2012 11-30 RiverFirst dnr-usace presentation
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2012 11-30 RiverFirst dnr-usace presentation

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Details proposed island restoration in the Upper Mississippi as part of an ecologically sustainable, multifunctional riverfront park design. ...

Details proposed island restoration in the Upper Mississippi as part of an ecologically sustainable, multifunctional riverfront park design.

TLS/KVA presentation, prepared with Kestrel Design Group, InterFluve and Barr Engineering, and given to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

DNR and USACE are regulatory agencies overseeing the RiverFirst area.

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2012 11-30 RiverFirst dnr-usace presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. RiverFIRST / Scherer Site Discussions MPRB / TLS / KVAMeeting with DNR / USACE 30 November 2012 1
  • 2. GOAL + OBJECTIVEThe USGS Habitat Needs Assessment (HNA) summaryconcludes that habitats throughout all Mississippi Riverreaches are currently degraded and are expected to getworse in the years ahead. BARGE TRAFFIC POLLUTION HISTORICAL RIVER RiverFIRSTA paradigm shift in our approach to urban watersis imperative if we expect to reverse this trend ofenvironmental degradation. Furthermore, the USGSpoints out that habitat needs along the MississippiRiver “are expected to nearly double by 2050 if noaction is taken.” ARMORED SHORELINE2
  • 3. “ENVIRONMENTAL POOL PLANS” Prepared By: FISH AND WILDLIFE WORK GROUP : RIVER RESOURCES FORUM (USACE, MN DNR, IA DNR, WI DNR, US FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICES, NPS) ISLAND CREATION IN POOL 3CURRENT RIVER CONDITION- Lack of Vegetative / Terestrial Habitat- Minimal Public access to River shore- Existing wetlands are becoming less productive due to sedimentation- Loss of islands caused water flow to become “sheet flow” which reduce flow and diversity of aquatic habitatBENEFITS OF ISLAND CREATION- Improvements to terrestrial habitat- Restore native vegetation along stream banks- Revert river to pre-lock and dam aquatic habitat of the pools- Islands provide habitat for terrestrial species- Shorelines of islands provide nesting sites for aquatic species “The Environmental Pool Plans establish- Provide sheltered “beach” for public acces to river’s edge desired habitat conditions and identify actions to reverse the trend of reduced ecological integrity.DESIRED FUTURE HABITAT CONDITIONS Implementation of the Environmental Pool Plans- “Opportunities exist for improving aquatic habitat above St. Anthony Falls by restoring historic rapids, improving connectivity of a small will begin the steps necessary to reach a more stream and side channel, and building a string of small islands sustainable Mississippi River ecosystem.” from Boom Island park upstream to the head of navigation.” ENVIRONMENTAL POOL PLAN : PAGE II- The adjacent graph shows that we are in a critical time period for actionSTATE RULE 6115.0191 : Subpart 6Allows fill in a public water is allowed for fish and wildlife habitat improvement. The specific language of the subpart is:Subp. 6. Fish and wildlife habitat. Filling to restore or improve fish and wildlife habitat, except for filling in designated trout streams,shall be permitted provided plans are submitted showing the nature and degree of habitat to be benefited, and the project will not createother adverse effects such as flooding, erosion, sedimentation, or navigational obstructions. 3
  • 4. RIVER HABITAT SYSTEM CONNECTIVITYMISSING LINK IN UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER HABITAT SCHERER PARK SITE CONNECTIVITY 0 1/4 mile 1/2 mile 1 mile MWMO Ecologically Significant Areas Hennepin County Dept of Environmental Services HARD EDGE / RIPRAP CONDITION PROPOSED HABITAT NODES MPRB PARKS MISSISSIPPI RIVER ISLANDS ARMORED RIVERBANK EDGE / RIPRAP SCENIC NATURAL AREAS WETLAND / EXISTING HABITAT URBAN CORE OPEN SPACE CORRIDOR FLOODPLAIN EXISTING HABITAT SHORELAND (Oak Forest, Lowland Hardwood Forest, Wet Meadow) Source - Minneapolis Zoning Plates / Aerial Research MIGRATORY FLYWAY GRAND ROUNDS MARSHALL TERRACE PARK FARVIEW PARK BOTTINEAU FIELD JIM LUPIENT WATER PARK NORTH MISSISSIPPI REGIONAL PARK LOGAN PARK GREAT HERON ROOKERY SCHERER PARK ST ANTHONY PARK BOOM ISLAND PARK PROPOSED WETLANDS NEW ROOKERY ISLANDS / COLONIES NICOLLET ISLAND SCHERER PARK BASSETT CREEK MOUTH MISSING LINK LORING PARK LORING PARK CEDAR LAKE MISSISSIPPI RIVER GORGE WOODLANDS LAKE OF THE ISLES LAKE CALHOUN LAKE HARRIET 0 0.15 mile 0.3 mile 0.6 mile4
  • 5. EXISTING DEGRADED RIVER EDGE CONDITIONS HARD EDGE / RIPRAP CONDITION MPRB PARKS WETLAND / EXISTING HABITAT FLOODPLAIN SHORELAND Source - Minneapolis Zoning Plates / Aerial Research BOTTINEAU FIELD MARSHALL TERRACE PARKHANGING OUTFALLS ROAD / SHEET PILING WALL RIP RAP / OUTFALL PIPE GLUEK PARKRunoff / Sedimentation Runoff / Sedimentation Degraded habitat LOGAN PARKinto river into river No water treatment prior to release SCHERER PARK SITE ST ANTHONY PARK BOOM ISLAND PARK NICOLLET ISLANDRIP RAP EDGE / SHEET PILING AT SCHERER SITE Lack of habitat formation Denies public access to river’s edge Barrier to Interacting with river 5
  • 6. HISTORY OF SITE - AERIALSBefore 1892 - 1965 : HALL’S ISLAND INTACT 1966-2010 : SCHERER INDUSTRIAL USE PROPOSED PLAN 1938 Aerial 2010 AerialIsland Provides Backchannel Habitat River Widened Riprap Armored Edges Improve Biodiversity OpportunitiesWetland Habitat along Western Bank Site Paved Sheet Piles Create Softer Connection to WaterAccess to River Edge Heavy Industrial Use Harsh connection to River Provide Migratory Flyway Stopover within Urban CorridorNarrower Navigation Channel No Access to River Edge Maintain Existing Navigation ChannelMigration Stopping Point along Mississippi Flyway Stormwater Runoff6
  • 7. SCHERER SITE-1938 HALL’S ISLAND LOCATION H A L L’ S I S L A N D H I S T O R Y Hall’s Island was the northenmost of a series of islands P (including Nicollet Island, and Boom Island) which lined R Pr the eastern bank of the Mississippi River. O ote P cte O Historic maps and city surveys locate the island dating d N A S back to the earliest reliable mapping in 1892. Ba E T 150 F P ck D V I ch R The 3-acre island was the most expensive real-estate an H O in Minneapolis. In 1963 the Island was sold to Scherer ne G A S P I S Brothers Lumber for $95,000. l H H O ab O T I T O S ita By 1966 the lumber company had filled the R t E backchannel.This provided unobstructed access to the E O N E D R main river navigation channel. L X I I C I H N S A C H E T I L S L A N N ’ S H G O N E R I S E S L L L I H H LEGEND A I O Historic / Existing / Proposed Shoreline N S N R D T E Proposed Channel E O Mean Water 798’ R L I Proposed Backchannel Mean Water 798’ I C N Flooded Wetland 1966-Present E S Historic Shoreline (1892-1964) H O Existing Shoreline (798’) R Proposed Shoreline (798’) E 9’ Dredge Channel L I N 0 50’ 100’ 200’ E
  • 8. HALL’S ISLAND REVISIONSORIGINAL PROPOSAL CURRENT PROPOSAL 0 50’ 100’ 200’ 0 50’ 100’ 200’ N A N A V I G V I G A T A T I O N I O N E X E X I C H C H I S S A N A N T I T I N N N E N E G G L L S H S LEGEND LEGEND H ELEVATIONS ELEVATIONS O O R R 815’ 815’ E L E 814’ 814’ L I 812’ 815 812’ I N N 810 810 E E 808’ : 100yr Flood 808’ : 100yr Flood 806’ 806’ 810 804’ 804’ 802’ : High Water 802’ : High Water 800’ 800’ 798’ : Mean Water 798’ : Mean Water PEDESTRIAN TRAIL HIGHLIGHTS HIGHLIGHTS WIDENED BACKCHANNEL Introduction of New Upland Habitat Eliminate Introduction of New Upland Habitat EXISTING SHORELINE Narrow Backchannel Mouth Widen Mouth / Improve Velocity EXISTING SHORELINE SWIMMING POOL Opportunities for Sedimentation Deposition Reduction of Sedimentation Deposition Recreational Swimming Pool PEDESTRIAN TRAIL Widen Backchannel Heavy Human Impacts on Island Remove Pool Steep Banks / Hard Edges Limit Trail / Human Impact on Island Do Not Affect Navigation Channel Do Not Affect Navigation Channel8
  • 9. FLOOD ANALYSIS798’ : Mean Water 802 ’ : High Water 808’ : 100yr Flood 9
  • 10. EDGE CONDITION TREATMENTSSHORELINE RESPONSE TO ALLOWABLE WATER VELOCITIES 808’ CONDITION 1 LEGEND 802’ Edge Conditions Emergent Vegetation 0-2 FPS Arrowhead, Spike Rush, Burr Reed, Cup Plant, Sweet Flag, Blue Joint Grass 798’ 0 4’ 8’ 16’ 32’ Live Stakes 3-5 FPS Live Stakes & Fascines 6-8 FPS Live Stakes / Fascines / 808’ CONDITION 2 4-9 FPS Brush Mattresses / Imbricated Boulders 802’ Live Stake 798’ 808’ CONDITION 3 Live Stake 802’ Fascine Bundle 798’ 808’ CONDITION 4 Brush Mattress Fascine Bundle 802’ Boulder 798’ Live Stake 0 50’ 100’ 200’ Toe Splash12
  • 11. HABITAT CROSS SECTIONS CONTRIBUTE TO MORE DIVERSE VEGETATIVE ZONES ALONG WATER’S EDGE MISSISSIPPI FLOODPLAIN XERIC MESIC WET WET RIVER FOREST PRAIRIE PRAIRIE PRAIRIE BACKCHANNEL BACKCHANNEL PRAIRIE FLOODPLAIN FOREST - ZONE A EMERGENT HABITAT - ZONE B WET PRAIRIE HABITAT - ZONE C Established vegetation provides bank stability A multitude of rushes, sedges, and grasses popu- Erosive waves and high water velocities are con- which alleviate the erosive stresses caused by river late this shallow water zone while providing ref- fined to the navigation channel. This protected navigation and wave forces. uge habitat for the river’s wildlife inhabitants. This shoreline has a gradual slope and allows humans backchannel habitat teams with insects, reptiles, and animals to interact with the water’s edge. and fish TYPICAL SPECIES Hackberry Junegrass Swamp White Oak Little Bluestem TYPICAL SPECIES TYPICAL SPECIES Catalpa Sideoats and Blue Gramma Indian Cord Grass Joe Pye Weed Joe Pye Weed Cottonwood Compass Plant Cup Plant Cup Plant Cup Plant Kentucky Coffee Tree Prairie Clovers Big Bluestem Switch Grass Switch Grass Prairie Cord Grass Prairie Cord Grass Including: Snags for Woodpeckers / Flickers Brush piles for Prothonotary Warblers ISLAND SCHERER PARK BACKCHANNEL 0 16’ 32’ 64’ 128’RIVER 13
  • 12. HABITAT ZONES VEGETATION DIVERSITY 1. Floodplain Forest 2 Kentucky Coffee Tree Swamp White Oak Hackberry Tree Cottonwood (Populus deltoides) Brush Piles (Gymnocladus dioicus) (Quercus bicolor) (Celtis Ulmaceae) with snags for Woodpeckers for Flickers and Prothonotary Warblers 1 4 Deep-rooted Mesic Prarie 2. Xeric Prairie 3 Wet Prarie Prairie Junegrass Little Bluestem Side Oats Grama Blue Gramma Compass Plant Purple Prairie Clovers (Koeleria cristata) (Schizachyrium scoparium) (Bouteloua curtipendula) (Bouteloua gracilis) (Silphium laciniatum) (Dalea purpurea) 3. Wet Prairie 1 1 Floodplain Forest Joe Pye Weed Cup Plant Switchgrass Prairie Cord Grass (Eutrochium) (Silphium perfoliatum) (Panicum virgatum) (Spartina pectinata) 4. Deep-rooted Mesic Prairie g e i d 2 Xeric Prarie b r t h o u y m p l 1 Floodplain Forest Indian Cord Grass Cup Plant Big Bluestem (Sorghastrum nutans) (Silphium perfoliatum) (Andropogon gerardii)14
  • 13. HABITAT ZONESISLAND HABITAT AND STRUCTURE 1. BirdsCotton Wood with snags for Birds Brush Piles and Standing Snags 1 Osprey Bald Eagles Warbles Thrushes B RDS BIRDS RDS S Root Wad 2. Mammals / Reptiles BEAVER 2 OTTER 2 B AVER BEAVER AVEE OTTER O OT E FISH MUSSE S MUSSE FISH / MUSSELS Beaver Otter Blandings Turtle Tiger Salamander (River and Back Channel) (River and Back Channel) (Back Channel/Sandy Beach) (Back Channel/Sandy Beach) Blandings Turtle Beach 3. Macro Invertebrates / Insects / Pollinators 2 4 2 BLANDING BLAN G LAN LANDING AN Lofting Logs for Blandings Turtle BIRDS B RDS TURTLE TL 1 Mayfly Dragon Fly Caddisfly Karner Blue Butterfly Mason Bees Honey BeesBrush Piles and Standing Snags 2 (Back Channel) (Back Channel) (Back Channel) (Xeric Prairie) (Throughout Site) (Throughout Site) BEAVER BEAVER FISH FIS FI / MUSSELS ISH SS OTTER OTT TT TER Root Wad 4 Boulders along Main Channel / Hover Bees Burrowing Bees Mussels 4. Fish e d g b r i BIRDS BIRDS S t h o u y m p l Root Wad Northern Pike Black Crappie Bluegill White Bass Fathead Minnow Walleye 15
  • 14. TOPOGRAPHIC COMPARISONS A’ A B’ EXISTING VS. PROPOSED EDGE CONDITION B C’ C SECTION A - A’ EXISTING EDGE CONDITION 808’ 802’ PROPOSED BACKCHANNEL 798’ 0 16’ 32’ 64’ 4 128’ SECTION B - B’ EXISTING EDGE CONDITION 808’ 802’ 798’ PROPOSED BACKCHANNEL 0 16’ 32’ 64’ 128’ SECTION C - C’ 821’ 816’ EXISTING EDGE CONDITION 808’ 802’ PROPOSED BACKCHANNEL 798’ 0 16 16’ 32 32’ 64 64’ 128 2 28’16
  • 15. SECTIONS SECTION D - D’ Bottom of Bridge 816’ Bottom of Bridge 809.5’ 808’ 100 yr Flood 802’ High Water 798’ Mean Water E’ E F’ D’ F SECTION E - E’ D 808’ WILDLIFE CROSSING 802’ 798’ SECTION F - F’ 808’ 802’ H A L L ’ S I S L A N D 798’M I S S I S S I P P I R I V E R B A C K C H A N N E L
  • 16. BIODIVERSITY CONCEPT DIAGRAM CREATE UNIQUE HABITAT ZONES ALONG ECOLOGICALLY IMPOVERISHED STRETCH OF MISSISSIPPI RIVER O S P R E Y N E S T MISSISSIPPI RIVER F L O HA E O L D LL T E P ’S R V A L A IS A I N 79 LA I L T E 8’ ND D F SH O R OR E EL S IN T E 80 79 2’ 8’ 79 8’ E M E SC R G E H B N BACKCHANNEL HABITAT L ER B A T E N W ER A D E C I N T H G L S A BA 79 N D 8’ S N A Q K S H U A E T L I C F18