Mollusca Alexander Kanov Stoyan Kolev Pavel Vanev 10/8 http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/12/images/061222-giant...
Background & Characteristics <ul><li>Mollusks and Mollusca family - “soft” in Latin [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Invertebrates [1...
Evolution & Cladistics <ul><li>Last common ancestor with humans: Bilateria - Cambrian Period (~500 mil. yrs. ago) [1] [7] ...
Food & Digestion <ul><li>Food opening: mouths [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Most mollusks contain a  radula  within the mouth - an...
Defensive Systems <ul><li>External shell - chitons, bivalves, gastropods (except slugs) [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Jet stream -...
Movement <ul><li>Mollusks have a muscular foot with which they move [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Gastropods and chitons move at a...
Human Interaction <ul><li>Most of the mollusks serve as food for humans especially octopi, squids, clams and even snails [...
Giant Clam ( Tridacna gigas) <ul><li>Height: 1.2m; weight: 200kg </li></ul><ul><li>[2]  </li></ul><ul><li>Lifespan: 100 ye...
South African Giant Slug ( Arion subfucsus ) <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQYDkwGYqDk </li></ul><ul><li>Widely f...
Giant Squid ( Architeuthis dux ) <ul><li>Average 12-13m in length  </li></ul><ul><li>and 450kg in weight [3] </li></ul><ul...
Works Cited <ul><ul><li>Campbell, Neil A., Jane B. Reece, Lisa Andrea. Urry, Michael L. Cain, Steven Alexander. Wasserman,...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Mollusca 10-8 alex, pavel, stoyan

1,499 views
1,321 views

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,499
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
11
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
69
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Mollusca 10-8 alex, pavel, stoyan

  1. 1. Mollusca Alexander Kanov Stoyan Kolev Pavel Vanev 10/8 http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/12/images/061222-giant-squid.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9e/Tonicella-lineata.jpg/800px-Tonicella-lineata.jpg
  2. 2. Background & Characteristics <ul><li>Mollusks and Mollusca family - “soft” in Latin [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Invertebrates [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Bilateral symmetry [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Outer shell & soft, fleshy body [4] </li></ul><ul><li>Circulatory system is composed of a heart and blood vessels [4] </li></ul><ul><li>Bring water in their body to obtain oxygen, emit carbon dioxide [4] </li></ul>
  3. 3. Evolution & Cladistics <ul><li>Last common ancestor with humans: Bilateria - Cambrian Period (~500 mil. yrs. ago) [1] [7] </li></ul><ul><li>Closest phylums: Rotifera and Nematoda [1] </li></ul>Textbook
  4. 4. Food & Digestion <ul><li>Food opening: mouths [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Most mollusks contain a radula within the mouth - an organ that uses a scraping technique to move into the mouth [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Mouth -> Stomach -> </li></ul><ul><li>Digestive tract -> Anus [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Only cephalopods are </li></ul><ul><li>active predators [1] </li></ul>http://www.pirx.com/gallery/albums/mollusks/radula.jpg
  5. 5. Defensive Systems <ul><li>External shell - chitons, bivalves, gastropods (except slugs) [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Jet stream - cephalopods: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Water - squids </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Melanin ink - octopi [6] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Octopi can camouflage </li></ul><ul><li>themselves by producing </li></ul><ul><li>color patters and complex </li></ul><ul><li>skin textures [5] </li></ul>http://29.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ky3o4iPyRx1qzde41o1_500.jpg
  6. 6. Movement <ul><li>Mollusks have a muscular foot with which they move [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Gastropods and chitons move at a “snail’s pace” because of a small rippling motion of the foot [1] </li></ul><ul><li>Cephalopods move with jet propulsion which draws water in the mantle cavity and exudes it from a siphon [1] </li></ul>
  7. 7. Human Interaction <ul><li>Most of the mollusks serve as food for humans especially octopi, squids, clams and even snails [1] </li></ul><ul><li>However, gastropods </li></ul><ul><li>are also a pest to many </li></ul><ul><li>plants [17] </li></ul><ul><li>Pearls are extracted </li></ul><ul><li>from clams [1] </li></ul>http://www.faqs.org/photo-dict/photofiles/list/4371/5816cooked_octopus.jpg
  8. 8. Giant Clam ( Tridacna gigas) <ul><li>Height: 1.2m; weight: 200kg </li></ul><ul><li>[2] </li></ul><ul><li>Lifespan: 100 years [2] </li></ul><ul><li>South Pacific </li></ul><ul><li>and Indian Oceans [2] </li></ul><ul><li>Symbioses with </li></ul><ul><li>dinoflagellate algae [2] </li></ul><ul><li>Egg -> larva -> clam [2] </li></ul><ul><li>Moves only in larva stage [2] </li></ul><ul><li>It’s useless [2] </li></ul>http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/11/Giant_clam_or_Tridacna_gigas.jpg
  9. 9. South African Giant Slug ( Arion subfucsus ) <ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQYDkwGYqDk </li></ul><ul><li>Widely found in South Africa, North America, New Zealand, and Australia [17] </li></ul><ul><li>Reach to 20 - 30cm in size [17] </li></ul><ul><li>They feed on plants, which is the </li></ul><ul><li>main reason they are exterminated </li></ul><ul><li>[17] </li></ul><ul><li>Locomotion is accomplished by the </li></ul><ul><li>rippling motion of the foot [17] </li></ul><ul><li>They undergo a process called torsion </li></ul><ul><li>[17] </li></ul>http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nurspest/Images/mollusks/slugs/Arufusprofilethumb.JPG
  10. 10. Giant Squid ( Architeuthis dux ) <ul><li>Average 12-13m in length </li></ul><ul><li>and 450kg in weight [3] </li></ul><ul><li>North Atlantic, South </li></ul><ul><li>Atlantic, North Pacific, </li></ul><ul><li>Southwestern Pacific [3] </li></ul><ul><li>Eat deep-sea fishes and other squid species; preyed on by some whales and sharks [3] </li></ul><ul><li>Use tentacles to attack and immobilize its prey [3] </li></ul>http://www.chiba-muse.or.jp/NATURAL/exhibitions/special_ex/2006sinkaiten/image_exp_specimens/architeuthis_fig2.jpg
  11. 11. Works Cited <ul><ul><li>Campbell, Neil A., Jane B. Reece, Lisa Andrea. Urry, Michael L. Cain, Steven Alexander. Wasserman, Peter V. Minorsky, and Robert Bradley Jackson. Biology . San Francisco: Pearson, Benjamin Cummings, 2008. Print. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Giant Clam.&quot; Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Web. 28 Mar. 2010. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_clam>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Giant Squid, Architeuthis Dux at MarineBio.org.&quot; MarineBio.org - Marine Biology, Ocean Life Conservation, Sea Creatures, Biodiversity, Oceans Research... Web. 28 Mar. 2010. <http://marinebio.org/species.asp?id=156>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Mollusk.&quot; Monroe County Women's Disability Network . Web. 28 Mar. 2010. <http://www.mcwdn.org/Animals/Mollusks.html>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Octopus Defense - The Master of Camouflage.&quot; Cephalopod Information - Coral Sea Cephalopods - Nautilus, Octopus and Cuttlefish . Web. 28 Mar. 2010. <http://www.australiancephalopods.com/occy_defense.html>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;The Odd, Odd Octopus.&quot; Your Daily Octopus . Web. 28 Mar. 2010. <http://fuckyeahoctopi.tumblr.com/post/413797291/the-odd-odd-octopus-mentalfloss-ink-in>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Origin of Bilateral-symmetrical Animals (Bilateria).&quot; National Center for Biotechnology Information . Web. 28 Mar. 2010. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15559569>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Biology . San Francisco: Pearson, Benjamin Cummings, 2008. 662. Print. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Web. <http://29.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ky3o4iPyRx1qzde41o1_500.jpg>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Web. <http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/12/images/061222-giant-squid.jpg>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Web. <http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nurspest/Images/mollusks/slugs/Arufusprofilethumb.JPG>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Web. <http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/11/Giant_clam_or_Tridacna_gigas.jpg>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Web. <http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9e/Tonicella-lineata.jpg/800px-Tonicella-lineata.jpg>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Web. <http://www.chiba-muse.or.jp/NATURAL/exhibitions/special_ex/2006sinkaiten/image_exp_specimens/architeuthis_fig2.jpg>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Web. <http://www.faqs.org/photo-dict/photofiles/list/4371/5816cooked_octopus.jpg>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photograph. Web. <http://www.pirx.com/gallery/albums/mollusks/radula.jpg>. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Slug Taxonomy.&quot; Home Page for Oregon State University . Web. 28 Mar. 2010. <http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nurspest/slug_taxonomy.htm>. </li></ul></ul>

×