 10,984 7,577 11,223 8,945 10,865Note: Young offender (YO), Young Prisoner (YP), Women (W), Men (M), Remand ®Source: Uganda Prisons Department 159
    • 3.0 Production Statistics3.2 AgricultureTable 3.2 A: Procurement of main export cash crops (tonnes), 2004-2008Cash crop 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Coffee 170,081 158,100 133,110 175,346 211,762 Robusta 138,088 122,489 96,490 144,109 180,992 Arabica 31,993 35,611 36,620 31,237 30,770Tea 35,706 37,734 34,334 44,923 42,808Tobacco 32,520 23,730 15,793 26,383 29,040Source: Uganda Coffee Development Authority (UCDA), Uganda Tea Authority, B.A.T (U) LtdTable 3.2 B: Area planted of selected food crops in thousand hectares, 2004-2008Crop 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 estimatesBananas 1,670 1,675 1,677 1,678 1,680Cereals Finger millet 412 420 429 437 448 Maize 750 780 819 839 862 Sorghum 285 294 308 314 321 Rice 93 102 113 119 128 Wheat 9 9 10 11 11Total 1,549 1,605 1,678 1,721 1,770Root crops Sweet potatoes 602 590 584 590 599 Irish potatoes 83 86 90 93 97 Cassava 407 387 379 386 398Total 1,092 1,063 1,053 1,070 1,094Pulses Beans 812 828 849 870 896 Field beans 25 25 26 26 26 Cow peas 70 71 71 72 74 Pigeon peas 84 85 86 87 88Total 991 1,009 1,032 1,055 1,084Legumes Ground nuts 221 225 230 235 244 Soya beans 144 144 145 147 148 Sim Sim 255 268 276 280 286Total 620 637 651 662 678Source: Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF) and Uganda Bureau of Statistics. 160
    • Table 3.2 C: Production of selected food crops in thousand tonnes, 2004-2008Crop 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 estimatesBananas 9,686 9,380 9,052 9,233 9,371Cereals Finger millet 659 672 687 732 783 Maize 1,080 1,237 1,258 1,262 1,266 Sorghum 399 449 440 458 477 Rice 121 153 154 162 171 Wheat 15 15 18 19 19Root crops Sweet potatoes 2,650 2,604 2,627 2,654 2,707 Irish potatoes 573 585 628 650 670 Cassava 5,500 5,576 4,924 4,973 5,072Pulses Beans 455 478 424 430 440 Field beans 15 15 16 16 16 Cow peas 69 70 71 75 79 Pigeon peas 84 85 88 89 90Legumes Ground nuts 137 159 154 162 173 Soya beans 158 158 175 176 178 Sim Sim 125 161 166 168 173Note: Estimates are of economic production with post harvest losses are taken into account.Source: Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF) and Uganda Bureau of Statistics.Table 3.2 D: Fish catch by water body (thousand tonnes), 2003 – 2007 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007Lake Victoria 175.3 253.3 253.3 215.9 223.1Lake Albert 56.4 56.4 56.4 56.4 19.5Albert Nile 6.4 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.6Lake Kyoga 68.5 68.4 60.0 60.0 32.9Lake Edward, George & Kazinga Channel 9.6 9.6 8.8 8.8 5.9Other Waters 40.6 24.1 21.1 21.0 8.3Total 247.5 434.8 416.8 367.2 374.3Source: Fisheries Department, Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF).Table 3.2 E: Livestock numbers (thousand animals), 2004 – 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Cattle 6,567 6,770 6,973 7,182 7,398Sheep 1,552 1,600 1,648 1,697 1,748Goats 7,566 7,800 8,034 8,275 8,523Pigs 1,940 2,000 2,060 2,122 2,186Poultry 31,622 32,600 26,049 26,950 27,508Source: Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries (MAAIF), and Uganda Bureau of Statistics 161
    • 3.3 IndustryTable 3.3 A: Index of Industrial Production, Annual (Calendar year) Summary 2004 – 2008, 2002 = 100Description Wt 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total manufacturing 1,000 114.1 125.8 129.6 145.2 150.8Food processing 400 106 110 117 126 138Meat preparation & processing 2 101 91 86 81 73Fish processing & preservation 28 98 87 77 63 68Edible oils & fats production 42 124 128 207 239 196Dairy production 10 136 159 166 191 295Grain milling 9 137 217 354 319 312Bakery production 9 169 125 146 179 196Sugar processing 139 114 119 119 107 141Coffee processing 89 87 75 65 83 98Tea processing 68 95 112 101 133 128Animal feed production 5 96 146 128 163 137Other food processing 1 118 94 139 167 170Drinks and tobacco 201 123 146 146 180 191Beer production 99 115 137 143 198 220Soft drinks & bottled water production 69 139 174 209 240 243Tobacco manufacturing 33 114 117 29Textiles, clothing and foot wear 43 161 165 135 163 142Cotton ginning 12 162 247 73 132 65Textile & garment manufacture 19 189 173 229 214 259Leather & footwear production 11 113 58 45 113 26Sawmilling, paper and printing 35 120 125 132 149 166Sawmilling, Papermaking, etc 12 60 55 60 54 59Printing & publishing 23 151 161 170 199 222Chemicals, paint, soap & foam products 97 109 130 132 145 124Chemical & pharmaceutical production 9 119 132 149 190 181Paint & vanish manufacturing 3 56 249 267 354 398Soap, Detergent, etc Production 75 108 124 117 116 91Foam products manufacturing 10 120 143 190 275 243Bricks & cement 75 104 126 149 156 173Bricks, tiles & other ceramic production 10 70 80 91 118 113Cement & lime production 60 112 133 158 160 185Concrete articles manufacturing 5 112 132 157 199 143Metal products 83 109 125 132 140 130Iron and Steel Manufacturing 78 109 124 131 140 131Other metal production 5 110 146 143 143 99Miscellaneous 66 125 130 121 138 144Plastic products manufacturing 33 136 135 135 139 145Furniture-making 14 114 142 94 123 141Other Manufacturing nes 19 114 111 118 146 144Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 162
    • Table 3.3 B: Index of Industrial Production, Annual (Fiscal year) Summary 2003/04 – 2007/08, 2002 = 100Description Wt 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08Total manufacturing 1,000 110 119 128 136 149Food processing 400 105 104 112 123 131Meat preparation & processing 2 121 64 103 81 75Fish processing & preservation 28 90 95 83 72 66Edible oils & fats production 42 116 112 156 235 222Dairy production 10 122 143 170 170 226Grain milling 9 134 133 287 350 302Bakery production 9 114 112 140 164 185Sugar processing 139 110 118 120 117 116Coffee processing 89 86 75 68 73 97Tea processing 68 114 104 107 114 134Animal feed production 5 107 107 139 142 161Other food processing 1 122 120 89 152 174Drinks and tobacco 201 116 127 152 155 190Beer production 99 112 117 139 161 217Soft drinks & bottled water production 69 131 154 199 220 242Tobacco manufacturing 33 99 104 91 0 0Textiles, clothing and foot wear 43 144 174 131 139 151Cotton ginning 12 135 257 81 117 82Textile & garment manufacture 19 169 182 208 190 241Leather & footwear production 11 110 66 55 77 73Sawmilling, paper and printing 35 115 116 131 133 163Sawmilling, Papermaking, etc 12 80 51 61 54 54Printing & publishing 23 133 149 168 174 220Chemicals, paint, soap & foam products 97 109 124 131 142 134Chemical & pharmaceutical production 9 119 107 144 175 188Paint & vanish manufacturing 3 56 224 246 304 377Soap, Detergent, etc Production 75 108 122 121 118 103Foam products manufacturing 10 120 134 160 246 257Bricks & cement 75 104 124 132 157 162Bricks, tiles & other ceramic production 10 70 82 85 106 118Cement & lime production 60 112 131 140 164 169Concrete articles manufacturing 5 112 131 130 186 170Metal products 83 112 127 133 132 141Iron and Steel Manufacturing 78 113 127 132 131 142Other metal production 5 85 132 148 149 125Miscellaneous 66 107 121 129 130 141Plastic products manufacturing 33 126 129 131 137 138Furniture making 14 88 114 141 102 147Other Manufacturing nes 19 88 114 116 138 144Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 163
    • 3.4 Producer pricesTable 3.4 A: Producer Price Indices by major industry group (Combined) July- September 2004=100, CYGroup Weight 2005 2006 2007 2008Food Processing 419 113 129 140 172Drinks and Tobacco 185 101 101 102 119Textiles, Clothing and Footwear 42 96 103 108 114Sawmilling, Paper and Printing 48 104 120 135 140Chemicals, Paint, Soap & Foam Products 106 99 103 115 155Bricks & Cement 68 107 112 128 153Metal Products 91 100 119 129 173Miscellaneous 41 106 124 143 149PPI-M (Combined) 1000 106 117 127 154Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 3.4 B: Producer Price Indices by major industry group (Combined) July- September 2004=100, FYGroup Weight 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08Food Processing 419 106 120 135 153Drinks and Tobacco 185 100 101 101 110Textiles, Clothing and Footwear 42 98 98 107 112Sawmilling, Paper and Printing 48 102 107 133 136Chemicals, Paint, Soap & Foam Products 106 100 100 109 137Bricks & Cement 68 103 109 119 143Metal Products 91 99 105 127 148Miscellaneous 41 103 113 135 146PPI-M (Combined) 1000 103 110 123 139Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 164
    • Table 3.4 C: Average producer prices to wholesalers for selected manufactured products, shs 2004-2008 Animal Animal Animal Feeds Bakers Buns Cooking Cooking Feeds Feeds (Sow and wheat flour Oil Oil (Broiler (Layers Weaver) Mash) Mash) Unit of Bag of 70 Kg Bag of 70 Bag of 70 kg Bag of 50 Packet 10 Litres 20Litre Measure kg kg of Jerry can Jerry can 6 pieces 2004 Q1 23,400 23,333 18,550 39,675 484 16,642 32,151 Q2 23,778 23,711 19,117 42,147 512 16,227 31,145 2005 Q1 23,067 23,022 18,267 39,454 512 15,459 32,225 Q2 22,900 22,833 17,800 39,458 530 14,837 31,288 Q3 22,900 22,833 17,800 38,564 533 14,576 28,901 Q4 22,589 21,839 17,950 39,901 506 14,535 27,914 2006 Q1 23,767 23,383 18,967 38,083 506 14,309 28,337 Q2 25,700 25,044 19,850 41,564 519 14,268 28,570 Q3 24,333 23,444 18,750 42,130 519 14,864 28,565 Q4 23,744 22,911 18,750 43,650 538 15,628 29,910 2007 Q1 24,956 23,456 20,000 45,983 554 17,268 32,460 Q2 25,289 23,789 20,000 48,275 547 18,941 36,512 Q3 26,267 24,256 19,883 52,083 644 20,134 31,503 Q4 27,678 25,944 22,217 60,450 735 21,274 31,203 2008 Q1 30,087 28,534 22,968 68,833 763 27,100 40,330 Q2 34,209 32,192 23,286 68,700 763 30,765 49,069 Q3 38,669 34,042 26,001 61,446 819 30,176 46,707 Q4 36,929 34,574 26,750 69,503 819 29,836 45,595 165
    • Table 3.4 D: Average producer prices to wholesalers for selected manufactured products, shs 2004-2007 Soda UHT Beer of Juice Mineral Crate Bar Posho Sugar Milk 25 Carton water Mineral of 24 soap Barbed Flour Bag (Carton) bottles of Box water bottles Carton wire Cement (Grade 1) of 24 Crate bottles 12 of of bottlesUnit of of 500mls 24 0.5 (1500 (300mls of 25kg 50 kgMeasure 1 Kg 50 kg 12 litres each) sackets litres ml) each) 25 bars roll bag 2004 Q3 453 44,174 13,577 14,797 5,129 5,561 4,565 7,110 14,570 42,099 12,852 Q4 447 43,282 13,723 14,797 5,129 5,561 4,565 7,110 14,305 40,902 12,851 2005 Q1 419 44,856 13,827 14,797 5,129 5,561 4,565 7,110 14,018 40,502 13,662 Q2 461 49,177 13,827 14,797 5,129 5,561 4,565 7,110 13,618 40,072 13,983 Q3 454 53,259 13,773 14,672 5,068 5,494 4,510 7,050 13,448 38,996 13,906 Q4 411 54,246 13,500 14,672 5,068 5,494 4,510 7,075 13,374 39,451 13,940 2006 Q1 438 54,932 13,633 14,672 5,068 5,986 4,914 7,125 13,512 41,683 13,926 Q2 568 56,059 13,867 14,672 5,199 5,986 5,330 7,125 13,513 44,326 14,067 Q3 520 56,536 15,100 14,672 5,226 5,986 5,330 7,125 14,027 47,150 14,194 Q4 577 62,465 15,100 14,787 5,281 5,986 5,330 7,125 14,274 47,970 14,700 2007 Q1 485 63,709 14,878 14,787 5,303 5,986 5,330 7,125 15,014 49,154 15,262 Q2 461 63,709 15,010 14,787 5,292 5,986 5,330 7,122 15,956 49,318 15,958 Q3 529 61,513 15,011 15,446 5,248 5,986 5,330 7,125 17,252 49,657 16,498 Q4 613 56,442 15,122 15,775 5,248 5,986 5,330 7,125 17,636 50,598 17,582 2008 Q1 636 49,770 15,111 15,782 5,424 5,986 5,330 7,216 22,596 59,062 19,111 Q2 735 52,048 15,701 15,759 5,424 5,986 5,330 8,845 25,590 66,516 19,712 Q3 776 51,798 16,667 10,675 5,424 5,986 5,330 8,477 25,016 68,812 19,443 Q4 823 54,163 18,000 11,092 5,605 5,986 5,330 8,477 24,303 68,297 19,120Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 166
    • 3.5 EnergyTable 3.5 A: Sales of petroleum products by type (cubic metres) 2004 – 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Volume, cubic litresPetrol 186,285 174,054 198,125 191,713 250,256Aviation Fuel 79,131 88,932 89,995 92,616 44,572Diesel 260,978 319,574 417,449 464,122 514,114Fuel oil 53,313 44,423 38,289 34,384 28,311Kerosene 49,340 39,836 42,897 34,309 62,377LPG 4,500 4,486 5,800 7,273 8,272Percentage changePetrol -6.6 13.8 -3.2 30.5Aviation Fuel 12.4 1.2 2.9 -51.9Diesel 22.5 30.6 11.2 10.8Fuel oil -16.7 -13.8 -10.2 -17.7Kerosene -19.3 7.7 -20.0 81.8LPG -0.3 29.3 25.4 13.7Source: Petroleum Supplies Department, Ministry of Energy and Mineral ResourceTable 3.5 B: UETCL energy purchases (GWh), 2004 – 2008Period 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Hydro electricity 1,887.69 1,721.72 1,190.03 1,293.92 1,405.04 Eskom 1,872.33 1,698.54 1,160.45 1,263.54 1,373.44 Kilembe mines 11.47 20.81 28.05 29.64 29.80 Kasese Cobalt 3.89 2.37 1.53 0.74 1.80Thermal electricity - 140.77 369.98 539.13 597.07 Aggreko 1(Lugogo) - 140.77 319.95 272.8 141.39 Aggreko 2(Kiira) - - 50.03 266.33 239.59 Aggreko 3(Mutundwe) - - - - 99.52 Jacobsen(Namanve) - - - - 116.57Others - 28.19 68.89 71.72 173.89Backflows to UETCL(At 33kv) - 3.72 19.98 11.63 130.68Electrogaz - 1.32 2.18 1.84 2.29KPCL(Import) - 23.15 46.73 58.25 40.92TOTAL 1,887.7 1,890.7 1,628.9 1,904.8 2,176.0Annual Percentage change - 0.2 -13.8 16.9 14.2Source: Uganda Electricity Transmission Company limited 167
    • Table 3.5 C: Average Lake Levels (in Meters) from Jinja Pier Mechanical Recorder ChartPeriod Annual Averages Percent change2004 11.33 -3.412005 10.96 -3.272006 10.66 -2.702007 11.18 4.882008 11.22 0.31Source: Eskom (U) Ltd 168
    • 3.6 Building and ConstructionTable 3.6 A: CSI Sector Price Indices, Jan-March 2006=100Sub sector Weight 2006 2007 2008Whole sector 100 108.8 121.3 139.7 All buildings 80 109.9 123.7 141.2 Residential buildings 30 113.0 119.9 137.1 Formal 15 119.3 119.4 136.7 Own-account 15 106.7 120.4 137.4 Non-Residential buildings 50 111.6 125.8 143.5 Civil works 20 104.5 111.7 133.5 Roads paved 10 103.9 110.7 134.1 Roads gravel 5 103.9 107.5 131.0 Water projects 5 106.2 118.0 134.7Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 3.6 B: Basic Heading Indices, 2006 – 2008, Jan-March 2006=100Basic heading 2006 2007 2008 Timber 120.5 145.1 164.4 Paint 101.2 103.8 117.6 PVC/HDPE pipes 105.6 117.3 127.4Water tanks 100.0 100.8 104.6 Burnt clay bricks & tiles 120.4 140.3 171.1 Cement 102.1 117.2 139.5 Concrete articles 102.9 112.2 129.3 Steel bars 100.4 111.5 168.3 Roofing sheets 116.4 129.4 169.4 Other iron & steel 115.9 128.6 178.7Electrical wire & cable 126.5 139.8 149.5Aggregate 105.4 123.0 119.2Lime 93.8 98.2 115.9Diesel 104.9 107.3 135.2Bitumen 107.5 118.3 140.9Labour wage rates 101.1 108.1 115.0Equipment Charge Out Rates - 115.6CPI (rescaled) 2006 Q1 = 100 103.5 109.6 122.8Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 169
    • 3.7 Transport and CommunicationTable 3.7 A: Estimated number of motor vehicles on road, 2004 – 2008Vehicle type 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Trucks 17,530 18,684 20,496 23,323 28,501Pick-up vans & 4-Wheel drives 52,685 53,203 53,137 55,950 58,317Buses 878 868 857 995 1,237Mini buses 22,565 27,568 32,006 39,476 49,235Cars 59,786 65,471 70,652 81,320 90,856Motor cycles 89,212 108,207 133,985 176,516 236,452Agric tractors 2,574 2,717 2,778 2,958 3,306Others 1,815 1,876 1,991 2,235 2,584Source: Ministry of Works and TransportTable 3.7 B: New registration of Vehicles by type 2004 – 2008CLASS OF VEHICLES 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Car 7,614 10,001 9,639 11,218 11,950Mini Bus 229 135 177 223 275Pick Up 3,714 4,006 3,443 4,062 3,193Van 1,984 2,599 1,722 2,389 2,739Bus 45 75 73 151 262Lorry 990 1,353 1,819 1,661 3,750Tractor 373 273 195 206 346Trailer 202 313 349 258 237Tanker 20 25 41 48 92Station Wagon 2,761 3,709 4,247 5,546 7,684Semi Trailer 7 24 22 25 46Forklift 9 26 40 42 30Earth Equipment 217 125 169 209 332Ambulance 43 27 23 29 28Omnibus 140 36 8 11 17Tipper 705 304 496 1,202 1,472Motor Cycles 19,398 27,885 35,057 46,921 68,787TOTAL 38,451 50,916 57,520 74,201 101,240Annual Percentage Change (%) 32.42 12.97 29.00 36.44Source: Uganda Revenue Authority 170
    • Table 3.7 C: National Roads Network Length in Kilometers (June 2008)Area Paved Unpaved TotalCentral Region 1138 1458 2596 Kampala 466 247 713 Luwero 159 335 494 Masaka 239 294 533 Mpigi 151 349 500 Mubende 123 233 356Eastern Region 615 2223 2838 Jinja 212 434 646 Kotido n.a 440 440 Mbale 218 347 565 Moroto 1 346 347 Soroti 68 396 464 Tororo 116 260 376Northern Region 409 2077 2486 Arua 130 416 546 Gulu 192 402 594 n.a Kitgum 596 596 Lira 87 502 589 Moyo 161 161Southern Region 588 1025 1613 Kabale 156 254 410 Kasese 138 203 341 Mbarara 294 568 862Western Region 348 1084 1432 Fort Portal 162 390 552 Hoima 96 309 405 Masindi 90 385 475National 3098 7867 10965Note: Roads under local government are not includedSource: Uganda National Roads Authority 171
    • Table 3.7 D: Commercial Traffic at Entebbe International Airport, 2004 - 2008Mode of traffic 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Commercial aircraft movement Number 16,692 17,253 19,200 22,000 23,847Over flight at Entebbe Number 3,816 n.a n.a n.a n.aPassengersInternationalLanded Number 237,869 274,307 252,432 396,079 470,397Embarked Number 237,857 277,546 254,606 392,695 465,787In Transit Number 24,509 33,107 35,692 35,988 38,681DomesticLanded Number 21,918 19,837 18,458 13,703 12,205Embarked Number 21,437 19,087 17,692 12,196 10,867Total Number 543,590 623,884 578,880 850,661 997,937FreightCargoUnloaded Tonne 14,420 14,180 13,236 22,881 21,298Loaded Tonne 33,473 38,231 35,075 40,837 37,695MailUnloaded Tonne 486 516 463 511 520Loaded Tonne 135 150 113 110 166Total Tonne 48,514 53,077 576 621 686Source: Civil Aviation Authority3.7.2 TelecommunicationTable 3.7 E: Postal statistics (Pieces), 2004 - 2008Item 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Letters: Letters posted 8,751,012 6,449,314 4,447,180 3,780,103 2,586,073 Letters received 4,874,614 3,401,232 3,129,866 2,660,386 3,117,142 Registered letters posted 38,510 34,466 32,511 27,634 40,050 Registered letters Received 38,121 43,704 27,153 23,080 27,896 Total - Letters 13,702,257 9,928,716 7,636,710 6,491,203 5,771,161Parcels: Parcels posted internationally 4,019 1,703 876 745 1,440 Parcels received 13,796 18,544 17,809 15,138 16,851 Small packets posted 2,816 5,440 14,571 12,385 n.a Small packets received 14,916 18,940 24,649 20,952 n.a Mailbags received 7,936 8,527 4,589 3,901 n.a EMS items posted 82,177 109,499 116,049 n.a 120,738 EMS items received 10,443 10,228 10,842 n.a 14,569 Total - Parcels 136,103 172,881 189,385 n.a n.aSource: Posta Uganda Limited 172
    • Table 3.7 F: Telecommunications statistics as at December, 2004 – 2008 Item 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Fixed Telephone lines 82,495 100,777 129,863 165,788 168,481 Mobile Cellular Subscribers 1,165,035 1,525,125 2,697,616 5,163,414 8,554,864 Telephone Traffic (‘000 Minutes) 1,559,162 1,723,964 2,307,391 3,004,738 4,268,705 Payphones 4,634 10,263 12,889 27,999 52,515 Mobile Cellular Operators 3 3 3 3 4 Internet Services’ Operators 18 17 17 n.a n.a Private FM Radio Stations(registered) 148 145 145 195 220 Private TV Stations(registered) 31 34 34 41 50 Courier Services Operators 19 22 22 20 21Source: Uganda Communications Commission 173
    • 3.8 Tourism and migrationTable 3.8 A: Total Arrivals and Departures in Uganda, 2004 – 2008 Period Arrival Departure Resident Non- resident Total Resident Non- resident Total 2004 225,739 512,379 738,118 231,109 465,241 696,350 2005 194,393 467,728 662,121 188,951 389,269 578,220 2006 231,067 538,595 769,662 254,064 501,812 755,876 2007 241,487 641,743 883,230 271,735 607,373 879,108 2008 319,504 843,864 1,163,368 337,237 805,605 1,142,842 Quarters 2007 1st 54,913 143,741 198,654 61,804 135,067 196,871 2nd 55,278 150,760 206,038 67,226 146,107 213,333 3rd 70,704 196,908 267,612 80,016 189,300 269,316 4th 60,592 150,334 210,926 62,689 136,899 199,588 2008 1st 61,253 180,896 242,149 62,695 157,156 219,851 2nd 71,208 185,714 256,922 73,293 175,865 249,158 3rd 98,939 260,493 359,432 108,239 254,804 363,043 4th 88,104 216,761 304,865 93,010 217,780 310,790 Source: Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 3.8 B: Migration Statistics: Entebbe Arrivals, 2004– 2008 Ugandans Non-Ugandans Grand total Non- Sub SubPeriod Resident Resident Total Resident Non -resident Total Other & Western Other North Other COMESA Not Europe Europe America Africa Stated2004 61,633 6,400 68,033 18,611 37,193 975 18,677 28,335 19,871 19,578 143,240 211,2732005 69,702 8,180 77,882 22,380 48,841 2,193 23,259 37,152 26,136 25,802 185,763 263,6452006 81,346 9,011 90,357 23,842 57,556 2,232 29,417 44,013 30,128 27,694 214,882 305,2392007 89,767 12,413 102,180 28,372 63,551 1,907 35,613 51,470 36,558 33,286 250,757 352,9372008 144,667 20,354 165,021 44,641 89,900 2,391 47,047 91,780 56,050 50,652 382,461 547,482Quarter20061st 16,083 1,480 17,563 5,664 12,448 485 6,116 8,729 6,520 6,326 46,288 63,8512nd 18,475 2,150 20,625 5,751 11,632 574 7,612 9,857 7,941 7,241 50,608 71,2333rd 21,624 1,934 23,558 6,393 16,773 592 8,428 11,863 7,262 7,042 58,353 81,9114th 25,164 3,447 28,611 6,034 16,703 581 7,261 13,564 8,405 7,085 59,633 88,24420071st 18,478 2,083 20,561 7,559 14,367 573 7,389 11,393 7,834 6,803 55,918 76,4792nd 20,966 2,230 23,196 5,811 13,801 508 9,859 12,052 9,740 7,822 59,593 82,7893rd 24,735 2,933 27,668 7,902 20,059 465 10,952 14,939 10,499 9,988 74,804 102,4724th 25,588 5,167 30,755 7,100 15,324 361 7,413 13,086 8,485 8,673 60,442 91,19720081st 24,083 2,848 26,931 9,252 16,315 434 8,944 18,831 11,028 9,647 74,451 101,3822nd 31,648 3,604 35,252 8,984 17,297 443 12,305 19,118 12,682 10,970 81,799 117,0513rd 44,476 6,150 50,626 14,367 32,431 719 15,078 28,706 16,787 15,932 124,020 174,6464th 44,460 7,752 52,212 12,038 23,857 795 10,720 25,125 15,553 14,103 102,191 154,403Source: Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of Statistics 174
    • Table 3.8 C: Migration Statistics: Entebbe Departures, 2004 - 2008 Grand Ugandans Non-Ugandans Total Non- Sub SubPeriod Resident Resident Total Resident Non-resident Total Other & Western Other North Other COMESA Not Europe Europe America Africa Stated2004 61,319 7,500 68,819 19,333 35,031 940 17,368 26,778 17,834 19,376 136,660 205,4792005 61,834 8,113 69,947 24,950 39,086 1,712 19,757 30,866 21,327 19,595 157,293 227,2402006 83,924 9,793 93,717 32,965 52,566 2,777 28,734 45,761 27,319 23,769 213,891 307,6082007 98,357 13,178 111,535 35,345 64,317 2,659 36,775 51,930 33,974 32,945 257,945 369,4802008 133,190 18,127 151,317 45,446 79,443 2,235 43,860 76,866 46,158 45,746 339,754 491,071Quarter20061st 16,255 3,175 19,430 7,091 11,412 650 5,547 7,815 5,352 4,965 42,832 62,2622nd 17,234 1,749 18,983 6,817 9,672 529 5,961 9,998 6,390 5,014 44,381 63,3643rd 24,965 2,658 27,594 8,283 17,245 762 9,750 13,088 7,434 7,041 63,603 91,2264th 25,470 2,211 27,021 10,774 14,237 836 7,476 14,860 8,143 6,749 63,075 90,75620071st 21,116 4,006 25,122 7,095 15,966 702 7,678 10,765 7,540 6,885 56,631 81,7532nd 24,464 2,509 26,973 9,024 13,812 805 9,365 14,265 9,126 6,852 63,249 90,2223rd 28,526 3,483 32,009 8,524 20,548 630 13,341 14,802 9,475 9,494 76,814 108,8234th 24,251 3,180 27,431 10,702 13,991 522 6,391 12,098 7,833 9,714 61,251 88,68220081st 23,343 4,988 28,331 7,974 17,230 459 8,587 15,927 8,897 9,480 68,554 96,8852nd 29,698 2,941 32,639 9,662 14,775 401 9,187 17,223 11,416 10,098 72,762 105,4013rd 43,227 5,823 49,050 13,399 27,872 691 16,014 22,000 13,138 13,755 106,869 155,9194th 36,922 4,375 41,297 14,411 19,566 684 10,072 21,716 12,707 12,413 91,569 132,866Source: Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 3.8 D: Migration Statistics: Malaba and Busia Arrivals, 2004 – 2008 Ugandans Non-Ugandans Grand Non- Sub Total Period Resident Resident Total Resident Non–resident Western Other North Other Other & Sub Europe Europe America COMESA Africa Not Total Stated2004 101,107 3,920 105,027 12,253 4,383 312 2,440 194,062 41,986 4,870 260,306 365,3332005 64,949 3,420 68,369 8,797 3,817 377 1,931 119,388 25,116 3,758 163,184 231,5532006 62,841 3,501 66,342 10,002 3,450 381 2,203 134,875 24,739 2,872 178,522 244,8642007 56,602 2,876 59,478 12,646 3,375 250 2,166 178,440 27,089 3,279 227,245 286,7232008 48,582 2,782 51,364 18,647 2,605 493 1,429 206,707 19,557 3,645 253,083 304,447Quarter20061st 15,224 780 16,004 2,686 838 68 412 26,284 6,046 815 37,149 53,1532nd 18,169 1,042 19,211 2,712 900 126 678 38,237 7,425 682 50,760 69,9713rd 17,370 929 18,299 2,688 1,038 110 660 39,599 6,833 743 51,671 69,9704th 12,078 750 12,828 1,916 674 77 453 30,755 4,435 632 38,942 61,77020071st 12,375 465 12,840 3,010 562 57 442 38,169 7,023 498 49,761 62,6012nd 12,592 664 13,256 2,631 650 51 518 40,082 5,910 484 50,326 63,5823rd 19,321 926 20,247 4,833 1,540 99 913 63,444 9,807 921 81,557 101,8044th 12,314 821 13,135 2,172 623 43 293 36,745 4,349 1,376 45,601 58,73620081st 11,473 506 11,979 5,256 422 82 281 63,519 5,583 1,141 76,284 88,2632nd 13,107 647 13,754 4,451 576 113 384 52,350 5,174 679 63,727 77,4813rd 13,982 699 14,681 6,261 973 161 386 54,928 5,597 1,106 69,412 84,0934th 10,020 930 10,950 2,679 634 137 378 35,910 3,203 719 43,660 54,610 Source: Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of Statistics 175
    • Table 3.8 E: Migration Statistics: Malaba and Busia Departures, 2004 – 2008 Ugandans Non-Ugandans Grand Non- Sub Sub TotalPeriod Resident Resident Total Resident Non–resident Total Western Other North Other Other & COMESA Europe Europe America Africa Not Stated2004 101,343 4,599 105,942 10,244 5,297 258 2,836 168,402 33,527 6,287 226,851 332,7932005 58,686 2,883 61,569 8,099 3,419 195 1,740 97,597 20,476 3,196 134,722 196,2912006 62,481 2,707 65,188 11,391 4,199 253 2,562 128,000 24,215 2,991 173,611 238,7992007 59,169 2,775 61,944 10,950 4,615 197 3,050 147,528 25,884 3,914 196,128 258,0722008 60,201 2,496 62,697 13,962 2,573 186 1,740 213,923 22,636 3,309 258,329 321,026Quarter20061st 14,213 887 15,100 2,172 982 28 427 24,427 5,244 840 34,122 49,2222nd 16,951 620 17,571 2,629 872 71 788 32,401 6,775 711 44,247 61,8183rd 16,699 700 17,399 2,850 1,576 99 841 37,108 6,869 887 50,230 67,6294th 14,618 500 15,118 3,740 767 55 506 34,064 5,327 553 45,012 60,13020071st 13,707 572 14,279 1,870 788 56 631 30,030 5,762 508 39,645 53,9242nd 13,028 465 13,493 2,517 704 30 641 33,516 5,908 458 43,774 57,2673rd 22,181 1,141 23,322 4,527 2,473 71 1,440 54,665 9,324 1,488 73,988 97,3104th 10,253 597 10,850 2,036 650 40 328 29,317 4,890 1,460 38,721 49,57120081st 13,513 734 14,247 2,784 359 33 237 39,479 4,438 710 48,040 62,2872nd 15,065 564 15,629 3,965 568 41 375 50,779 6,374 840 62,942 78,5713rd 19,105 795 19,900 3,758 1,161 65 725 53,039 6,536 1,181 66,465 86,3654th 12,518 403 12,921 3,455 485 47 403 70,626 5,288 578 80,882 93,803 Source: Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 3.8 F: Migration Statistics: Mutukula, Western and Northern Borders Arrivals, 2004–2008 Ugandans Non-Ugandans Total Grand Non-resident Non- TotalPeriod Resident Resident Western Other North COMESA Other Other & not Resident Europe Europe America Africa Stated Total2004 28,623 4,438 33,061 3,512 2,525 182 953 86,383 29,955 4,941 128,451 161,5122005 26,043 3,295 31,343 2,522 3,001 251 1,315 89,398 33,351 7,747 137,585 166,9232006 49,875 2,715 52,590 3,161 3,451 196 1,838 130,404 25,329 2,590 166,969 219,5592007 50,308 2,728 53,036 3,792 3,456 241 1,791 143,411 34,662 3,181 190,534 243,5702008 77,242 3,508 80,750 5,725 3,232 331 1,737 208,989 27,813 2,862 250,689 331,439Quarter20061st 9,166 631 9,797 743 621 49 322 19,982 7,231 630 29,578 39,3752nd 11,210 781 11,991 855 597 39 433 27,235 5,498 913 35,570 47,5613rd 13,777 572 14,349 769 1,286 55 613 35,713 8,720 463 47,619 61,9684th 15,722 731 16,453 794 947 53 470 47,474 3,880 584 54,202 70,65520071st 12,570 447 13,017 921 683 56 378 33,433 10,378 708 46,557 59,5742nd 12,301 750 13,051 977 744 52 416 35,246 8,613 568 46,616 59,6673rd 12,887 684 13,571 1,026 1,238 86 591 35,790 10,144 890 49,765 63,3364th 12,550 847 13,397 868 791 47 406 38,942 5,527 1,015 47,596 60,99320081st 9,931 849 10,780 1,258 576 28 278 31,977 6,932 676 41,725 52,5052nd 31,868 796 32,664 1,150 659 49 469 41,695 5,055 649 49,726 82,3903rd 18,125 984 19,109 1,728 1,288 115 661 70,072 7,088 632 81,584 100,6934th 17,318 879 18,197 1,589 709 139 329 65,245 8,738 905 77,654 95,851 Source: Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of Statistics 176
    • Table 3.8 G: Migration Statistics: Mutukula, Western and Northern Borders Departures, 2004 – 2008 Ugandans Non-Ugandans Grand Non- Total Total Non-residentsPeriod Resident Resident Resident Western Other North Other Other & COMESA Europe Europe America Africa Not Stated Total2004 35,252 3,549 38,801 3,618 2,738 130 1,220 78,470 28,698 4,403 119,277 158,0782005 32,847 2,447 35,294 2,535 3,781 202 1,462 80,717 27,152 3,546 119,395 154,6892006 59,964 3,084 63,048 3,339 4,372 128 2,153 108,297 24,633 3,499 146,421 209,4692007 63,816 3054 66,870 4,098 4,550 201 2,225 138,438 31,235 3,939 184,686 251,5562008 79,650 5,489 85,139 4,788 4,820 422 2,895 228,002 27,989 6,690 275,606 360,745Quarter20061st 10,856 990 11,846 588 772 25 369 16,148 5,762 1,297 24,961 36,8072nd 15,450 912 16,362 983 813 39 598 25,452 8,017 1,050 36,952 53,3143rd 16,496 479 16,975 816 1,617 41 666 30,652 6,982 610 41,384 58,3594th 17,162 703 17,865 952 1,170 23 520 36,045 3,872 542 43,124 60,98920071st 17,204 619 17,823 812 1,034 55 531 33,202 7,087 650 43,371 61,1942nd 17,077 779 17,856 1,116 905 31 549 35,579 9,094 714 47,988 65,8443rd 15,178 913 16,091 1,080 1,518 63 718 33,809 8,521 1,383 47,092 63,1834th 14,357 743 15,100 1,090 1,093 52 427 35,848 6,533 1,192 46,235 61,33620081st 14,168 1,832 16,000 913 920 84 493 35,014 5,400 1,855 44,679 60,6792nd 13,815 1,151 14,966 1,088 764 45 660 41,595 4,806 1,262 50,220 65,1863rd 27,358 1,426 28,784 1,392 2,071 155 1,122 77,648 7,923 1,664 91,975 120,7594th 24,309 1,080 25,389 1,395 1,065 138 620 73,745 9,860 1,909 88,732 114,121Source: Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of Statistics 177
    • Table 3.8 H: Visitor arrivals by country of usual residence, 2004 - 2008Country of residence 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Africa 406,744 337,188 398,052 410,553 624,352Egypt 1,038 1,035 1,021 948 1,725Ethiopia 2,482 2,954 3,075 7,895 8,319Kenya 220,062 138,346 160,306 199,598 249,786Rwanda 65,298 80,522 111,385 123,262 181,339Sudan 5,536 2,819 6,433 10,299 16,169Tanzania 67,885 50,723 50,111 55,435 45,276DR Congo 3,998 6,277 4,653 4,745 12,495Other Africa 40,445 45,124 61,068 8371 109,245America 23,438 28,557 35,749 42,388 53,950Canada 3,669 5,195 6,123 8,308 9,186USA 18,898 21,968 28,120 32,344 42,418Other America 871 1,394 1,506 1,736 2,346Asia 17,884 20,423 21,873 25,106 33,532China 1,798 2,177 2,951 4,220 6,088India 9,366 10,691 11,829 12,408 16,236Japan 897 1,514 1,512 1,873 1,949Pakistan 2,773 3,188 2,510 2,395 2,609Other Asia 3,050 2,853 3,071 4,210 6,650Europe 48,847 62,312 71,131 77,391 106,020Austria 500 396 420 639 1,331Belgium 1,914 2,675 3,433 3,301 4,422Czechoslovakia 135 236 259 415 505Denmark 1,891 2,509 2,974 2,852 3,389Finland 354 411 596 450 585France 2,079 2,351 2,956 2,775 3,958Germany 4,241 4,972 5,683 5,802 8,083Ireland 1,139 1,422 1,243 1,633 2,615Italy 2,406 3301 4,075 3,679 5,063Netherlands 3,313 4,751 5,162 4,790 7,136Norway 1,749 2,262 2,343 2,517 3,528Russia 486 623 1,251 678 716Sweden 2,471 2,458 3,120 3,131 4,575Switzerland 1,568 1,966 1,902 1,755 1,986United Kingdom 22,402 28,227 31,495 38,667 51,812Yugoslavia 103 34 410 108 79Other Europe 2096 3,718 3,809 4,199 6,237Middle East 2,095 2,731 3,090 4,023 7,995Oceania 2,405 3,502 4,469 4,163 6,264Australia 2,132 3,190 3,846 3,566 5,342New Zealand 273 312 623 597 922Other & Not Stated 10,966 13,015 4,222 7,922 11,751Total 512,379 467,728 538,586 641,743 843,864Source: Ministry of Internal Affairs and Uganda Bureau of Statistics 178
    • Table 3.8 I: Tourism basic indicators, 2004 – 2008Indicator 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Inbound tourism (‘000)Visitor arrivals 512 468 539 642 844Visitor arrivals by region (‘000)Africa 407 337 398 411 624Americas 23 29 36 42 54Europe 49 62 71 77 106Asia 18 20 22 25 34Middle East 2 3 3 4 8Oceania 2 4 4 4 6Other & not stated 11 13 4 8 12Visitor arrivals by mode of transport (‘000)Air 131 172 200 234 358Road 381 296 336 408 486Arrivals by purpose of visit (‘000)Leisure, recreation and holidays 86 9 30 140 144Business and professional 81 31 72 110 163Visiting friends and relatives 71 35 89 272 347Other 274 393 345 120 190Tourism expenditure in the country (US$ M) 321 327 375 449 590Outbound Tourism (‘000):Departures 231 189 254 272 337Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics.Table 3.8 J: Visitors to the National Parks (Citizen and Foreigners) 2004– 2008National Parks 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Murchison Falls National Park 46,033 39,133 26,256 32,049 36,752Queen Elizabeth national park 41,843 48,720 43,885 51,749 53,921Kidepo Valley National Park 818 758 959 795 1,558Lake Mburo National Park 15,118 16,181 12,508 14,264 16,539Rwenzori Mountains National Park 592 906 948 1,583 2,020Bwindi Impenetrable National Park 5,768 9,012 10,176 9,585 10,128Mgahinga Gorrila National Park 3,337 1,910 2,071 2,676 3,244Semliki National Park 1,755 1,949 2,584 1,940 2,701Kibale National Park and Katonga 5,463 6,490 7,741 8,440 7,733Mount Elgon National Park 3,610 3,751 2,964 3,472 3,708Total 124,337 128,810 110,092 126,553 138,304Source: Uganda Wildlife Authority 179
    • Table 3.8.K: Monthly accommodation capacity for selected Hotels in Uganda, occupancy rates and guest nights in 2005, 2007 and 2008 * Accommodation Room occupancy Guest nights Occupancy Bed/room Number Total Total Month of No. of No. of room bed Foreign Domestic Room Bed Hotels rooms bedspaces nights nights2005Jan 28 45,880 66,898 16,614 19,284 7,365 11,919 36.2 29 1.16Feb 28 39,648 58,548 17,270 19,231 9,834 9,397 43.6 33 1.11Mar 29 44,702 66,433 20,738 24,127 11,302 12,825 46.4 36 1.16Apr 29 43,350 64,290 18,457 21,123 9337 11,786 42.6 33 1.14May 29 44,795 66,433 19,538 21,790 8,658 13,132 43.6 33 1.12Jun 29 43,350 64,290 19,988 22,590 8,346 14,314 46.1 35 1.13Jul 30 45,508 67,611 19,762 22,590 8,977 13,613 43.4 33 1.14Aug 30 45,508 67,611 19,309 22,288 8,580 13,708 42.4 33 1.15Sept 30 46,320 68,700 21,788 24,389 12,246 12,143 47.0 36 1.12Oct 30 45,508 66,650 21,643 23,687 9,591 14,096 47.6 36 1.09Nov 30 44,040 64,500 20,322 22,645 10,070 12,578 46.1 35 1.11Dec 30 45,508 66,650 14,596 16,431 32,418 8,628 32.1 25 1.13Total 534,117 788,614 230,025 260,175 136,724 148,139Average 44.6 33 1.132007Jan 51 68,820 80,278 20,435 23,334 9,640 13,694 29.7 29 1.14Feb 51 59,472 70,258 21,242 23,270 10,611 12,659 35.7 33 1.10Mar 51 67,053 79,720 25,508 29,194 13,312 15,881 38.0 37 1.14Apr 51 65,025 77,148 22,702 25,559 11,655 13,904 34.9 33 1.13May 51 67,193 79,720 24,032 26,366 12,023 14,343 35.8 33 1.10Jun 51 65,025 77,148 24,585 27,334 12,464 14,870 37.8 35 1.11Jul 51 68,262 81,133 24,307 27,334 10,464 16,870 35.6 34 1.12Aug 51 68,262 81,133 23,750 26,968 12,298 14,671 34.8 33 1.14Sept 51 69,480 82,440 26,799 29,511 13,457 16,054 38.6 36 1.10Oct 51 68,262 79,980 26,621 28,661 13,070 15,592 39.0 36 1.08Nov 51 66,060 77,400 24,996 27,400 12,495 14,906 37.8 35 1.10Dec 51 68,262 79,980 17,953 19,882 15,066 4,816 26.3 25 1.11Total 801,176 946,338 282,930 314,813 146,555 168,260Average 35.3 33 1.112008Jan 72 107,818 140,486 27,247 35,234 15,969 19,265 25.3 25 1.29Feb 72 93,173 122,951 28,323 35,137 17,920 17,217 30.4 29 1.24Mar 72 105,050 139,509 34,010 44,082 22,482 21,600 32.4 32 1.30Apr 72 101,873 135,009 30,269 38,594 18,683 19,911 29.7 29 1.28May 72 105,268 139,509 32,042 39,813 10,304 29,508 30.4 29 1.24Jun 72 101,873 135,009 32,780 41,274 21,050 20,224 32.2 31 1.26Jul 72 106,944 141,983 32,410 41,274 21,050 20,224 30.3 29 1.27Aug 72 106,943 141,983 31,667 40,722 16,768 23,954 29.6 29 1.29Sept 72 108,852 144,270 35,732 44,561 21,726 22,835 32.8 31 1.25Oct 72 106,944 139,965 35,495 43,279 22,072 21,206 33.2 31 1.22Nov 72 103,494 135,450 33,328 41,375 21,101 20,274 32.2 31 1.24Dec 72 106,944 139,965 23,937 30,021 20,311 9,710 22.4 21 1.25Total 1,255,177 1,656,089 377,240 475,366 229,436 245,928 361 345Average 30.1 29 1.26* Note: Data for 2006 was not collectedSource: Uganda Wildlife Authority 180
    • 4.0 Macro Economic Statistics4.1 National AccountsTable 4.1 A: Summary of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at market prices, 2000 - 2008 Gross Domestic Product Per capita GDP GDP, Bill. Shs. Growth rate Per capita GDP, Shs. Growth rate Constant 2002 Constant 2002 Current Constant Constant 2002 Current price price price price 2002 price price Calendar year 2000 10,030 10,297 - 437,251 448,860 - 2001 11,132 11,199 8.8 469,976 472,816 5.3 2002 11,990 11,990 7.1 490,190 490,190 3.7 2003 13,843 12,728 6.2 548,137 503,980 2.8 2004 15,271 13,467 5.8 585,622 516,420 2.5 2005 17,878 14,814 10.0 663,971 550,193 6.5 2006 20,166 15,859 7.0 725,343 570,410 3.7 2007 23,351 17,156 8.2 813,425 597,638 4.8 2008 28,340 18,582 8.3 956,081 626,895 4.9 Fiscal year 2000/01 10,296 10,591 - 441,712 454,366 - 2001/02 10,907 11,493 8.5 453,151 477,499 5.1 2002/03 12,438 12,237 6.5 500,516 492,412 3.1 2003/04 13,972 13,070 6.8 544,529 509,354 3.4 2004/05 16,026 13,897 6.3 604,859 524,538 3.0 2005/06 18,172 15,396 10.8 664,269 562,792 7.3 2006/07 21,187 16,691 8.4 750,039 590,904 5.0 2007/08 24,709 18,202 9.0 847,166 624,068 5.6 2008/09 29,824 19,469 7.0 990,314 646,477 3.6Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 181
    • Table 4.1 B (i): GDP by economic activity at current prices,billion Shillings, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 15,271 17,878 20,166 23,351 28,340Agriculture, forestry and fishing 3,520 4,284 4,553 4,827 6,083 Cash crops 297 335 350 476 559 Food crops 2,075 2,605 2,708 2,564 3,350 Livestock 269 286 305 346 461 Forestry 509 595 648 816 973 Fishing 369 463 542 625 740Industry 3,451 4,093 4,488 5,585 6,744Mining & quarrying 42 49 55 67 81Manufacturing 1,066 1,226 1,394 1,616 2,032 Formal 776 895 1,010 1,183 1,506 Informal 290 330 384 433 527Electricity supply 207 260 309 487 496Water supply 320 402 474 575 676Construction 1,816 2,156 2,256 2,840 3,458Services 7,345 8,405 9,900 11,435 13,699Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 1,941 2,267 2,738 3,286 4,055Hotels & restaurants 611 724 818 954 1,165Transport & communications 788 916 1,218 1,474 1,946 Road, rail & water transport 401 451 510 602 766 Air transport and support services 89 109 125 166 210 Posts and telecommunication 298 356 584 706 971Financial services 421 439 510 683 894Real estate activities 1,160 1,294 1,447 1,645 1,873Other business services 221 258 302 359 435Public administration & defence 596 658 720 747 838Education 1,072 1,227 1,419 1,474 1,562Health 249 279 311 307 319Other personal & community services 285 345 416 506 614Adjustments 956 1,096 1,225 1,503 1,814FISIM -253 -274 -330 -408 -512Taxes on products 1,209 1,371 1,555 1,911 2,326Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 B (ii): Expenditure on GDP at current prices,billion Shillings, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 15,271 17,878 20,166 23,351 28,340Final consumption expenditure 13,610 15,828 18,834 20,580 25,878Household final consumption expenditure 11,394 13,387 16,142 17,970 23,063Government final consumption expenditure 2,216 2,441 2,692 2,609 2,814Gross capital formation 3,318 3,855 4,180 5,366 5,749Fixed capital formation 3,300 3,813 4,126 5,304 5,672Changes in inventories 18 42 53 62 77Net exports -1,657 -1,805 -2,848 -2,595 -3,287Exports 2,046 2,717 3,003 4,405 5,625 Goods, fob 1,375 1,813 2,175 3,481 4,642 Services 671 904 828 924 983less Imports -3,702 -4,521 -5,851 -7,000 -8,912 Goods, fob -2,572 -3,115 -4,057 -5,126 -6,850 Services -1,130 -1,406 -1,794 -1,874 -2,062Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 182
    • Table 4.1 B (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at current prices, billion Shillings, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 15,271 17,878 20,166 23,351 28,340 Monetary 13,010 15,165 17,239 20,230 24,519 Non-monetary 2,261 2,713 2,927 3,121 3,821Total Agriculture 3,520 4,284 4,553 4,827 6,083 Monetary 2,103 2,516 2,686 2,910 3,638 Non-monetary 1,416 1,768 1,868 1,917 2,444Food crops 2,075 2,605 2,708 2,564 3,350 Monetary 1,021 1,254 1,289 1,221 1,595 Non-monetary 1,054 1,351 1,419 1,343 1,755Livestock 269 286 305 346 461 Monetary 221 231 244 277 370 Non-monetary 48 55 61 69 92Forestry 509 595 648 816 973 Monetary 203 243 270 326 395 Non-monetary 306 352 377 491 578Fishing 369 463 542 625 740 Monetary 361 452 531 611 721 Non-monetary 8 11 11 14 19Construction 1,816 2,156 2,256 2,840 3,458 Monetary 1,747 2,079 2,170 2,747 3,351 Non-monetary 69 77 86 93 108Real estate activities 1,160 1,294 1,447 1,645 1,873 Monetary rents 384 426 473 534 604 Owner-occupied dwellings 775 868 973 1,110 1,269Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 B (iv): Fixed capital formation at current prices, billion Shillings, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Gross fixed capital formation 3,300 3,813 4,126 5,304 5,672 Public 787 832 933 1,204 1,092 Private 2,513 2,980 3,193 4,100 4,580Construction works 2,377 2,806 2,937 3,680 4,480 Public 481 495 522 577 694 Private 1,896 2,311 2,415 3,103 3,786Machinery and equipment 923 1,007 1,190 1,624 1,192 Public 305 338 411 627 398 Private 618 669 779 997 794Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 183
    • Table 4.1 C (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, billion Shillings, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 13,467 14,814 15,859 17,156 18,582Agriculture, forestry and fishing 2,773 2,842 2,791 2,838 2,902 Cash crops 282 223 218 235 262 Food crops 1,518 1,576 1,514 1,547 1,587 Livestock 233 234 241 248 256 Forestry 431 457 476 486 507 Fishing 308 352 342 322 291Industry 3,139 3,658 3,892 4,201 4,571Mining & quarrying 39 47 56 59 65Manufacturing 959 1,050 1,087 1,169 1,248 Formal 696 767 785 856 919 Informal 264 283 302 313 328Electricity supply 180 180 155 167 170Water supply 298 309 316 328 345Construction 1,663 2,071 2,278 2,478 2,743Services 6,590 7,170 7,908 8,537 9,444Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 1,704 1,879 2,062 2,350 2,645Hotels & restaurants 587 660 718 784 882Transport & communications 718 768 934 1,052 1,291 Road, rail & water transport 365 377 398 426 456 Air transport and support services 81 91 97 117 125 Posts and telecommunication 272 300 439 509 711Financial services 276 326 385 366 437Real estate activities 1,071 1,130 1,193 1,261 1,332Other business services 204 225 249 275 309Public administration & defence 546 572 589 614 668Education 987 1,055 1,160 1,177 1,168Health 233 255 274 271 275Other personal & community services 263 302 343 388 436Adjustments 965 1,144 1,269 1,580 1,666FISIM -111 -142 -189 -156 -185Taxes on products 1,075 1,285 1,458 1,736 1,851Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 C (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, billion Shillings, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 13,467 14,814 15,859 17,156 18,582Final consumption expenditure 11,881 12,769 14,161 14,655 16,026Household final consumption expenditure 9,851 10,647 11,960 12,513 13,780Government final consumption expenditure 2,031 2,122 2,201 2,143 2,246Gross capital formation 2,938 3,545 3,936 4,539 4,531Fixed capital formation 2,922 3,511 3,896 4,497 4,489Changes in inventories 16 34 41 42 42Net exports -1,352 -1,500 -2,239 -2,038 -1,975Exports 1,677 2,038 1,909 2,829 3,908 Goods, fob 1,134 1,377 1,380 2,232 3,266 Services 543 661 530 597 643less Imports -3,030 -3,538 -4,148 -4,868 -5,884 Goods, fob -2,092 -2,411 -2,840 -3,531 -4,487 Services -937 -1,128 -1,308 -1,337 -1,397Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 184
    • Table 4.1 C (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, billion Shillings, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 13,467 14,814 15,859 17,156 18,582 Monetary 11,614 12,860 13,871 15,093 16,434 Non-monetary 1,852 1,955 1,987 2,064 2,148Total Agriculture 2,773 2,842 2,791 2,838 2,902 Monetary 1,698 1,709 1,671 1,692 1,725 Non-monetary 1,075 1,133 1,119 1,146 1,177Food crops 1,518 1,576 1,514 1,547 1,587 Monetary 747 759 721 736 756 Non-monetary 771 817 793 810 831Livestock 233 234 241 248 256 Monetary 192 189 193 199 205 Non-monetary 42 45 48 49 51Forestry 431 457 476 486 507 Monetary 176 194 205 207 220 Non-monetary 255 263 271 279 287Fishing 308 352 342 322 291 Monetary 302 344 335 314 283 Non-monetary 7 8 7 7 8Construction 1,663 2,071 2,278 2,478 2,743 Monetary 1,602 2,008 2,213 2,411 2,674 Non-monetary 61 63 65 67 69Real estate activities 1,071 1,130 1,193 1,261 1,332 Monetary rents 355 372 391 410 430 Owner-occupied dwellings 716 758 803 851 902Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 C (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Gross fixed capital formation 2,922 3,511 3,896 4,497 4,489 Public 688 751 853 1,003 866 Private 2,234 2,760 3,043 3,494 3,623Construction works 2,177 2,697 2,967 3,212 3,554 Public 441 478 532 507 554 Private 1,736 2,219 2,435 2,705 3,000Machinery and equipment 745 815 928 1,285 935 Public 246 273 320 496 312 Private 498 541 608 789 623Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 185
    • Table 4.1 D (i): GDP by economic activity at current prices, billion shillings, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 16,026 18,172 21,187 24,709 29,824Agriculture, forestry and fishing 4,025 4,377 4,720 5,239 7,055 Cash crops 283 348 399 557 532 Food crops 2,479 2,628 2,666 2,747 4,091 Livestock 282 293 323 393 544 Forestry 553 611 735 882 1,038 Fishing 427 497 597 659 850Industry 3,774 4,146 5,313 6,326 7,214Mining & quarrying 52 47 65 73 85Manufacturing 1,125 1,291 1,510 1,796 2,238 Formal 819 945 1,098 1,323 1,677 Informal 306 346 411 473 561Electricity supply 225 264 423 492 513Water supply 352 424 529 624 717Construction 2,020 2,119 2,786 3,341 3,661Services 7,273 8,580 9,960 11,686 13,827Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 1,662 2,010 2,411 2,962 3,627Hotels & restaurants 663 757 887 1,040 1,257Transport & communications 832 1,047 1,316 1,662 2,028 Road, rail & water transport 415 484 539 687 791 Air transport and support services 98 117 140 196 217 Posts and telecommunication 319 447 637 779 1,020Financial services 409 475 581 794 1,042Real estate activities 1,170 1,289 1,438 1,635 1,852Other business services 238 283 337 413 480Public administration & defence 595 725 707 827 875Education 1,133 1,315 1,507 1,490 1,659Health 259 301 317 306 337Other personal & community services 313 378 461 557 669Adjustments 954 1,070 1,194 1,458 1,728FISIM -254 -301 -362 -453 -597Taxes on products 1,209 1,371 1,555 1,911 2,326Table 4.1 D (ii): Expenditure on GDP at current prices, billion shillings, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 16,026 18,172 21,187 24,709 29,824Final consumption expenditure 14,144 16,707 18,998 21,557 26,977Household final consumption expenditure 11,818 14,139 16,303 18,835 23,963Government final consumption expenditure 2,326 2,568 2,695 2,721 3,014Gross capital formation 3,588 3,848 5,013 5,639 6,547Fixed capital formation 3,564 3,810 4,967 5,583 6,476Changes in inventories 25 37 45 56 71Net exports -1,707 -2,382 -2,824 -2,487 -3,699Exports 2,276 2,782 3,543 5,346 6,345 Goods, fob 1,542 1,903 2,696 4,397 5,257 Services 734 878 848 949 1,088less Imports -3,983 -5,164 -6,367 -7,833 -10,045 Goods, fob -2,754 -3,594 -4,463 -5,944 -7,734 Services -1,229 -1,569 -1,904 -1,889 -2,311Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 186
    • Table 4.1 D (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at current prices, billion shillings, Fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 16,026 18,172 21,187 24,709 29,824 Monetary 13,515 15,430 18,222 21,445 25,572 Non-monetary 2,511 2,742 2,964 3,264 4,252Total Agriculture 4,025 4,377 4,720 5,239 7,055 Monetary 2,366 2,576 2,808 3,173 4,162 Non-monetary 1,659 1,801 1,912 2,066 2,893Food crops 2,479 2,628 2,666 2,747 4,091 Monetary 1,207 1,251 1,269 1,308 1,948 Non-monetary 1,272 1,377 1,397 1,439 2,143Livestock 282 293 323 393 544 Monetary 230 234 259 315 435 Non-monetary 52 58 64 78 108Forestry 553 611 735 882 1,038 Monetary 229 255 297 350 418 Non-monetary 325 356 438 532 619Fishing 427 497 597 659 850 Monetary 417 487 585 643 828 Non-monetary 10 10 13 16 22Construction 2,020 2,119 2,786 3,341 3,661 Monetary 1,951 2,043 2,703 3,249 3,559 Non-monetary 68 76 84 92 102Real estate activities 1,170 1,289 1,438 1,635 1,852 Monetary rents 387 423 469 529 595 Owner-occupied dwellings 783 866 969 1,106 1,257Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 D (iv): Fixed capital formation at current prices, billion shillings, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Gross fixed capital formation 3,564 3,810 4,967 5,583 6,476 Public 798 838 1,046 1,089 1,363 Private 2,766 2,972 3,921 4,494 5,112Construction works 2,634 2,762 3,606 4,316 4,753 Public 487 502 543 614 785 Private 2,147 2,259 3,063 3,702 3,968Machinery and equipment 930 1,049 1,361 1,267 1,723 Public 311 336 503 476 578 Private 619 713 858 792 1,145Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 187
    • Table 4.1 E (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings. fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 13,897 15,396 16,691 18,202 19,469Agriculture, forestry and fishing 2,808 2,821 2,824 2,862 2,936 Cash crops 246 220 232 253 257 Food crops 1,547 1,545 1,531 1,567 1,613 Livestock 234 237 244 252 259 Forestry 451 469 478 492 508 Fishing 331 350 339 299 299Industry 3,329 3,820 4,186 4,566 4,742Mining & quarrying 46 49 59 61 66Manufacturing 994 1,067 1,127 1,212 1,299 Formal 724 780 817 893 967 Informal 271 287 310 320 333Electricity supply 179 167 161 169 176Water supply 304 311 322 335 349Construction 1,805 2,225 2,517 2,789 2,851Services 6,815 7,644 8,259 9,104 9,963Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 1,762 1,978 2,183 2,504 2,696Hotels & restaurants 620 675 751 831 897Transport & communications 768 900 1,059 1,285 1,542 Road, rail & water transport 399 450 493 595 669 Air transport and support services 87 93 106 125 126 Posts and telecommunication 283 357 461 565 747Financial services 287 378 333 413 500Real estate activities 1,100 1,161 1,227 1,296 1,369Other business services 214 241 267 305 332Public administration & defence 531 615 577 653 684Education 1,009 1,104 1,220 1,141 1,196Health 240 271 278 264 286Other personal & community services 282 322 365 412 462Adjustments 946 1,112 1,422 1,670 1,829FISIM -129 -173 -150 -173 -198Taxes on products 1,075 1,285 1,571 1,843 2,027Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 E (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 13,897 15,396 16,691 18,202 19,469Final consumption expenditure 12,164 13,512 14,601 15,194 16,774Household final consumption expenditure 10,088 11,334 12,403 13,044 14,418Government final consumption expenditure 2,077 2,178 2,198 2,150 2,356Gross capital formation 3,127 3,763 4,359 4,641 5,064Fixed capital formation 3,107 3,733 4,326 4,607 5,030Changes in inventories 20 30 33 34 34Net exports -1,393 -1,879 -2,269 -1,633 -2,369Exports 1,817 1,958 2,196 3,661 4,145 Goods, fob 1,256 1,352 1,662 3,029 3,478 Services 562 607 535 632 668less Imports -3,211 -3,837 -4,465 -5,294 -6,514 Goods, fob -2,202 -2,639 -3,092 -3,984 -4,981 Services -1,008 -1,198 -1,373 -1,310 -1,533Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 188
    • Table 4.1 E (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 13,897 15,396 16,691 18,202 19,469 Monetary 11,995 13,421 14,666 16,096 17,274 Non-monetary 1,903 1,975 2,025 2,106 2,195Total Agriculture 2,808 2,821 2,824 2,862 2,936 Monetary 1,704 1,690 1,692 1,701 1,740 Non-monetary 1,104 1,131 1,133 1,162 1,196Food crops 1,547 1,545 1,531 1,567 1,613 Monetary 753 736 729 746 768 Non-monetary 794 809 802 821 845Livestock 234 237 244 252 259 Monetary 190 190 196 202 208 Non-monetary 43 47 49 50 52Forestry 451 469 478 492 508 Monetary 191 202 203 209 217 Non-monetary 259 267 275 283 292Fishing 331 350 339 299 299 Monetary 324 343 332 292 291 Non-monetary 7 7 7 7 8Construction 1,805 2,225 2,517 2,789 2,851 Monetary 1,743 2,160 2,451 2,721 2,781 Non-monetary 62 64 66 68 70Real estate activities 1,100 1,161 1,227 1,296 1,369 Monetary rents 364 381 400 419 440 Owner-occupied dwellings 737 780 827 876 929Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 E (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, billion shillings, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Gross fixed capital formation 3,107 3,733 4,326 4,607 5,030 Public 687 798 887 891 1,059 Private 2,420 2,936 3,439 3,716 3,971Construction works 2,354 2,900 3,258 3,603 3,702 Public 435 531 492 514 614 Private 1,919 2,369 2,766 3,089 3,089Machinery and equipment 753 834 1,068 1,003 1,328 Public 252 267 395 377 446 Private 501 567 673 627 882Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 189
    • Table 4.1 F (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 5.8 10.0 7.0 8.2 8.3Agriculture, forestry and fishing 1.1 2.5 -1.8 1.7 2.2 Cash crops 15.2 -21.0 -2.4 8.2 11.3 Food crops -4.1 3.8 -3.9 2.1 2.6 Livestock 5.7 0.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 Forestry 2.8 6.0 4.2 2.2 4.2 Fishing 12.0 14.3 -3.0 -5.9 -9.6Industry 8.7 16.5 6.4 8.0 8.8Mining & quarrying 9.9 21.4 18.2 5.0 10.4Manufacturing 4.4 9.5 3.5 7.6 6.7 Formal 6.1 10.3 2.3 9.1 7.4 Informal 0.2 7.5 6.7 3.5 4.9Electricity supply 6.8 0.2 -13.8 8.0 1.7Water supply 3.9 3.7 2.2 3.9 5.1Construction 12.5 24.6 10.0 8.8 10.7Services 6.3 8.8 10.3 8.0 10.6Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 4.8 10.2 9.8 14.0 12.5Hotels & restaurants 5.0 12.5 8.7 9.2 12.5Transport & communications 11.6 7.0 21.7 12.6 22.7 Road, rail & water transport 5.4 3.3 5.6 6.9 7.1 Air transport and support services 20.4 12.2 7.2 20.6 6.2 Posts and telecommunication 18.2 10.3 46.3 16.1 39.6Financial services 13.0 17.9 18.1 -4.9 19.4Real estate activities 5.5 5.5 5.6 5.6 5.7Other business services 6.3 10.2 10.8 10.3 12.5Public administration & defence 1.0 4.7 3.0 4.2 8.9Education 6.7 6.9 10.0 1.4 -0.7Health 3.3 9.1 7.7 -1.3 1.6Other personal & community services 15.5 14.5 13.8 13.1 12.5Adjustments 7.4 18.6 10.9 24.6 5.4FISIM 0.4 28.0 33.8 -17.5 18.5Taxes on products 6.7 19.5 13.4 19.1 6.6Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 F (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 5.8 10.0 7.0 8.2 8.3Final consumption expenditure 3.5 7.5 10.9 3.5 9.4Household final consumption expenditure 3.4 8.1 12.3 4.6 10.1Government final consumption expenditure 3.7 4.5 3.7 -2.7 4.8Gross capital formation 11.9 20.7 11.0 15.3 -0.2Fixed capital formation 13.8 20.2 11.0 15.4 -0.2Changes in inventories 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0Net exports -1.8 10.9 49.2 -8.9 -3.1Exports 20.9 21.5 -6.3 48.2 38.1 Goods, fob 18.5 21.5 0.2 61.8 46.3 Services 26.2 21.6 -19.9 12.8 7.6less Imports 9.6 16.8 17.2 17.4 20.9 Goods, fob 6.9 15.2 17.8 24.3 27.1 Services 16.0 20.3 16.0 2.2 4.5Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 190
    • Table 4.1 F (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 5.8 10.0 7.0 8.2 8.3 Monetary 6.4 10.7 7.9 8.8 8.9 Non-monetary 2.2 5.5 1.7 3.9 4.1Total Agriculture 1.1 2.5 -1.8 1.7 2.2 Monetary 1.9 0.6 -2.2 1.2 1.9 Non-monetary -0.1 5.4 -1.2 2.4 2.7Food crops -4.1 3.8 -3.9 2.1 2.6 Monetary -6.1 1.6 -5.0 2.1 2.6 Non-monetary -2.0 6.0 -3.0 2.1 2.6Livestock 5.7 0.2 3.0 3.0 3.0 Monetary 3.4 -1.3 2.0 3.0 3.0 Non-monetary 18.0 7.2 7.2 2.9 3.0Forestry 2.8 6.0 4.2 2.2 4.2 Monetary 2.4 10.3 5.8 1.2 5.8 Non-monetary 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0Fishing 12.0 14.3 -3.0 -5.9 -9.6 Monetary 11.8 14.1 -2.8 -6.1 -9.9 Non-monetary 23.3 21.4 -12.2 3.3 3.3Construction 12.5 24.6 10.0 8.8 10.7 Monetary 12.9 25.4 10.2 8.9 10.9 Non-monetary 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0Real estate activities 5.5 5.5 5.6 5.6 5.7 Monetary rents 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 Owner-occupied dwellings 5.8 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.0Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 F (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Gross fixed capital formation 13.8 20.2 11.0 15.4 -0.2 Public 11.6 9.3 13.5 17.5 -13.7 Private 14.6 23.5 10.3 14.8 3.7Construction works 11.9 23.9 10.0 8.3 10.7 Public -0.5 8.3 11.4 -4.9 9.3 Private 15.6 27.8 9.7 11.1 10.9Machinery and equipment 19.9 9.4 14.0 38.4 -27.3 Public 42.6 11.0 17.2 54.8 -37.1 Private 11.2 8.6 12.3 29.8 -21.0Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 191
    • Table 4.1 G (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 6.3 10.8 8.4 9.0 7.0Agriculture, forestry and fishing 2.0 0.5 0.1 1.3 2.6 Cash crops -5.5 -10.6 5.4 9.0 1.7 Food crops -0.2 -0.1 -0.9 2.4 2.9 Livestock 3.0 1.6 3.0 3.0 3.0 Forestry 6.5 4.1 2.0 2.8 3.3 Fishing 13.5 5.6 -3.0 -11.8 -0.1Industry 11.6 14.7 9.6 9.1 3.8Mining & quarrying 27.2 6.1 19.4 3.0 9.2Manufacturing 9.5 7.3 5.6 7.6 7.2 Formal 11.8 7.8 4.9 9.2 8.3 Informal 3.6 6.0 7.7 3.3 4.0Electricity supply 2.1 -6.5 -4.0 5.4 4.2Water supply 3.9 2.4 3.5 3.8 4.1Construction 14.9 23.2 13.2 10.8 2.2Services 6.2 12.2 8.0 10.2 9.4Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 7.2 12.3 10.4 14.7 7.6Hotels & restaurants 6.5 8.7 11.3 10.7 7.9Transport & communications 9.8 17.1 17.7 21.3 20.0 Road, rail & water transport 6.7 12.8 9.5 20.8 12.4 Air transport and support services 19.4 6.9 13.8 17.8 1.3 Posts and telecommunication 11.8 26.2 29.1 22.6 32.2Financial services 13.0 31.7 -11.9 24.1 21.1Real estate activities 5.5 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.7Other business services 9.2 12.5 10.6 14.3 8.8Public administration & defence -5.4 15.8 -6.3 13.3 4.7Education 4.4 9.4 10.6 -6.5 4.8Health 5.6 12.9 2.7 -4.8 8.1Other personal & community services 15.0 14.1 13.4 12.8 12.3 Adjustments 3.4 17.6 27.9 17.5 9.5FISIM 39.2 34.2 -13.8 15.9 14.3Taxes on products 6.7 19.5 22.3 17.3 9.9Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 G (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 6.3 10.8 8.4 9.0 7.0Final consumption expenditure 5.2 11.1 8.1 4.1 10.4Household final consumption expenditure 5.5 12.4 9.4 5.2 10.5Government final consumption expenditure 4.1 4.9 0.9 -2.2 9.6Gross capital formation 12.5 20.3 15.8 6.5 9.1Fixed capital formation 12.9 20.2 15.9 6.5 9.2Changes in inventories -29.1 47.0 11.1 3.7 -0.8Net exports 9.8 34.8 20.8 -28.0 45.0Exports 14.8 7.8 12.1 66.7 13.2 Goods, fob 19.8 7.6 22.9 82.3 14.8 Services 4.9 8.1 -11.9 18.3 5.6less Imports 12.6 19.5 16.4 18.6 23.0 Goods, fob 10.5 19.8 17.1 28.9 25.0 Services 17.5 18.8 14.6 -4.6 17.0Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 192
    • Table 4.1 G (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 6.3 10.8 8.4 9.0 7.0 Monetary 6.7 11.9 9.3 9.8 7.3 Non-monetary 3.9 3.8 2.6 4.0 4.2Total Agriculture 2.0 0.5 0.1 1.3 2.6 Monetary 1.6 -0.8 0.1 0.5 2.3 Non-monetary 2.7 2.4 0.2 2.6 3.0Food crops -0.2 -0.1 -0.9 2.4 2.9 Monetary -2.3 -2.3 -0.9 2.4 2.9 Non-monetary 1.9 1.9 -0.9 2.4 2.9Livestock 3.0 1.6 3.0 3.0 3.0 Monetary 1.0 -0.1 3.0 3.0 3.0 Non-monetary 12.4 9.3 3.0 3.0 3.0Forestry 6.5 4.1 2.0 2.8 3.3 Monetary 11.5 5.6 0.6 2.7 3.8 Non-monetary 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0Fishing 13.5 5.6 -3.0 -11.8 -0.1 Monetary 13.3 5.8 -3.1 -12.2 -0.2 Non-monetary 23.7 -5.4 3.3 3.3 3.3Construction 14.9 23.2 13.2 10.8 2.2 Monetary 15.4 24.0 13.5 11.0 2.2 Non-monetary 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0Real estate activities 5.5 5.6 5.6 5.6 5.7 Monetary rents 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 4.9 Owner-occupied dwellings 5.9 5.9 6.0 6.0 6.0Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 G (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, percentage change, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Gross fixed capital formation 12.9 20.2 15.9 6.5 9.2 Public 2.6 16.2 11.2 0.4 18.9 Private 16.2 21.3 17.2 8.1 6.9Construction works 14.1 23.2 12.4 10.6 2.7 Public -2.2 22.1 -7.3 4.4 19.4 Private 18.6 23.4 16.8 11.7 0.0Machinery and equipment 9.2 10.7 28.1 -6.0 32.3 Public 12.3 5.9 48.0 -4.5 18.3 Private 7.8 13.2 18.8 -6.9 40.8Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 193
    • Table 4.1 H (i): GDP by economic activity: deflators, 2002=100, calendar years 2002 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 113.4 120.7 127.2 136.1 152.5Agriculture, forestry and fishing 100.0 126.9 150.7 163.2 170.1 209.6 Cash crops 100.0 105.4 150.1 160.9 202.1 213.3 Food crops 100.0 136.7 165.3 178.8 165.8 211.1 Livestock 100.0 115.1 122.2 126.6 139.4 180.6 Forestry 100.0 118.2 130.3 136.1 167.9 192.0 Fishing 100.0 119.6 131.4 158.6 194.4 254.4Industry 100.0 110.0 111.9 115.3 132.9 147.6Mining & quarrying 100.0 109.2 104.0 98.8 114.5 125.9Manufacturing 100.0 111.1 116.7 128.3 138.2 162.9 Formal 100.0 111.5 116.7 128.8 138.1 163.8 Informal 100.0 110.2 116.6 126.9 138.4 160.3Electricity supply 100.0 115.4 144.3 199.4 291.1 291.1Water supply 100.0 107.3 130.2 150.1 175.2 196.1Construction 100.0 109.2 104.1 99.0 114.6 126.1Services 100.0 111.5 117.2 125.2 134.0 145.1Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 100.0 113.9 120.7 132.8 139.8 153.3Hotels & restaurants 100.0 104.1 109.7 114.0 121.7 132.1Transport & communications 100.0 109.9 119.3 130.4 140.1 150.8 Road, rail & water transport 100.0 109.9 119.5 128.1 141.4 168.1 Air transport and support services 100.0 109.9 119.5 128.1 141.4 168.1 Posts and telecommunication 100.0 109.9 118.8 133.1 138.6 136.6Financial services 100.0 152.3 134.7 132.5 186.5 204.4Real estate activities 100.0 108.3 114.5 121.2 130.5 140.6Other business services 100.0 108.3 114.5 121.2 130.5 140.6Public administration & defence 100.0 109.1 115.0 122.3 121.8 125.3Education 100.0 108.6 116.3 122.3 125.3 133.7Health 100.0 106.6 109.6 113.5 113.5 115.9Other personal & community services 100.0 108.3 114.5 121.2 130.5 140.6Adjustments 100.0 99.1 95.8 96.6 95.1 108.9FISIM 100.0 228.8 193.9 174.4 261.0 276.7Taxes on products 100.0 112.4 106.6 106.7 110.1 125.7Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 H (ii): Expenditure on GDP: deflators, 2002=100, calendar years 2002 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 113.4 120.7 127.2 136.1 152.5Final consumption expenditure 100.0 114.5 124.0 133.0 140.4 161.5Household final consumption expenditure 100.0 115.7 125.7 135.0 143.6 167.4Government final consumption expenditure 100.0 109.1 115.0 122.3 121.8 125.3Gross capital formation 100.0 113.0 108.7 106.2 118.2 126.9Fixed capital formation 100.0 112.9 108.6 105.9 118.0 126.4Changes in inventories 100.0 115.1 123.3 130.2 146.5 181.4Net exports 100.0 122.5 120.3 127.2 127.3 166.4Exports 100.0 121.9 133.3 157.3 155.7 143.9 Goods, fob 100.0 121.2 131.6 157.6 155.9 142.1 Services 100.0 123.5 136.8 156.4 154.8 153.0less Imports 100.0 122.2 127.8 141.1 143.8 151.5 Goods, fob 100.0 122.9 129.2 142.9 145.2 152.7 Services 100.0 120.5 124.7 137.1 140.1 147.6Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 194
    • Table 4.1 H (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP: deflators 2002=100, Calendar Years 2002 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 113.4 120.7 127.2 136.1 152.5 Monetary 100.0 112.0 117.9 124.3 134.0 149.2 Non-monetary 100.0 122.1 138.8 147.3 151.2 177.9Total Agriculture 100.0 126.9 150.7 163.2 170.1 209.6 Monetary 100.0 123.8 147.2 160.7 172.0 210.9 Non-monetary 100.0 131.8 156.0 166.9 167.3 207.7Food crops 100.0 136.7 165.3 178.8 165.8 211.1 Monetary 100.0 136.7 165.3 178.8 165.8 211.1 Non-monetary 100.0 136.7 165.3 178.8 165.8 211.1Livestock 100.0 115.1 122.2 126.6 139.4 180.6 Monetary 100.0 115.1 122.2 126.6 139.4 180.6 Non-monetary 100.0 115.1 122.2 126.6 139.4 180.6Forestry 100.0 118.2 130.3 136.1 167.9 192.0 Monetary 100.0 115.5 125.4 131.9 157.0 179.8 Non-monetary 100.0 120.0 133.8 139.2 176.0 201.3Fishing 100.0 119.6 131.4 158.6 194.4 254.4 Monetary 100.0 119.6 131.4 158.6 194.4 254.4 Non-monetary 100.0 119.6 131.4 158.6 194.4 254.4Construction 100.0 109.2 104.1 99.0 114.6 126.1 Monetary 100.0 109.1 103.5 98.1 113.9 125.3 Non-monetary 100.0 112.7 122.4 131.2 139.2 155.9Real estate activities 100.0 108.3 114.5 121.2 130.5 140.6 Monetary rents 100.0 108.3 114.5 121.2 130.5 140.6 Owner-occupied dwellings 100.0 108.3 114.5 121.2 130.5 140.6Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 H (iv): Fixed capital formation: deflators, 2002=100, calendar years 2002 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Gross fixed capital formation 100.0 112.9 108.6 105.9 118.0 126.4 Public 100.0 114.4 110.8 109.4 120.1 126.1 Private 100.0 112.5 108.0 105.0 117.3 126.4Construction works 100.0 109.2 104.1 99.0 114.6 126.0 Public 100.0 109.1 103.5 98.1 113.9 125.3 Private 100.0 109.2 104.2 99.2 114.7 126.2Machinery and equipment 100.0 123.9 123.6 128.1 126.4 127.5 Public 100.0 123.9 123.5 128.1 126.4 127.5 Private 100.0 123.9 123.6 128.1 126.4 127.5Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 195
    • Table 4.1 I (i): GDP by economic activity: deflators, 2002=100, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 115.3 118.0 126.9 135.7 153.2Agriculture, forestry and fishing 143.3 155.1 167.1 183.0 240.3 Cash crops 115.1 158.2 172.2 220.7 207.1 Food crops 160.2 170.1 174.2 175.3 253.6 Livestock 121.0 123.3 132.3 156.2 209.6 Forestry 122.8 130.3 153.6 179.3 204.2 Fishing 129.0 142.1 176.1 220.4 284.8Industry 113.4 108.5 126.9 138.5 152.1Mining & quarrying 111.9 95.1 110.6 119.7 128.3Manufacturing 113.1 121.0 134.0 148.1 172.2 Formal 113.2 121.3 134.3 148.2 173.5 Informal 113.1 120.4 132.9 148.1 168.6Electricity supply 125.6 158.0 263.4 291.1 291.1Water supply 115.7 136.1 164.0 186.4 205.7Construction 111.9 95.3 110.7 119.8 128.4Services 106.7 112.2 120.6 128.4 138.8Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 94.3 101.6 110.4 118.3 134.5Hotels & restaurants 106.8 112.3 118.1 125.1 140.2Transport & communications 108.2 116.4 124.2 129.4 131.5 Road, rail & water transport 104.1 107.6 109.5 115.5 118.3 Air transport and support services 112.7 125.2 132.1 157.1 171.6 Posts and telecommunication 112.7 125.2 138.2 137.9 136.6Financial services 142.8 125.8 174.7 192.4 208.6Real estate activities 106.3 110.9 117.2 126.2 135.3Other business services 110.9 117.2 126.2 135.3 144.8Public administration & defence 112.0 117.9 122.6 126.6 128.0Education 112.2 119.2 123.4 130.6 138.7Health 108.1 111.1 113.9 115.7 117.7Other personal & community services 110.9 117.2 126.2 135.3 144.8Adjustments 100.9 96.2 84.0 87.3 94.5FISIM 196.7 173.4 241.7 261.4 301.5Taxes on products 112.4 106.6 99.0 103.7 114.8Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 I (ii): Expenditure on GDP: deflators, 2002=100, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 115.3 118.0 126.9 135.7 153.2Final consumption expenditure 116.3 123.6 130.1 141.9 160.8Household final consumption expenditure 117.2 124.7 131.4 144.4 166.2Government final consumption expenditure 112.0 117.9 122.6 126.6 128.0Gross capital formation 114.8 102.3 115.0 121.5 129.3Fixed capital formation 114.7 102.1 114.8 121.2 128.7Changes in inventories 122.2 126.2 137.8 164.6 209.6Net exports 122.5 126.8 124.4 152.3 156.2Exports 125.2 142.0 161.4 146.0 153.1 Goods, fob 122.8 140.8 162.2 145.2 151.2 Services 130.8 144.7 158.6 150.1 163.0less Imports 124.1 134.6 142.6 148.0 154.2 Goods, fob 125.1 136.2 144.4 149.2 155.3 Services 121.8 131.0 138.6 144.2 150.8Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 196
    • Table 4.1 I (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP: deflators 2002=100, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 115.3 118.0 126.9 135.7 153.2 Monetary 112.7 115.0 124.2 133.2 148.0 Non-monetary 131.9 138.9 146.4 155.0 193.7Total Agriculture 143.3 155.1 167.1 183.0 240.3 Monetary 138.8 152.4 166.0 186.6 239.2 Non-monetary 150.3 159.3 168.8 177.8 241.9Food crops 160.2 170.1 174.2 175.3 253.6 Monetary 160.2 170.1 174.2 175.3 253.6 Non-monetary 160.2 170.1 174.2 175.3 253.6Livestock 121.0 123.3 132.3 156.2 209.6 Monetary 121.0 123.3 132.3 156.2 209.6 Non-monetary 121.0 123.3 132.3 156.2 209.6Forestry 122.8 130.3 153.6 179.3 204.2 Monetary 119.4 126.3 145.8 167.6 193.0 Non-monetary 125.2 133.3 159.4 187.9 212.4Fishing 129.0 142.1 176.1 220.4 284.8 Monetary 129.0 142.1 176.1 220.4 284.8 Non-monetary 129.0 142.1 176.1 220.4 284.8Construction 111.9 95.3 110.7 119.8 128.4 Monetary 112.0 94.6 110.3 119.4 128.0 Non-monetary 109.7 118.5 126.3 135.7 145.6Real estate activities 106.3 110.9 117.2 126.2 135.3 Monetary rents 106.3 110.9 117.2 126.2 135.3 Owner-occupied dwellings 106.3 110.9 117.2 126.2 135.3Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 I (iv): Fixed capital formation: deflators, 2002=100, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Gross fixed capital formation 114.7 102.1 114.8 121.2 128.7 Public 116.2 105.0 117.9 122.3 128.7 Private 114.3 101.3 114.0 120.9 128.7Construction works 111.9 95.2 110.7 119.8 128.4 Public 112.0 94.6 110.3 119.4 128.0 Private 111.9 95.4 110.7 119.8 128.5Machinery and equipment 123.5 125.8 127.5 126.3 129.7 Public 123.5 125.9 127.4 126.3 129.7 Private 123.5 125.8 127.5 126.3 129.7Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 197
    • Table 4.1 J (i): GDP by economic activity at current prices, percentage share, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0Agriculture, forestry and fishing 23.0 24.0 22.6 20.7 21.5 Cash crops 1.9 1.9 1.7 2.0 2.0 Food crops 13.6 14.6 13.4 11.0 11.8 Livestock 1.8 1.6 1.5 1.5 1.6 Forestry 3.3 3.3 3.2 3.5 3.4 Fishing 2.4 2.6 2.7 2.7 2.6Industry 22.6 22.9 22.3 23.9 23.8Mining & quarrying 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3Manufacturing 7.0 6.9 6.9 6.9 7.2 Formal 5.1 5.0 5.0 5.1 5.3 Informal 1.9 1.8 1.9 1.9 1.9Electricity supply 1.4 1.5 1.5 2.1 1.7Water supply 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.5 2.4Construction 11.9 12.1 11.2 12.2 12.2Services 48.1 47.0 49.1 49.0 48.3Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 12.7 12.7 13.6 14.1 14.3Hotels & restaurants 4.0 4.1 4.1 4.1 4.1Transport & communications 5.2 5.1 6.0 6.3 6.9 Road, rail & water transport 2.6 2.5 2.5 2.6 2.7 Air transport and support services 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 Posts and telecommunication 2.0 2.0 2.9 3.0 3.4Financial services 2.8 2.5 2.5 2.9 3.2Real estate activities 7.6 7.2 7.2 7.0 6.6Other business services 1.4 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.5Public administration & defence 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.2 3.0Education 7.0 6.9 7.0 6.3 5.5Health 1.6 1.6 1.5 1.3 1.1Other personal & community services 1.9 1.9 2.1 2.2 2.2Adjustments 6.3 6.1 6.1 6.4 6.4FISIM -1.7 -1.5 -1.6 -1.7 -1.8Taxes on products 7.9 7.7 7.7 8.2 8.2Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 J (ii): Expenditure on GDP at current prices, percentage share, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0Final consumption expenditure 89.1 88.5 93.4 88.1 91.3Household final consumption expenditure 74.6 74.9 80.0 77.0 81.4Government final consumption expenditure 14.5 13.7 13.4 11.2 9.9Gross capital formation 21.7 21.6 20.7 23.0 20.3Fixed capital formation 21.6 21.3 20.5 22.7 20.0Changes in inventories 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3Net exports -10.8 -10.1 -14.1 -11.1 -11.6Exports 13.4 15.2 14.9 18.9 19.8 Goods, fob 9.0 10.1 10.8 14.9 16.4 Services 4.4 5.1 4.1 4.0 3.5less Imports -24.2 -25.3 -29.0 -30.0 -31.4 Goods, fob -16.8 -17.4 -20.1 -22.0 -24.2 Services -7.4 -7.9 -8.9 -8.0 -7.3Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 198
    • Table 4.1 J (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at current prices, percentage share, calendar 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Monetary 85.2 84.8 85.5 86.6 86.5 Non-monetary 14.8 15.2 14.5 13.4 13.5Total Agriculture 23.0 24.0 22.6 20.7 21.5 Monetary 13.8 14.1 13.3 12.5 12.8 Non-monetary 9.3 9.9 9.3 8.2 8.6Food crops 13.6 14.6 13.4 11.0 11.8 Monetary 6.7 7.0 6.4 5.2 5.6 Non-monetary 6.9 7.6 7.0 5.8 6.2Livestock 1.8 1.6 1.5 1.5 1.6 Monetary 1.4 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.3 Non-monetary 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3Forestry 3.3 3.3 3.2 3.5 3.4 Monetary 1.3 1.4 1.3 1.4 1.4 Non-monetary 2.0 2.0 1.9 2.1 2.0Fishing 2.4 2.6 2.7 2.7 2.6 Monetary 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.6 2.5 Non-monetary 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1Construction 11.9 12.1 11.2 12.2 12.2 Monetary 11.4 11.6 10.8 11.8 11.8 Non-monetary 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4Real estate activities 7.6 7.2 7.2 7.0 6.6 Monetary rents 2.5 2.4 2.3 2.3 2.1 Owner-occupied dwellings 5.1 4.9 4.8 4.8 4.5Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 J (iv): Fixed capital formation at current prices, percentage share, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Gross fixed capital formation 21.6 21.3 20.5 22.7 20.0 Public 5.2 4.7 4.6 5.2 3.9 Private 16.5 16.7 15.8 17.6 16.2Construction works 15.6 15.7 14.6 15.8 15.8 Public 3.2 2.8 2.6 2.5 2.4 Private 12.4 12.9 12.0 13.3 13.4Machinery and equipment 6.0 5.6 5.9 7.0 4.2 Public 2.0 1.9 2.0 2.7 1.4 Private 4.0 3.7 3.9 4.3 2.8Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 199
    • Table 4.1 K (i): GDP by economic activity at constant (2002) prices, percentage share, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0Agriculture, forestry and fishing 20.6 19.2 17.6 16.5 15.6 Cash crops 2.1 1.5 1.4 1.4 1.4 Food crops 11.3 10.6 9.5 9.0 8.5 Livestock 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.4 1.4 Forestry 3.2 3.1 3.0 2.8 2.7 Fishing 2.3 2.4 2.2 1.9 1.6Industry 23.3 24.7 24.5 24.5 24.6Mining & quarrying 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.3Manufacturing 7.1 7.1 6.9 6.8 6.7 Formal 5.2 5.2 4.9 5.0 4.9 Informal 2.0 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.8Electricity supply 1.3 1.2 1.0 1.0 0.9Water supply 2.2 2.1 2.0 1.9 1.9Construction 12.3 14.0 14.4 14.4 14.8Services 48.9 48.4 49.9 49.8 50.8Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 12.7 12.7 13.0 13.7 14.2Hotels & restaurants 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.6 4.7Transport & communications 5.3 5.2 5.9 6.1 6.9 Road, rail & water transport 2.7 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 Air transport and support services 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 Posts and telecommunication 2.0 2.0 2.8 3.0 3.8Financial services 2.1 2.2 2.4 2.1 2.4Real estate activities 8.0 7.6 7.5 7.3 7.2Other business services 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.6 1.7Public administration & defence 4.1 3.9 3.7 3.6 3.6Education 7.3 7.1 7.3 6.9 6.3Health 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.6 1.5Other personal & community services 2.0 2.0 2.2 2.3 2.3Adjustments 7.2 7.7 8.0 9.2 9.0FISIM -0.8 -1.0 -1.2 -0.9 -1.0Taxes on products 8.0 8.7 9.2 10.1 10.0Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 K (ii): Expenditure on GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage shares, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0Final consumption expenditure 88.2 86.2 89.3 85.4 86.2Household final consumption expenditure 73.1 71.9 75.4 72.9 74.2Government final consumption expenditure 15.1 14.3 13.9 12.5 12.1Gross capital formation 21.8 23.9 24.8 26.5 24.4Fixed capital formation 21.7 23.7 24.6 26.2 24.2Changes in inventories 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.2Net exports -10.0 -10.1 -14.1 -11.9 -10.6Exports 12.5 13.8 12.0 16.5 21.0 Goods, fob 8.4 9.3 8.7 13.0 17.6 Services 4.0 4.5 3.3 3.5 3.5less Imports -22.5 -23.9 -26.2 -28.4 -31.7 Goods, fob -15.5 -16.3 -17.9 -20.6 -24.1 Services -7.0 -7.6 -8.2 -7.8 -7.5Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 200
    • Table 4.1 K (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at constant (2002) prices, percentage share, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Total GDP at market prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 Monetary 86.2 86.8 87.5 88.0 88.4 Non-monetary 13.8 13.2 12.5 12.0 11.6Total Agriculture 20.6 19.2 17.6 16.5 15.6 Monetary 12.6 11.5 10.5 9.9 9.3 Non-monetary 8.0 7.6 7.1 6.7 6.3Food crops 11.3 10.6 9.5 9.0 8.5 Monetary 5.5 5.1 4.5 4.3 4.1 Non-monetary 5.7 5.5 5.0 4.7 4.5Livestock 1.7 1.6 1.5 1.4 1.4 Monetary 1.4 1.3 1.2 1.2 1.1 Non-monetary 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3Forestry 3.2 3.1 3.0 2.8 2.7 Monetary 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.2 1.2 Non-monetary 1.9 1.8 1.7 1.6 1.5Fishing 2.3 2.4 2.2 1.9 1.6 Monetary 2.2 2.3 2.1 1.8 1.5 Non-monetary 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 0.0Construction 12.3 14.0 14.4 14.4 14.8 Monetary 11.9 13.6 14.0 14.1 14.4 Non-monetary 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4Real estate activities 8.0 7.6 7.5 7.3 7.2 Monetary rents 2.6 2.5 2.5 2.4 2.3 Owner-occupied dwellings 5.3 5.1 5.1 5.0 4.9Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 K (iv): Fixed capital formation at constant (2002) prices, percentage share, calendar years 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Gross fixed capital formation 21.7 23.7 24.6 26.2 24.2 Public 5.1 5.1 5.4 5.8 4.7 Private 16.6 18.6 19.2 20.4 19.5Construction works 16.2 18.2 18.7 18.7 19.1 Public 3.3 3.2 3.4 3.0 3.0 Private 12.9 15.0 15.4 15.8 16.1Machinery and equipment 5.5 5.5 5.9 7.5 5.0 Public 1.8 1.8 2.0 2.9 1.7 Private 3.7 3.7 3.8 4.6 3.4Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 201
    • Table 4.1 L (i): GDP by economic activity at current prices, percentage share, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0Agriculture, forestry and fishing 25.1 24.1 22.3 21.2 23.7 Cash crops 1.8 1.9 1.9 2.3 1.8 Food crops 15.5 14.5 12.6 11.1 13.7 Livestock 1.8 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.8 Forestry 3.5 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.5 Fishing 2.7 2.7 2.8 2.7 2.9Industry 23.5 22.8 25.1 25.6 24.2Mining & quarrying 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3Manufacturing 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.3 7.5 Formal 5.1 5.2 5.2 5.4 5.6 Informal 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9Electricity supply 1.4 1.5 2.0 2.0 1.7Water supply 2.2 2.3 2.5 2.5 2.4Construction 12.6 11.7 13.2 13.5 12.3Services 45.4 47.2 47.0 47.3 46.4Wholesale & retail trade; repairs 10.4 11.1 11.4 12.0 12.2Hotels & restaurants 4.1 4.2 4.2 4.2 4.2Transport & communications 5.2 5.8 6.2 6.7 6.8 Road, rail & water transport 2.6 2.7 2.5 2.8 2.7 Air transport and support services 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.7 Posts and telecommunication 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.2 3.4Financial services 2.6 2.6 2.7 3.2 3.5Real estate activities 7.3 7.1 6.8 6.6 6.2Other business services 1.5 1.6 1.6 1.7 1.6Public administration & defence 3.7 4.0 3.3 3.3 2.9Education 7.1 7.2 7.1 6.0 5.6Health 1.6 1.7 1.5 1.2 1.1Other personal & community services 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.2Adjustments 6.0 5.9 5.6 5.9 5.8FISIM -1.6 -1.7 -1.7 -1.8 -2.0Taxes on products 7.5 7.5 7.3 7.7 7.8Source: Uganda Bureau of StatisticsTable 4.1 L (ii): Expenditure on GDP at current prices, percentage share, fiscal years 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09Total GDP at market prices 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0Final consumption expenditure 88.3 91.9 89.7 87.2 90.5Household final consumption expenditure 73.7 77.8 76.9 76.2 80.3Government final consumption expenditure 14.5 14.1 12.7 11.0 10.1Gross capital formation 22.4 21.2 23.7 22.8 22.0Fixed capital formation 22.2 21.0 23.4 22.6 21.7Changes in inventories 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2Net exports -10.7 -13.1 -13.3 -10.1 -12.4Exports 14.2 15.3 16.7 21.6 21.3 Goods, fob 9.6 10.5 12.7 17.8 17.6 Services 4.6 4.8 4.0 3.8 3.6less Imports -24.9 -28.4 -30.1 -31.7 -33.7 Goods, fob -17.2 -19.8 -21.1 -24.1 -25.9 Services -7.7 -8.6 -9.0 -7.6 -7.7Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 202
    • Table 4.1 L (iii): Monetary and non-monetary GDP at current prices, percentage share, fiscal years