0
Sonnet 43<br />Elizabeth barret browning<br />Powerpoint Created by Sachin Budhrani and Harsh Shah<br />
What is a sonnet? <br />A sonnet  is a fourteen line poem that is based on love. <br />All sonnets follow a specific rhyme...
POEM<br />How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. <br />I love thee to the depth and breadth and height <br />My soul c...
Subject Matter<br />	Sonnet 43 expresses the poet’s intense love for her future husband, Robert Browning. She claims her l...
Analysis (lines 1 - 4)<br />Rhyme Scheme<br />How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. <br />I love thee to the depth an...
Caesura – 3rd line
Enjambment – 2nd, 3rd line
Rhetorical Q’s– 1st  line </li></ul>Simple Annotations:<br /><ul><li>Elizabeth uses thee to the poet's husband, Robert Bro...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Sonnet 43 (1)

9,786

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
6 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
9,786
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
184
Comments
0
Likes
6
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Sonnet 43 (1)"

  1. 1. Sonnet 43<br />Elizabeth barret browning<br />Powerpoint Created by Sachin Budhrani and Harsh Shah<br />
  2. 2. What is a sonnet? <br />A sonnet is a fourteen line poem that is based on love. <br />All sonnets follow a specific rhyme scheme.<br />Sonnet 43 follows a rhyme scheme of ABBA-ABBA-CD-CD-CD.<br /> Sonnet 43 follows the Iambic pentameter. <br />An iambic pentameter follows the rules of 10 beats per line, where unstressed and stressed syllables alternate.<br />A sonnet is broken down into 4 sections. These are called quatrains .Each quatrain contains a rhyme scheme. <br />
  3. 3. POEM<br />How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. <br />I love thee to the depth and breadth and height <br />My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight <br />For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. <br />I love thee to the level of everyday's <br />Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. <br />I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; <br />I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. <br />I love thee with the passion put to use <br />In my old griefs, and with my childhood's faith. <br />I love thee with a love I seemed to lose <br />With my lost saints!---I love thee with the breath, <br />Smiles, tears, of all my life!---and, if God choose, <br />I shall but love thee better after death.<br />
  4. 4. Subject Matter<br /> Sonnet 43 expresses the poet’s intense love for her future husband, Robert Browning. She claims her love is so intense for him that it even rises to spiritual levels. She loves him freely and purely, without any selfish mindset or expectation of self-gain. She loves him so much, at the level of intense suffering. So intense it even resembles Christ on the cross. She also says she loves him the way she loved her ‘lost’ saints as a child. In the end, she even says their bonds and love wont end if death set them apart. <br />
  5. 5. Analysis (lines 1 - 4)<br />Rhyme Scheme<br />How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. <br />I love thee to the depth and breadth and height <br />My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight <br />For the ends of Being and ideal Grace. <br />A<br />B<br />B<br />A<br />Other Annotations<br /><ul><li>Anaphora – 1st, 2nd line
  6. 6. Caesura – 3rd line
  7. 7. Enjambment – 2nd, 3rd line
  8. 8. Rhetorical Q’s– 1st line </li></ul>Simple Annotations:<br /><ul><li>Elizabeth uses thee to the poet's husband, Robert Browning
  9. 9. Depth and breadth displays internal rhyme
  10. 10. When till Grace indicates when the authors soul feels its way into a more spiritual world that a human cannot see. Here she can find the reason of her being alive for her beloved one.</li></li></ul><li>Analysis (lines 5 - 8)<br />I love thee to the level of everyday's <br />Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light. <br />I love thee freely, as men strive for Right; <br />I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise. <br />A<br />B<br />B<br />A<br />Rhyme Scheme<br />Other Annotations<br /><ul><li>Anaphora –1st, 2nd, 3rd line
  11. 11. Caesura – 1st, 2nd, 3rd line
  12. 12. Enjambment – 1st line</li></ul>Simple Annotations:<br /><ul><li>She says level of everyday’s as she indicates she loves him enough to meet all of his needs during day and night
  13. 13. She loves him as freelyas intensely as men who fight for freedom 
  14. 14. She loves him as purelyand genuinely as a man without the desire for praise</li></li></ul><li>Analysis (lines 9 - 14)<br />I love thee with the passion put to useIn my old griefs, and with my childhoods faith.<br />I love thee with the love I seemed to loseWith my lost Saints, - I love thee with the breath,<br />Smiles, tears, of all my life! – and, if god God choose,<br />I shall but love thee better after my death.<br />C<br />D<br />C<br />D<br />C<br />D<br />Rhyme Scheme<br />Other Annotations<br /><ul><li>Caesura – 2nd, 4th, 5th line
  15. 15. Enjambment – 1st , 3rd line
  16. 16. Anaphora – 1st, 3rd, 4th line.</li></ul>Simple Annotations:<br /><ul><li>She loves him with the intensity equal to the feeling you get when suffering or mourning.
  17. 17. She loves him with a blind faith of a child.
  18. 18. She had an intense childlike feeling for her husband but as she grew up it changed into a more passionate love.
  19. 19. Oxymoron is used by the writer. This suggests that if she had not found her husband then her life would be filled with tears. But now her life is filled with tears of joy.
  20. 20. This last finishing sentence shows how strong their love is, because it means that their love is eternal, ever-lasting. </li></li></ul><li>Conclusion<br /> Elizabeth Barret Browning has written a very touching poem. This poem shows how much Elizabeth loves Robert Browning. She’s exaggerating her love for him and telling the audience that she would go to distances that is impossible to go to, just for her husband. The finishing line shows just the distance she is willing to go when she writes ‘I shall but love thee better after death’. This line is showing the limitless character of Elizabeth BarretBrowning. <br />
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×