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  • 1. KEY CONCEPT There were theories of biological and geologic change before Charles Darwin. 10.1 Evolution
  • 2. HW: Read pages 298-301 5 Facts/Page Stop whining & do your homework! 10.1 Evolution
  • 3. Early scientists proposed ideas about evolution.  Biological Evolution is the process through which species change over time.  A Species is a group of organisms that can naturally reproduce and have fertile offspring. 10.1 Evolution
  • 4. Early Scientists who influenced theory of evolution • Linnaeus 1700s: developed a classification system for all types of organisms based on similarities, • he believed species could change over time. • he believed that new species could come to be from hybridization. • hybridization means crossing • He observed that different plants could cross and make a new species. • Buffon 1700s:  species shared ancestors rather than arising separately •due to geologic evidence he believed the Earth was older than 6,000 yrs. old 10.1 Evolution
  • 5. Early Scientist who influenced theory of evolution • E. Darwin 1731: – proposed that all living things came from one common ancestor more-complex forms developed from less-complex forms – saw competition as a cause of evolution • Lamarck 1809: – all things evolve toward perfection and complexity. environmental change leads to use or disuse of a structure believed in inheritance of acquired characteristics 10.1 Evolution
  • 6. What is the common idea these 4 scientists share? 10.1 Evolution
  • 7. Comparing Lamarck and Darwin 10.1 Evolution
  • 8. 10.1 Part-1 Study Guide Review 1. What is the contribution of Linnaeus? 2. Buffon 3. E. Darwin 4. Lamarck 5. What two conditions must be true for a group of animals to be considered the same species? 6. What was incorrect about Lamarck’s theory of how organisms evolve? 7. In the 1700s, most people believed that species were fixed and did not change. How did plant hybridization – a type of crossing that could be observed help change this view. 10.1 Evolution
  • 9. Apply • The Padaung tribe of Burma considered a long neck beautiful. This woman used metal rings to stretch her neck over her lifetime. Do you think her children will be born with longer necks? Why? Karen Tribe Can you think of other examples? 10.1 Evolution
  • 10. Theories of geologic change set the stage for Darwin’s Theory Company Biologist A company has been digging a new oil well near the ocean. They have found these bones. They have hired you to explain what this means. (wow, a job!) 1. Which layer do you think is oldest? Why? 2. Which fossils are oldest? Why? 3. Develop a theory (an idea based on facts) to explain the fossils. 10.1 Evolution
  • 11. Theories of geologic change set the stage for Darwin’s Theory • There was debate about how old the Earth was and whether it could change! • Zoologist Cuvier believed that organisms did not change, but could go extinct. • He observed as evidence that each layer of rock had different fossils in it. Encino Man pt 2 Encino Man pt3 10.1 Evolution
  • 12. Theories of geologic change set the stage for Darwin’s theory. • Observations like Cuvier’s needed explanations so theories developed for geologic change. – gradualism – uniformitarianism –catastrophism 10.1 Evolution
  • 13. Catastrophism (Cuvier) • Catastrophe means sudden disaster.  Sudden natural disasters such as floods and volcanic eruptions shaped landforms and caused species to become extinct. What do you think happened to the animals? Where do you think the new animals came from? 10.1 Evolution
  • 14. Gradualism (Hutton) • Gradual means moving or changing slowly  Landforms were shaped by very slow changes over a long periods of time, and not by natural disasters. Can you think of examples of landforms that would be created by slow step by step changes? 10.1 Evolution
  • 15. • Uniform means always staying the same.  The same processes that shaped landforms in the past also shape landforms today. • The processes are the same = uniform. What do you think those processes are? Each layer of rock was formed by the uniform laying down of sediment that still occurs today Scientists now believe the Earth is 4.55 billion years old Uniformitarianism (Lyell) 10.1 Evolution
  • 16. • Uniformitarianism is the prevailing theory of geologic change. The Grand Canyon How It Formed 10.1 Evolution
  • 17. Plate Tectonics & Continental Drift 10.1 Evolution
  • 18. Can you think of any constant changes near you? How fast is are the plates moving in California? 1 inch a year!!! Hidden Fury 04 Hidden Fury Complete San Andreas Fault 10.1 Evolution
  • 19. San Andreas Fault 10.1 Evolution
  • 20. 10.1 Evolution
  • 21. • Thanks to a remarkable complete fossil record of the evolution of the horse, scientists can chart its gradual change into the ancestor of today's native breeds 10.1 Evolution
  • 22. Thanks to a remarkable complete fossil record of the evolution of the horse, scientists can chart its gradual change into the ancestor of today's native breeds Isn't Evolution Just a Theory? 10.1 Evolution
  • 23. Vocabulary 1. Geology 2. Geologic change 3. Fertile 4. Offspring 5. Species 6. biological change? CW:Reader: Read Pgs. 164-165 and do P.166 # 1-5 Study Guide page 99-100 # 1-16 Staple Reader on top of vocabulary.HW: 10.2 P.302-303 5 Facts/Page 10.1 Evolution
  • 24. 10.1 Study Guide Review #2 1. Catastrophism 2. Gradualism 3. Uniformitarianism 4. Fossils 5. Evolution Use these names (Linnaeus / Lamarck / Buffon / Darwin) to answer the following: 6. Who is Charles Darwin’s grandfather? 7. Thought that giraffe’s long neck evolved from reaching high in trees. 8. Grouped living organisms into categories based on what they looked like. 9. What geologic theory can be summarized by the phrase “the present is the key to the past”? 10.1 Evolution
  • 25. HW: Read P.302-303 5 Facts/Page “Quiz is next people!” 10.1 Evolution
  • 26. Charles Darwin Got my 10.2 P. 302-303 5 Facts/Page homework? 10.2 Evolution
  • 27. Activating Prior Knowledge Animal Observation In your table team, describe on a sheet of paper: what this could be? talk about size, color, number, shape of things. Based on your observations, predict: what do you think its traits are good for? where do you think it lives? how does it move? what do you think it eats? 10.2 Evolution
  • 28. Activating Prior Knowledge Tapeworm in Colonoscopy 10.2 Evolution
  • 29. Activating Prior Knowledge Sean Anemone Eating Venus Flytrap 10.2 Evolution
  • 30. 10.2 Objectives • Describe how Darwin arrived at his idea about species variation. • Recognize how Darwin’s discoveries supported Charles Lyell’s ancient-Earth theory. 10.2 Evolution
  • 31. Charles Darwin travelled to the Galapagos Islands off of Ecuador. 10.2 Evolution
  • 32. Darwin observed differences among island species. 10.2 Evolution
  • 33. Darwin observed differences (variation) among island species. • Variation: the difference in the physical traits among individuals in a group of organisms • interspecific variation: is variation among members of different species 10.2 Evolution
  • 34. Darwin observed differences among island species. • Variation: the difference in the physical traits among individuals in a group of organisms • intraspecific variation: is variation among members of the same species 10.2 Evolution
  • 35. Darwin observed differences among island species. Domed Tortoise Saddle-backed Tortoise What type of environment do you think the saddle back tortoise would live in? Observe the two tortoises pictured. What are the variations between the individuals? What type of environment do you think the domed tortoise would live in? 10.2 Evolution
  • 36. Darwin observed differences among island species. • Domed Tortoises have short legs and necks and live in areas with short plants and moss • Saddle-backed Tortoises have long legs and necks and live in areas with tall plants Domed Tortoise Saddle-backed Tortoise 10.2 Evolution
  • 37. Darwin observed differences among island species Based on your observations, what type of food do you think each would eat? Observe the two Finches pictured. What are the variations between the individuals? Finches What type of environment do you think each would live in? 10.2 Evolution
  • 38. Darwin observed differences among island species – Finches had different kinds of beaks in areas with different kinds of food. – Galápagos finches that had large strong beaks live in areas with hard-shelled nuts. – Galápagos finches that had small beaks lived in areas where fruits were available. 10.2 Evolution
  • 39. • An adaptation is a trait that allows an organism to better survive in its environment. – Species are able to adapt to their environment. – Adaptations can lead to genetic change in a population. 10.2 Evolution
  • 40. California Finches • You may see these around L.A. Get a bird- feeder with sunflowers or regular bird seeds from pet shops or home depot and such. House Finch Purple Finch American Goldfinch Lesser Goldfinch 10.2 Evolution
  • 41. 10.2 Study Guide Review #1 1. Interspecific 2. Intraspecific 3. Adaptation 4. What island chain in S. America was the source of many of Darwin’s insights? 5. Darwin saw various species that seemed well-suited to their environment. What did this suggest? 6. Draw the beak of a meat eater. 10.2 Evolution
  • 42. • Darwin found fossils of extinct animals that resemble modern animals. • This suggested that modern animals are related to fossil forms. Darwin observed fossil and geologic evidence supporting an ancient Earth. GLYPTODON ARMADILLO This is important because in order for such changes to occur, the Earth must be older than 6,000 years old! 10.2 Evolution
  • 43. Darwin observed fossil and geologic evidence supporting an ancient Earth. • Darwin found fossil shells high up in the Andes mountains Plate tectonics and fossils 10.2 Evolution
  • 44. • He saw land move from underwater to above sea level due to an earthquake. Kilauea Volcano Eruption 10.2 Evolution
  • 45. • Darwin realized that small gradual processes add up to big change over time. • Darwin extended his observations of slow gradual change to the evolution of organisms. 10.2 Evolution
  • 46. Charles Darwin Published a book on his thoughts. Who Was Charles Darwin? 10.2 Evolution
  • 47. CW # 23 Vocabulary • Make a KWL, I know it, I sort of know it, IDK it 1. Darwin 2. evolution 3. species 4. extinct 5. fossil 6. catastrophism 7. gradualism 8. uniformitarianism 9. hybridization 10.descendants 11.ancestors 12.phenotype 13.mutation 14.modification 15.variation 16.beneficial 17.adaptation 18.heritability 19.population 20.competition 21.fitness 22.natural selection Know / Sort of / IDK 10.2 Evolution
  • 48. 10.2 Study Guide Review #2 1. Darwin observed fossils of huge animals such as Glyptodon, a giant armadillo. Why were these fossils of interest to him? 2. Darwin observed fossil shells of marine organisms high up in the Andes mountains, how did he apply these insights to the evolution of organisms? 3. What is a feature that allows an organism to better survive in its environment? 4. One bird in a population has a slightly thicker beak than its relatives. This thicker beak is an example of what in the population, variation or adaptation? 5. One student has bigger ears than most, is this variation or an adaptation? 10.2 Evolution
  • 49. Team Talk: Reader 10.2 P.168 Write your answers. HW: Read Section 10.3 P.304- 309 5 Facts/Page Whole Class Discussion Reader page 168 What is one example of evidence from Darwin’s travels that support an ancient Earth? The Lakers and this class have a quiz next! 10.2 Evolution
  • 50. KEY CONCEPT Darwin proposed natural selection as a mechanism for evolution. What is a mechanism? a process (something) that makes it happen. 10.3 Evolution
  • 51. Several key insights led to Darwin’s idea for natural selection. • Darwin noticed domesticated plants and animals had more variation than those in the wild.  Artificial selection is the process by which humans change a species by breeding for a specific trait. • Darwin decided to observe the breeding of pigeons neck feathers crop tail feathers 10.3 Evolution
  • 52.  Heritability is the ability of a trait to be passed down from one generation to the next. • In order for artificial or natural selection to happen the advantageous trait must be heritable. What!? 10.3 Evolution
  • 53. Several key insights led to Darwin’s idea for natural selection.  Artificial selection humans decide what traits are favorable and then breed those animals. 10.3 Evolution
  • 54. Several key insights led to Darwin’s idea for natural selection.  Artificial selection Imagine the dark circles are cows that produce the most milk. Milking Cows 10.3 Evolution
  • 55. Several key insights led to Darwin’s idea for natural selection.  Artificial selection 10.3 Evolution
  • 56. Artificial Selection Holy Cow Holy Cow- Short Beef 10.3 Evolution
  • 57. Artificial selection Dog example Pedigree Dogs 10.3 Evolution
  • 58. • Darwin used his observations of artificial selection to develop his theory of natural selection.  Natural selection is a mechanism by which individuals that have inherited beneficial adaptations produce more offspring on average than do other individuals. What is the selective agent? • Nature selects characteristics that give advantages in the environment right now. What happens if the environment changes? 10.3 Evolution
  • 59. • Darwin took some more ideas from Thomas Malthus • He proposed that resources such as food, water and shelter limited population growth, so he called them Limiting Resources. Adaptations 10.3 Evolution
  • 60. 10.3 Study Guide Review #1 1. What is a mechanism? 2. What is natural selection? 3. What is artificial selection? 4. Explain how humans forced cows to evolve into producing lots of milk? 5. How can nature change a rabbit population’s color from white fur to brown fur? 6. What are some limiting resources that lower a population? 7. Why did artificial selection interest Darwin? 8. Why must selected traits be heritable? 9. Is a good sense of humor heritable? 10. What important idea from Malthus inspired Darwin?
  • 61.  There is a struggle for survival due to overpopulation and limited resources. • Darwin found the answer in variation! • Some individuals had variations that matched the environment, he called them…. Why do some individuals survive and reproduce and others die? Adaptations 10.3 Evolution
  • 62. • There are four main principles to the theory of natural selection. 1. overproduction Natural selection explains how evolution can occur. 2. variation 3. adaptation 4. descent with modification 10.3 Evolution
  • 63. 1. overproduction: organisms have more offspring than the environment can support, this results in competition for resources. 10.3 Evolution
  • 64. 2. variation: The differences come from differences in the genetic material of the individuals whether inherited from the parent or resulting from a genetic mutation. 10.3 Evolution
  • 65. 3. adaptation: some individuals have certain variations that allow them to survive better than other individuals in their environment. These individuals are “naturally selected” to live longer and produce more offspring that also have those adaptations. ADAPTATION 10.3 Evolution
  • 66. 4. descent with modification: over time, natural selection will result in species with adaptations that are beneficial for survival and reproduction in a particular environment. More individuals will have the trait in every following generation, as long as the environment does not change. DESCENT with MODIFICATION 10.3 Evolution
  • 67. • Fitness is the measure of survival ability and ability to produce more offspring in relation to other members of the population in a specific environment •Instant Replay: –What is the difference between the biological term fitness and the common meaning of the word? 10.3 Evolution
  • 68. • Fitness is the measure of survival ability and ability to produce more offspring in relation to other members of the population in a specific environment 10.3 Evolution
  • 69. • Natural selection CANNOT make new alleles! – new alleles come from…. Natural selection acts on existing variation. mutations! • Natural selection acts on the phenotype, or the physical trait, not the genetic material! • Natural selection can act only on traits that already exist. VARIATION What is the variation that existed in the jaguar example? Head and teeth size 10.3 Evolution
  • 70. • As the environment changes, variations that already exist in the population become beneficial to survival. • Because the environment constantly changes, a trait that is an advantage today may be a disadvantage in the future. Changing Environments ADAPTATIONHow did the variation of head and teeth size benefit some jaguars? They had a new food source, turtles 10.3 Evolution
  • 71. • Structures can take on new functions in addition to their original function. • Panda’s have five fingers and no thumb, how can they hold their bamboo? • A wrist bone that sticks out functions like a thumb. Adaptations as Compromise. wrist bone five digits 10.3 Evolution
  • 72. Evolution 3/7 How Do We Know Evolution Happens 10.3 Evolution
  • 73. 10.3 Study Guide Review #2 1. In natural selection, what must be true of traits that are passed down through generations? For #2-5 use: variation, overproduction, adaptation, descent with modification 2. ____ producing many offspring, some of which may not survive. 3. ____ individual differences that may be heritable. 4. ____ a structure well-suited for the environment. 5. ____ a heritable trait becoming common in a population. 6. Humans are the selective agent in which type of process, artificial selection or natural selection? 7. The environment is the selective agent in which type of process, artificial or natural selection?
  • 74. Team Talk and Share In your teams answer questions 13-19 on page 104 of study guide. At the end of class turn in Reader 10.3. P.172 The Quiz is Next! HW: 10.4 P.310-314 5 Facts/Page 10.3 Evolution
  • 75. KEY CONCEPT Evidence of common ancestry among species comes from many sources. • Fossils • Biogeography • Embryology • Anatomy Evidence in Darwin’s time. Collect HW: 10.4 P.310-314 5 Facts/Pg. 10.4 Evolution
  • 76. Review 10.3 1. What are the four main principles to the theory of natural selection? 2. What is the difference between artificial and natural selection? 3. Why might a trait that is an advantage today become a disadvantage in the future? 4/7 How Does Evolution Really Work 10.4 Evolution
  • 77. • Fossils provide evidence of evolution.  Fossils in older layers (bottom layers) are more primitive than those in the upper layers. Trilobite • Findings in the fossil record support Darwin’s idea of descent with modification. • The gradual changes in the organisms could be seen in the fossils. 10.4 Evolution
  • 78. 10.4 Evolution
  • 79. • The study of geography provides evidence of evolution. – Darwin observed that island species most closely resemble nearest mainland species – populations can show variation from one island to another 10.4 Evolution
  • 80. • biogeography provides evidence of evolution.  Different ecosystems favor different traits and can establish separate populations that have a common ancestor. –biogeography is the study of the distribution of organisms around the world. 10.4 Evolution
  • 81. • Embryology provides evidence of evolution. Larva Adult barnacleAdult crab – identical larvae, different adult body forms – similar embryos, diverse organisms 10.4 Evolution
  • 82.  Embryos of different organisms that develop similarly provide evidence of a distant common ancestor 10.4 Evolution
  • 83. • The study of anatomy provides evidence of evolution. Homologous structures are similar in structure but different in function. Homologous structures are evidence of a common ancestor. – It would be unlikely for organisms to develop such similar structures independently Human hand Mole foot Bat wing What body part of a dolphin is homologous to the structures shown? 10.4 Evolution
  • 84. 10.4 Evolution
  • 85. Human hand Bat wing Mole foot Fly wing – Analogous structures are not evidence of a common ancestor. Analogous structures have a similar function but different structure. Notice that flies and bats both have wings to fly, but the structure of the wings are different. Bats wings have bones, flies do not. Bats and insects evolved similar functions separately. 10.4 Evolution
  • 86. Team Talk and Share In your teams talk about 10.4 questions 1- 4 on page 105 of study guide. Write your answers, be prepared to share with the class! 10.4 Evolution
  • 87. • Some organisms have structures or organs that are no longer useful.  Vestigial structures are remnants of organs or structures that had a function in an early ancestor. • Ostrich wings are examples of vestigial structures. Structural patterns are clues to the history of a species. 10.4 Evolution
  • 88. • Whales and snakes have tiny pelvic bones •Why do you think biologists consider vestigial structures among the most important pieces of evidence for evolution? •What do you think the presence of these structures suggests? Examples of Vestigial Structures 10.4 Evolution
  • 89. Evolution of the Whale 5/7 Did Humans Evolve 10.4 Evolution
  • 90. Team Talk and Share Reader 10.4 P.175 #1-6 Study Guide page 105-106, # 5-13 Write your answers, be prepared to share with the class! HW: 10.5 Pages 316-319 5 Facts/Page Oh God, the quiz is next!!! 10.4 Evolution
  • 91. Study Guide Review 10.4 1. Describe the four sources of evidence for evolution. 2. Give three examples of vestigial structures. 3. Many whales have vestigial pelvic and leg bones. What does this suggest about the ancestry of whales? 4. What is an analogous structure? 5. What is a homologous structure? 6. Give two examples of each type of evidence for evolution: A. Fossils B. Geography C. Embryology D. Anatomy 10.4 Evolution
  • 92. KEY CONCEPT New technology is furthering our understanding of evolution. New Technologies •Genetics •Molecular Biology 10.5 Evolution
  • 93. Objectives • Learn more about different types of evidence that support evolution • Learn about the importance of evolution in unifying all branches of biological study • In this section, the work of Darwin and Mendel will come together 10.5 Evolution
  • 94. Popcorn Reading 10.5 • Reader 10.5 page 176 • Fossils Provide a Record of Evolution • we will take turns reading each paragraph • highlight vocabulary as we go. • ask questions about something you don’t understand. 10.5 Evolution
  • 95. Fossils provide a record of evolution. • Paleontology is the study of fossils or extinct organisms. • The fossil record is not complete • Most organisms do not form fossils after they die. • Fossils only form under particular conditions. • There is currently no fossil evidence that does not support evolution. Basiliosaurus isis, 40 million years ago, found in the desert, has characteristics of both land and sea animals 10.5 Evolution
  • 96. • transitional fossils: are the fossils that show the gradual change. They are sometimes called missing links. Actually, all organisms are transitional, why do you think this is true? Many of the gaps in the fossil record are being filled in because of paleontology. 10.5 Evolution
  • 97. Whole Group Discussion CW # 29 Reader Instant Replay 10.5 (pg 176): What is a transitional fossil? Reader Vocabulary Check 10.5 (pg 178): 1. What is paleontology? Reader Big Picture 10.5 (pg 178): 2. Why are transitional fossils important information for tracing the course of evolution? 10.5 Evolution
  • 98. Team Talk and Share Study Guide 10.5 page 107, # 1-3 Write your answers, be prepared to share with the class! 10.5 Evolution
  • 99. Popcorn Reading 10.5 • Reader 10.5 page 177 • Molecular and Genetic Evidence Support Fossil and Anatomical Evidence 10.5 Evolution
  • 100. Molecular and genetic evidence support fossil and anatomical evidence. • All living things have DNA • They share the same genetic code • They use the same 20 amino acids to make proteins • DNA or protein sequences can be use to show evolutionary relationships. Mitochondrial DNA comparisons provide the most evidence. It doesn’t go through crossover! 10.5 Evolution
  • 101. DNA sequence analysis • DNA contains a huge amount of evolutionary history • Two closely-related organisms will have similar DNA sequences. 10.5 Evolution
  • 102. • Pseudogenes are sequences providing evidence of evolution – Like vestigial structures, (no longer function) are carried along with functional DNA – Can be clues to a common ancestor – function genes are similar in organism that have similar lifestyles. (Why?) – similarities in pseudogenes are remnants of a common ancestor Pseudogenes 10.5 Evolution
  • 103. • Hox genes indicate a very distant common ancestor. – control the early development of specific structures pattern in embryos – Head-to-tail – found in many organisms Homeobox Genes 10.5 Evolution
  • 104. • Protein comparisons, or molecular fingerprinting reveals similarities among cell types of different organisms. • Unique proteins are found in specific cells, ex liver or muscle cells Protein Comparisons •What do the same cells in different organisms suggest? Eye spots of this worm have light sensitive cells with a molecular fingerprint similar to eyes in vertebrates. 10.5 Evolution
  • 105. 6/7 Why Does Evolution Matter Now 10.5 Evolution
  • 106. Whole Group Discussion Reader Instant Replay 10.5 (pg 177): How does genetic evidence give information about evolutionary relationships? Reader Big Picture 10.5 (pg 178): 3. Lets look at the chart and see which two organisms are most closely related Organism A TCAGGAACTA Organism B ACAGGAAGTA Organism C TGTAAGTATA Organism A TCAGGAACTA Organism B ACAGGAAGTA Organism C TGTAAGTATA 10.5 Evolution
  • 107. Team Talk and Share Study Guide 10.5 page 107, # 4-7 Write your answers, be prepared to share with the class! 1. DNA Sequence Analysis: The more related two organisms are, the more similar their DNA will be. 2. pseudogenes: no longer function but are still carried along with functional DNA, like a vestigial structure, they provide evidence for a common ancestor 3. Homeobox genes: control the development of a specific structure. Indicates a very distant common ancestor. 4. Protein comparisons: comparing proteins in cells, called molecular fingerprinting, similarities of proteins can indicate a common ancestor. 10.5 Evolution
  • 108. Putting it all together, Evolution of the Whale How do we know whales are related to ungulates? 10.5 Evolution
  • 109. • transitional fossils: are the fossils that show the gradual change. They are sometimes called missing links. 10.5 Evolution
  • 110. Whales are divided into two groups: tooth whales, such as orcas and baleen whales such as the humpbacked. Which would you predict is most closely related to Dorudon? 10.5 Evolution
  • 111. Cladogram 10.5 Evolution
  • 112. • The theory of natural selection combined with genetics is called the modern synthesis of evolutionary theory. • Modern tools from different fields are adding to what we know from the fossil record, and confirm what people thought. Evolution unites all fields of biology. 10.5 Evolution
  • 113. • Scientist from any fields contribute to the understanding of evolution. • The basic principles of evolution are used in many scientific fields. Evolution unites all fields of biology. 7/7 Why is Evolution Controversial 10.5 Evolution
  • 114. • Reader 10.5 page 177 • P.179 #1-7. Study Guide 10.5 page 107, # 4-7 HW: Chapter 10 - 3 Multiple Choice Questions per section 10.1, 10.2, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5 = 15 Test on ? 10.5 Evolution
  • 115. Chapter 10 Text Book Review • P. 323 # 8,9,10,11,12, 13, 16, 17, • HW: write an essay titled “Evolution”. Explain why it is widely regarded as fact now. – Intro. – Body (1 paragraph per point you want to make) =3 minimum. Include how it works, natural selection, and some evidence. – Conclusion 10.5 Evolution
  • 116. Whole Group Discussion Reader Instant Replay 10.5 (pg 177): How does genetic evidence give information about evolutionary relationships? Reader Big Picture 10.5 (pg 178): 3. Lets look at the chart and see which two organisms are most closely related Organism A TCAGGAACTA Organism B ACAGGAAGTA Organism C TGTAAGTATA Organism A TCAGGAACTA Organism B ACAGGAAGTA Organism C TGTAAGTATA 10.5 Evolution
  • 117. 10.5 Quiz is next!!! And the chapter test!!! Type a cover page and have your notes ready to turn in on the day of the test. 10.5 Evolution

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