Editing <ul><li>There are 4 types of relationship between shots. </li></ul><ul><li>Spatial relationships </li></ul><ul><li...
Spatial relationship <ul><li>Reveals more of the cinematic space or reveals a part of the space in detail.  </li></ul><ul>...
Temporal relationships <ul><li>Conventional editing presents events in the order that they happen. A  B  C etc Eg: </li>...
Ellipses <ul><li>Cutting unnecessary action out of the sequence, creating a ‘gap’ in time. For example: </li></ul><ul><ul>...
Rhythmic relationships <ul><li>Editing is here used to underscore or compliment the rhythm, pace or accent of the action. ...
Graphic relationships <ul><li>Graphic relationships govern whether two or more shots from the same sequence could realisti...
Graphic relationships <ul><li>Graphic relationships also involve shape. By blending similar shapes, or locating objects in...
The 180 degree rule. A B D
Crosscutting <ul><li>Creates a ‘god-like’ omniscience. It ties together different shots from different locations, giving t...
Cutaways <ul><li>Inserted shots to something (normally, but not always) within the diegesis, which underscores and emphasi...
Your Task. <ul><li>You have until Friday to produce a series of still images that you will edit together on Friday. </li><...
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Editing

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Editing

  1. 1. Editing <ul><li>There are 4 types of relationship between shots. </li></ul><ul><li>Spatial relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Temporal relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Rhythmic relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic relationship </li></ul>
  2. 2. Spatial relationship <ul><li>Reveals more of the cinematic space or reveals a part of the space in detail. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reaction shots </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over the shoulder shots </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dialogue coverage </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Temporal relationships <ul><li>Conventional editing presents events in the order that they happen. A  B  C etc Eg: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Boy sees girl </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Girl sees Boy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boy walks towards girl </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Girl smiles. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Manipulated using flashbacks and flashforwards </li></ul>
  4. 4. Ellipses <ul><li>Cutting unnecessary action out of the sequence, creating a ‘gap’ in time. For example: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Man leaves house (5 seconds) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Man walking along street (3 seconds) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Man arrives at another house (5 seconds) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>We can assume that the man did walk all the way to the other house, but not that he did so in only a few seconds </li></ul><ul><li>This is known as elliptical editing </li></ul>
  5. 5. Rhythmic relationships <ul><li>Editing is here used to underscore or compliment the rhythm, pace or accent of the action. Editing is used extensively to reinforce rhythm and mood in music videos. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Graphic relationships <ul><li>Graphic relationships govern whether two or more shots from the same sequence could realistically be from the same sequence. It concerns colour, light, shape, volume and depth. </li></ul><ul><li>Contrasts can be created if one diegesis is graphically different from the next. For example, cutting from a green forest to a stone castle will mark a change in atmosphere between scenes. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Graphic relationships <ul><li>Graphic relationships also involve shape. By blending similar shapes, or locating objects in the same area of the screen, we can create meaning. </li></ul>
  8. 8. The 180 degree rule. A B D
  9. 9. Crosscutting <ul><li>Creates a ‘god-like’ omniscience. It ties together different shots from different locations, giving the viewer the ‘whole picture’ of what is going on. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Cutaways <ul><li>Inserted shots to something (normally, but not always) within the diegesis, which underscores and emphasises an aspect of the main action. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, a man and a woman are arguing in front of a window. There is a cut away to a cat in the garden, killing a mouse and toying with it. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Your Task. <ul><li>You have until Friday to produce a series of still images that you will edit together on Friday. </li></ul><ul><li>You must bring in a piece of music that will accompany and heighten the meanings that you impose through editing. </li></ul><ul><li>Aim to use all types of shot to shot relationships in your piece </li></ul><ul><li>Have a MINIMUM of 15 shots. </li></ul><ul><li>Pictures must be in .jpg format by the start of Friday’s lesson. Camera phone shots are fine, but they MUST BE ON A DISC OR STICK BY FRIDAY!!! </li></ul>

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