Us history the war for independence

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  • - Colonies bound together against Britain- Britain bends, but believes it can still assert authority
  • Us history the war for independence

    1. 1. Why can‟t Britain leave the colonies alone?
    2. 2. Stamp Act (1765)  Required to buy stamped paper  Affected elites – (publishers & lawyers)  Widely hated in colonies
    3. 3. Sons of Liberty  Organized to protest Stamp Act  Boycotts  Threatened & harassed customs officers  Samuel Adams  Patrick Henry  Benedict Arnold  John Hancock  Paul Revere  Benjamin Rush
    4. 4. How is the Stamp Act protested?  Colonial assemblies refuse to cooperate  Colonial merchants refuse to import British goods  Parliament repeals
    5. 5. What are the effects of the Stamp Act? - Colonies bound together against Britain - Britain bends, but believes it can still assert authority
    6. 6. Townshend Acts (1767)  Taxes on imports  3 cents tax on tea  Boycotts of British goods  English goods fall out of fashion  2,000 British soldiers in America to stop smugglers
    7. 7. The Boston Massacre (1770)  Growing tension between soldiers and citizens Why?  clash between a mob and soldiers  Shots ring out: five dead  Committees of correspondence
    8. 8. Tea Act (1773)  British East India Company can sell tea without paying taxes  Violent protests result  Boston Tea Party: 18,000 lbs of tea dumped into Boston Harbor  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eytc9ZaNWyc&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtMwmepBjTSG593eG7ObzO7s&index=6 (4:50)
    9. 9. Intolerable Acts (1774)  Boston Harbor shut down  Quartering Act: British soldiers housed in private homes  Martial law declared in Boston  First Continental Congress: supports protests & asserts colonial rights
    10. 10. Lexington & Concord  British attempt to destroy munitions stockpile in Concord  Colonists organize to meet the soldiers  British soldiers destroyed marching back to Boston
    11. 11. Separation vs. Reconciliation
    12. 12. Second Continental Congress  Debating separation vs. reconciliation  Arguments:  Militiamen are now “Continental Army”  Prints money  Sends delegates to foreign governments
    13. 13. Olive Branch Petition  What does it mean to “extend an olive branch”?  Urges a return to “the former harmony”  Rejected by King George III  Declares colonies in revolt  Orders blockade
    14. 14. Declaring Independence  June 7, 1776: Richard Henry Lee moves an independence resolution  Thomas Jefferson writes a formal declaration.  Why is it important to include Virginians?  July 2: Congress votes for independence  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZ0Nkdi-GpE
    15. 15. Declaration of Independence  Draws from Locke‟s theory of “natural rights”  Government‟s power comes from the people  What did “all men are created equal” mean?
    16. 16. Declaration of Independence  Intro: “We have a right to declare independence.”  Preamble: “Revolution is just when natural rights are harmed.”  Indictment: “These are the „repeated injuries‟ of the king.”  Conclusion: “Our case is made; the fault lies with Britain.”  We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.
    17. 17. Taking Sides Loyalists Patriots
    18. 18. Taking Sides  Native-Americans:  African-Americans:
    19. 19. Revolutionary War Four Questions  Who‟s fighting?  Who won?  Where is it fought?  Why?
    20. 20. Advantages https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EiSymRrKI4 (3:13) Continental Army British Army
    21. 21. Battle of Trenton https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwT_eLpdrmI  Winter, 1776: Britain winning war  Continental army less than 8,000 men  Dec. 25, 1776: Americans surprise attack at Trenton  Eight days later, victory at Princeton
    22. 22. Burgoyne‟s Plan  Burgoyne marches down from Canada  Plans to meet up with Howe in Albany  Goal:
    23. 23. Burgoyne‟s Plan (American Story of US)  Why does Burgoyne‟s Plan fail?  Aftermath of Saratoga
    24. 24. The Home Front During the War  Over printing of money causes inflation  Continental army poorly equipped  Profiteering a problem
    25. 25. Women during the War  left to run farms, shops, and families  Make clothing, ammunition  Some women fought in battles
    26. 26. European Help  Friedrich von Steuben whips colonial troops into shape.  Marquis de Lafayette lobbies for French aid
    27. 27. Surrender at Yorktown  French navy block British at Chesapeake Bay  French & Americans converge on British at Yorktown  Siege of Three Weeks; British surrender
    28. 28. Treaty of Paris 1783  Adams, Franklin & Jay: American Independence or bust.  US: Atlantic to Mississippi – Canada to Florida  Unresolved issues of the Treaty?
    29. 29. Aftermath of War  Rise of egalitarianism…for some  Now what…
    30. 30. How Revolutionary Was It?

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