The Making of the President 2.0: How the Process Changed in 2008  Micah L. Sifry Personal Democracy Forum personaldemocrac...
Seven ways technology is changing politics <ul><li>1. Social networks foster real engagement. </li></ul>
 
 
<ul><li>2. Online video is replacing the soundbite with the soundblast. </li></ul>
 
 
<ul><li>3. Outsiders can make and spread better messages than insiders. </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>4. Campaigns are becoming less dependent on big donors. </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>5. Open-source fundraising works (just ask Ron Paul). </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>6. We can tell new, powerful stories with data and hold government more accountable. </li></ul>
 
 
<ul><li>7. We can be our own media and inject our concerns directly into the debate. </li></ul>
 
 
Some things haven’t changed (yet) <ul><li>1. The media narrative is still dominated by the horserace (bloggers obsess abou...
 
 
<ul><li>2. Candidates still avoid issues (as do their websites). </li></ul>
 
<ul><li>3. Voters are wanted by campaigns for their money and their time … but not their input. </li></ul>
 
Come to PdF,  June 29-30,2009
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The Making of the President 2.0: How the Internet is Changing the Political Game

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Micah Sifry of techPresident describes seven ways the Internet is changing politics in America, as seen through the 2008 presidential election, and three ways that the process has yet to change.

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The Making of the President 2.0: How the Internet is Changing the Political Game

  1. The Making of the President 2.0: How the Process Changed in 2008 Micah L. Sifry Personal Democracy Forum personaldemocracy.com
  2. Seven ways technology is changing politics <ul><li>1. Social networks foster real engagement. </li></ul>
  3.  
  4.  
  5. <ul><li>2. Online video is replacing the soundbite with the soundblast. </li></ul>
  6.  
  7.  
  8. <ul><li>3. Outsiders can make and spread better messages than insiders. </li></ul>
  9.  
  10. <ul><li>4. Campaigns are becoming less dependent on big donors. </li></ul>
  11.  
  12. <ul><li>5. Open-source fundraising works (just ask Ron Paul). </li></ul>
  13.  
  14. <ul><li>6. We can tell new, powerful stories with data and hold government more accountable. </li></ul>
  15.  
  16.  
  17. <ul><li>7. We can be our own media and inject our concerns directly into the debate. </li></ul>
  18.  
  19.  
  20. Some things haven’t changed (yet) <ul><li>1. The media narrative is still dominated by the horserace (bloggers obsess about it too). </li></ul>
  21.  
  22.  
  23. <ul><li>2. Candidates still avoid issues (as do their websites). </li></ul>
  24.  
  25. <ul><li>3. Voters are wanted by campaigns for their money and their time … but not their input. </li></ul>
  26.  
  27. Come to PdF, June 29-30,2009

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