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Land, Water, People: New Parks in Practice

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  • H. W. S. Cleveland’s 1883 plan for the Minneapolis Park System shaped the city we have today…. Not a very splashy graphic; but notice that this copy is from the engineering library. > Cleveland envisioned a democratic city in which the parks would provide everyday access to the city’s principal water bodies, which would be connected by parkways. The park system would protect these waters by public management. > In 1888 he revised this plan to include Minnehaha Creek. At the juncture of the Creek and the Mississippi he envisioned a large park that would be a state park and the central park of the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul. The structure of the Minnehaha Creek watershed and the creeks’ connectivity between Lake Minnetonka and the Mississippi River guided this thinking. His plan is a map , of course, but it is special kind of map that proposes an ecological footprint of the city, based in an intelligent infrastructure about water and the watershed. organic, connective and systemic….
  • Here’s another Google science combined with Calvin Fremling science design problem. What if we were to look at a critical impact on the river such as sedimentation . Two –really 3 other ---species are affected by this impact, which comes from outside the main stem of the river, from the watershed where humans have some measure of control. >Centrarchids, apparently the scientific name for crappies, bluegills and largemouth bass, populate the backwaters of the river need oxygen. Oxygen in water is depleted by sediment loads, the effect of which is often exacerbated by increases in nitrates and phosphates. > These, in turn, stimulate algae growth, but not necessarily the growth of plants needed by other animals such as the wild celery needed by canvasback ducks.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.
  • We will need new scientific insights, new organic processes. Janine Benyus’s breakthrough research on biomimicry , proposes the cloning of the processes and structures of nature in design and materials. > This idea holds the promise of science to help us make the map of sustainability across scales and all the design fields. > It may become the most important—and accessible—concept available as we reconceive how we will build here.

Land, Water, People: New Parks in Practice Land, Water, People: New Parks in Practice Presentation Transcript