How To Use Outside Sources
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

How To Use Outside Sources

on

  • 2,000 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,000
Views on SlideShare
1,977
Embed Views
23

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
43
Comments
1

5 Embeds 23

http://britlit10h.blogspot.com 10
http://britlit10g.blogspot.com 8
http://www.britlit10h.blogspot.com 3
http://www.britlit10g.blogspot.com 1
http://britlit10g.blogspot.ru 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Provide support for claims or add credibility to your writingRefer to work that leads up to the work you are now doingGive examples of several points of view on a subjectCall attention to a position that you wish to agree or disagree withHighlight a particularly striking phrase, sentence, or passage by quoting the originalDistance yourself from the original by quoting it in order to cue readers that the words are not your ownExpand the breadth or depth of your writing
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.Set the original aside, and write your paraphrase on a note card.Jot down a few words below your paraphrase to remind you later how you envision using this material. At the top of the note card, write a key word or phrase to indicate the subject of your paraphrase.Check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.

How To Use Outside Sources Presentation Transcript

  • 1. how to use outside sources
  • 2. Why use sources?
    Add credibility to your writing
    Provide background
    Give several points of view
    Call attention to another position
    Highlight striking phrases, sentences or passages
    Show that words are not your own
    Expand your writing with ideas that are not yours
  • 3. How to use sources
    Direct Quote
    Paraphrase
    Summarize
  • 4. Quotations
    Only use a direct quotation when you have a good reason to. Quotations may be writing tools for the lazy.
  • 5. Quotations
    Identical to the original
    Use only a small bit of the original
    Match the source word for word
    Be attributed to the original author (including page #)
  • 6. Paraphrasing
    Putting a passage into your words
    Attributed to the original source
    Shorter than the original
    Usually condenses information slightly
  • 7. Paraphrasing
    Is better than quoting from an ordinary passage
    Helps you to not quote too much
    Helps you to grasp the meaning of your source
  • 8. Paraphrasing
    Is better than quoting from an ordinary passage
    Helps you to not quote too much
    Helps you to grasp the meaning of your source
  • 9. Five steps to paraphrase
    Read the original for complete understanding
    Put the original away. Write on a clean piece of paper
    Check your paraphrase against the original
    Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or borrowed exactly from the source
    Record the source (including the page) on your notes so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.
  • 10. Still having trouble?
    Change the sentence structure and then the words, or vice versa.
    Break-up long sentences
    Combine shorter sentences
    Work on understanding the original passage as a whole idea.
    Don’t paraphrase unnecessary material.
    You can use direct quotations in a paraphrase as long as you cite them accordingly.
    You do not have to omit details (like a summary).
  • 11. In your paraphrase
    Always cite the original source
    Include page numbers or other identifying information when available
  • 12. Summarizing
    Summaries are significantly shorter than the original and take a broad overview of the source material.
  • 13. Summarizing
    Put the main idea(s) into your own words
    include only the main point(s).
    attribute summarized ideas to the original source
  • 14. Parenthetical citation
    Citation in the body of your writing
    In MLA style, it includes the author’s last name and the page number
    If there is no page number, you obviously cannot give the page number.
  • 15. Examples of parenthetical citations for quotations with page #s
    Jefferson attacked “taxation without representation” (32).
  • 16. Examples of parenthetical citations for quotations with page #s
    Dorothea Brooke noted that her sister was “a wonderful little almanac” (7).
  • 17. Examples of parenthetical citations with no page #s
    Fukuyama’s Our Posthuman Future includes many examples of this trend.
    But Anthony Hunt has offered another view.
    Kurosawa’s Rashomonwas one of the first Japanese films to attract a Western audience.
    Chan considers the same topic in the context of Hong Kong cinema.
  • 18. Translating
    Translating from another language into English without a citation is plagiarism.