Chinese Exclusion Act

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  • What was the daily life of the excluded Chinese people
    What started the Chinese Exclusion? Who started it? And when did it start?
    Where were the Chinese people excluded? Did it happen every where or what?
    How did the exclusion affect the Chinese?
    Is it still going on today?
  • The first known Chinese immigrants that immigrated to America was during the 1800’s because of the gold rush.

    Most early Chinese immigrants moved to the west coast
  • Began in the 18th-Century- Chinese immigration to America began in the 1700’s

    First group of Chinese immigrants were widely respected- the first Chinese immigrants were wealthy, successful merchants, along with skilled artisans, fishermen, and hotel and restaurant owners. The first Chinese immigrants in America were widely received and respected for their work ethic and dependability.

    Gold Rush= large scale immigration of unskilled laborers; less respect- So when the gold rush in California began, this caused the Chinese both unskilled and skilled, wanting to immigrate to some regions of America in search for jobs and gold.

    Americans blamed the Chinese for minimum wage and lack of jobs- During the 1870’s America's economy fell drastically leading to unemployment, the Americans began to blame the “rice eaters” for minimum wage and lack of jobs, which is funny because the Chinese originally took the jobs that the Americans didn’t want to take and were considered dirty, and then after a while they began to blame them for taking all their jobs. This ultimately started the Chinese hate in America

    Discrimination leads to violence which then leads to the Chinese Exclusion Act

  • Guangdong to san fran
  • To san francisco port, then dispersed throughout the west coast.

  • Many homicides/violence involving Chinese victims were committed throughout the Chinese Exclusion; Rock Springs massacre of 1885- although many people relocated to Chinatowns, some people still stayed behind, and were once again, abused. Hostile feelings towards the Chinese were so strong that many Americans murdered and assaulted Chinese people like the Rock Springs massacre of 1885 where 28 Chinese miners were killed by British and Swedish miners and in 1862 alone 88 Chinese were reported murdered *click

    “A chinaman’s chance”- in fact, the Chinese were treated so badly, that a common phrase was made, “ “ literally meant no chance at all

    States that most Chinese people cannot immigrate to America- The Exclusion Act stated that only teachers, students, merchants and others that would benefit America.

    Chinese could not marry Whites

    Legal harassment- Shave off queues (braids of hair). like black people in the south the Chinese were prevented from going to school with white people, also, a special tax that took over half of the Chinese minders’ wages was made.

    Prevented Chinese from testifying in court against a white person-

    Chinatowns- The Chinese were treated so badly, that they had to relocate, and live in small areas with safety and support called Chinatowns, although they were safe, they were isolated from practically everyone else, In addition the Chinatowns were overcrowded and very poor, almost like the ghettoes of the Holocaust in a way.



  • Population began to fall drastically because of Chinese exclusion act and the highly imbalanced ration of male to female, and the increasing crimes and murders. 1900’s=declined

    1860’s- male to female ratio 19:1
    1890’s- 27:1
  • Daily Life & The Transcontinental Railroad

    - Working conditions- So in 1865, came a demand of workers to work on the transcontinental railroad having to work in dangerous conditions of clearing land to make tracks, since there was a low amount of white people, the contractor turned to Chinese people who were willing to do the job for money back home. 9/10 Chinese workers. Over a thousand had their bones sent back to China to bury. And even though the Chinese practically built most of the railroad, they were still discriminated and weren't even thanked
    *click
    - Wages- Even though they had to work through horrible and dangerous conditions to support their families back home, the Chinese were still paid less than white workers. 30$ a month for Chinese with no shelter and food, 35$ pay for whites with food and shelter.

    - Chinatown conditions- AND ASIDDEE from bad working conditions their living conditions werent that great either, since they were practically driven out of the public, they had to live in groups of other Chinese people called China towns, and usually these places were drug ridden places, crime filled, unsanitary, overcrowded like the ghettoes of the Holocaust to some degree
    *click

    Treatment
    - Abused. Physically and mentally – “rice eaters” massacres, assault etc. “yellow terror” *click!
    - Discriminated- treated differently then white people, didn’t get the same rights as whites
    - Angel Island Processing Center-1910-1940- from 1910- 1940 the Chinese people that were eligible to migrate to America had to pass through a processing center on angel Island before they could set foot on America. They were separated from all other races, and detained on the island for a week or even months, with over 300 Chinese at the facility for interrogation they were treated like criminals, even when they just wanted to immigrate to America

  • Discrimination and violence continued for 40 years; Geary Act- Because of discrimination and hostile feelings towards Chinese, the violence and racism continued over the next 40 years, under the Geary Act which was an extension of the Chinese Exclusion act

    World War II, China and USA become allies- After 40 years, WWII was occurring at the time in the 1940’s, China and USA became allies making a pathway to the Magnuson act which went against the Chinese exclusion act and the Geary act

    Magnuson Act of 1943- the year China and USA became allies, the Magnuson act was created, letting Chinese people of all backgrounds immigrate to America, and also letting the Chinese people already in America to become American citizens

    Chinese weren’t so quick to accept the American’s apology- of course, after America’s formal apology, the Chinese were not so quick to accept the apology, for they had gone through many many years of pain, racism, and discrimination, and it took many years to actually recover from everything of the past.
  • Thomas J. Geary was born on January 18, 1854, and died on July 6, 1929. He was a U.S. representative from California. Geary was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-First Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of John J. De Haven. He was reelected to the Fifty-Second and Fifty-Third Congresses and served from December 9, 1890, to March 3, 1895. He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1894 to the Fifty-Fourth Congress. Geary wrote the Geary Act, a United States law passed in 1892, which extended the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and added new requirements for Chinese residents in the United States.
  • In 1892, Congressman Thomas J. Geary of California introduced the Geary Act, a bill that extended the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and all other laws related to Chinese immigration for another decade (10 Years). The Geary Act established an internal passport system for all Chinese residents in the United States, by requiring them to apply for and carry a certificate of residence. If found without their certificate, they would be subject to deportation or imprisonment for a year of hard labor. Furthermore, bail was denied to Chinese involved in habeas corpus proceedings, and Chinese witnesses were prohibited from appearing in court. Chinese Americans and the Chinese government denounced the law. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Geary Act in 1893. It lasted for a decade and then the act was denounced.
  • Denis Kearney was born in 1847 in Oakmount, County Cork, Ireland and died in 1907. He was a California Populist political leader in the late 19th century, known for his nativist and racist views towards Chinese Immigrants. Although he hated Chinese Immigrants, it was ironic, because he immigrated to the USA himself. During the Long Depression, he became popular by speaking to the unemployed in San Francisco, denouncing the railroad monopoly and immigrant Chinese workers (known as Coolies.) Kearney began his political life on the side of employers. In July 1877, when anti-Chinese violence broke out in San Francisco, Kearney joined William Tell Coleman vigilante Public Safety Committee as a member of Coleman's "pick handle brigade." By August 1877, however, Kearney had been elected Secretary of the newly formed Workingman's Party of California, and led often violent attacks on Chinese, including denunciations of the powerful Central Pacific Railroad which had employed them in large numbers.
  • This Piece of Propaganda is saying that, like the previous piece of Propaganda, that all Chinese people have ques. It is also saying that all Chinese people use washboards for their clothes.
  • Psychology

    The definition of Psychology is the scientific study of the human mind and its functions, esp. those affecting behavior in a given context.
    The Chinese people took up almost all of the jobs Americans didn’t want to do. Later when the Americans had lots of unemployed people they kicked out the Chinese people from their jobs forcefully.
    It’s kind of simple, all the Asians take your job and you get angry.
    Almost all Americans were against the Chinese, so it would be hard to NOT be against them. Its just like if your parents teach you something early in your life your bound to take that for granted.
  • Sociology

    Sociology definition- the study of the development, structure, and functioning of human society
    When the Chinese came to America they lost the social roles, which they had in China. So basically coming to America meant you were able to be whatever you wanted, because there were no social roles. But back in China if you were born into a farmer family, you almost never could be a higher class. It was a great opportunity for the Chinese people.
    Some of the consequences of coming to America was being harassed, plainly because they were different, excluded, again discrimination. Abused etc.
    The Chinese people had to adapt to the new social system,
  • Relevance

    America was embarrassed because they treated the Chinese in a very cruel manner and they felt really bad because of that.
    The exclusion act ended, but there is still some racism toward the Chinese
    America is not trying to have no racial laws and isn’t as discriminating as we were, there still is a lot though.
    We don't feel the effects today because there is about 3 million Chinese people and it is growing in America!
  • Relevance 2!!!!

    The Magnuson act of 1943, equalized Chinese and American citizens. Allowing Chinese people to Migrate in and out of America freely.
    Warren Grant Magnuson, in the US representative that proposed the Magnuson Act.
    After the act ended America and China learned that discrimination is not right at all, and that all people are equal.
    Racism towards the Chinese is still around today, people are saying they eat rice, eat lots of dumplings, are bad drivers, have squinty eyes etc.
    The Black on Chinese violence in San Francisco is one example of discrimination toward Chinese people today. African Americans see they as easy targets, and beat on them in the bus, on the way to school, in their homes, and basically everywhere.

    Stories-
    In South Boston, 16 year-old Chinese student Bang Mai was killed on July 11, 2004 in a massive brawl between white and Vietnamese youths. The basketball court brawl was the result of weeks of tension between the two groups. Mai was fatally stabbed as he attempted to walk away from the brawl. 

    In Fresno, California at Edison High School, Hmong students had been taunted and had food thrown at them during lunch. On February 25, 2005, the taunts escalated into fights involving at least 30 students, resulting in numerous injuries, suspensions, and expulsions. Eight students were convicted of misdemeanor assault.39
  • Immigration Today

    The main people who Immigrate to America are the Mexicans (23-7), Chinese (7-4), and Filipino people (4-2).
    The Chinese Immigrate from China to America (DUH), by boat and airplane. Mostly by plane but there in some driving immigrants too, only from Mexico and Canada though. So the Chinese only use boat and planes.
    The distance from China to America is 11,172 kilometers or 6942 miles.
    About 7 - 4percent of the immigrants are Chinese.
    The Chinese people are doing pretty good in America, generally hard wording small business owner, with stable families.
  • Connection to theme

    The Chinese Exclusion act relates the Human rights because its inhumane to exclude certain races, discriminate, abuse and judge certain people by their look or what they do, which is what the white people did to the Chinese people back in the day
    Every body has the right to be treated the same.
    Discrimination is just wrong in everyway.
  • When did Chinese people begin to immigrate to America? Why?

    A. Chinese people began to immigrate to America during the early 1800’s, the reason why they wanted to immigrate to America is because they wanted to make more money and find gold, which would help support their families back home.
  • What started the Chinese Exclusion? Who started it? And when did it start?
    A. The Chinese Exclusion was signed into law on May 8, 1882 by Chester A. Arthur. The exclusion started because Chinese people were becoming abundant in America therefore, taking a lot of jobs making the Americans want to take away the right of immigrating to America for Chinese people
  • How were the Chinese treated in America?
    A. The first Chinese immigrants were widely respected by the Americans, then, once the Gold Rush began, it attracted more unskilled Chinese people which is when the Americans began to lose respect for Chinese people. The Americans were racist towards Chinese people and began to be violent towards them committing many homicides with Chinese victims. They also verbally abused them, treated them differently, and completely stripping their human rights.
  • How did the exclusion affect the Chinese? The Americans?
    A. The Exclusion affected the Chinese in many negative ways, they were discriminated, violated, and abused. The Exclusion also affected the Americans in a negative way, during this time period America’s economy fell drastically because of less Chinese immigrants, they actually needed the Chinese
  • Is there some form of Chinese exclusion/Chinese hate going on today?
    A. . No, the Chinese Exclusion Act and all other laws similar to that ended in 1943 with the Magnuson Act but of course, not everyone believes all races are equal and some people are still racist towards Chinese people and other Asians causing hate crimes and some violence even in today’s society , 2.5 percent (188 of 7624) of all hate crimes are reported with Chinese victims
  • Chinese Exclusion Act

    1. 1. By : Calvin C. Jordan E. & Ryan C.
    2. 2. Chinese Immigration & Exclusion 5 Essential Questions Geography (Throughout) History Important People Relevant Science Behind 5 Essential Answers Bibliography Basic Facts
    3. 3. 1. When did Chinese people begin to immigrate to America? Why? 2. What started the Chinese Exclusion? Who started it? And when did it start? 3. How were the Chinese treated in America? 4. How did the exclusion affect the Chinese? The Americans? 5. Is there some form of Chinese exclusion/Chinese hate going on today?
    4. 4. • First Chinese immigrants in 1800’s; first Asian immigrants in America •Most early Chinese immigrants moved to the west coast • Chinese Exclusion Act is the first law in America that restricts immigration by race
    5. 5. • ImmigrationtoAmerica • ChineseExclusion&Anti ChineseMovement • DailyLife& Treatment • The EndoftheExclusion& Influence
    6. 6. • Began in the early 1800’s • First group of Chinese immigrants were widely respected • Gold Rush, 1840’s = large scale immigration of unskilled laborers; less respect • Americans blamed the Chinese (“rice eaters”) for minimum wage and lack of jobs •1865 Transcontinental Railroad • Discrimination leads to violence which then leads to the Chinese Exclusion Act
    7. 7. • Many homicides/violence involving Chinese victims were committed throughout the Chinese Exclusion; Rock Springs massacre of 1885 • “A Chinaman’s Chance” • May 6, 1882 Chinese Exclusion • States that most Chinese people cannot immigrate to America/ no US citizenship • Chinese could not marry Whites • Legal harassment • Prevented Chinese from testifying in court against a white person • Bad treatment, flees to Chinatowns= Ghettos
    8. 8. Year Total Population Chinese Population 1840 17,069,453 not available 1850 23,191,876 4,000 1860 31,443,321 35,000 1870 38,558,371 64,000 1880 50,189,209 105,000 1890 62,979,766 100,000 1900 76,212,168 110,000 1910 92,228,496 95,000 1920 106,021,537 62,000 1930 123,202,624 102,000 1940 132,164,569 106,000 1950 151,325,798 150,000 1960 179,323,175 237,000 1970 203,302,031 436,000 1980 226,542,199 812,000 1990 248,709,873 1,645,472 2000 281,421,906 2,432,585 2004 (Estimation of the US Census) 285,691,501 3,353,486
    9. 9. Daily Life & The Transcontinental Railroad - Working conditions - Wages - Chinatown conditions Treatment - Abused. Physically and mentally - Discriminated - Angel Island Processing Center- 1910-1940
    10. 10. • Discrimination and violence continued for 40 years; Geary Act • World War II, China and USA become allies • Magnuson Act of 1943 • Chinese weren’t so quick to accept the American’s apology
    11. 11. • Thomas J. Geary • Geary Act • Denis Kearney
    12. 12. • 1892 • Extended Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 • Certificate of residence • Deportation or 1 year imprisonment • Not allowed in court
    13. 13.  1847-1907  California political leader  Immigrated toUSA  William Tell Coleman  Workingman's Party  Led violent Attacks  Central Pacific Railroad “The Chinese must go”
    14. 14. • Psychology • Technology (Propaganda) • Sociology
    15. 15. • The scientific study of the human mind and its functions, esp. those affecting behavior in a given context • Took their jobs • Cooks, peddlers, and storekeepers • If somebody takes your jobs, you’re bound to be angry • If everyone’s doing it, you should too? White Protesters on Banning the Chinese
    16. 16. •Definition- the study of the development, structure, and functioning of human society • They lost the social role they would have in China •Harassed, excluded, discriminated, abused, etc. •They had to learn a new social system
    17. 17. • Do we still feel the effects today? Did we learn anything from this? •Are there new laws because of this? •Is it still happening? •Is anyone trying to stop it, if it is still happening?
    18. 18.  America is embarrassed  The exclusion act ended, but there is still some racism toward Chinese  We aren’t (so) racist anymore!  Effects Chinese White
    19. 19.  Magnuson Act of 1943..  Warren G. Magnuson  America and China actually learned something!  The racisms towards the Chinese  Black on Chinese violence…  Anti-Chinese stories today  2007, 2.5 percent of all reported hate crimes (188 out of 7,624) Warren G. Magnuson
    20. 20. • Mexican, Chinese, and Filipino people… • Boat and Airplane • How long is the trip? • How many? • Chinese people are actually doing good from once! Country per year 2000 2004 2010 2010, % Mexico 175,9 00 7,841,0 00 8,544,6 00 9,600,0 00 23.7 % China 50,90 0 1,391,0 00 1,594,6 00 1,900,0 00 4.7% Philippines 47,80 0 1,222,0 00 1,413,2 00 1,700,0 00 4.2% India 59,30 0 1,007,0 00 1,244,2 00 1,610,0 00 4.0% Total Pop. Top 10 498,9 00 16,112, 000 18,747, 600 21,741, 000 53.7 % Total Foreign Born 940,0 00 31,100, 000 34,860, 000 40,500, 000 100%
    21. 21. • The Chinese Exclusion Act relates because… • Everyone is the same • It just isn’t right
    22. 22. 1. When did Chinese people begin to immigrate to America? Why? A. Chinese people began to immigrate to America during the early 1800’s. The reason why they wanted to immigrate to America is because they wanted to make more money and find gold, which would help support their families back home.
    23. 23. 2. What started the Chinese Exclusion? Who started it? And when did it start? A. The Chinese Exclusion was signed into law on May 8, 1882 by Chester A. Arthur. The exclusion started because Chinese people were becoming abundant in America therefore, taking a lot of jobs making the Americans want to take away the right of immigrating to America for Chinese people
    24. 24. 3. How were the Chinese treated in America? A. The first Chinese immigrants were widely respected by the Americans, then, once the Gold Rush began, it attracted more unskilled Chinese people which is when the Americans began to lose respect for Chinese people. The Americans were racist towards Chinese people and began to be violent towards them committing many homicides with Chinese victims. They also verbally abused them, treated them differently, and completely stripping their human rights.
    25. 25. 4. How did the exclusion affect the Chinese? The Americans? A. The Exclusion affected the Chinese in many negative ways; they were discriminated, violated, and abused. The Exclusion also affected the Americans in a negative way, during this time period America’s economy fell drastically because of less Chinese immigrants, they actually needed the Chinese
    26. 26. 5. Is there some form of Chinese exclusion/Chinese hate going on today? A. No, the Chinese Exclusion Act and all other laws similar to that ended in 1943 with the Magnuson Act but of course, not everyone believes all races are equal and some people are still racist towards Chinese people and other Asians causing hate crimes and some violence even in today’s society , 2.5 percent (188 of of all hate crimes are reported with Chinese victims
    27. 27. •http://library.thinkquest.org/20619/Chinese.html •http://www.srvhs.org/Staff/teachers/ehamilton/US%20Pages/Readings/Chinese%20Immigration.pdf •http://teachingamericanhistorymd.net/000001/000000/000136/html/t136.html •http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist1/1874.html •http://www.calisphere.universityofcalifornia.edu/themed_collections/subtopic2a.html •http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/tcrr/peopleevents/p_cprr.html •http://teachingamericanhistorymd.net/000001/000000/000136/html/t136.html •http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/asian_voices/voices_display.cfm?id=13 •http://www.civilrights.org/publications/hatecrimes/asian-pacific.html •http://newamericamedia.org/2010/05/san-franciscos-black-on-chinese-violence-goes-back-decades.php Book: 1. Immigration By:Tamara L. Roleff, Bonnie Szumski, Scott Barbour, Helen Cothran 2. Political History of America’s wars By: Alan Axelrod 3. Anti Chinese Movement in California By: Elmer Clarence Sandmeyer Video: Remembering 1882: Fighting for Civil Rights in the Shadow of the Chinese ExclusionAct
    28. 28. KIDS, DON’T HATE… APPRECIATE…… 
    29. 29. By : Calvin C. Jordan E. & Ryan C.

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