Creating Learning Objectives
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Creating Learning Objectives

on

  • 453 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
453
Views on SlideShare
452
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://opeogunlaja.blogspot.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Creating Learning Objectives Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Designing Learning andInstructional Strategies MID 7133 Lecturer : Azmawati Binti Mohd Lazim: azmawati.mohd.lazim@gmail.com : Azmawati Mohd Lazim : 21A4FE60 : wawacrv : wawacrv
  • 2. At the end of this lesson, learners should be able to : Write clearly the instruction and learning objectives State the differences between goal and objective Discuss the measurable objectives for the final project documentation Construct the different set of objectives Identify the Information Design Principle Relate the Gagne Nine Event to the learning and document preparation for the product assignment.Learning Objectives
  • 3. Instruction and learning Effective Interactivity instruction in instruction begins with a refers to Learner systematic active the learner transform it planning learning acts on the into new, process for information personal instructional given or meaning. events. presented Information Gagne 3 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 4. Instructional Strategy Instructional Effective Learning strategy is a instructional Theories guideline on strategies are describe the which instructors based on ways that base their learning theorists believe teaching and theories. E.g : people learn learning Gagne Nine new ideas and approach or Event concepts. methodology on. Information Gagne 4 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 5. The The steps needed to objectives get there. Where we want to The goal be. Information Gagne 5 Goal vs Measurable Type of MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle University, Cyberjaya, Malaysia Event Design by Azmawati Mohd Lazim for masters of E-Learning Students Class of 2012, Multimedia
  • 6. Developing goals GOAL The course Goals can be Example of a goals are broad lofty ideas, broad course statements of using words or goal: Students what the phrases like will gain a students will be "appreciates" greater able to do when or "shows appreciation for they have leadership traditional completed the ability." music. course. Information Gagne 6 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 7. Writing objectives How can we measure if the user It would be very difficult. That is understand the lesson? why we develop objectives. For example : how to measure if they appreciate history? OBJECTIVES The objectives must be Also called  measurable • learning outcomes specific • measurable objectives you can determine if the goal • behavioral objectives because was achieved. they describe observable behavior rather than knowledge. Information Gagne 7 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 8. GOAL OBJECTIVES • Goals are broad. • Objectives are narrow • Goals are general • objectives are precise. intentions; • objectives are • Goals are intangible; tangible. • Goals are abstract; • objectives are • Goals cant be concrete validated as is;. • objectives can be validated Goals vs Objectives Information Gagne 8 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 9. What is measurable objectives? Measurable The Use verbs objectives objectives describe to the specific instructions include what degree use to about what measures specific the students determine we want the whether or conditions will be able student to (how well or to not we are be able to successful in how many) demonstrate do. mastery of achieving the goal. the task. Information Gagne 9 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 10. Objectives MUST BE clearly written and measurable. They are clear in that the learner knows how they will be measure (condition), what he/she must do (performance) and how well he/she must do it (criterion). The objectives are measurable in that the criterion clearly states the performance level that must be achieved. Measurable Objectives Information Gagne10 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 11. Writing Measurable Objectives Use the big-picture view to understand Wrap their minds ALLOW DEVELOPERS what themes, around the content to TO interactivity and understand its scope engagement strategies can work Logically order the content (this can be Organize the content Ensure that no content done in an into chunks, topics, slips through the instructional analysis lessons, units, cracks which many people modules, etc. don’t do) Communicate the content to clients, Ensure all required subject matter experts content is tested and the development team Information Gagne11 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 12. Writing measurable objectives First, it must be noted that one must consider one’s audience. Second, 1. Performance/Action verbs. An objective always states what a learner is expected to be able to do and/or produce to an be considered competent. objective should 2. Conditions. An objective describes the important conditions (if any) under which the performance is to occur. include the 3. Criteria/Standards. An objective describes the criteria of following: acceptable performance; that is, it says how well someone would have to perform to be considered competent. 4. Audience. End user Information Gagne12 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 13. Example Information Gagne13 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle University, Cyberjaya, Malaysia Event Design by Azmawati Mohd Lazim for masters of E-Learning Students Class of 2012, Multimedia
  • 14. knowFORBIDDEN WORDSUnderstand Information Gagne14 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 15. Types of Objectives Cognitive : thought or knowledge: "what the student is able to do" (an observable) Three domains and Affective : feelings or choices ensuing type "how the student chooses to act” of objectives include: Psychomotor : physical skills "what the student can perform" Information Gagne15 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 16. Cognitive Domain Use this list to help you express distinct performance expectations you have of your users / students. In general, cognitive competency in a field begins with knowledge level learning and advances up the taxonomy to comprehension, application, and then the higher order skills involved in analysis, synthesis, and evaluation or problem solving. Information Gagne16 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 17. Information Gagne17 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle University, Cyberjaya, Malaysia Event Design by Azmawati Mohd Lazim for masters of E-Learning Students Class of 2012, Multimedia
  • 18. Verbs Words Use in Cognitive Comprehensi Knowledge Application Analysis Synthesis Evaluation on• arrange • characterize • administer • analyze • combine • appraise• define • classify • apply • appraise • compose • argue• duplicate • complete • calculate • categorize • consolidate • assess• know • depict • choose • compare • construct • critique• label • describe • compute • contrast • create • defend• list • discuss • conduct • critique • design • envision• match • establish • demonstrate • diagram • formulate • estimate• memorize • explain • dramatize • differentiate • hypothesize • evaluate• Name • express • employ • discriminate • integrate • examine• order • identify • implement • distinguish • merge • grade• quote • illustrate • interpret • examine • organize • inspect• recognize • locate • operate • experiment • plan • judge• recall • recognize • perform • explore • propose • justify• repeat • report • practice • inventory • synthesize • rank• reproduce • Relate • prescribe • investigate • systematize • rate• restate • review • roleplay • question • theorize • review• retain • sort • sketch • research • unite • value • translate • solve • test • write Information Gagne18 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle University, Cyberjaya, Malaysia Event Design by Azmawati Mohd Lazim for masters of E-Learning Students Class of 2012, Multimedia
  • 19. Information Gagne19 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle University, Cyberjaya, Malaysia Event Design by Azmawati Mohd Lazim for masters of E-Learning Students Class of 2012, Multimedia
  • 20. Affective Domain The affective domain (Krathwohl, Bloom, Masia, 1973) includes the manner in which we deal with things emotionally, such as feelings, values, appreciation, enthusiasms, motivations, and attitudes. The five major categories are listed from the simplest behavior to the most complex: Information Gagne Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 21. Psychomotor Domain The psychomotor domain (Simpson, 1972) includes physical movement, coordination, and use of the motor-skill areas. Development of these skills requires practice and is measured in terms of speed, precision, distance, procedures, or techniques in execution. The seven major categories are listed from the simplest behavior to the most complex: Information Gagne Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 22. Information Gagne22 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 23. 3/6/2012 MID 7133 23Design by Azmawati Mohd Lazim for masters of E-Learning Students Class of 2012, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Malaysia
  • 24. Information Design PrinciplesRetrieval • Attention to external stimulus will initially last up to a maximum of 20 minutes.  Keep content small and self-contained.  Chunking or grouping pieces of data into units is a major technique for getting and keeping information in short-term memory; it is also a type of elaboration that will help get information into long-term memory.  Label topics clearly.  Use a template for consistency.  Disclose information in progressive layers.  Each topic has only one learning outcome and have 7 + 3 units of information ( a maximum of 10 screens)Orientation • E-learning material has no physical representation of its organization; there are no covers, chapters, or pages. Provide visual cues through metaphor or color.  Provide a site map, easy backtracking and exit, and a default path. Information Gagne24 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 25. Information Design Principles Presentation •Consider readability and layout. •Reduce clutter; aim for 50% white space. •Distinguish important information. •Use color and graphics appropriately. Be consistent and conservative. •Use color and graphics for clarification and explanation, not for decoration. • When designing the structure, consider the purpose. Encoding design sequentially design hierarchically • Structure each topic to answer one question/learning outcome •Provide several access techniques: menu, index, table of Sequence contents, hypertext links, keyword searches. •Provide multiple entry points and paths to address a variety of learner needs. Information Gagne25 Goal vs Measurable Type ofIntro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 26. Gagne Nine Event Information Gagne26 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 27. Example: Instructional Event Lesson Activity 1.Gain Attention Engaging opening sequence. A space theme is used to play off the new software products name, STAR. Inspirational music accompanies the opening sequence, which might consist of a shooting star or animated logo. 2. Recall Information Students are called upon to use their prior knowledge of other software applications to understand the basic functionality of the STAR system. They are asked to think about how they start, close, and print from other programs such as their word processor, and it is explained that the STAR system works similarly. 3. Inform Learner of A computer programmer presents students Objective with the following learning outcome immediately after the introduction. Upon completing this lesson you will be able to: list the benefits of the new STAR system. Information Gagne27 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 28. Instructional Event Lesson Activity 4. Present Stimulus Using screen images captured from the live Material application software and audio narration, the training program describes the basic features of the STAR system. After the description, a simple demonstration is performed. 5. Provide Learning With each STAR feature, students are Guidance shown a variety of ways to access it - using short-cut keys on the keyboard, drop-down menus, and button bars. Complex sequences are chunked into short, step-by- step lists for easier storage in long-term memory. 6. Elicit Performance After each function is demonstrated, students are asked to practice with realistic, controlled simulations. Information Gagne28 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 29. Instructional Event Lesson Activity7. Provide Feedback During the simulations, students are given guidance as needed. If they are performing operations correctly, the simulated STAR system behaves just as the live application would. If the student makes a mistake, the tutorial immediately responds with an audible cue, and a pop-up window explains and reinforces the correct operation.8. Assess Performance After all lessons are completed, students are required to take a post-test. Mastery is achieved with an 80% or better score.9. Enhance Retention • A one-page, laminated quick reference card is distributed for further reinforcement of the learning session. • A case study on the application of the software is discussed using the course discussion forum. Information Gagne29 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 30.  Gagne Conditions for learning ◦ http://www.knowledgebank.irri.org/rkb/RKB_C ontent/eLearning.htm ◦ http://www.geom.uiuc.edu/apps/rainbow/  Apply Gagne Nine Events of Instruction for a specific topic in the Design Template given Information Gagne30 Goal vs Measurable Type of 3/6/2012 MID 7133Intro Design Nine Objectives Objectives Objectives Principle Event
  • 31. Please prepare your 1 Learning goal for your English Course 10 learning objectives for your English Courseware by referring to the Cognitive Domain element & Blooms taxonomy verbs. Update your blogs & present it in class.Why you have a ‘date’ with menext week?