Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Narrative first second lesson
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Narrative first second lesson

3,134

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,134
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
88
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  1. Narrative<br />
  2. Section 2B<br />Genre<br />Narrative<br />Media Language<br />Audience<br />Representation<br />
  3. Before Production Takes Place<br />You need to understand the way narrative is constructed in music videos<br />Have knowledge of narrative theories relating to story structure, characters and themes<br />
  4. What is Narrative?<br />Claude Levi-Strauss = Binary Oppositions<br />Vladimir Propp = Characters<br />TzvetanTodorov =5 conventional stages <br />
  5. Todorov - Classic Narrative<br />Cause and Effect <br />Invisible Editing<br />Story told in chronological order:<br />Equilibrium<br />Disequilibrium<br />Recognition<br />Reparation<br />New equilibrium<br />
  6. Levi- Strauss- Binary Oppositions<br />One side is represented as the ‘right’ side who the audience can identify with and support<br />Examples:<br />Good and evil<br />Past and present<br />Normal and strange<br />Known and unknown<br />Heaven and earth<br />
  7. Propp - characters<br />Hero: Seeks something<br />Villain: Obstructs the hero<br />Princess: Hero’s reward<br />Father: Give of rewards<br />Donor: Provides information and help<br />Helper: Helps the hero<br />Dispatcher: Sends the hero on a quest<br />False hero<br />In Propp’s theory, these character types are established to increase understanding from the point of view of the audience<br />
  8. Activity 1<br />In your pair select one of the film below and apply these three narrative theories:<br />Spiderman<br />The Dark Knight<br />Star Wars<br />Titanic<br />Toy Story 3<br />Shrek<br />
  9. Activity 2<br />How far can you apply these traditional narrative theories to a music video?<br />Let’s explore some video examples<br />
  10. Narrative in Music Videos<br />Narratives are rarely complete often fragmentary<br />Tend to suggest storylines<br />Non-linear order (not cause and effect)<br />Desire to see them again<br />Narrative often divided between performance and conceptual clips<br />
  11. Time & Narrative<br />Flashbacks<br />Real time<br />Reversal<br />Dream sequence<br />Repetition<br />Different characters POV<br />Ellipsis<br />Pre-figuring of events that have not yet taken place<br />
  12. Types of Narrative you might see<br />Linear<br />Non-linear<br />Circular<br />Parallel Narrative<br />Convergent Narrative<br />Interweaving Narrative <br />
  13. Key Task<br />Analyse a video chosen from the list provided<br />Explore the extent to which you can apply the traditional narrative theories to the text<br />Write a 500 work account with specific examples from the text<br />

×