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Star Classification

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Transcript

  • 1. Classifying stars!
  • 2. What IS a star anyway?!?! STARS: A star is a large ball of ionized gas, held together by gravity, that emits energy produced by nuclear reactions in its interior. Types of stars:  Stars are classified by their size, temperature, and brightness!
  • 3. Classifying Stars SIZE!!!! Temperature!!!  Super Giant  Hot = Red  Red Giant  Hotter = White  Main  Hottest = Blue/White Sequence  White Dwarf  Neutron Star Brightness!  How bright it appears depends on it’s distance from us  How bright it actually is depends on its size & temp.
  • 4. Relationship between surface temperature and color of stars: 3,500 K (red) 5,000 K (yellow) Just like car headlights look small and dim when they are far away and then BLIND you as they get closer, Stars are similar. 7,000 K (white) 25,000 K (blue) You may notice at night when you look up at the stars that some seem to be slightly different colors, that has to do with their temperature!
  • 5. Apparent vs. Absolute Apparent Magnitude  The observed luminosity of a celestial body, such as a star, as observed from earth.  The apparent magnitude of a star depends on its luminosity and distance. Absolute Magnitude  The apparent magnitude a star would have if it were 32.6 light years away from Earth.
  • 6. TOOLS OF ASTRONOMY Spectrograph: A tool that is used to obtain information from stars by breaking up the colors they emit. http://herschel.jpl.nasa.gov/farIRandSubmm.shtml
  • 7. Chemical compositions: Each element absorbs different wavelengths of light and shows up as lines on a spectrum.
  • 8. Temperature: Stars at different temperatures produce a different line spectra.
  • 9. Distances to stars •Light Speed: Light travels at 300,000 km/s. •Light Year: The distance light travels in a year.