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  • Hand out worksheet ‘Responsibility scenarios’
  • Lower set
  • When we’re reading a play we’re not only looking at the words as we did with Oliver Twist, but we look at the stage directions as well
  • 20 minutes and then He keeps on asking questions He control who sees the photo
  • 20 minutes and then He keeps on asking questions He control who sees the photo
  • 20 minutes He keeps on asking questions He control who sees the photo
  • He encourages Sheila to embody these new ideas Does the Inspector convey Priestley’s message successfully? Have we learnt that all our lives are linked?
  • Hand out ‘Act Two Questions’ worksheet
  • Provide sugar paper for each group, books, 3 slips of paper each
  • Hand out ‘Literary Terms’ handout

An inspector Calls exam Presentation Transcript

  • 1. An Inspector Calls by J B Priestley Exam revision – Miss Righetti
  • 2. To give convincing/imaginativeinterpretations of ideas/themes (6.5) To explore ideas/themes (5.5) (Part 1) Lesson 1
  • 3. Lit Exam Assessment objectivesSection A (Modern Texts)20% of Unit 1 Exploring Modern Texts (40%)AO1 –10%respond to texts critically and imaginatively; select andevaluate relevant textual detail to illustrate and supportinterpretationsAO2 – 10%explain how language, structure and form contribute to writers’presentation of ideas, themes and settings
  • 4. H - Section A Lit ExamMark Band 6 – 26-30 marksCandidates demonstrate:6.1 Insightful exploratory response to task6.2 Insightful exploratory response to text6.3 Close analysis of detail to support interpretation6.4 Evaluation of the writer’s uses of language and/or structureand/or form and effects on readers/audience6.5 Convincing/imaginative interpretation of ideas/themesInformation is presented clearly and accurately. Writing is fluentand focused. Syntax and spelling are used with a high degree ofaccuracy.
  • 5. H - Section A Lit ExamMark Band 5 – 21-25 marksCandidates demonstrate:5.1 Exploratory response to task5.2 Exploratory response to text5.3 Analytical use of details to support interpretation5.4 Analysis of writer’s uses of language and/or structure and/orform and effects on readers/audience5.5 Exploration of ideas/themesStructure and style are used effectively to render meaning clear.Syntax and spelling are used with a high degree of accuracy.
  • 6. H - Section A Lit ExamMark Band 4 – 16-20 marksCandidates demonstrate:4.1 Considered/qualified response to task4.2 Considered/qualified response to text4.3 Details linked to interpretation4.4 Appreciation/consideration of writer’s uses of languageand/or form and/or structure and effect on readers/audience4.5 Thoughtful consideration of ideas/themesInformation is presented in a way which assists withcommunication of meaning. Syntax and spelling are generallyaccurate.
  • 7. H - Section A Lit ExamMark Band 3 – 11-15 marksCandidates demonstrate:3.1 Sustained response to task3.2 Sustained response to text3.3 Effective use of details to support interpretation3.4 Explanation of effects of writer’s uses of language and/orform and/or structure and effects on readers/audience3.5 Understanding of ideas/themesInformation is usually presented in a way which assists withcommunication of meaning. Syntax and spelling are generallyaccurate.
  • 8. H - Section A Lit ExamMark Band 2 – 6-10 marksCandidates demonstrate:2.1 Explained response to task2.2 Explained response to text2.3 Details used to support a range of comments2.4 Identification of effect(s) of writer’s choices of languageand/or form and/or structure2.5 Awareness of ideas/themes/feelings/attitudesInformation is presented in a way which is generally clear.Syntax and spelling have some degree of accuracy.
  • 9. H - Section A Lit ExamMark Band 1 – 1-5 marksCandidates demonstrate:1.1 Supported response to task1.2 Supported response to text1.3 Comment(s) on detail(s)1.4 Awareness of writer making choice(s) of language and/orstructure and/or form1.5 Generalisations about ideas/themes/feelings/attitudesDespite lapses, information is presented in a way which isusually clear. Syntax and spelling have some degree ofaccuracy, although there are likely to be frequent errors.
  • 10. What do these terms mean?• Morality• Responsibility• Community• Society
  • 11. How does thisposter reflectthe followingthemes?•morality•responsibility•community•society
  • 12. To give convincing/imaginativeinterpretations of ideas/themes (6.5) To explore ideas/themes (5.5) (Part 2) Lesson 2
  • 13. Moral choices• Look at the different scenarios to get you thinking of the moral choices you would make and whether there is a right and wrong way to act• What is the reason for your decisions?
  • 14. Moral choice 1• You see two primary aged children shoving another child against the wall. Do you: a) ignore them because you don’t know what’s going on b) go up to them and try to stop the fight before it starts c) tell an adult that you think a young child is about to get beaten up
  • 15. Moral choice 2• Someone who doesn’t speak English gets on the bus and tries to ask the bus driver if the bus goes to the hospital. You understand what he says, but the bus driver is impatient and can’t be bothered to make the effort to understand. Do you: a) push past the person, show your pass and get on b) tell the driver that the person wants the hospital c) speak to the person and reassure the person and tell him that it’s the right bus
  • 16. Moral choice 3• An old person falls down in the street and looks hurt. Do you: a) pass by because you are in a hurry b) rush to help him/her c) slow down so that someone else will help first
  • 17. Moral choice 4• There is a bottle bank near where you live but no one in your family uses it. Do you: a) think nothing of it because one family’s bottles won’t make any difference b) put a box in the kitchen and tell everyone to put their empty bottles in c) tell your family that you’ll take the bottles in return fro not doing the washing up
  • 18. Moral choice 5• A beggar asks you for money outside the station. You don’t have any money on you. Do you: a) ignore him/her because you disapprove of begging b) apologise for having no change c) pass by because you’re in a hurry
  • 19. Moral choice 6• Your class is involved in raising money for a charity. Some class members openly take some of the money themselves. Do you: a) do nothing b) try to persuade them to put it back c) tell an adult in the hope that it will be dealt with by them
  • 20. Who is to blame?• Read the 5 scenarios on responsibility and decide who is to blame• Can you justify your choices?
  • 21. A young woman has committed suicideThe events leading up to her death were as follows:Whilst working in a factory, in bad conditions and for low pay, she was part of a groupwhich organised a strike. Her employer sacked her for being a trouble maker.She then got a job as a sales assistant in an expensive clothes shop. An importantcustomer (in a bad mood) thought she was giggling at her, and used her influence toget the girl sacked.She then became despondent and thought about becoming a prostitute. She got pickedup in a bar by a man who pitied her and ‘kept’ her for several months. She fell in lovewith him, but he was forced to dump her because he was engaged to be married.She went back to the same bar, thinking again of becoming a prostitute to earn a living,when she was picked up by a younger man who saw her twice, but then left her.She found she was pregnant and applied for help to a charity. The head of the charityrefused her help because she didn’t believe her. WHO IS TO BLAME FOR HER DEATH?
  • 22. Arthur Birling’s adviceLook carefully at Mr Birling’s advice from AnInspector Calls on the next slide: – Highlight what you think the key words/phrases are in Mr Birling’s speech – What do these key phrases show about Mr Birling’s attitude to responsibility?
  • 23. Arthur Birling’s adviceThe first is Arthur Birling giving Eric and Gerald thebenefit of his philosophy on life over after-dinner drinks:“I don’t want to lecture you two young fellows again. Butwhat so many of you don’t seem to understand now,when things are so much easier, is that a man has tomake his own way – has to look after himself – and hisfamily too, of course, when he has one – and so long ashe does that he won’t come to much harm. But the waysome of these cranks talk and write now, you’d thinkeverybody has to look after everybody else, as if wewere all mixed up together like bees in a hive –community and all that nonsense.”
  • 24. Exam scenarioYou’re sitting your exam… the exam paperasks you ‘How does Priestley present thetheme of responsibility in the play?’. Youhave found this great speech by Mr Birlingat the beginning of the play…Use the extract to write a PEE paragraph inresponse to the exam question (Make sureyou include precisely selected evidence…)
  • 25. ReflectionLook at what you’ve written and self assess:•How have you explored the attitudes toresponsibility shown in each quotation? (5.5)•How have you imaginatively and convincinglyinterpreted the attitudes to responsibility shownin each quotation? (6.5)
  • 26. Self assessmentLook at the assessment criteria below. Whatband is your response?6.5 Convincing/imaginative interpretation of ideas/themes (6)5.5 Exploration of ideas/themes (5)4.5 Thoughtful consideration of ideas/themes (4)3.5 Understanding of ideas/themes (3)2.5 Awareness of ideas/themes/feelings/attitudes (2)1.5 Generalisation about ideas/themes/feelings/attitudes (1)
  • 27. To give convincing/imaginativeinterpretations of ideas/themes (6.5) To explore ideas/themes (5.5) (Part 3) Lesson 3
  • 28. The Inspector’s final speechLook carefully at the Inspector’s final speechfrom An Inspector Calls: – Highlight what you think the key words/phrases are in the Inspector’s speech – What do these key phrases show about the Inspector’s attitude to responsibility?
  • 29. The Inspector’s final speechThe second extract is the Inspector’s final speech tothe family immediately before he leaves:“But just remember this. One Eva Smith has gone –but there are millions and millions of Eva Smiths andJohn Smiths still left with us, with their lives, theirhopes and fears, their suffering and chance ofhappiness, all intertwined with our lives, with what wethink and say and do. We don’t live alone. We aremembers of one body. We are responsible for eachother. I tell you that the time will soon come when, ifmen will not learn that lesson, then they will be taughtit in fire and blood and anguish.”
  • 30. Exam scenarioYou’re sitting your exam… the exam paperasks you ‘How does Priestley present thetheme of responsibility in the play?’. Youhave found this great speech by theInspector at the end of the play…Use the extract to write a PEE paragraph inresponse to the exam question (Make sureyou include precisely selected evidence…)
  • 31. Self assessmentLook at the assessment criteria below. Whatband is your response?6.5 Convincing/imaginative interpretation of ideas/themes (6)5.5 Exploration of ideas/themes (5)4.5 Thoughtful consideration of ideas/themes (4)3.5 Understanding of ideas/themes (3)2.5 Awareness of ideas/themes/feelings/attitudes (2)1.5 Generalisation about ideas/themes/feelings/attitudes (1)
  • 32. How would you explore (Band 5) ideas/themes or How would you give aconvincing/imaginative interpretation (Band 6) of ideas/themes?
  • 33. How to write a Band 5/6 paragraphSpeculate or interpret what you think the Inspector might bereferring to when he speaks of the ‘fire and blood and anguish’that may occur in the future? (6.1, 6.2, 6.3) (5.1, 5.2, 5.3)Analyse the style of language in this speech (give examplesand explain meaning and effects). Consider what Priestley isusing the character of the Inspector for at this point in the play(structure). (6.4) (5.4)Speculate or interpret what you think Priestley’s main messageto the audience might be with this speech? Why do you thinkPriestley included this speech in the play? (6.5) (5.5)
  • 34. Feedback• Have you given alternative interpretations?• Have you closely unpicked a key word or words and analysed its subtle meanings and intended effect?• Have you considered structure?• Have you speculated on Priestley’s intentions when he wrote this speech?
  • 35. To find out about writer’s ideas andattitudes at the time the novel was written and set Lesson 4
  • 36. J B Priestley
  • 37. Biography• Born 13th September 1894 died 14th August 1984.• Left school at 16 ‘to write’ and began work in 1910 as a junior clerk at a wool firm.• Priestley stated that it was the period 1911-1914 that ‘set their stamp upon me’ (the time before the first world war).
  • 38. Biography• Priestley surrounded himself with ‘people who read a great deal, cared a lot for the arts and preferred real talk and hot argument to social chit chat’.• He found himself having political discussions with his father’s socialist friends.
  • 39. What is Socialism?
  • 40. Socialist principles“The establishment of a system of societybased upon the common ownership anddemocratic control of the means andinstruments for producing and distributingwealth by and in the interest of the wholecommunity.” The Socialist Party of Great Britain.
  • 41. Back to Priestley…• World War I broke out in 1914 and Priestley joined the infantry at age 20 and fought in France.• He left the army in 1919. He narrowly escaped being killed when a German shell exploded near him and he was the victim of a gas attack.• His experiences in the war affected his writing; “I was lucky in that war and never ceased to be aware of the fact.”
  • 42. After the war…• In 1921 he completed a degree in Modern History and Political Science at Cambridge University• He married and left for London with his wife• He began his writing career with essays and achieved success with novels and plays
  • 43. His work• With the outbreak of WW2 in 1939, Priestley continued writing and worked for BBC radio.• However, his programmes were cancelled by the British Government for being too critical of their actions in the war• The play, An Inspector Calls was written in 1945 and first performed in 1946.
  • 44. ResearchUse the internet to do some research and answer the followingquestions about Priestley: 1. How was Priestley a ‘radical’ (someone who had ideas new or experimental ideas, maybe even shocking to people at the time)? 2. What two periods of English history do we need to look at to understand the play and why? 3. How does the line of the song ‘all the nation is united’ relevant to An Inspector Calls? 4. Why did Priestley write? 5. What ideas was he trying to promote with his broadcast ‘Journey into daylight’? 6. How had the WWII changed the social make-up of Britain? 7. Why did Priestley set his play in 1912 (Edwardian Britain)? 8. What is the play about? 9. What was Mr Birling was wrong about? 10. What was Edwardian Britain like?
  • 45. Video clipWatch the video documentary about J B Priestley whichyou can find here:http://wildernenglish.wordpress.com/category/gcse-english-litAs you listen, answer the following questions in yourbooks: 1. What were Priestley’s intentions in writing the play? 2. Why did he set the play in 1912 (Edwardian Britain)? 3. What was Edwardian Britain like? 4. How did WWI change the social make-up of Britain?
  • 46. How does Priestley present the theme of responsibility in the play?Now, using a large sheet of paper, plan for a Band 5/6 PEEparagraph based on the Inspector’s final speech. Remember to:speculate or interpret what you think the Inspector might bereferring to when he speaks of the ‘fire and blood and anguish’that may occur in the future? (6.1, 6.2, 6.3) (5.1, 5.2, 5.3)analyse the style of language in this speech (give examples andexplain meaning and effects). Consider what Priestley is usingthe character of the Inspector for at this point in the play(structure). (6.4) (5.4)speculate or interpret what you think Priestley’s main messageto the audience might be with this speech? Why do you thinkPriestley included this speech in the play? (6.5) (5.5)
  • 47. To give convincing/imaginativeinterpretations of ideas/themes (6.5) To explore ideas/themes (5.5) (Part 5) Lesson 5
  • 48. 1912 vs 1945Assign a year (1912 or 1945) to each statement:1. Because of the wars, class differences were not so clear.2. Men were much more valued than women. Women had very little freedom and no choices.3. Because of the wars, women had become more valued in society.4. There were very clear differences between the upper and lower classes.5. They were in control and saw no reason to change the way things were.6. Because of the wars, there was a great desire for social change – new government, more rights, etc.
  • 49. 1912 1945War World War I would start World War II ended on in two years. People May 8th. People were were worried about the recovering from nearly 6 future. years of danger and uncertaintyClasses How clear do you think How clear do you think the the differences were differences were between between the classes at the classes after the war? this time? Why? Why?Women How do you think women What effect do you think were treated? Was there the wars had on women in any difference between society? rich and poor women?The What are the ruling What effect do you thinkruling classes? How did they get the war had on the rulingclasses to this position? class’ position?
  • 50. The Play itself…• A straightforward detective thriller……....or is it?
  • 51. Who is the Inspector?• Think about your answer to this question for a few minutes…
  • 52. What is the role of the Inspector?• This is an exam question. Now plan your response to this question• You have 10 minutes• Check your response with the ideas on the next slide…
  • 53. A possible planWhat is the role of the Inspector?1. To promote Socialist ideas2. To prove Priestley’s point that we’re all part of ‘one body’3. To teach the audience in 1947 not to repeat the mistakes of the past (1912)4. To act as a mouthpiece for Priestley’s ideas5. To promote ideas about morality, responsibility and community
  • 54. Write your response• You now have 35 minutes to write a response to the question.
  • 55. Self assess• Look at your response now and compare it with the assessment criteria on the next slide• Have you managed to tick every one of the 5 skills?
  • 56. H - Section A Lit ExamMark Band 6 – 26-30 marksCandidates demonstrate:6.1 Insightful exploratory response to task6.2 Insightful exploratory response to text6.3 Close analysis of detail to support interpretation6.4 Evaluation of the writer’s uses of language and/or structureand/or form and effects on readers/audience6.5 Convincing/imaginative interpretation of ideas/themesInformation is presented clearly and accurately. Writing is fluentand focused. Syntax and spelling are used with a high degree ofaccuracy.
  • 57. How do we plan and write an examquestion response (An Inspector Calls – Section A of paper)
  • 58. Some tips• Plan and connect your ideas and find your evidence – 10 minutes max• Answer the question – remember to pick key words for close language analysis• Remember: this is a play (not a novel, or a ‘book); as such it has an audience (not a reader) and therefore, stage directions are important, nay, essential!
  • 59. Attitudes to Labour• How do these quotes reflect the family’s attitude to the poor? “Last month, just because the miners came out on strike, there’s a lot of wild talk about possible labour trouble in the near future. Don’t worry. We’ve passed the worst of it.” Birling speech, Act 1 (page 6) “If you don’t come down sharply on some of these people, they’d soon be asking for the earth.” Birling to Eric, Act 1 (page 15)
  • 60. Attitudes to Capitalism• How does this quote reflect the family’s attitude to being successful or becoming rich? “We employers at last are coming together to see that our interests – and the interests of Capital – are properly protected. And we’re in for a time of steadily increasing prosperity.” Birling speech, Act 1 (page 6)
  • 61. An Inspector CallsHow can inference and deduction help us understand a play?
  • 62. Inference and DeductionLook at the lines on the next few slides. Theseare all lines spoken by different characters inthe play.•What can you infer about each character?•Annotate each quote with a minimum of 2ideas
  • 63. Mr Birling“We hard-headed practical business menmust say something sometime. And wedon’t guess – we’ve had experience – andwe know.”(Mr Birling)
  • 64. Mrs Birling“When you are married you’ll realize thatmen with important work to do sometimeshave to spend nearly all their time andenergy on business.”(Mrs Birling)
  • 65. Sheila Birling“I’m sorry Daddy. In fact I was listening.”(Sheila Birling)
  • 66. Gerald Croft“Hear, hear! And I think my father wouldagree to that.”(Gerald Croft)
  • 67. Eric Birling“I don’t know – really. Suddenly I felt Ijust had to laugh.”(Eric Birling)
  • 68. Edna“Yes, Ma’am.”(Edna)
  • 69. They have a maid, so Act Onemust be wealthy. Also,perhaps comfortable Concerned withwith inequality? appearances not feelings?
  • 70. What does it tell us about the family?FurniturePropsCostumesLightingCharacters
  • 71. What does it tell us about the family?Furniture Solid, heavy, comfortable;Props On the table there was a telephone and this would have been very expensive in 1912; cigar box (brand new and expensive, for the men) and cigarettes; port glasses and decanter (this would be done by a maid); dessert (3 course meal, expensive); champagne glasses (celebration?)Costumes Not wearing dinner jackets, but in tails (dinner jacket is a regular jacket, whereas a jacket with tails is a sign of celebration); ladies in evening dress (special occasion)Lighting Fireplace would provide warm glow (expensive to run one); pink stage lighting (joyful, romantic mood); lighting becomes brighter and harder when the Inspector arrives (serious, change of mood)Characters Seating plan suggests they’re upper class and strict (owner at the head of the table)
  • 72. An Inspector CallsHow can I analyse characters in the play?
  • 73. Character profilesGerald Inspector SheilaEric Birling Mrs B.
  • 74. Character profilesGerald Inspector Sheila• tries to keep secrets • firm, in control “I think • sarcastic, talks back“where did you get the you’d better stay here” to Birling and Geraldidea that I did know (p.22) “we haven’t had anyher?” (p.33) • delves into things “when details yet” (p.38)• admits when he did this affair end?” (p.38) • takes responsibility “itknows he’s been • scornful “then surveys was I who got the girlcaught “alright – I did them sardonically” (p.56) turned out” (p.37)for a time” (p.38)Eric Birling Mrs B.• hides in the shadows • protective of Sheila “I • protective of Sheila “it“we don’t need to tell really must protest - ” (p.37) would be much betterthe Inspector about • business-minded “I speak if Sheila didn’t listen tothat, do we?” (p.16) as a hard-headed business this story at all” (p.34)• does things without man” (p. 6) • worried aboutthinking “suddenly I • thinks he knows it all manners “there’s nofelt I just had to laugh” “absolutely unsinkable” need to be disgusting”(p.3) (p.7) (p.35)
  • 75. An Inspector CallsWhat is the function of the Inspector?
  • 76. Function Where QuotationTo make the Mrs Birling MRS B. “I don’t think we needcharacters questions to…”confess their (pg 44) INPECTOR “You have noactions and hope of not…” (pg.44)reveal what he INSPECTOR “do you wantalready seems me to tell you – in plainto know words? (p.42) INSPECTOR “and you’ve nothing further to tell me, eh? (pg.45)To controlspeech andmovement onstage
  • 77. Function Example QuotationTo createmoments oftension andintrigueTo act as avehicle forPriestley’smoral message;to teach thecharacter andaudience thatall our lives arelinked
  • 78. Function Example QuotationTo encourage thecharacters andaudience to learnfrom the mistakes ofthe past and changein order to achieve abetter futureIs he successful?
  • 79. Function Example QuotationTo make the Mrs Birling MRS B. “We don’t need to…”characters questions INPECTOR “You have noconfess their (pg 44) hope in not…” (pg.44)actions and INSPECTOR “do you wantreveal what he me to tell you – in plainalready seems words? (p.42)to know INSPECTOR “and you’ve nothing further to tell me, eh? (pg.45)To control Birling photo The INSPECTOR interposesspeech and (p.12) himself between them and themovement on photograph (p.12)stage
  • 80. Function Example QuotationTo create Gerald and “The Inspector looks frommoments of Sheila Sheila to Gerald, then goestension and tension out with Eric” (p.25)intrigue (p.25)To act as a Exit of “We are all members of onevehicle for Inspector (p. body…” (p.56)Priestley’s 56)moral message;to teach thecharacter andaudience thatall our lives arelinked
  • 81. Function Example QuotationTo encourage thecharacters andaudience to learnfrom the mistakes ofthe past and changein order to achieve abetter futureIs he successful?
  • 82. Act II Quiz1. What is the mood in the dining room at the start of Act Two?2. Why do Gerald and Sheila react ‘bitterly’ to each other?3. How should the actor playing the Inspector take charge ‘massively’?4. How has the inspector affected Sheila?5. Why does Sheila stare at the Inspector ‘wonderingly and dubiously’ (page 29)?6. How does Mrs Birling re-enter the dining room? Why does Sheila try to warn her?7. What is Mrs Birling’s attitude to Eva Smith?8. What does Mrs Birling being ‘staggered’ (page 32) about Eric’s drinking reveal of the family relationships?9. How should Gerald ‘break off’ (page 35) from telling his story?10. How should Gerald tell his story to the Inspector?11. How should the Inspector listen to Gerald?
  • 83. An Inspector CallsHow are themes and ideas revealed through language?
  • 84. Section A Lit Exam Mark SchemeMark Band 6 – 26-30 marksCandidates demonstrate:6.1 Insightful exploratory response to task6.2 Insightful exploratory response to text6.3 Close analysis of detail to support interpretation6.4 Evaluation of the writer’s uses of language and/or structureand/or form and effects on readers/audience6.5 Convincing/imaginative interpretation of ideas/themesInformation is presented clearly and accurately. Writing is fluentand focused. Syntax and spelling are used with a high degree ofaccuracy.
  • 85. Section A Lit Exam Mark SchemeMark Band 5 – 21-25 marksCandidates demonstrate:5.1 Exploratory response to task5.2 Exploratory response to text5.3 Analytical use of details to support interpretation5.4 Analysis of writer’s uses of language and/or structure and/orform and effects on readers/audience5.5 Exploration of ideas/themesStructure and style are used effectively to render meaning clear.Syntax and spelling are used with a high degree of accuracy.
  • 86. Section A Lit Exam Mark SchemeMark Band 4 – 16-20 marksCandidates demonstrate:4.1 Considered/qualified response to task4.2 Considered/qualified response to text4.3 Details linked to interpretation4.4 Appreciation/consideration of writer’s uses of languageand/or form and/or structure and effect on readers/audience4.5 Thoughtful consideration of ideas/themesInformation is presented in a way which assists withcommunication of meaning. Syntax and spelling are generallyaccurate.
  • 87. Section A Lit Exam Mark SchemeMark Band 3 – 11-15 marksCandidates demonstrate:3.1 Sustained response to task3.2 Sustained response to text3.3 Effective use of details to support interpretation3.4 Explanation of effects of writer’s uses of language and/orform and/or structure and effects on readers/audience3.5 Understanding of ideas/themesInformation is usually presented in a way which assists withcommunication of meaning. Syntax and spelling are generallyaccurate.
  • 88. Section A Lit Exam Mark SchemeMark Band 2 – 6-10 marksCandidates demonstrate:2.1 Explained response to task2.2 Explained response to text2.3 Details used to support a range of comments2.4 Identification of effects of writer’s choices of language and/orform and/or structure2.5 Awareness of ideas/themes/feelings/attitudesInformation is presented in a way which is generally clear.Syntax and spelling have some degree of accuracy.
  • 89. Section A Lit Exam Mark SchemeMark Band 1 – 1-5 marksCandidates demonstrate:1.1 Supported response to task1.2 Supported response to text1.3 Comment(s) on detail(s)1.4 Awareness of writer making choice(s) of language and/orstructure and/or form1.5 Awareness of ideas/themes/feelings/attitudesDespite lapses, information is presented in a way which isusually clear. Syntax and spelling have some degree ofaccuracy, although there are likely to be frequent errors.
  • 90. Act II Quiz1. How should each of Sheila, Mr Birling and Mrs Birling listen and react to Gerald’s story?2. How had Daisy’s relationship with Gerald affected Sheila? How did she react when it ended?3. Why is Gerald ‘upset by this business’ (page 39)? How should his upset be shown?4. What is the state of Sheila and Gerald’s relationship now?5. How should the actress playing Mrs Birling look at the Inspector’s photograph (page 41)?6. How should Mrs Birling tell her story to the Inspector?7. How should each of Sheila, Mr Birling and the Inspector listen and react to her story?8. How does the Inspector’s attitude start to change?9. What makes Sheila suddenly aware of Eric’s involvement?10.Why does Mrs Birling react in a ‘frightened’ (page 49) way?11.What is the mood in the dining-room as Eric re-enters?
  • 91. Annotating Act II quotesLook at the crucial quotations from Act II onthe next slide. Read one quotation carefully,find out who says it and why and annotate itfocusing on:• Language –meaning and connotations of keywords; effect of these words on audience• Themes and Ideas– what themes are shownthrough the key words? what was Priestley tryingto show audiences?
  • 92. Crucial quotes – Act Two1. ‘You see, we all have to share something. If there’s nothing else, we’ll have to share our guilt.’2. ‘They’re more impressionable’ (the young ones)3. ‘You mustn’t try to build up a wall between us and that girl. … the inspector will just break it down.’4. ‘But we really must stop these silly pretences’5. ‘I must say, we are learning something tonight.’6. ‘That’s probably the best thing you’ve said tonight. At least it’s honest.’7. ‘You and I aren’t the same people who sat down to dinner here.’8. ‘Public men, Mr. Birling, have responsibilities as well as privileges.’9. ‘... we’ve no excuse now for putting on airs ...’10. ‘Unlike the other three, I did nothing I’m ashamed of …….I consider I did my duty.’11. ‘ Go and look for the father of the child. It’s his responsibility.’
  • 93. An Inspector CallsHow are attitudes and beliefs shown in Act 3?
  • 94. Annotating Act III quotesLook at the crucial quotations from Act III onthe next slide. Read one quotation carefully,find out who says it and why and annotate itfocusing on:• Language – meaning and connotations of keywords; effect of these words on audience• Themes and Ideas – what themes or ideas areshown through the key words? what was Priestleytrying to show audiences?
  • 95. Crucial quotes – Act III1. ‘There’ll be plenty of time, when I’m gone, for you all to adjust your family relationships.’2. ‘I understand a lot of things now I didn’t understand before.’3. ‘Because you’re not the kind of father a chap could go to when he’s in trouble -’4. ‘You’ll be able to divide the responsibility between you when I’ve gone.’5. ‘But each of you helped to kill her.’6. ‘One Eva Smith has gone - but there are millions and millions and millions of Eva Smiths and John Smiths still left with us, with their lives, their hopes and fears, their suffering and chance of happiness, all intertwined with our lives, and what we think and say and do. We don’t live alone. We are members of one body. We are responsible for each other.’7. ‘He was our police inspector all right.’8. ‘You’re just beginning to pretend all over again.’
  • 96. An Inspector CallsWhy did Priestley write the play?
  • 97. Questions1. What is dramatic irony?2. When was the play written? When was it set?3. Priestley said “We had glimpse of what life might be if men and women freely dedicated themselves not to their appetites and prejudices, their vanities and fears, but to some great communal task” at the end of WW2. What do you think he meant by this?4. Why did Priestley set his play in Edwardian times? What was he trying to make people think about? (HINT: think about what had just happened to the country and its effect on the nation as a whole – links to the quote in the previous question). Make reference to the class structure in Edwardian times and the changes it went through.
  • 98. An Inspector CallsHow does Priestley use dramatic techniques?
  • 99. Dramatic techniquesDramatic Evidence ExplanationTechnique (quote from text showing What is the effect of this technique? technique) How does it affect tension – between the characters? - for the audience?Interruption Sheila: And if I could help her Interruption in the play speeds up the now, I would – interaction between the characters. Inspector: (harshly) Yes, but Tension between them has increased you can’t. It’s too late. She’s shown by the fact that they are too dead. impatient to let each other finish their sentences. This increases the pace of the play and also raises the tension for the audience.Dramatic IronyConfrontationSecretsInappropriatebehaviour
  • 100. An Inspector CallsHow does Priestley use dramatic irony?
  • 101. Birling’s speeches• In the next slide are the main speeches Birling makes in the opening of the play• Give each speech a heading from those listed below to sum up what it is about: – Strikes – War won’t happen – No such thing as society – History doesn’t matter – Look after number one – Progress – Business prospects – The future looks good• Annotate each speech with comments on the use and impact of dramatic irony.
  • 102. Birling’s speeches• “There’s a good deal of silly talk about these days – but – and I speak as a hard- headed business man, who has to take risks and know what he’s about – I say, you can ignore all this silly pessimistic talk. When you marry you’ll be marrying at a very good time. Yes, a very good time – and soon it’ll be an even better time.”
  • 103. Birling’s speeches• “Last month, just because the miners came on strike, there’s lots of wild talk about possible labour trouble in the near future. Don’t worry. We’ve passed the worst of it.”
  • 104. Birling’s speeches• “We employers at last are coming together to see that our interests – and the interests of Capital – are properly protected. And we’re in for a time of steadily increasing prosperity.”
  • 105. Birling’s speeches• “Glad you mentioned it, Eric. I’m coming to that. Just because the Kaiser makes a speech or two, or a few German officers have too much to drink and begin talking nonsense, you’ll hear some people say that war’s inevitable. And to that I say – fiddlesticks! The Germans don’t want war. Nobody wants war, except some half-civilised folks in the Balkans. And why? There’s too much at stake these days. Everything to lose and nothing to gain by war.”
  • 106. Birling’s speeches• “Look at the progress we’re making. In a year or two we’ll have aeroplanes that will be able to go anywhere. And look at the way the auto- mobile’s making headway – bigger and faster all the time. And then ships. Why, a friend of mine went over this new liner last week – the Titanic – she sails next week – forty-six thousand eight hundred tons - forty-six thousand eight hundred – New York in five days – and every luxury – and unsinkable, absolutely unsinkable.”
  • 107. Birling’s speeches• “In twenty or thirty years’ time – lets say, in 1940 – you may be giving a little party like this – your son or daughter might be getting engaged – and I tell you, by that time you’ll be living in a world that will have forgotten all these Capital versus Labour agitations and all these silly little war scares. There’ll be peace and prosperity and rapid progress everywhere – except of course in Russia, which will always be behindhand naturally.”
  • 108. Birling’s speeches• “But what so many of you don’t seem to understand now, when things are so much easier, is that a man has to make is own way – has to look after himself – and his family too of course, when he has one – and so long as he does that he won’t come to much harm.”
  • 109. Birling’s speeches• “But the way some of these cranks talk and write now, you’d think everybody has to look after everybody else, as if we were all mixed up together like bees in a hive – community and all that nonsense.”
  • 110. An Inspector CallsDefensive vs moralistic quotes
  • 111. Defensive vs MoralisticAct I Act I•Birling: “…there’s •Inspector: “…whatnothing mysterious – or happened to her thenscandalous – about this may have determinedbusiness – at least not what happened to heras far as I’m concerned. afterwards, and what … it has nothing to do happened to herwith the wretched girl’s afterwards may havesuicide…” driven her to suicide. A chain of events.”
  • 112. Your turn• Build up a list of all the defensive comments made by the Birlings and Gerald and the moralistic comments made by the Inspector.
  • 113. An Inspector CallsHow do I write a C grade essay on An Inspector Calls?
  • 114. SpeculationHow to ‘suggest’ alternative readings in essays
  • 115. A ‘C’ grade asks for:‘insight into different meanings’ using ‘an appropriate range of exploratory forms’You need to show that you know that the meaning isn’t fixed - it is up to the reader/ audience how they interpret it.
  • 116. Doing this is simpler than you think!Just use words such as ‘could’‘perhaps’ or ‘might’.This can also help you to move up a wholegrade as it is also very important for B and Agrades!
  • 117. For example:• The character of the Inspector is very rudeBecomes…..• The character of the Inspector could be considered very rude.
  • 118. Or:• An audience in 1945 would have thought that Mr Birling was ignorant.Becomes….• An audience in 1945 might have thought Mr Birling was ignorant.
  • 119. Alternatively use ‘perhaps’• Priestly uses interruption to show the strength and also the rudeness of the Inspector’s character.Becomes• Priestly uses interruption to show the strength and also, perhaps, the rudeness of the Inspector’s character.
  • 120. Try these ones yourself - use ‘might’, ‘could’or ‘perhaps’ :• The audience thinks the Inspector is behaving inappropriately.• The playwright is using this technique to help the audience understand his ideas on equality.• However, a audience from a different time would see it differently.
  • 121. The question…• How does J. B. Priestly show the audience that Mr Birling is an unpleasant character in Act 3 of An Inspector Calls?
  • 122. Planning• Create a word bank of words to describe Mr. Birling• Back these up with evidence from Act III• You should not take more than 10 minutes to plan (time yourself!)
  • 123. Describe Birling• Choose a word to describe Birling’s personality.•
  • 124. Question• Remember your question: How does J.B. Priestley show the audience that Mr. Birling is an unpleasant character in Act 3 of An Inspector Calls?
  • 125. Writing the essay• Mr. Birling is portrayed as an arrogant man throughout the play but he seems to exceed his own unpleasantness in Act 3. His treatment of his own son, concern about his public image and his lack of respect for those of a lower status than himself all combine to make a bad example of the higher class male.
  • 126. • J. B. Priestly recognised that the country was full of nasty men like Mr. Birling so perhaps this character was used by the author as a symbol of England’s need for change.
  • 127. Writing the essay• You now need to select 4 of the quotations your collected• Each one will constitute a paragraph.• Use P.E.E.
  • 128. An Inspector CallsHow do I write a C grade essay on An Inspector Calls?
  • 129. Conclusion• In conclusion, it seems highly likely that the audience would dislike Mr. Birling. Most parents would support, protect and nurture their children so would be shocked at the way Birling treats his son, particularly as Eric’s shortcomings might be seen as a reflection of His father’s poor parenting skills. They would also notice and be distressed to see the way Birling disregards a young girl’s death when his precious public image is threatened. In addition, he fails to take responsibilty for
  • 130. his own actions but is more than happy toblame those of his own family. J. B.Priestley portrays Birling in a poor lightthroughout the play but particularly in Act3 where his speech, actions andselfishness combine to create a veryunpleasant character.
  • 131. An Inspector CallsSome literary terms useful for analysing a play
  • 132. Act One Act Two or Act Three? A play in three ActsSheila hands the ring back to GeraldEric is a thiefThe inspector is a fraudGerald and Sheila announce their engagementThe inspector arrivesMr and Mrs Birling think it’s all a jokeGerald is a cheatMrs Birling turns away a woman in needMr Birling makes several speeches
  • 133. How did you do? A play in three Acts• Act OneGerald and Sheila announce their engagementMr Birling makes several speechesThe inspector arrives• Act TwoGerald is a cheatSheila hands the ring back to GeraldMrs Birling turns away a woman in needAct ThreeEric is a thiefThe inspector is a fraudMr and Mrs Birling think it’s all a joke
  • 134. Key quotations • Find some quotations and annotate: Dramatic irony – we all • For example: know it did sink, we know Birling doesn’t know what he’s talking about. “The Titanic […] absolutely unsinkable.” Act I, page 7 Maybe Birling thinks that his family is alsoThe Titanic, a symbol of progress in the early 1900s, unsinkable, but like thebecame a symbol of the sinking of progress, of confidence ship, it might fall apart.being put to the test and failing.
  • 135. Literary Term DefinitionCoup de theatre A sudden and spectacular turn of events in the plot of a play.Dialogue Speech and conversation between characters.Didactic Writing or speech intended to teach or instruct.Dramatic irony This occurs when the development of the plot allows the audience to possess more information about what is happening than some of the characters have themselves.Euphemism Unpleasant, embarrassing or frightening facts or words can be concealed behind this – a word or phrase less blunt or offensive.Hyperbole A figure of speech in which emphasis is achieved by exaggeration.Irony This consists of saying one thing while you mean another, often through understatement, concealment or indirect statement.Monologue Lengthy speech by one person.Morality play Form of play developed in the late Middle Ages in which a Christian moral lesson was brought out through the struggle between the forces of good and evil.Polemic A piece of writing expressing an argument about important social issues such as religion or politics.Sarcasm An extreme form of irony, usually intended to be hurtful.Stage directions Advice printed in the text of a play giving instructions or information about the movements, gestures and appearance of the actors, or on the special effects required at a particular moment in the action.Well-made play A play that exhibits a neatness of plot and smooth-functioning exactness of action, with all its parts fitting together precisely.Whodunit A novel, play etc. concerned with crime, usually murder.
  • 136. Writing a responseHave a look at the 4 exam questions below, pick one and planfor a maximum of 10 minutes:Question 1:•How does Priestley use the characters of An Inspector Calls topresent a social message to the audience?Question 2:•What is the dramatic impact of the Inspector’s final speech?Question 3:•How does Priestley convey the idea of ‘two worlds’ in AndInspector Calls?Question 4:•Who is the Inspector?
  • 137. An Inspector CallsHow do we use evidence to explore character?
  • 138. Thinking charactersLook at the character list below and think of onecharacteristic for each:• Inspector• Mr Birling• Mrs Birling• Sheila• Eric• Gerald• Eva Smith
  • 139. Thinking characters•Inspector – wants people to face up to responsibility• Mr Birling – moralistic (likes the sound of his ownvoice)• Mrs Birling – concerned with propriety (manners)• Sheila – spoilt Daddy’s girl• Eric – secret alcoholic• Gerald – his mother is a Lady• Eva Smith – factory ringleader
  • 140. Thinking characters• Find 6 key quotes by your character which show how your character develops throughout the play (2 per Act)• Annotate your six quotations explaining how they reveal your character’s development (how your character changes throughout the play
  • 141. An Inspector CallsHow do we identify ideas and themes from the play?
  • 142. Themes of the playOn a large sheet, jot down notes and ideas as youwork through the resources and gather informationfor one of the themes: A time of change (context) Class tensions Different generations Family tensions Propriety and manners Responsibility and community Status and power
  • 143. An Inspector CallsHow do we plan for an exam question?
  • 144. Model - planning“How does Priestley show that tension is atthe heart of the Birling family?”• What key words would you underline for thisquestion?• What theme does this question ask you to focuson?• Which characters could you explore to answerthis question?
  • 145. Model - planning“How does Priestley show that tension is atthe heart of the Birling family?”• Theme: family tensions• Characters: • Eric and Sheila – ‘she’s got a nasty temper sometimes, but she’s not bad really.’ (Act I, page 5) • Eric and Mr Birling – ‘why shouldn’t they try for higher wages… I’d have let her stay.’ (Act I, page 16) • Eric and Mr Birling – ‘because you’re not the kind of father a chap could go to when he’s in trouble.’ (Act III, page 54) • Sheila and Mrs Birling – ‘I think it was a mean thing to do.’ (Act I, page 176)
  • 146. Model – opening paragraphIn the opening paragraph you will be referring back tothe question and answering it clearly, using the 4points you found in the quotations. For example:“How does Priestley show that tension is atthe heart of the Birling family?”J.B Priestley shows that tension is at the heart of theBirling family through character relationships. It isobvious that Eric and Sheila don’t get on as siblings,but there are even more tensions between theparents and the younger generation.
  • 147. Model – first pointStart by developing your first point about Sheila andEric not getting along.If you explain the point, you are writing a C graderesponse; but if you explore the point, you canachieve a B grade.See the examples on the next slides to help youunderstand the difference between a C grade and aB grade response.
  • 148. C gradeFamily tensions are obvious in Act I when siblingsEric and Sheila show a difficult relationship. Forexample, Eric says about Sheila, ‘she’s got a nastytemper sometimes, but she’s not bad really.’ Thisshows that Eric is aware that Sheila does not thinkmuch of him (for example, she says to him ‘you’resquiffy’) and because of this they don’t get alongwell. The fact that Sheila calls him an alcoholic alsoshows that she has little respect for her brother.
  • 149. B gradeFamily tensions are obvious in Act I when siblingsEric and Sheila show a difficult relationship. Forexample, Eric says about Sheila, ‘she’s got a nastytemper some times, but she’s not bad really.’ Thisshows that Eric is aware that Sheila does not thinkmuch of him (for example, she says to him ‘you’resquiffy’) and the word ‘nasty’ suggests that he thinksthis is a flaw in her personality rather than takeresponsibility for his own actions. Furthermore, Ericmakes this statement about Sheila despite the factthat it is not really relevant at this time of celebration.This suggests his resentment which is possibly theresult of previous arguments between the two.
  • 150. Your turn – second pointChoose the second point of the plan, ie.the tension between both parents and their childrenand develop into a PEE paragraphStarter sentence:In addition, family tensions are also evident betweenMr Birling and his son Eric. This is seen when Eric…
  • 151. Self assessRe-read your response and check you have done thefollowing: • Referred back to the question and answered it • Provided a clear point • Provided a relevant key quotation • Explained the quotation in relation to the point made • Focused on a key word and explored it (B grade) • Provided further exploration (B grade)
  • 152. An Inspector CallsHow do we plan and respond to exam question?
  • 153. Model - planning“Priestley criticises the selfishness of people likethe Birlings. What methods does he use to presentthis selfishness?”• What key words would you underline for thisquestion?• What theme does this question ask you to focus on?• Which characters could you explore to answer thisquestion?
  • 154. Model - planning“Priestley criticises the selfishness of people likethe Birlings. What methods does he use to presentthis selfishness?”• Theme: community and responsibility• Methods: • dramatic irony, play set in 1912 and written in 1945 – humiliate people like Birling who think they can get away with being selfish (“they wanted about twenty-five shillings a week. I refused, of course.” (p.14); “there’s a lot of wild talk about possible labour trouble […]. We’ve passed the worst of it.” (p.6) • chain of events – shows that one selfish action can have many consequences • dialogue – highlights selfishness • Inspector’s tone and method of questioning – shows up characters’ selfishness
  • 155. Model – first pointStart by developing your first point about dramaticirony:•If you explain the point clearly and in detail, usingevidence, you are writing a C grade response•If you explore the point and link it to evidence, writer’sideas and the themes of the play, as well as effect on theaudience, you can achieve a B grade•To achieve an A grade, you need to analyse andinterpret your evidence in detail, linking each piece ofevidence to the writer’s ideas and themes and you needto evaluate the effect on the audience
  • 156. Your turn – second pointChoose the second point of the plan, ie.the chain of eventsand develop into a PEE paragraphStarter sentence:Another method Priestley uses to highlight how theactions of one character affect everybody else is tocreate a chain of events. This is evident when…
  • 157. Self assessRe-read your response and check you have done thefollowing: • Referred back to the question and answered it • Provided a clear point • Provided a relevant key quotation • Explained the quotation in relation to the point made • Focused on a key word and explored it (B grade) • Provided further exploration (B grade)
  • 158. An Inspector Calls GCSE exam practice
  • 159. Exam question• How does Priestley show the differences inattitudes between different generations in AnInspector Calls?
  • 160. PEE• Point• Evidence (For example,…)• Explain meaning of evidence• Explore use of language/structure• Explain effect of evidence on the reader• Link evidence to writer’s ideas + themes