Music Industry: Gig Contracts

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Music Industry: Gig Contracts

  1. 1. Week 4 Contracts TAFE
  2. 2. Why have a contract?  You’re on the same side (band/promoter)  Is it worth anything at the end of the day?  How can it avoid disputes? (Pre-arranged issues such as backline, promotion, accommodation)  What can it protect you from? $$$$$  Why is it essential? Protection  Who writes the contract?  How much does it cost to write one?  360 degree contracts
  3. 3. Know the fine details A good music promoter contract will cover the important issues:  The date of the show  The venue (name, address, phone number, website)  The position of the band on the bill (opening act? headliners?)  The length of the set required (how long should/can the band play?)  Soundcheck times and lengths  Will accommodation be provided? If so, will the cost be charged back to the band?*  Will the band be able to sell merchandise?  Backline provided  The rider  Is the band to provide posters and promo materials?*  Last but not least, the deal*
  4. 4. Sample Contracts  See class forum for sample contracts or visit here:  https://www.docracy.com/5972/band- performance-contract  http://www.alliance.org.au/docman/view- document/wa-musicians-standard-contract  http://www.dgeworld.com/downloads/thesunr iserevoltbandperform.pdf
  5. 5. Notes for the band  Bands - What You Must Do  Maintaining good relationships with promoters is absolutely essential.  Be realistic about your expectations when you go into a show.  If your band is in the building stages, you may play many very small shows which don't earn you any cash, and in fact may actually cost you money.  If that happens to you, make sure it is REALLY the promoter's fault before you burn that bridge.  A good promoter can help you out A LOT, and even if your particular show wasn't a sell out, if you have a good attitude, that promoter will work with you again.  Be professional, and remember that every show is a promotional tool for you.
  6. 6. Notes for the promoter  Promoters - What You Can't Do  Here's the truth - being a promoter is hard work, and when you are just getting started, you may lose money on a lot shows.  What you CAN'T EVER do, however, is ask a band to pay you back for your expenses if the show did not make enough money for you earn it all back. That's the risk a promoter takes.  There may be the odd special case, such as renting a ton of special equipment, in which you could ask the band to cover the cost, but 99% of the time, if you lose money on a show, you lose money on a show.  Keep a close watch on your expenses and the bands you book, and you'll find a formula that works for you.

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