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  • Article 6: All children have the right to life. Governments should ensure that children survive and develop healthily. Article 12: Children have the right to say what they think should happen when adults are making decisions that affect them, and to have their opinions taken into account. Article 14: Children have the right to think and believe what they want.
  • Article 23: Children who have any kind of disability have the right to special care and support so that they can lead full and independent lives. Article 31: Children have the right to relax and play, and join in a wide range of cultural, artistic, and other recreational activities. Article 37: No one is allowed to punish children in a cruel or harmful way.
  • Child labor started in the late 1700s. Children went from working with there parents on farms to working in factories witch was dangerous because they could loose body parts. They started working at the age of 4. they lost there youth from working 12 to 18 hours for 6 days a week and working in harsh conditions. Even though children worked so hard they would be paid 75cents to $1. child labor is still around but not in as many places as before.
  • Child Labor Reform and the U.S. Labor Movement 1832 New England unions condemn child labor The New England Association of Farmers, Mechanics and Other Workingmen resolve that “Children should not be allowed to labor in the factories from morning till night, without any time for healthy recreation and mental culture,” for it “endangers their . . . well-being and health” Women’s Trade Union League of New York 1836 Early trade unions propose state minimum age laws Union members at the National Trades’ Union Convention make the first formal, public proposal recommending that states establish minimum ages for factory work 1836 First state child labor law Massachusetts requires children under 15 working in factories to attend school at least 3 months/year 1842 States begin limiting children’s work days Massachusetts limits children’s work days to 10 hours; other states soon pass similar laws—but most of these laws are not consistently enforced 1876 Labor movement urges minimum age law Working Men’s Party proposes banning the employment of children under the age of 14 1881 Newly formed AFL supports state minimum age laws The first national convention of the American Federation of Labor passes a resolution calling on states to ban children under 14 from all gainful employment 1883 New York unions win state reform Led by Samuel Gompers, the New York labor movement successfully sponsors legislation prohibiting cigar making in tenements, where thousands of young children work in the trade 1892 Democrats adopt union recommendations Democratic Party adopts platform plank based on union recommendations to ban factory employment for children under 15 National Child Labor Committee 1904 National Child Labor Committee forms Aggressive national campaign for federal child labor law reform begins 1916 New federal law sanctions state violators First federal child labor law prohibits movement of goods across state lines if minimum age laws are violated (law in effect only until 1918, when it’s declared unconstitutional, then revised, passed, and declared unconstitutional again) 1924 First attempt to gain federal regulation fails Congress passes a constitutional amendment giving the federal government authority to regulate child labor, but too few states ratify it and it never takes effect 1936 Federal purchasing law passes Walsh-Healey Act states U.S. government will not purchase goods made by underage children 1937 Second attempt to gain federal regulation fails Second attempt to ratify constitutional amendment giving federal government authority to regulate child labor falls just short of getting necessary votes 1937 New federal law sanctions growers Sugar Act makes sugar beet growers ineligible for benefit payments if they violate state minimum age and hours of work standards 1938 Federal regulation of child labor achieved in Fair Labor Standards Act For the first time, minimum ages of employment and hours of work for children are regulated by federal law
  • Mining Males under 15 1851 37,300 1861 45,100 1871 43,100 188130,400 Females under 15 1,400 500 900 500 Males 15-20 50,100 65,300 74,900 87,300 Females over 15 5,400 4,900 5,300 5,700 Total under 15 as % of work force 13% 12% 10% 6% Textiles and Dyeing Males under 15 93,800 80,700 78,500 58,900 Females under 15 147,700 115,700 119,800 82,600 Males 15-20 92,600 92,600 90,500 93,200 Females over 15 780,900 739,300 729,700 699,900 Total under 15 as % of work force 15% 19% 14% 11% There are many opinions regarding the reason(s) for the diminished role of child labor in these industries. Social historians believe it was the rise of the domestic ideology of the father as breadwinner and the mother as housewife, that was imbedded in the upper and middle classes and spread to the working-class. Economic historians argue it was the rise in the standard of living that accompanied the Industrial Revolution that allowed parents to keep their children home. Although mandatory schooling laws did not play a role because they were so late, other scholars argue that families started showing an interest in education and began sending their children to school voluntarily. Finally, others claim that it was the advances in technology and the new heavier and more complicated machinery, which required the strength of skilled adult males, that lead to the decline in child labor in Great Britain. Although child labor has become a fading memory for Britons, it still remains a social problem and political issue for developing countries today. Although the debate over whether children were exploited during the British Industrial Revolution continues today [see Nardinelli (1988) and Tuttle (1998)], Parliament passed several child labor laws after hearing the evidence collected. The three laws which most impacted the employment of children in the textile industry were the Cotton Factories Regulation Act of 1819 (which set the minimum working age at 9 and maximum working hours at 12), the Regulation of Child Labor Law of 1833 (which established paid inspectors to enforce the laws) and the Ten Hours Bill of 1847 (which limited working hours to 10 for children and women). Editor Robert Whaples Navigation Index Authors Top Articles Advisory Board Members and Consulting Editors Terms of Use Navigation EH.net Home EHA Home Book Reviews Book Review Signup Editors Previous Newsletter Issues Reviewers Browse Library Copyright Course Syllabi Databases Directory Encyclopedia How Much Is That? Mailing Lists Related Sites Sponsors Economic History Association Economic History Society Business History Conference The Cliometric Society Please read our Copyright Information page for important copyright information. Comments? Questions? Use our online feedback form or send email to [email_address] . Child Labor during the British Industrial Revolution Posted Mon, 2010-02-01 17:21 by Anonymous Carolyn Tuttle, Lake Forest College During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries Great Britain became the first country to industrialize. Because of this, it was also the first country where the nature of children's work changed so dramatically that child labor became seen as a social problem and a political issue. This article examines the historical debate about child labor in Britain, Britain's political response to problems with child labor, quantitative evidence about child labor during the 1800s, and economic explanations of the practice of child labor. The Historical Debate about Child Labor in Britain Child Labor before Industrialization Children of poor and working-class families had worked for centuries before industrialization - helping around the house or assisting in the family's enterprise when they were able. The practice of putting children to work was first documented in the Medieval era when fathers had their children spin thread for them to weave on the loom. Children performed a variety of tasks that were auxiliary to their parents but critical to the family economy. The family's household needs determined the family's supply of labor and "the interdependence of work and residence, of household labor needs, subsidence requirements, and family relationships constituted the 'family economy'" [Tilly and Scott (1978, 12)]. Definitions of Child Labor The term "child labor" generally refers to children who work to produce a good or a service which can be sold for money in the marketplace regardless of whether or not they are paid for their work. A "child" is usually defined as a person who is dependent upon other individuals (parents, relatives, or government officials) for his or her livelihood. The exact ages of "childhood" differ by country and time period. Preindustrial Jobs Children who lived on farms worked with the animals or in the fields planting seeds, pulling weeds and picking the ripe crop. Ann Kussmaul's (1981) research uncovered a high percentage of youths working as servants in husbandry in the sixteenth century. Boys looked after the draught animals, cattle and sheep while girls milked the cows and cared for the chickens. Children who worked in homes were either apprentices, chimney sweeps, domestic servants, or assistants in the family business. As apprentices, children lived and worked with their master who established a workshop in his home or attached to the back of his cottage. The children received training in the trade instead of wages. Once they became fairly skilled in the trade they became journeymen. By the time they reached the age of twenty-one, most could start their own business because they had become highly skilled masters. Both parents and children considered this a fair arrangement unless the master was abusive. The infamous chimney sweeps, however, had apprenticeships considered especially harmful and exploitative. Boys as young as four would work for a master sweep who would send them up the narrow chimneys of British homes to scrape the soot off the sides. The first labor law passed in Britain to protect children from poor working conditions, the Act of 1788, attempted to improve the plight of these "climbing boys." Around age twelve many girls left home to become domestic servants in the homes of artisans, traders, shopkeepers and manufacturers. They received a low wage, and room and board in exchange for doing household chores (cleaning, cooking, caring for children and shopping). Children who were employed as assistants in domestic production (or what is also called the cottage industry) were in the best situation because they worked at home for their parents. Children who were helpers in the family business received training in a trade and their work directly increased the productivity of the family and hence the family's income. Girls helped with dressmaking, hat making and button making while boys assisted with shoemaking, pottery making and horse shoeing. Although hours varied from trade to trade and family to family, children usually worked twelve hours per day with time out for meals and tea. These hours, moreover, were not regular over the year or consistent from day-to-day. The weather and family events affected the number of hours in a month children worked. This form of child labor was not viewed by society as cruel or abusive but was accepted as necessary for the survival of the family and development of the child. Early Industrial Work Once the first rural textile mills were built (1769) and child apprentices were hired as primary workers, the connotation of "child labor" began to change. Charles Dickens called these places of work the "dark satanic mills" and E. P. Thompson described them as "places of sexual license, foul language, cruelty, violent accidents, and alien manners" (1966, 307). Although long hours had been the custom for agricultural and domestic workers for generations, the factory system was criticized for strict discipline, harsh punishment, unhealthy working conditions, low wages, and inflexible work hours. The factory depersonalized the employer-employee relationship and was attacked for stripping the worker's freedom, dignity and creativity. These child apprentices were paupers taken from orphanages and workhouses and were housed, clothed and fed but received no wages for their long day of work in the mill. A conservative estimate is that around 1784 one-third of the total workers in country mills were apprentices and that their numbers reached 80 to 90% in some individual mills (Collier, 1964). Despite the First Factory Act of 1802 (which attempted to improve the conditions of parish apprentices), several mill owners were in the same situation as Sir Robert Peel and Samuel Greg who solved their labor shortage by employing parish apprentices. After the invention and adoption of Watt's steam engine, mills no longer had to locate near water and rely on apprenticed orphans - hundreds of factory towns and villages developed in Lancashire, Manchester, Yorkshire and Cheshire. The factory owners began to hire children from poor and working-class families to work in these factories preparing and spinning cotton, flax, wool and silk. The Child Labor Debate What happened to children within these factory walls became a matter of intense social and political debate that continues today. Pessimists such as Alfred (1857), Engels (1926), Marx (1909), and Webb and Webb (1898) argued that children worked under deplorable conditions and were being exploited by the industrialists. A picture was painted of the "dark satanic mill" where children as young as five and six years old worked for twelve to sixteen hours a day, six days a week without recess for meals in hot, stuffy, poorly lit, overcrowded factories to earn as little as four shillings per week. Reformers called for child labor laws and after considerable debate, Parliament took action and set up a Royal Commission of Inquiry into children's employment. Optimists, on the other hand, argued that the employment of children in these factories was beneficial to the child, family and country and that the conditions were no worse than they had been on farms, in cottages or up chimneys. Ure (1835) and Clapham (1926) argued that the work was easy for children and helped them make a necessary contribution to their family's income. Many factory owners claimed that employing children was necessary for production to run smoothly and for their products to remain competitive. John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, recommended child labor as a means of preventing youthful idleness and vice. Ivy Pinchbeck (1930) pointed out, moreover, that working hours and conditions had been as bad in the older domestic industries as they were in the industrial factories.
  • Most times the kids are put into slavery by a gangster who kidnapped them or by their parents who force them to do work like do the farm work Also they use little children as sex slaves by kidnappers or sick parents Also people sell their children just to make a little bit of money Most the time slaves cost less than an iPod Today in this economy there are 300,000 child slaves just in Haiti
  • Child soldiers perform a range of tasks including participation in combat, laying mines and explosives; scouting, spying, acting as decoys, couriers or guards; training, drill or other preparations There are an estimated 250,000 child soldiers in the world today. Children involved in armed conflict are frequently killed or injured during combat or while carrying out other tasks. Child soldiers are in Burundi, Chad, Colombia, Ivory Coast, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sri Lanka, Sudan and Uganda, Central African Republic, Somalia amongst others. Children are used as soldiers because they are easier to condition and brainwash. They don't eat much food, don't need paying much and have an underdeveloped sense of risk/danger so are easier to send into the line of fire.
  • There are no definitions of other terms used to describe young people such as “adolescents” "teenagers" or “youth" in international law The children's rights movement is a historical and modern movement committed to the acknowledgment, expansion, and/or regression of the rights of children around the world The Rights of Infants was published in 1796 it was ahead of its time. Charles brace use child aid society to help take in children Social experiment for transporting children in 1800s it transported an estimated 300000 orphans from place to place 1852 children must start going to school The Children’s Aid Society (CAS) is a private charitable organization based in New York City. It serves 150,000 children per year, providing foster care, medical and mental health services In the 1890s The national child labor committee, or nclc , is a private, non-profit organization in the United States that serves as a leading proponent for the national child labor reform movement
  • Yes we have the remains of a great thing More homes and orphanages for homeless kids Less child abuse and they will catch the people More kids have at least one family member there is less kids walking alone on the street without a family ,110less the earlier in time
  • Mary Ellen Wilson (1864–1956) or sometimes Mary Ellen McCormack was an American whose case of child abuse led to the creation of the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children . As an 8 year old, she was severely abused by her stepparents, Francis and Mary Connolly. She was adopted at 1. Her case was made at age 12.
  • In June 1897, after Mary addressed the railway union convention, she began to be referred to as "Mother" by the men of the union. The name stuck. That summer, when the 9,000-member Mine Workers called a nationwide strike of bituminous (soft coal) miners and tens of thousands of miners laid down their tools, Mary arrived in Pittsburgh to assist them. She became "Mother Jones" to millions of working men and women across the country for her efforts on behalf of the miners. Mother Jones was so effective the Mine Workers sent her into the coalfields to sign up miners with the union. She agitated in the anthracite fields of eastern Pennsylvania, the company towns of West Virginia and the harsh coal camps of Colorado. Nearly anywhere coal miners, textile workers or steelworkers were fighting to organize a union, Mother Jones was there.   She was banished from more towns and was held incommunicado in more jails in more states than any other union leader of the time. In 1912, she was even charged with a capital offense by a military tribunal in West Virginia and held under house arrest for weeks until popular outrage and national attention forced the governor to release her. Mother Jones was deeply affected by the "machine-gun massacre" in Ludlow, Colo., when National Guardsmen raided a tent colony of striking miners and their families, killing 20 people—mostly women and children. She traveled across the country, telling the story, and testified before the U.S. Congress.   In addition to miners, Mother Jones also was very concerned about child workers. During a silk strike in Philadelphia, 100,000 workers—including 16,000 children—left their jobs over a demand that their workweek be cut from 60 to 55 hours. To attract attention to the cause of abolishing child labor, in 1903, she led a children’s march of 100 children from the textile mills of Philadelphia to New York City "to show the New York millionaires our grievances." She led the children all the way to President Theodore Roosevelt’s Long Island home. In her 80s, Mother Jones settled down near Washington, D.C., in 1921 but continued to travel across the country. In 1924, although unable to hold a pen between her fingers, she made her last strike appearance in Chicago in support of striking dressmakers, hundreds of whom were arrested and black-listed during their ill-fated four month-long struggle. She died at the age of 94 in Silver Spring, Md., and was buried in the Union Miners Cemetery in Mount Olive, Ill.
  • Samuel Gompers was an English-born American labor union leader and a key figure in American labor history. Gompers founded the American Federation of Labor (AFL), and served as that organization's president from 1886 to 1894 and from 1895 until his death in 1924. He promoted harmony among the different craft unions that comprised the AFL, trying to minimize jurisdictional battles. He promoted "thorough" organization and collective bargaining to secure shorter hours and higher wages, the first essential steps, he believed, to emancipating labor. He also encouraged the AFL to take political action to "elect their friends" and "defeat their enemies." During World War I, Gompers and the AFL worked with the government to avoid strikes and boost morale, while raising wage rates and expanding membership. January 27, 1850 – December 13, 1924
  • John Dewey becomes president of the American Psychological Association, openly advocates for children's rights, and later writes several books about progressive education that emphasize the necessity for children's rights in education and throughout democratic society. He is acknowledged as one of the heroes of the children's rights movement in the United States. Dewey died in New York City on 1 June 1952.
  • Mentally : The children where mentally damaged when the people would abuse them. So when the would grow up they would be mentally damaged. Like if someone was beat up as a child they would be scared for life and could maybe be nonsocial or always depressed. Psychology : People let this happen but not on purpose. Some knew what was going on others didn’t. The ones that did know were either the people doing it or they were protesting about it. The ones that did know just didn't do anything. Technology : The used news to tell everyone that people where mistreating the children and some people would take pictures of the child workers or slaves and put the pictures on the news paper to raise awareness.
  • Kenya has plans to test four million people in their homes next year for H.I.V., the virus that causes AIDS, and the advocacy group Human Rights Watch recently sent the Kenyan government a letter asking that it ensure that all those tested — particularly children and teenagers — have their rights protected during the process. About 150,000 children are believed to be infected in Kenya, which has a widespread epidemic. Offering tests and counseling at home is seen as crucial because many people cannot be persuaded to go to a clinic for testing for fear of being seen there. But testing children at home can create serious family problems. The rights group asked that outreach workers obtain the consent of older children rather than relying on demands from parents or other relatives, especially if the child is pregnant or already a parent, and also that they stay nearby when results are given “ In the past,” the group said, “children have been kicked out of their home, exploited or physically ill-treated by their relatives when their status became known.” A report about Kenya’s epidemic, which the organization issued last year, painted a grim picture. Orphans are often treated badly or fed little by resentful relatives who take them in. Some parents refuse to give children antiretroviral pills, even when they are in the home, because they can cause nausea, pain or hunger, while food is scarce and expensive.
  • The children’s rights laws were made because children were being treated wrong and sometimes abused, like they weren’t human beings.
  • Most of the time, they had to do work in factories. They would do small things like make cigar boxes, or yarn. Sometimes they would even work in fish canning factories, using knives to open oysters so they could cut out the meat. They also worked in landromats, which resutled in them breathing in dangerous chemicals.
  • The children usually got paid a small amount of two or three dollars a week. Girls made less money than boys, who did the exact same jobs, but just by a different name. For working 12 hours a day, 5 days a week, they would get paid nine dollars a day for shelling nuts. Since girls were paid half of the price, they were paid four dollars and fifty cents.
  • There are forty-two different children’s rights laws. This includes the right to privacy, life, and the right to stay with their parents.
  • In the 1890s, adult factory workers began to join together to form labor unions so they could bargain for better working conditions and better wages. These benefits naturally extended down to the children workers as well.

Children Rights Children Rights Presentation Transcript

  • Children’s Rights By: Raquel, Amy, Bobby, Jordan W.
    • 5 essential questions
    • Laws
    • Laws compared
    • History
    • Child labor
    • Child slaves
    • Child soldiers
    • Relevant
    • Important people
    • Current events
    • Video
    • 5 essential answers
    • Bibliography
  • 5 Essential Questions
    • Why were the children’s rights laws made?
    • What kind of work did children have to do?
    • How much did the children get paid?
    • How many rights laws are there?
    • How did the push for Children’s working rights get started?
  • Articles 1-5: All children under the age of 18 have these rights regardless of their race, religion, abilities; whatever they think or say, whatever type of family they come from. Article 6: All children have the right to life. Governments should ensure that children survive and develop healthily. Articles 7-8: All children have the right to a legally registered name and nationality. Articles 9-11, 18-21, 25: Children have the right to stay with their families unless it is for their own good. Children have the right to be properly cared for, and protected from violence, abuse and neglect by their parents, or anyone else who looks after them. If they cannot be looked after by their own family, children have the right to be looked after properly by people who respect their religion, culture, and language. This situation should be reviewed regularly. When children are adopted the first concern must be what is best for them. Article 12: Children have the right to say what they think should happen when adults are making decisions that affect them, and to have their opinions taken into account. Article 13 and 17: Children have the right to get and share information as long as the information is not damaging to them or to others. Article 14: Children have the right to think and believe what they want. Article 15: Children have the right to meet together and join groups. Article 16: Children have the right to privacy. Article 22: Children who come into a country as refugees should have the same rights as children born in that country.
  • Article 23: Children who have any kind of disability have the right to special care and support so that they can lead full and independent lives. Article 24: Children have the right to good quality health care, to clean water, nutritious food, and a clean environment, so that they will stay healthy. Article 26: Children – either through their guardians or directly – have the right to help from the government if they are poor or in need. Article 27: Children have the right to a standard of living that is good enough to meet their physical and mental needs. Article 28-29: All children have the right to a primary education, which should be free. Young people should be encouraged to reach the highest level of education of which they are capable and develop each child’s personality, talents and abilities to the fullest. Article 30: Minority or indigenous children have the right to learn about and practice their own culture, language and religion. Article 31: Children have the right to relax and play, and to join in a wide range of cultural, artistic and other recreational activities. Article 32: Children have the right to be protected from work that is dangerous or might harm their health or their education. Children's work should not jeopardize any of their other rights, including the right to education, or the right to relaxation and play. Article 33-36, 39: Children have the right to be protected from all forms of exploitation and abuse. Article 37: No one is allowed to punish children in a cruel or harmful way. Article 38: Children under 18 should not be forced or recruited to take part in a war or join the armed forces. Article 40: Children who are accused of breaking the law have the right to legal help and fair treatment in a justice system that respects their rights.
  • Children’s Rights Laws~ Explained Articles 1-5: All children under the age of 18 have these rights regardless of their race, religion, abilities; whatever they think or say, whatever type of family they come from. Article 12: Children have the right to say what they think should happen when adults are making decisions that affect them, and to have their opinions taken into account. Article 27: Children have the right to a standard of living that is good enough to meet their physical and mental needs. Article 38: Children under 18 should not be forced or recruited to take part in a war or join the armed forces.
  • Children’s Divorce Laws~ 1- Neither parent shall deny the child reasonable use of the telephone to place and receive calls with the other parent or relatives 5- Each parent will permit the child to display photographs of the other parent or both parents in the child’s room. 19: Neither parent will say or do things with an eye to gaining the child as an “ally” against the other parent. 22- Neither parent will try to make the child believe he or she loves the child more than the other parent, by, for example, saying that he or she loves the child than the other parent or over informing the child on adult topics or overindulging the child.
  • Laws Compared
    • American laws
    • The right to equality, regardless of race , colour, religion, national, or social origin.
    • The right to develop physically and mentally in a healthy manner.
    • The right to a name and nationality.
    • The right to adequate nutrition, housing, and medical services.
    • The right to special care, if handicapped.
    • The right to love, understanding and protection.
    • The right to free education, to play and recreation.
    • The right to be among the first to recieve relief in time so disaster.
    • The right to protection against all forms of neglect, cruelty and exploitation.
    • The right to be brought up in a spirit of tolerance, peace and universal brotherhood.
    • Iran laws
    • The right to develop physically and mentally in a healthly manner.
    • The right to a name and nationality.
    • The right to adequate nutrition, housing, and medical services.
    • The right to protection against all forms of neglect, cruelty and exploitation.
    • When Child labor started.
    • Working in factories.
    • How old they were when they started working.
    • Lost youth
    • Money
    • Child labor today
    • 1836
    • 1836
    • 1842
    • 1876
    • 1881
    • 1883
    • 1892
    • 1904
    • 1916
    • 1924
    • 1936
    • 1937
    • 1937
    • 1938
  • labor workers in mining and textiles plant in England
    • 1851
    • 1861
    • 1871
    • 1881
  • Child slaves
    • Kidnapped
    • Sick parents
    • Bad
    • $
    • iPod
    • 300,000
    • a range of tasks
    • Deaths
    • Different countries
    • 250,000 kids
    • Why?
  • Child rights history child rights movement
    • "A child is any human being below the age of eighteen years, unless under the law applicable to the child, majority is attained earlier.“
    • Historical and modern movement
    • 1796 Thomas Spence book
    • 1800s orphan train
    • 1852 to attend school
    • 1853 children's aid society
    • 1890s child labor committee
    • 1924 constitutional amendment
    • 1929 orphan stops
    • 1938 frank d. Roosevelt made child labor law
    • YES
    • HOMES
    • WHACK
    • FAMILY
    • STREET
    Has anything gotten better?
  • Children of slavery
  • Important People
  • Mary Ellen Wilson
    • 1864–1956
    • Case of child abuse
    • New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.
    • As an 8 year old
  • Mother Jones
    • Born may 1 st 1830
    • Died in the 1930s
    • Founder of the children's rights movement.
    • New York Labor Movement
    • End of child labor in cigar making
    • January 27, 1850 – December 13, 1924
  • John Dewey
    • President of the American Psychological Association
    • Children's rights in education
    • Acknowledged as one of the heroes
    • Mentally
    • Psychology
    • Technology
  • Current Events
  • Kenya’s H.I.V’s
    • Kenya test four million people for H.I.V.
    • Children’s right number 2 that states “The right to develop physically and mentally in a healthy manner.”
    • Main focus is on children and teens.
    • One of the many current event on children’s rights
  • Child brick slaves
    • YouTube - Modern Day Child Slaves
  • First Question: Why were the children’s rights laws made? The children’s rights laws were made because children were being treated wrong and sometimes abused, like they weren’t human beings.
  • Second Question: What kind of work did the children have to do? Most of the time, they had to do work in factories. They would do small things like make cigar boxes, or yarn. Sometimes they would even work in fish canning factories, using knives to open oysters so they could cut out the meat. They also worked in laundromats, which resulted in them breathing in dangerous chemicals.
  • Third Question: How much did the children get paid? The children usually got paid a small amount of two or three dollars a week. Girls made less money than boys, who did the exact same jobs, but just by a different name. For working twelve hours a day, five days a week, they would get paid nine dollars a day for shelling nuts. Since girls were paid half of the price, they were paid four dollars and fifty cents.
  • Fourth Question: How many rights laws are there? There are forty different children’s rights laws.
  • Fifth Question: How did the push for Children’s working rights get started? In the 1890’s adult factory workers began to join together to form labor unions so they could bargain for better working conditions and better wages. These benefits naturally extended down to the children workers as well.
  • Bibliography
    • Websites
    • http://www.aflcio.org/aboutus/history/history/jones.cfm
    • Googleimages.com
    • http://www.madisonpubliclibrary.org/history/immigrant/kids.gif
    • Books
    • Marching for freedom by Paritage Elizabeth
    • California's rights and regulations by Nolo Guergin
    • We rode the orphan trains by Andria warren
    • Videos
    • youbtube.com
    • Interview
    • I did interview some one for child abuse but she has asked not to have her name in the PowerPoint