Dr Harold Varmus<br /><ul><li>  Nobel prize winning scientist
 Discovery of the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes
  Director of the National Cancer Institute  (USA)
Former director of NIH
 Launched PubMed central
 Co-founder of PLoS</li></ul>http://vimeo.com/15881200(7:40 – 12:16)<br />
What the Leeds Met Repository can do for you<br />Presentation based on:<br />Swan, A. (2009) What an institutional reposi...
Some context - Old paradigm of research dissemination<br /><ul><li>Use of proxy measures of an individual scholar’s merit ...
The responsibility for disseminating your work rests with the publisher
The printed article is the format of record
Other scholars have time to search out what you want them to know</li></li></ul><li>New paradigm of research dissemination...
Effective dissemination of your work is now in your hands (at last)
The digital format will be the format of record (is already in many areas)
Unless you routinely publish in Nature or Science, ‘getting it out there’ is up to you </li></li></ul><li>
The system is broken<br /><ul><li>WHO survey (2000):
56% of research-based institutions in lower-income countries - NO current subscriptions to research journals
Nor had they for the previous 5 years
Even libraries at wealthy institutions
We will never close the “10/90 gap” unless we change the system
Publicly-funded research should be freely available to the ‘public’</li></li></ul><li>The solution:  Open Access<br /><ul>...
Immediate
Free (to use)
Free (of restrictions)
Access to the peer-reviewed literature (and data)
Not vanity publishing
Not a ‘stick anything up on the Web’ approach
Moving scholarly communication into the Web Age</li></li></ul><li>Open Access:  Who benefits?<br /><ul><li>Researchers
Institutions
National economies
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International Open Access week at Leeds Met

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This is my own presentation but borrows too extensively from Alma Swan's presentation at Salford University not to credit her - Alma's content is reused under the terms of a Creative Commons - Attribution-Non-commercial-ShareAlike licence:

Swan, A. (2009) What an institutional repository can do for you - and for your institution. In: University of Salford institutional repository event (number 2), 15 December 2009, Salford, UK.
http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/18364/

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  • This is my own presentation but borrows too extensively from Alma Swan's presentation at Salford University not to credit her - Alma's content is reused under the terms of a Creative Commons - Attribution-Non-commercial-ShareAlike licence:

    Swan, A. (2009) What an institutional repository can do for you - and for your institution. In: University of Salford institutional repository event (number 2), 15 December 2009, Salford, UK.
    http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/18364/
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Transcript of "International Open Access week at Leeds Met"

  1. 1. Dr Harold Varmus<br /><ul><li> Nobel prize winning scientist
  2. 2. Discovery of the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes
  3. 3. Director of the National Cancer Institute (USA)
  4. 4. Former director of NIH
  5. 5. Launched PubMed central
  6. 6. Co-founder of PLoS</li></ul>http://vimeo.com/15881200(7:40 – 12:16)<br />
  7. 7. What the Leeds Met Repository can do for you<br />Presentation based on:<br />Swan, A. (2009) What an institutional repository can do for you - and for your institution. In: University of Salford institutional repository event (number 2), 15 December 2009, Salford, UK.<br />http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/18364/<br />Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Share Alike<br />
  8. 8. Some context - Old paradigm of research dissemination<br /><ul><li>Use of proxy measures of an individual scholar’s merit is as good as it gets
  9. 9. The responsibility for disseminating your work rests with the publisher
  10. 10. The printed article is the format of record
  11. 11. Other scholars have time to search out what you want them to know</li></li></ul><li>New paradigm of research dissemination<br /><ul><li>Rich, deep, broad metrics for measuring the contributions of individual scholars
  12. 12. Effective dissemination of your work is now in your hands (at last)
  13. 13. The digital format will be the format of record (is already in many areas)
  14. 14. Unless you routinely publish in Nature or Science, ‘getting it out there’ is up to you </li></li></ul><li>
  15. 15. The system is broken<br /><ul><li>WHO survey (2000):
  16. 16. 56% of research-based institutions in lower-income countries - NO current subscriptions to research journals
  17. 17. Nor had they for the previous 5 years
  18. 18. Even libraries at wealthy institutions
  19. 19. We will never close the “10/90 gap” unless we change the system
  20. 20. Publicly-funded research should be freely available to the ‘public’</li></li></ul><li>The solution: Open Access<br /><ul><li>Open dissemination?
  21. 21. Immediate
  22. 22. Free (to use)
  23. 23. Free (of restrictions)
  24. 24. Access to the peer-reviewed literature (and data)
  25. 25. Not vanity publishing
  26. 26. Not a ‘stick anything up on the Web’ approach
  27. 27. Moving scholarly communication into the Web Age</li></li></ul><li>Open Access: Who benefits?<br /><ul><li>Researchers
  28. 28. Institutions
  29. 29. National economies
  30. 30. Science and society</li></li></ul><li>Why Open Access?<br /><ul><li>Greater impact from scientific endeavour
  31. 31. More rapid and more efficient progress of science
  32. 32. Novel information-creation using new and advanced technologies
  33. 33. Better assessment, better monitoring, better management of science</li></ul>Science and scholarship are cumulative. Open Access can <br />Accelerate their pace by allowing new connections – big or <br />small – to be made faster SPARC 2010<br />
  34. 34. Open Access: How?<br /><ul><li>Open Access Journals (gold)
  35. 35. http://www.doaj.org/
  36. 36. Open Access repositories (green)
  37. 37. http://www.opendoar.org/</li></li></ul><li>Open Access repositories<br /><ul><li>Digital collections
  38. 38. Most usually institutional
  39. 39. Sometimes centralised (subject-based)
  40. 40. Interoperable
  41. 41. Form a network across the world
  42. 42. Create a global database of openly-accessible research
  43. 43. Currently >1700 globally
  44. 44. 181 in the UK</li></li></ul><li>How to make your work Open Access through the Leeds Met repository<br /><ul><li>Prepare paper & submit to journal of choice for peer review
  45. 45. Make changes required as a result of peer review process
  46. 46. Submit final version to the journal
  47. 47. Deposit that same final version to the Leeds Met repository
  48. 48. email repository@leedsmet.ac.uk
  49. 49. Repository team will check journal copyright conditions on your behalf
  50. 50. Or you may do so yourself using the SHERPA RoMEO service at http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/</li></li></ul><li>Heavy lifting done for you<br />Image source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/pagedooley/2737698737/<br />Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic licence<br />
  51. 51. What about researchers?<br /><ul><li>An institutional repository provides researchers with:
  52. 52. The means to disseminate their work to the world
  53. 53. Secure storage (for completed work and for work-in-progress)
  54. 54. A location for supporting data that are unpublished
  55. 55. One-input-many outputs (CVs, publications)
  56. 56. Tool for research assessment (REF)
  57. 57. Personal marketing tool
  58. 58. The route to maximal visibility and impact for their work</li></li></ul><li>Open Access and citation<br /><ul><li>Evidence that:
  59. 59. OA articles cited more often than non-OA.
  60. 60. OA articles are cited earlier than non-OA.
  61. 61. Free online availability substantially increases a paper's impact. (Lawrence, 2001)</li></li></ul><li>
  62. 62.
  63. 63. And for University...<br />...what is a University for?<br />It is one of the noblest duties of a university to advance knowledge and to diffuse it not merely among those who can attend the daily lectures but far and wide. <br />Daniel Coit Gilman<br />First President, John Hopkins University (1878)<br />
  64. 64. Leeds Met – Strategic Plan 2010 - 2015 <br />
  65. 65. An Institutional Repository...<br /><ul><li>Fulfils a university’s mission to engender, encourage and disseminate scholarly work
  66. 66. Complete record of its intellectual effort
  67. 67. Permanent record of all digital output
  68. 68. Research management tool
  69. 69. Marketing tool
  70. 70. Provides maximum Web impact for the institution</li></li></ul><li>Lost citations = lost impact<br /><ul><li>Say, Open Access brings 50% more citations
  71. 71. Only around 15% of research is Open Access
  72. 72. ….. so 85% is not
  73. 73. University X is therefore losing 85% of the 50% increase in citations (conservative end of the range) that Open Access brings (= 42.5%)</li></li></ul><li>Repositories… “are vital to universities’ economies and to the UK economy as a whole.” <br />Professor J Drummond Bone<br />Past President, Universities UK<br />
  74. 74.
  75. 75.
  76. 76.
  77. 77. Most viewed items...<br />Report covers 4th September 2009 – 05th October 2010<br />
  78. 78. Integrated research infrastructure<br /><ul><li> Andrew Slade - DVC for research
  79. 79. Research Management System
  80. 80. Potential to improve workflows / automate deposit
  81. 81. Research lifecycle
  82. 82. Dynamic bibliographic feeds
  83. 83. Personal web-page(s)
  84. 84. Faculty / research centre web-sites</li></li></ul><li>Enemy isn’t plagiarism, it’s obscurity!<br /><ul><li> Maintain web-presence for your work
  85. 85. Copyright management / advice
  86. 86. Statistics / download data
  87. 87. Benefits you as the researcher
  88. 88. Benefits the University</li></li></ul><li>
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