Western Civilization Lecture 9
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Western Civilization Lecture 9 Western Civilization Lecture 9 Presentation Transcript

  • Western Civilization IS-VNU Lecture 9 The Romantic Era
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic NOT Romance
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Era Interests
    • Emotions not Rational Thinking
    • Intuition, Imagination & Creativity
    • Beauty
    • Untamed Nature
    • The Sublime
    • Horror, Terror and Awe
    • The Supernatural
    • Spontaneity not Calculations/Planning
    • Revival of Medieval Ideals
      • Gothic – Directing attention to another world
      • Escaping this world
    View slide
  • Western Civilization Counter-Enlightenment Movement
    • Enlightenment
    • Science
    • Technology
      • Power of machines
    • Progress
    • Reason & Logic
    • Mechanistic Reality
    • Modern Civilized Man
    • Factory-made “Sameness”
    • Romantic
    • Supernatural
    • Nature
      • Power of nature
    • Chaos & Disorder
    • Emotions & Creativity
    • Organic Reality
    • The Noble Savage
    • Originality
    View slide
  • Western Civilization Broken Promises of the Enlightenment and Industrial Revolution
    • Freedom & Liberty
  • Western Civilization Broken Promises of the Enlightenment and Industrial Revolution
    • Social Equality
  • Western Civilization Broken Promises of the Enlightenment and Industrial Revolution
    • Science & Technology will make life better
  • Western Civilization
    • The Romantic Artist
    • Misunderstood Loner
    • Gifted Genius
    • Follows his inspirations and emotions not logic
    • Art as an expression of emotions not a realistic representation of the world
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Literature
    • Stories of misery and exploitation
    • Interest in the Supernatural
    • Strong Emotions
    • Sublimity of Nature
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Poets: William Wordsworth
    • Poetry is, “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings”
    • Criticized materialism and industrialization through his poetry
    • Mourned the loss of Nature
    • Pastoral NOT Urban
  • Western Civilization William Wordsworth The World is Too Much with Us The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending , we lay waste our powers;— Little we see in Nature that is ours ; We have given our hearts away , a sordid boon! This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not . Great God! I’d rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea; Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn. Materialism criticized Mourns the loss of Nature Critical of rationalism over emotions Critical of lack of awe at Nature
  • Western Civilization William Wordsworth The World is Too Much with Us The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending , we lay waste our powers;— Little we see in Nature that is ours ; We have given our hearts away , a sordid boon! This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, we are out of tune; It moves us not . Great God! I’d rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea, Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea; Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn. Materialism criticized Mourns the loss of Nature Critical of rationalism over emotions Critical of lack of awe at Nature
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Poets: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    • Close friend of William Wordsworth
    • Suspension of Disbelief - the reader would suspend judgment concerning the implausibility of the narrative
    • Descriptive Emphasis on Nature
    • Employs Supernatural elements in his poetry
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Poets: Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    • Close friend of William Wordsworth
    • Suspension of Disbelief - the reader would suspend judgment concerning the implausibility of the narrative
    • Descriptive Emphasis on Nature
    • Employs Supernatural elements in his poetry
  • Western Civilization Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    • The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
    • Recounts the events of a mariner (sailor)
    • While sailing the ship gets lost
    • An albatross (a part of nature) leads the ship back on course
    • The Mariner kills the albatross so the ships crew will stop following it
    • The “spirits” are angry about the killing and cause the ship to get lost
    • A ghost ship passes and kills the entire crew except for the Mariner
    • The Mariner lives and is condemned to wander the earth and tell his story
  • Western Civilization Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    • The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
    • Recounts the events of a mariner (sailor)
    • While sailing the ship gets lost
    • An albatross (a part of nature) leads the ship back on course
    • The Mariner kills the albatross so the ships crew will stop following it
    • The “spirits” are angry about the killing and cause the ship to get lost
    • A ghost ship passes and kills the entire crew except for the Mariner
    • The Mariner lives and is condemned to wander the earth and tell his story
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Poets: John Keates
    • Died at 25 years old
    • Prolific writer
    • Sensual Imagery
    • Interest in the Emotions and Passion of love not “Romance”
    • Interested in Beauty
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Poets: John Keates
    • Died at 25 years old
    • Prolific writer
    • Sensual Imagery
    • Interest in the Emotions and Passion of love not “Romance”
    • Interested in Beauty
  • Western Civilization John Keates Ode on a Grecian Urn THOU still unravish'd bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of Silence and slow Time, Sylvan historian, who canst thus express A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme: What leaf-fringed legend haunts about thy shape … Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal—yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade , though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair! … When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, ' Beauty is truth, truth beauty ,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.'
  • Western Civilization John Keates Ode on a Grecian Urn THOU still unravish'd bride of quietness, Thou foster-child of Silence and slow Time, Sylvan historian, who canst thus express A flowery tale more sweetly than our rhyme: What leaf-fringed legend haunts about thy shape … Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal—yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade , though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair! … When old age shall this generation waste, Thou shalt remain, in midst of other woe Than ours, a friend to man, to whom thou say'st, ' Beauty is truth, truth beauty ,—that is all Ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.'
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Poets:
    • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    • The Supernatural
    • Emotionally charged
  • Western Civilization
    • Romantic Poets:
    • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    • The Supernatural
    • Emotionally charged
  • Western Civilization Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    • Goethe's Faust
    • Epic Poem
    • Heinrich Faust, a scholar
    • Mephistopheles, a Devil
    • Faust wants to learn everything that can be known
    • Faust make a deal with the Devil. The Devil will serve Faust in this life in exchange for Faust's soul
    • Faust wants access to knowledge not available through science and logic
    • Faust wants to feel pleasure so great that he'll want to be in that moment forever.
  • Western Civilization Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
    • Goethe's Faust
    • Epic Poem
    • Heinrich Faust, a scholar
    • Mephistopheles, a Devil
    • Faust wants to learn everything that can be known
    • Faust make a deal with the Devil. The Devil will serve Faust in this life in exchange for Faust's soul
    • Faust wants access to knowledge not available through science and logic
    • Faust wants to feel pleasure so great that he'll want to be in that moment forever.
  • Western Civilization Romantic Prose
    • Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
    • Gothic Novel
    • Dr. Frankenstein attempts to recreate “life” through science
    • Frankenstein creates a monster, an ugly mutation of life
    • All the monster wants is to be loved and accepted
    • The monster is feared and rejected
  • Western Civilization Romantic Prose
    • Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
    • Gothic Novel
    • Dr. Frankenstein attempts to recreate “life” through science
    • Frankenstein creates a monster, an ugly mutation of life
    • All the monster wants is to be loved and accepted
    • The monster is feared and rejected
  • Western Civilization Romantic Prose
    • Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
    • Obvious comparisons between Dr. Frankenstein and the Enlightenment
    • Science cannot create “life,” science can only create “monsters”
    • Science cannot proved “love”
  • Western Civilization Romantic Prose
    • Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
    • Obvious comparisons between Dr. Frankenstein and the Enlightenment
    • Science cannot create “life,” science can only create “monsters”
    • Science cannot proved “love”
  • Western Civilization Romantic Prose
    • Bram Stoker's Dracula
    • Gothic Novel
  • Western Civilization Romantic Prose
    • Bram Stoker's Dracula
    • Gothic Novel
  • Western Civilization Romantic Prose
    • Victor Hugo's Les Misérables
    • Set during the French Revolution
    • Graphic display of the chaos of revolution
    • Compassionate presentation of the life of factory workers, convicts, prostitutes and child-laborers.
  • Western Civilization Romantic Paintings
    • Romantic Style and Intersts
    • Landscapes
    • The Sublime in Nature
    • Use of color to express moods / emotions
    • Visible & Expressive Brush-strokes
    • Gothic feelings of death and decay
    • Nature will eventually overpower creations of man
  • Western Civilization Romantic Paintings
    • Romantic Style and Intersts
    • Landscapes
    • The Sublime in Nature
    • Use of color to express moods / emotions
    • Visible & Expressive Brush-strokes
    • Gothic feelings of death and decay
    • Exotic Subject and the “Noble Savage”
    • Nature will eventually overpower creations of man
  • Western Civilization Romantic Paintings
    • Eugène Delacroix
    • French Romantic Painters
    • Expressive Brush-strokes
    • Influenced later Impressionism
    • Interest in Exotic Subjects after taking a trip to North Africa
    • Moved away from precision and perfection
    Self-portrait, 1837
  • Eugène Delacroix Massacre at Chios (1824)
  • Eugène Delacroix Frédéric Chopin, 1838
  • Eugène Delacroix The Death of Desdemona, 1858
  • Eugène Delacroix Jewish Wedding in Morocco, c1839
  • Eugène Delacroix Liberty Leading the People (1830)
  • Liberty Leading the People (1830) upper class revolutionary middle class The Cost of Liberty, Equality & Fraternity
  • Thomas Cole
    • American Painter
    • Interest in American Landscapes
    • Large Open Skies
    • Ruins – Triumph of Nature over man-made things
    • The Sublime
    • Humans are Small when compared to nature
  • Thomas Cole The Oxbow (The Connecticut River near Northampton) (1836)
  • Thomas Cole Romantic Landscape with Ruined Tower (1832-36)
  • Thomas Cole The Course of Empire: Desolation (1836)
  • Thomas Cole The Past (1838)
  • Thomas Cole The Present (1838)
  • Thomas Cole Home in the Woods (1847)
  • Francisco Goya
    • Spanish Romantic Painter
    • Paints Brutality of War
  • Francisco Goya The Third of May 1808, 1814.
  • Francisco Goya The Disasters of War prints
  • Francisco Goya Dark Paintings
  • Western Civilization Classical Music 1750–1830
    • Repeated motifs (musical theme)
    • Highly complex compositions
    • Very structured
    • Require a significant degree of skill for a musician to play classical music
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
  • Western Civilization Romantic Music 1815–1910
    • Attempts to express strong emotions
    • Movement through a variety of emotions
    • Heightened Contrast between Movements
    • Sometimes Gothic themes
    • Bigger Orchestras
      • Expanded percussion & brass sections
    • Exploration of tones and “color”
    • Free forms such as nocturnes, fantasias, and preludes
    Ludwig van Beethoven