This publication is designed to guide you through the different types of question you willencounter in your GCSE History S...
1CONTENTS:What is this exam about? ..........................................................................................
2GCSE HISTORYSOURCES PAPERBRITAIN: 1939 - 1975WHAT IS THIS EXAM ABOUT?In this exam you will be given a selection of source...
3INFERENCE QUESTIONSThese questions want you to work something out using one or moresources. They are usually worth 6 or 7...
4Now You Try One…WHAT DOES THIS SOURCE SUGGEST ABOUT THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT’S ATTITUDE TOWOMEN WORKERS?My Answer:The Briti...
5PURPOSE QUESTIONSThese questions want you to link what the Source tells you to whatyou know was going on at the time the ...
6Now You Try One…WHY WAS THIS SOURCE PRODUCED IN 1960?Here’s one I made earlier (cont.)…… ended before any decision could ...
7RELIABILITY QUESTIONSWhat you are really being asked here is, do you trust the Source/sthey have given you?. You need to ...
8Now you try one…HOW RELIABLE IS THIS SOURCE?• Reason/s why the Source is reliableSection 1• Reason/s why the Source is no...
9My Answer:
10USEFULNESS QUESTIONSThis question wants you to work out how useful a source is for aparticular investigation / issue. Yo...
11Ask any man if he’d rather his wife worked or stayed at home and see what hesays; he would rather she stayed at home and...
12Section1How is ituseful?Section2How is itnot useful?Section3Is itreliable?Section4ConclusionMy Answer:
13COMPARISON QUESTIONSThese questions will ask you to work out, from two or more sources,which is the most reliable or whi...
14Now you try one…LOOK AT SOURCES A AND B. WHICH IS THE MOST USEFUL TO THE HISTORIAN TRYING TOFIND OUT ABOUT THE ROLE OF W...
15My Answer (cont.):
16Step 1Find some sourceswhich agree with thestatement in thequestion and some thatdisagree.Step 2Link the sources youhave...
17Source AA cartoon published in the NewStatesman on Boxing Day, 1959.The TV screen reads ‘I’malright Jack’, which means: ...
18My Answer:
19My Answer (cont.):
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Transcript of "History paper guide and questions"

  1. 1. This publication is designed to guide you through the different types of question you willencounter in your GCSE History Sources Paper. It is not going to do your revision for you.You will need to do that from the work you have done in class.GCSE HISTORY SOURCES PAPERBRITAIN: 1939 - 1975
  2. 2. 1CONTENTS:What is this exam about? ..................................................................................................................2What do you need to revise? ............................................................................................................2Where to find resources ...................................................................................................................2Inference Questions .........................................................................................................................3Purpose Questions............................................................................................................................5Reliability Questions.........................................................................................................................7Usefulness Questions......................................................................................................................10Comparison Questions ...................................................................................................................13Judgment Questions .......................................................................................................................16
  3. 3. 2GCSE HISTORYSOURCES PAPERBRITAIN: 1939 - 1975WHAT IS THIS EXAM ABOUT?In this exam you will be given a selection of sources. You can expectto see a mixture of things like photos, paintings, cartoons,newspaper clips, diaries, government reports, speeches andextracts from history books.You will be asked a number of questions which expect you to showthat you are able to use a range of different skills.WHAT DO YOU NEED TO REVISE?You could be given topics to do with: The experience of immigrants in Britain, The experience of women in Britain, The setting up of the NHS, The experience of children in Britain, The extent to which the period, or bits of the period, werepositive or negative for all the groups above.… So you need to revise them! You have done all of them in lessons.Equally as importantly, though, you need to be really clear on whatto do for the different types of questions. This guide is all about whatto do – that’s how important we think it is.WHERE TO FIND RESOURCES This guide will help with how to answer the different types ofquestion. Many of you will have a revision guide, but all of you should haveyour class notes to revise from. There are past examination papers available to download fromwww.chshistory.com/GCSEHOW TOREVISEDon’t just sit therereading stuff. Dothings! Practice questions Make revisioncards Make a timeline Make mindmaps Teach a topic to afriend / familymember Create conceptmaps Use helpful websites * Mark your ownanswers* Web SitesFor a full list of usefulweb sites go tochshistory.com/GCSE
  4. 4. 3INFERENCE QUESTIONSThese questions want you to work something out using one or moresources. They are usually worth 6 or 7 marks.An ExampleWHAT DOES THIS SOURCE SUGGEST ABOUT THEEXPERIENCES OF CHILDREN DURING WORLD WAR TWO?USEFULSENTENCESTARTERSIn the Source it says… Ican see…This suggests that [usethe key words from thequestion] was…because…When you are workingsomething out, it cannotbe something the sourcealready says – it needs tobe your own idea.Top Tips:Look at / annotate thesource/s carefully beforeyou write your answer.Don’t spend too long onthis question – it issupposed to be an easyone.Step 1:Pick out the key detailsfrom the source.Step 2:Work out what the keydetails suggest to you.Example:The house they are goinginto looks quite posh.Example:The home was probably anice place to live.Step 3:Add in a relevant piece ofown knowledge.Example:827,000 children wereevacuated during WW2.Here’s one I made earlier…In the Source I can see a posh looking house with large stonesteps and a neat looking drive and a group of children who looklike they have just arrived there. This suggests that childrenwould have had a positive experience during World War Twobecause the homes they moved into were often very nice placesto live. This was called evacuation and 827,000 children wereevacuated during the Second World War.You would need two paragraphs like this to get good marks!
  5. 5. 4Now You Try One…WHAT DOES THIS SOURCE SUGGEST ABOUT THE BRITISH GOVERNMENT’S ATTITUDE TOWOMEN WORKERS?My Answer:The British Government appointed Dame LauraKnight to paint this in 1943.This Question in Disguise…Any of the following questions need you to do the same thing as above:1. What can you learn from Source X about…?2. What does Source X suggest…?3. What is the attitude of the author in Source X?4. How can you tell Source X approves / disapproves of…?5. Is Source X for or against…?
  6. 6. 5PURPOSE QUESTIONSThese questions want you to link what the Source tells you to whatyou know was going on at the time the Source was produced. Youneed to use what you know to explain why this particular Source wasproduced at this particular time.An ExampleWHY WAS THIS SOURCE PRODUCED IN 1943?USEFULSENTENCESTARTERSIn the Source…This suggests that theSource was produced inX Year because…It can also be useful toconcentrate on the authorof the Source. Is thereanything we know abouthim/her that wouldexplain why they createdthe Source?Top Tips:Look at / annotate thesource/s carefully beforeyou write your answer.You must use details fromthe Source and your ownknowledge together toanswer this question.Step 1:Pick out the key detailsfrom the source.Step 2:Link to relevant, specific,own knowledge.Example:The crowd is lookingexpectantly at Churchill.Example:Churchill said NHS had towait to end of WW2.Step 3:Link back to question – whywas this produced in 1943?Example:Shows different attitudes ofpeople and government.Here’s one I made earlier…In the Source the crowd, who are gathered around the BeveridgeReport, are looking expectantly at the “Govt” as symbolized hereby Winston Churchill. In 1943, Churchill was the Prime Minister.A year earlier, in 1942, Beveridge had produced his Report whichcalled for a comprehensive welfare system. Churchill said thatthe British public would have to wait until after the War had…
  7. 7. 6Now You Try One…WHY WAS THIS SOURCE PRODUCED IN 1960?Here’s one I made earlier (cont.)…… ended before any decision could be made on the introduction of Beveridge’s ideas.Therefore, this cartoon was produced in 1943 to illustrate the differences in opinion held bythe British Government and the British public on the matter of the Beveridge Report and toshow Winston Churchill’s isolation from his people on this matter.You would need two paragraphs like this to get good marks!My Answer:
  8. 8. 7RELIABILITY QUESTIONSWhat you are really being asked here is, do you trust the Source/sthey have given you?. You need to use a range of skills to work outyour answer to this. Your answer should always show both sides ofthe argument (i.e. ways it is reliable and ways it is not reliable)before reaching a conclusion.An ExampleHOW RELIABLE IS THIS SOURCE?TWO COTType – What type ofsource is it? A cartoonisn’t supposed to be100% accurate, but aHistory book should be.Who – Who producedthis Source? Would theyhave a particularopinion?Own Knowledge – Doeswhat the Source saysmatch up with what youknow?Content – Does theSource use particularlystrong language thatgives away the author’sopinion?Other Sources – Doeswhat this Source saysmatch up with any of theother sources you have?Time – When was theSource made? Does itmatter if it is close to / faraway from the events it isdescribing?Top Tips:See which of the TWOCOT tests you can usebefore you start writing.You must use details fromthe Source and your ownknowledge / othersources together toanswer this question.Your answer must showboth how it is and how itisn’t reliable.I was at university in 1968 when campus health centres werehanding out the Pill like sweets. We slept around and talked a lotto each other about the evolution we were part of. And then itbegan to dawn. It wasn’t really what we wanted, but it had becomehard to say no.An anonymous interviewee on the BBC’s radio programme‘Woman’s Hour’ in 1970.Step 1:Pick out key details fromsource / provenance.Step 2:See which of the TWO COTtests will be useful here.Example:Describes Pill as beingavailable “like sweets”.Example:Content – seems a littleexaggerated.Step 3:Write arguments for andagainst Source’s reliability.Example:Exaggerated languagesuggests it is not reliable.Here’s one I made earlier…The interviewee in this source describes the Pill as being handedout “like sweets” when they were at university in 1968. Thelanguage they have used here seems a little exaggerated. Usingexaggerated language like this makes the Source less reliablebecause it makes you question where the truth ends andexaggeration begins.Step 4:Write your verdict: overall,how reliable is the Source?Example:Overall, I think this Sourceis not reliable because…
  9. 9. 8Now you try one…HOW RELIABLE IS THIS SOURCE?• Reason/s why the Source is reliableSection 1• Reason/s why the Source is not reliable.Section 2• Your verdict on how reliable the Source isoverall.Section 3Here’s one I made earlier (cont.)…On the other hand, perhaps the claim the interviewee makes about the availability of the Pill isnot as far-fetched as it at first seems. I know that after the Family Planning Act of 1967, the Pilldid become much more freely available for women. Perhaps this lady’s university was one ofthe places where a Family Planning Clinic was set up and they were prepared to hand out thePill to women who needed it. This Source appears more reliable when you compare what itsays to what we know was happening around that time, and perhaps not as exaggerated as itfirst appears.Overall, this Source seems quite reliable. Although it uses some exaggerated language, thesituation it describes is basically backed up by the facts about what was happening around1968.London is the place for me,London this lovely city,To live in London you are really comfortable,Because the English people are very much sociable,They take you here and they take you there,And they make you feel like a millionaire,London that’s the place for me.A song written by ‘Lord Kitchener’ (real name Aldwyn Roberts),who arrived in Britain on the SS Empire Windrush in 1948.Type Who Own KnowledgeContent Other Sources Time
  10. 10. 9My Answer:
  11. 11. 10USEFULNESS QUESTIONSThis question wants you to work out how useful a source is for aparticular investigation / issue. You will need to explain reasonswhy it is and is not useful before reaching a conclusion.An ExampleHOW USEFUL IS THIS SOURCE TO A HISTORIAN TRYING TOFIND OUT HOW THE NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE TRIED TOKEEP YOUNG PEOPLE HEALTHY?An anti-smoking poster produced by the government’s HealthEducation Council in the 1960s.USEFULSENTENCESTARTERSOn the one hand, theSource does tell usabout…On the other hand, theSource does notmention…The Source is [very,fairly, not] reliablebecause… This makes it[more, less] usefulbecause…Top Tips:Make a list of things youwould want to find outafter reading thequestion but before youlook at the Source.You must use details fromthe Source and your ownknowledge together toanswer this question.Step 1:List useful things you wouldneed to answer Q.Step 2:What does the Source tellyou about your list?Example:What health problems didyoung people have?Example:Source suggests smokingwas a problem.Step 3:What doesn’t the Sourcetell you about your list?Example:What other tactics the NHSused apart from posters.Step 4:Is the Source reliable?Does that affect usefulness?Example:Produced by government,so probably reliable.
  12. 12. 11Ask any man if he’d rather his wife worked or stayed at home and see what hesays; he would rather she stayed at home and looked after his children, and waswaiting for him with a decent meal and a sympathetic ear when he got home fromwork. You can’t have a deep and safe happiness in marriage and the excitingindependence of a career as well.Monica Dickens, an author, in the magazine Woman’s Own, 28 January 1961.Now you try one…HOW USEFUL IS THIS SOURCE TO A HISTORIAN ENQUIRING INTO OPPORTUNITIES FORWOMEN IN THE 1960S?Here’s one I made earlier…One thing which it would be useful to know if we are to work out how effectively the NHS triedto keep young people healthy is what health problems young people were facing in the firstplace. This source, which has the heading “More money – more fun – if you don’t smoke”,suggests that smoking related illnesses were common among young people and the fact thatthe Health Education Council produced a poster informing young people of the benefits ofstopping smoking suggests that the NHS were trying to combat this problem. Therefore, thisSource is useful because it tells us about a serious health problem affecting young people andshows us one way in which the NHS tried to deal with that problem.Another thing which it would be useful to know is what different techniques the NHS used todeal with the health problems of young people. This source, which is just a single posterabout smoking, unfortunately gives us no indication about whether the NHS used anythingother than posters to get through to young people. I know that the NHS helped set up FamilyPlanning Clinics, for example, but there is no mention of them here. Therefore, this Source isless useful because it fails to tell us about the range of strategies used by the NHS. Just relyingon this source we would have to assume that all the NHS did was produce posters, whichobviously isn’t true.Overall, this Source seems reliable. There is nothing controversial in what it is putting across,and I know that the NHS certainly did try to prevent illness in young people rather than justwaiting to clear up the mess after they had become ill. Since it is reliable that does make theSource more useful to the historian trying to find out about this issue.In conclusion, I think this Source is quite useful. It is reliable and tells us about one of the bighealth problems faced by young people and one of the ways the NHS tried to deal with thisproblem. However, its usefulness is limited because it is so narrow in what it tells us.This Question in Disguise…Any of the following questions need you to do the same thing as above:1. How far does this Source explain…?2. Does Source X surprise you?3. How far does this Source prove…?
  13. 13. 12Section1How is ituseful?Section2How is itnot useful?Section3Is itreliable?Section4ConclusionMy Answer:
  14. 14. 13COMPARISON QUESTIONSThese questions will ask you to work out, from two or more sources,which is the most reliable or which is the most useful. You will haveto compare the sources you have been given to work out which isthe best.These answers should follow the same ideas as the RELIABILITY andUSEFULNESS questions we have looked at already. Below, there is abasic guide for how to answer these questions.An ExampleWHICH SOURCE IS THE MOST USEFUL OUT OF SOURCES AAND B?For a reliability comparison question you would also need todirectly compare the sources, like in the example above. Youwould just need to pick two or three things from the TWOCOT list onPage 7 to base your answer on.Which one tellsyou the mostuseful things?Source A tellsme... which is[very, not very]usefulbecause...Source B tellsme... which is[very, not very]usefulbecause...Therefore,Source [A/B] ismore usefulthan Source[A/B]because...Which one is mostreliable?Source A seems[very, not very]reliablebecause...Source B seems[very, not very]reliablebecause...Therefore,Source [A/B] ismore usefulthan Source[A/B]because...In conclusion,Source [A/B] ismore useful thanSource [A/B]because...COMPARISONSENTENCESTARTERSWhereas…However…On the other hand…In contrast…Top Tips:Don’t forget to usespecific details andquotes from the sourcesto support the points youare making.You must use details fromthe Source and your ownknowledge together toanswer this question.
  15. 15. 14Now you try one…LOOK AT SOURCES A AND B. WHICH IS THE MOST USEFUL TO THE HISTORIAN TRYING TOFIND OUT ABOUT THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN THE 1950S?Source BWoman role: Have kids, be a house wife, makesure dinner is on the table, keep her mouth shut.Man’s role: Get married, go to work, andfinancially support the family.Answer to the question ‘What were gender roleslike in the 1950s?’ on answers.yahoo.com by theuser ‘Green Eyed RedHead’ in March 2011.Source AAn advert for a food blender from 1956My Answer:
  16. 16. 15My Answer (cont.):
  17. 17. 16Step 1Find some sourceswhich agree with thestatement in thequestion and some thatdisagree.Step 2Link the sources youhave chosen together(they should say similarthings).Step 3Start writing!Section 1Explain the argument whichagrees with the statement inthe question. Use details /quotes from the sources andyour own knowledge.Section 2Explain the argument whichdisagrees with the statementin the question. Use details /quotes from the sources andyour own knowledge.Section 3Conclude by explainingwhich side of the argumentyou find most convincing.You should comment on thereliability/strength of thesources here.JUDGMENT QUESTIONSYou will be given a statement and you need to decide whether youagree with it or not. You need to use a range of sources, and yourown knowledge, to explore both sides of the argument.Answer StructureNow you try one…STUDY ALL THE SOURCES AND USE YOUR OWN KNOWLEDGE.‘MOST PEOPLE IN THE 1950S HAD “NEVER HAD IT SO GOOD”.EXPLAIN WHETHER OR NOT YOU AGREE WITH THIS VIEW. [10]The sources are on the next page.JUDGMENTSENTENCESTARTERSWhereas…However…On the other hand…In contrast…In addition…Source B supports SourceA because…One fact which supportsthis idea is…I think the argument [infavour of / whichdisagrees with] thestatement is moreconvincing because…Top Tips:Don’t forget to usespecific details andquotes from the sourcesto support the points youare making.You must use details fromthe Sources and your ownknowledge together toanswer this question.You cannot sit on thefence! You must decidewhich side of theargument you support.
  18. 18. 17Source AA cartoon published in the NewStatesman on Boxing Day, 1959.The TV screen reads ‘I’malright Jack’, which means: ‘I’mbusy looking after myself anddon’t have any time for you’.Source BPossibly the most novel finding [of this report] is the extent ofpoverty among children. For over a decade it has been generallyassumed that such poverty as exists is found overwhelminglyamong the aged [elderly]… We have estimated that there wereabout two and a quarter million children in low incomehouseholds in 1960… On the whole the data we have presentedcontradicts the commonly held view that a trend towards greaterequality has accompanied the trend towards greater affluence.From Brian Abel-Smith and Peter Townsend, The Poor and thePoorest, published in 1965.Source CA poster advertisingholidays in NorthYorkshire in 1953.Source DA family watching television in the 1950s.Source E… Increased earnings come from the increasing production ofmost of our main industries – steel, coal, motor cars; a large partof the increase is going to exports or to investments. That is all tothe good. Indeed, let us be frank about it: most of our peoplehave never had it so good. Go around the country, go to theindustrial towns, go to the farms, and you will see a state ofprosperity such as we have never had in my lifetime – nor indeedever in the history of this country.What is beginning to worry some of us is, is it too good to be true?– or perhaps I should say, is it too good to last?Harold Macmillan’s speech at Bedford, 20 July 1957. HaroldMacmillan was British Prime Minister.You should usually expect to find seven sources on your exam paper, all of which you could use in youranswer to this question. Two have been removed here to save space.
  19. 19. 18My Answer:
  20. 20. 19My Answer (cont.):

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