Mobile Monday Developer Summit 2012 - Introduction to HealthVault

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Mobile Monday Developer Summit 2012 - Introduction to HealthVault

  1. 1. Introduction to HealthVault Cătălin Gheorghiu December 10th, 2012
  2. 2. Agenda • What is the problem? • What is HealthVault? • The big picture (yes, the really big picture) • How it looks (your HV account) • A few important concepts( just a few) • Programming it (is a dev session) • Discussion about some possible uses(Q&A)
  3. 3. What is the problem?
  4. 4. What is HealthVault?
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. The big picture (yes, the really big picture)
  7. 7. How it looks(your HV account)
  8. 8. A few important concepts (just a few)
  9. 9. A few important concepts • Pre Production Environment PPE • Custodian • Rights fine graining
  10. 10. Programming it
  11. 11. 11
  12. 12. Programming it • Web vs SODA
  13. 13. SODA(Software on device autentication) Following is a typical connection workflow for a HealthVault mobile application: 1. User launches application for the first time. 2. Application obtains a new application identifier, shared secret, and app creation token by calling the HealthVault web service and passing in the master application identifier, 3. Application directs user to HealthVault Shell for authentication and authorization, passing along the app creation token. 4. The user signs in to HealthVault Shell and grants the application access to the user's records. 5. The HealthVault Shell redirects the user back to the application, indicating success or failure. 6. Application stores the new application identifier and shared secret. 7. Application calls the HealthVault web service to create an authenticated session token using the application identifier and shared secret to identify the application. 8. Use the CreateAuthenticatedSessionToken request to create a session token. For more information.. 9. At this point, your application can operate like any other offline application. For example use GetAuthorizedPeople to obtain a list of users and records authorized with this instance of the application.
  14. 14. Patient connect A typical Patient Connect connection is made in the following way. 1. A patient visits a clinic and wants to enable the clinic to exchange data with his HealthVault account. 2. The clinic's app creates a connect request in HealthVault based on the patient’s ID in the clinic’s system, a friendly name for the patient, and a secret question and answer that will be used to verify the patient’s identity. 3. HealthVault returns an identity code for the connect request. 4. The app then sends the user an email containing the identity code and a link to HealthVault. The email does not include the secret question or answer. (Alternatively, the clinic could give the patient a print-out with the information.) 5. Later, the patient goes to the URL provided by the clinic and enters the identity code. 6. The patient is prompted for the answer to his secret question, and when he enters it correctly, this validates his identity. 7. The patient selects the HealthVault record to use with the app and then authorizes it. 8. The user receives confirmation that the app has been authorized. This includes the Patient Connect Success message that you configured in the Application Configuration Center . 9. The app is now authorized to exchange data with the user’s record, but it doesn’t know it yet. It finds out by periodically polling HealthVault for the list of connect requests that have been authorized since the last time it checked. In doing so, it retrieves the HealthVault IDs for the users and their records. 10. The app discovers that the user has authorized the app, so it stores the HealthVault IDs for the user and record and begins exchanging data with the record.
  15. 15. drop-off and pick-up (DOPU) A typical DOPU connection is made in the following way: 1. A patient visits a lab and wants to store her lab results in her HealthVault account. 2. The lab's application creates a DOPU package in HealthVault containing the patient's results, the patient's ID in the lab's system, a friendly name for the patient, and a secret question. The secret answer is used to encrypt the DOPU package and to later verify the identity of the user. 3. HealthVault returns an identity code for the DOPU package. 4. The application then sends the user an email containing the identity code and a link to HealthVault. (Alternatively, the lab could give the patient a print-out with the information.) 5. Later, the patient goes to the URL provided by the lab and enters the identity code. She will also create an account if she doesn't already have one. 6. The patient is prompted for the answer to her secret question, and when she enters it correctly, this validates her identity. 7. The patient then selects the HealthVault record in which the lab results should be stored. 8. The data from the DOPU package is written to the patient's record. 9. The patient receives confirmation, which includes the Patient Connect Success message that was configured in the Application Configuration Center
  16. 16. Demo(s)
  17. 17. Q&A
  18. 18. Thank you for your attention. Contact: •My Blog http://ronua.ro/CS/blogs/catalin/default.aspx •My Email catalin.gheorghiu@ronua.ro

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