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Judaism carousel
 

Judaism carousel

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    Judaism carousel Judaism carousel Presentation Transcript

    • Judaism
    • Learning objectivesWe are learning to...• Develop our questioning skills with the use of prompts• Understand the key beliefs and practices of Judaism• Create an information page that demonstrates our understandingSkills for Life: Questioning
    • On the sheet of paper...Write down questions that arise from the objects in the room.In your book, write down further information.
    • 3 things I can work out about the religion from Draw one image ofthe item: something which is an1. important part of the religion.2.3.3 Questions I would ask Religion I amsomeone about this religion: looking at:1. ……………2. 3 pieces of information about the religion:3. 1.A personal thought/opinionabout this religion: 2. 3.
    • What special things do Jews wear?Kippah (a skull cap)On their heads a devout Jew always wears the Kippah to remind him that he is always duty bound to follow the laws of God at all times and in all places.
    • Tallit (a prayer shawl)Before beginning to worship or pray the devout Jew will often put on a tallit. The fringes on the shawl remind him of the many commandments of the Torah.
    • Tefilin (small leather box with long leather straps attached)The boxes are worn on the left forearm and on the forehead. Inside the boxes are passages from the scriptures. A tefilin on the left arm is a reminder to keep Gods laws with all your heart, because it is near to the heart. A tefilin on the forehead remind the Jew to concentrate on the teachings of the Torah with all your full mind.Tefilin are worn when praying athome or in the synagogue
    • What is the Symbol of Judaism?The symbol or emblem of the Jewish people is the Magen David (Shield of David), also known as the Star of David.
    • JudaismJudaism has about 13 million followers throughout the world, mostly in USA and Israel.Judaism originated in the Middle East over 3500 years ago.Moses was the main founder of Judaism, but Jews can trace their history back as far as Abraham.
    • Who is Abraham?Abraham is the father of the Jewish people. Jews see Abraham as a symbol of trusting and obeying God.Abraham is also important to followers of Christianity and of Islam.
    • Who is Moses?Moses is the leader who freed them from slavery in Egypt. Moses protected the Jews from the wrath of God, and negotiated with God on their behalf.
    • BeliefsJews believe that there is only one God (monotheistic).Jews believe they have a special agreement or covenant with God.Judaism is a faith of action and Jews believe people should be judged not so much on what they believe as on the way they live their faith. It’s what they do that is important.
    • Holy BookThe most holy Jewish book is the Torah (the first five books of the Hebrew Bible) which was revealed by God to Moses on Mount Sinai over 3,000 years ago.The Torah, together with the Talmud (commentary on the Torah), give the Jewish people rules for everyday life. Observing these rules is central to the Jewish religion.
    • What is a Menorah?The Menorah is one of the oldest symbols of the Jewish faith. It is a candelabrum with seven candle holders displayed in Jewish synagogues. It symbolises the burning bush as seen by Moses on Mount Sinai.The term hanukiah or chanukiah, refers to the nine-candled holder used during the Jewish festival of Hanukkah.
    • HanukkahHanukkah or Chanukah is the Jewish Festival of Lights. It dates back to two centuries before the beginning of Christianity. It is an eight day holiday starting on the 25th night of the Jewish month of Kislev .Hanukka celebrates the miraculous victory over religious persecution in the Holy Land and also commemorates the re-dedication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem and the miracle of the burning oil. This is where the oil of the menorah (the candelabrum in the temple) miraculously burned for eight days, even though there was only enough oil for one day
    • What is a Mezuzah?A mezuzah is found on doorposts in Jewish homes. It is a little case, containing a tiny scroll. The writing on the scroll is from the bible. It is in Hebrew and is called the Shema. It says that Jewish people should love God and keep his rules.
    • CeremoniesWhat is a bar mitzvah and a batmitzvah?They are both special ceremonies where Jewish boys (aged 13) and girls (aged 12) can become adults in the eyes of the Jewish religion.Bar mitzvah is for boys and means Son of the Commandment.Bat mitzvah is for girls and means Daughter of the Commandment.
    • What is the most important day ofthe week for Jews?The most important day of the week is the Sabbath (Shabbat), which is a day made holy by refraining from weekday work.The Jewish holy day, or Sabbath, starts at sunset on Friday and continues until sunset on Saturday. During the Sabbath, observant Jews will do nothing that might be counted as work. Among the things that they cant do are driving and cooking.At the beginning of Shabbat Jewish families share a meal. They eat special bread called hallah. On the Sabbath, Jews attend services at the synagogue, often led by a Rabbi.
    • What is Kosher food?Kosher foods are those that conform to Jewish law. This means no mixing of dairy and meat, no pork or pork products and no shell fish.Meat The animal from which the meat is taken must have been slaughtered in accordance with prescribed Jewish ritual. Jews cannot eat meat from any animal which does not both chew its cud (food brought up into the mouth by an animal from its first stomach to be chewed again) and has a split hoof; animals such as rabbit or hare, pig, horse, dog or cat are therefore prohibited.Fish Jews may eat fish that have both fins and scales that are detachable from the skin.
    • Using your sheets as a guide, talk inyour groups about what you havelearnt so far
    • Create a page that demonstrates whatyou have learnt today
    • Success CriteriaSkilled work 1. Show understanding of Jewish beliefs,will practices and sources of influence. 2. Make a comparison to your own beliefs and practices.Excellent work 1. Identify a range of aspects of religionswill using key words. 2. Evaluate and compare how Judaism influences the lives of the believers with increasing levels of explanation. 3. Have a detailed explanation of how it compares to what you believe.S4L Questioning and making links!
    • 3 things I can work out about the religion from Draw one image ofthe item: something which is an1. important part of the religion.2.3.3 Questions I would ask Religion I am looking at:someone about this religion:1. …………… …2. 3 pieces of information about the religion:3. 1.A personal thought/opinionabout this religion: 2. 3.
    • Learning objectivesWe have learnt to...• Develop our questioning skills with the use of prompts• Understand the key beliefs and practices of Judaism• Create an information page that demonstrates our understandingCompetency: Questioning