25 turning

1,131 views
811 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,131
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
22
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
52
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

25 turning

  1. 1. WOOD MATERIALS TECHNOLOGY 4th Edition
  2. 2. Chapter 25 Woodturning
  3. 3. Woodturning lathe
  4. 4. Drive mechanism  Pulleys inside the lathe  Drive speed For safety, only your teacher should adjust the speed For safety, only your teacher should adjust the speed of the lathe – if in doubt, ask of the lathe – if in doubt, ask
  5. 5. There are 2 types of turning:  Turning between centres:  Face plate turning  These use the centres shown above. This is also known as spindle turning.  Used for turning wide hollowed out objects like bowls etc.
  6. 6. Centres Drive centre Live centre Hollow centre  Centres support the work while turning  The drive centre grips the end of the piece and it turns the wood with the speed of the motor.  The hollow centre is used when boring a hole through the middle of the piece.
  7. 7. Tool rest  Banjo & tool rest  The tool rest is adjusted when bowl turning
  8. 8. Chuck and faceplates  Chuck  Faceplates
  9. 9. Woodturning tools
  10. 10. Gouges  There are different gouges − Roughing out gouge − For roughing down in the early stages − Spindle gouges − Smaller and more precise than rough gouge − For finer work and concave pieces.
  11. 11. Gouges  Gouges are used to make coves  They are also used when turning bowls and dishes
  12. 12. Skew chisel  Skew chisel with edge swept back  Used forBeads and ‘V’grooves
  13. 13. Parting tool  Used to cut beads and make incisive straight cuts into a piece.
  14. 14. Taking measurements  Callipers are used to – measure the round sections of turned wood – transfer measurements from a drawing
  15. 15. Safety  Wear full face protection  Tie up long hair and secure loose clothing  Remove jewellery  Always get permission  Secure work on the lathe and get it checked  Rotate the piece by hand before turning on the lathe  Switch off the lathe before making adjustments
  16. 16. Preparing to turn – spindle turning  Join the diagonals to find the centres at each end of the piece  Draw a circle in the square  Plane down the corners  Small saw kerfs can be cut into the ends for added grip  Insert the drive centre  Insert the piece into the lathe at both centres, lining the centres up carefully
  17. 17. Lock the tailstock in position Turn the handwheel to push the tailstock centre into the work Position tool rest as close to the work as possible, setting in at centre height Spin the work by hand to make sure it does not catch on the tool rest
  18. 18. Profiles  Profiles show the outline of a turned piece  Profile templates assist in making copies of the same profile
  19. 19. Boring holes on the lathe Hollow centre put in tail stock
  20. 20. Drilling a hole  Long hole boring kit − The piece is secured with a hollow centre in the tailstock − Hole bored through the hollow centre half way − Remove auger often to clear shavings − Reverse piece and repeat the process
  21. 21. Boring holes on the lathe
  22. 22. Drilling a hole – alternative  Groove two pieces in the centre using a router  Glue the two pieces together to form the blank
  23. 23. Preparing to turn – Bowl/faceplate turning  Join the diagonals to find the centre of the piece  Draw a circle in the square  Remove the corners using a saw  Locate the faceplate onto the centre of the blank and secure  Faceplate is screwed onto the spindle of the lathe  Adjust tool rest and check the piece rotates freely
  24. 24. Joints  Spigot and socket joints are used to join two turned pieces  A hole is drilled into one piece  The spigot is turned on the other piece to match the hole  Outside callipers used to measure this
  25. 25. TIMBER SUITABLE FOR TURNING BEECH: Fine texture, pinkish buff CHESTNUT: High quality work resembling oak ELM: Light brown in heartwood, yellowish white in softwood. Suitable for bowl turning, not to be used with carbon steel blades SYCAMORE: Whitish with a close-fleck grain. Used for dairy and kitchen implements such as churns, rolling pins and bowls
  26. 26. TIMBER SUITABLE FOR TURNING WALNUT: Pale buff to dark brown SCOTS PINE: Matures to rich honey. Ideal for practice ASH: Pale grey tinged with pink; heartwood light brown. Coarse texture but turns very well for handles of tools, farm, gardening and sporting equipment
  27. 27. Wood turning speeds Diameter of piece Turning speeds at RPM (General cutting speeds) 0-50mm 3000 rpm 50-100 mm 1500 rpm 100-150 mm 1000 rpm
  28. 28. Quiz
  29. 29. 2007 hl
  30. 30. 2011 hl
  31. 31. 2008 hl
  32. 32.  Name the parts of the lathe Headstock Tailstock
  33. 33.  Name the parts of the lathe Drive centre Tool rest Bed On/off buttons
  34. 34.  State some safety precautions to be followed when using the lathe – – – – – – Wear full face protection Tie up long hair and secure loose clothing Remove jewellery Always get permission Secure work on the lathe and get it checked Rotate the piece by hand before turning on the lathe – Switch off the lathe before making adjustments
  35. 35.  Name two woodturning tools − Woodturning gouge − Skew chisel
  36. 36.  Name two woods suitable for turning. Why are they suitable?  Beech − An attractive hardwood − Close grained wood − Free from defects − Finishes well  Scots pine – It is easy to work – Finishes well – Has an attractive grain pattern
  37. 37.  With the aid of notes and neat freehand sketches describe a method that could be used to make another leg identical to the one shown. − Profile templates are used to make identical copies of turned pieces

×