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Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
Scopia Infrastructure Guide
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Scopia Infrastructure Guide

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Scopia Infrastructure Guide

Scopia Infrastructure Guide

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  • 1. Slide 1 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Course Duration: 2 Hours Designing Radvision Scopia® Infrastructure 3U00202O October 2012 Welcome to the Designing Radvision Scopia® Infrastructure technical sales training course. For approximately the next two hours we’re going to overview the Radvision Scopia infrastructure products including the Elite MCUs and related gateways.
  • 2. Slide 2 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Course Duration: 2 hours Welcome to Radvision Scopia® Infrastructure Portfolio By the end of this course you will understand the components and key features of Scopia Infrastructure portfolio You will recognize the connectivity and interoperability benefits of Scopia Infrastructure products You will be able to analyze competitors´ offers and identify the benefits that Scopia brings to you and your customer Course Overview We are going to discuss the key components and features of the Radvision Scopia® infrastructure portfolio. We are going to overview the connectivity and interoperability benefits of these products for system design purposes. By the end of this course will also be able to analyze the competitor’s offers and identify the primary benefits that Scopia infrastructure brings to you and your customers.
  • 3. Slide 3 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Downloading the Student Guide and Slip Sheet Click the Attachments tab to download the student guide for this course. A student guide containing the course slides and script is available for your reference. A slip sheet that provides some new content and additional details for this course is also available. It is highly recommended that you review the slip sheet for important information. To download one or both documents, click the Attachments tab.
  • 4. Slide 4 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. What is the Magic Ingredient? “Some people want it to happen, some wish it would happen, others make it happen.” -- M. Jordan What is the magic ingredient that can really impact successful business collaboration across geographical boundaries? Our answer is: a video system that brings people together like they are in the same room together that is made possible through the magic of an MCU. MCU stands for Multipoint Control Unit and this hardware infrastructure is a bridge that interconnects video calls from multiple sources. So why do we need an MCU for video calls and conferencing? It is important to be clear as possible with our customers as to why they need an MCU for video calls and how an MCU makes video calls work transparently even for good size groups of people across global locations. Basically, if we have users like we see here on this slide, each person can make point to point video calls to another person without much in the way of specialized video infrastructure. But when more than two parties want to be in the video conference, there is a need for an MCU to make the video conferencing magic happen. For a multi-party video call such as with four people in different geographical locations, each person will dial into the MCU and the MCU will combine different video streams into a single stream and send this stream to the group. There will be choices for viewing layouts and different settings that can magically be made available, so the user can monitor what he wants to see.
  • 5. Slide 5 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Eric - New York Laura - Berlin Donna - Paris Oskar – Stockholm The Magic Behind the Scenes Let's say we have Eric, who resides in New Your City and works for a company with several branches wants to conduct a video meeting with his colleagues. In our scenario here, we will have Laura in Berlin with Oscar in Stockholm and Donna in Paris. Now as we pointed out, if anyone wants to make a point-to-point video call with each other individual that operation can done with basic video calling software, an internet connection and PC type systems. These folks can just pick up the phone and clearly make a point-to-point call without much need for specialized video infrastructure. But if they want to make a multi-party video call to have a video conference meeting with more than 2 participants, then this is where the MCU comes in. And so the MCU supports each one of the participants that will dial in so they can collaborate in a conference meeting. The MCU provides controlled video and audio connections for each one of these meeting attendees who will dial into the MCU to conduct their virtual meeting and their monitor displays will feature the incoming signals from each one of these participants. And each one of these participants sends a unique video stream so the MCU can integrate them all together but so each participant can also then customize their signal display according to what they want to see. For example, each conference attendee can control whether they want to see themselves or not see themselves on their display monitor, or if they want to see only one speaker or another speaker or a lot of the virtual meeting attendees at the same time or whatever composed image like a presentation is being shown to the group and so on. This is the magic power of the MCU.
  • 6. So we have four different models of Scopia® Elite MCUs and different MCU bundles that we can use for system designs that will enable any global business to conduct high quality and flexible video calling from anywhere broadband Internet is available.
  • 7. Slide 6 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. At the end of this session, you should be able to:  Perform a technical sales presentation on Scopia® Infrastructure specific to a customer situation highlighting: - Key existing functionality, role and the related business value - Portfolio vision - Available services relevant to that customer situation  Define an outline Scopia Infrastructure solution in a given customer situation  Present real-life application examples of the solution  Answer questions with respect to: - System architecture - Underlying technology basics - Administration - Hardware requirements  Help sales to position Scopia Infrastructure competitively Course Objectives By the end of this course, you will be able to understand and position the Magic of our MCU infrastructure: Perform a technical sales presentation on Scopia® Infrastructure specific to a customer situation, highlighting its functionality, role, business value, and portfolio vision Outline a Scopia Infrastructure solution for a given customer situation Present examples of how the solution can be applied Answer questions a customer may have about the solution architecture, technology, administration, and requirements Help sales position Scopia Infrastructure effectively with customers
  • 8. Slide 7 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Infrastucture Solution portfolio Let’s start with a brief overview of the Radvision Scopia® infrastructure portfolio.
  • 9. Slide 8 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Elite 5230Elite 5115Elite 5110Elite 5105 3015105 High Definition Continuous Presence 60302010 Enhanced Definition 480p (License Option) 120604020 Enhanced Definition 352p (License Option) Scopia® Elite MCU Product Line We currently offer 4 different Scopia® Elite MCU models: Elite 5105, Elite 5110, Elite 5115 and Elite 5230. The model number terminology we use for this naming is according to the high definition ports so the 5105 has five high definition continuous presence ports and the 5230 has 30 high definition continuous presence ports. So in this table you can compare the number of ports used for each model category. The standard capacities are are listed here on the slide 1080p Video resolution is supported by all our MCU models. It is important to remember that 1080p video resolution consumes double the resources over 720p. There is also optional licensing options and pricing that we will cover in later slides that increases the capacity of the MCU by 2 or 4 times depending on the resolution that you want to use and how many endpoints you need to support for video conferencing. One clarification about resolution we want you to know about for this course and in other Radvision Scopia® course content is that we are literally talking about 352P resolution when we say 360P so in most slides, we refer to this actual 352p resolution as 360P; this is really the same resolution from our point of view and the 360p designation is industry convention, simplifies math calculations, keeps discussion more simple and is a standard resolution number terminology used often when video resolution is discussed publically. So to clarify, 352P and 360P are used interchangeably for these courses. We think that 360P is an appropriate “marketing” name to use while 352P is the actual mathematical resolution used by the systems in real world situations.
  • 10. Slide 9 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Elite 5200 - Carrier Grade Chassis ATCA Standard High speed backplane for decreased latency All parts are field replaceable  AC/DC power supply with redundancy  FAN drawers  Media blades  Shelf manager The Radvision Scopia® Elite MCUs are a carrier grade chassis and all the components are field replaceable. Our MCU chassis have media processing blade components and 2 power supplies. One of these power supplies is really a fully functional redundant power supply to support an instance of a power supply failure so that we can keep the MCU in good working order even if there is power supply failure. Both the power supplies can be AC or DC powered. . Now when we say all the parts are field replaceable, we mean that if a customer purchases this chassis and for some reason one of the components breaks, the service support team doesn't need to RMA the entire chassis. They can just RMA the specific items of component pieces that failed instead of sending the entire chassis back for repair or replacement. If you lose one of the media boards in the chassis, that specific MCU chassis will become unusable because both media blades work in conjunction of each other and calls in progress will be dropped, but for this type of problem we have designed our management solution system to enable a switchover automatically for new calls to go to another MCU that is a part of the system design, so the system can still be used. Of course some port flexibility etc. is lost, so the broken MCU should be fixed as soon as appropriate. Other hardware parts are also field replaceable including Fan drawers and the Shelf manager Some of the additional product specifications to know include: • Support for the ATCA or the Advanced Telecommunication Computing Architecture Standard • High speed backplane –for decreased latency
  • 11. Slide 10 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia Video Gateway for Microsoft Lync Scopia ISDN/PSTN Gateways Scopia TIP Gateway for Cisco Telepresence Scopia® Gateways Lineup Here is the Radvision Scopia® gateway family. We currently support 3 different gateway types. We have the Microsoft Gateway for the Microsoft Lync system. We also have an ISDN/PSTN gateway family and finally we have a new TIP gateway that provides interoperability for Cisco telepresence and uses Cisco’s “in house” developed telepresence Interoperability Protocol (TIP).
  • 12. Slide 11 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Infrastucture Key functionality Basic design capabilities Business value to customer Now let's discuss the key features of our product design while positioning the business value inherent in our Products.
  • 13. Slide 12 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=WEg_jVouuyk Remember This Development Direction! Use link to view the youtube video - then continue course playback via manual control The most important thing to remember here about our strategic development direction for the Elite MCU models is that they were designed with an emphasis on flexible resource allocation. Why is this so important? First of all, the MCU is an expensive component in a video system deployment and when a customer buys an MCU, he wants to deploy an efficient resource design around this component so he can meet current and future needs for his video scaling requirements and high definition resolution setups. One may need an MCU with an increased capacity license option today or in the future, so we offer our customers flexible cost effective choices that are unlike what our competitors offer. We will explain about this concept further in this course. Scopia® Elite MCUs, are reliable and highly scalable multi-party video conferencing platforms to make video conferencing available and in a high definition deployment. All of this is done dynamically. Lets look at the Scopia Elite MCU in operation. When calls come into the MCU, they will consume MCU resources according to that Model’s real capabilities with flexible choices as to how to assign those capabilities or optimize them with additional optional capabilities. So let's say that I'm dialing into the MCU with one of the calls that comes from a very low low-end laptop with very little bandwidth access. In that case I will connect with maximum 360p and I will consume a quarter of port. Not all of the competition can scale to use a port this efficiently.
  • 14. If I'm connecting with XT 5000 endpoint and I'm sitting in a meeting room and I have as much bandwidth as I want to use for my purposes then I will consume an entire port. These examples are done via dynamic allocation support so each one of the connections we are setting up via the MCU support is automatically connected and we consume the resources we need. There is no reason that a desktop client that does not need more than 360p connection will suddenly consume an entire port like what happens with other competitor MCU products. Check out the video on the Radvision YouTube Channel for more information about our Flexible Resource Allocation capabilities.
  • 15. Slide 13 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. 720p Basic x1 capacity 480p x2 capacity 360p x4 capacity Fine Grained Increased Capacity Increased Capacity License Option OR Increased Capacity x2 The Radvision MCU line offers Increased capacity as an option. As we discussed previously, the last two digits of the Elite MCU model number typically represents the number of 720p or HD ports each model supports with 1x or basic capacity. Each endpoint, up to 720p resolution uses a whole port to be part of a meet me conference. But not all endpoints require 720p resolution. So the Elite MCU line offers 2X and 4X capacity increases within any model MCU. This essentially doubles or quadruples the number ports or endpoints. In order to increase the number of supported endpoints that the MCU can support, the maximum resolution per port is reduces to 480p or 352P (360p) for 2X and 4X respectively. So what does this mean? We will use an Elite MCU model 5230 for the next three examples. 1. With basic 1X capacity, the 5230 supports a maximum of thirty 720p ports or endpoints. Any endpoint using up to 720p uses one port. So endpoints needing 360p or 480p each also use a single port. An endpoint needing 1080p requires two 720p or basic capacity ports. 2. With the addition of 2X capacity, the same 5230 would now support a maximum of 60 - 480p ports or endpoints, so that any endpoint using 480p or 360p would require one of the sixty ports. In this case of 2X capacity, endpoints requiring 720p use 2 ports and 1080p uses 4 ports of the sixty ports now available. Another way to refer to the port consumption for an MCU with a 2X capacity increase is to say that each 480p endpoint uses ½ of a basic capacity or a 720p port that would be designated in a 1X capacity design. 3. With the addition of 4X capacity, the same 5230 supports a maximum of 120 - 360p ports or endpoints. Any endpoint using 360p requires one port in this increased capacity
  • 16. setup and endpoints requiring 480p or 720p use four ports and a 1080p endpoint uses 8 ports. Similar to the previous example, another way to refer to the port consumption for an MCU with 4X capacity increase is to say that each 360p endpoint uses ¼ of a basic capacity or a 720p port that would be designated in a 1X capacity design. By the way, we are only talking here are about the resolutions that the MCU can encode, decoding can be done without design issues for any resolution. In short, using the increased capacity option and 480p or 360p for video calls, a business can achieve greater efficiency with their infrastructure through lower resolution ports for more connections per MCU. This is a unique differentiator for our products in the competitive market place. Other competitors may make certain efficiency claims, but in reality there will be more limitations and less flexibility than what we can offer to our customers. In designing a video system, one can configure the endpoints or desktop clients to use a specific resolution or maximum bandwidth. So if you license the Elite MCU with 360p ports, you should also set the desktop client or endpoint to 360P, so that no endpoint is consuming more than a single port per user. However users can still connect at 720p or 1080p by using multiple ports.
  • 17. Slide 14 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. 1st call 15th call 16th call Flexible HD Capacity One of the existing calls is moved to 720p Same behavior up to the 30th call Optional configuration for static 1080p Let’s further discuss HD capacity capabilities for our MCUs. We want to remind you our basic capacity specification is always counted using 720p resolution as the guideline. Let’s use the Radvision Scopia® MCU model 5230 again as an example here to clarify our discussion around capacity. A1080p call setup will always consume two 720p ports. So with the Elite MCU 5230 model, we can calculate that it can have a total of 15 1080p HD ports; therefore if we have 15 calls coming in at 1080p resolution, the MCU capacity will be full. One would expect then that if another call comes in, it will be rejected because there are no more HD ports available. So in order to overcome this type of challenge, we have a configuration option that provides more flexibility with regard to capacity allotment. This option allows that when another call comes into the MCU that is at full capacity, one of the existing calls will be taken down to 720p resolution and then the MCU frees up one port for the new call. With this configuration option, an open port can always be ready for call availability within the MCU to expand capacity as needed. Sure the resolution for one of the existing calls is downgraded from 1080p to 720p, but most viewers won’t even see or feel the difference, because it happens in real time in a really transparent operation. So as we have discussed, what this configuration set up does is free up more ports on the MCU when they are needed for call overflows, and this operation can happen consecutively as more calls come in. So this type of configuration setup is why we can say we can support up to 30 HD ports without specifying a specific resolution. For those customers who don’t want this down convert to 720p for a specific user and want to continue to stay connected always to 1080p, there is a configuration option to continue with 1080p for that specific user. For example, if you always want an executive
  • 18. to maintain 1080p resolution, then this can be set up so that others will be downgraded to the lower resolutions instead of a selected user who needs to remain at 1080p. So with the Scopia® Management tools, we can define the caller who should specifically always is stay with 1080p. This does not work for down converting 720p and all 30 ports are used and another call comes in, it will be rejected. For example, 720p calls will not be down converted to 360p or 480p to create more ports for call overflows.
  • 19. Slide 15 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. User joined/left the meeting Number of audio participants Encrypted conference Meeting being recorded DTMF for Layout control Audio only speaker Presenter Notification Audio/Video Muted/Unmuted Meeting locked Usability is Key Another aspect that we took seriously while designing the MCU is usability for multipoint conferences. All these features can appear on screen to provide information to the participants on what is happening in the conference. The MCU was designed so that what the user sees is the only thing that that specific user sees; what we are referring to is that we have set up the our solutions so a user can logically understand the important video call features that are set up either globally or locally by the user. On top of the video layout that a viewer sees, a set of indications can be accessed that will help the user understand the situation specific to that video call or meeting. First of all, when someone joins or leaves a meeting, they will see a message on the video screen that indicates that they have joined or left a meeting. There is also an indication of the number of audio only participants that are in the meeting. For security reasons, anytime there is an audio only participant, you will know about it. There are also audio only icons that will also be indicated so that audio only participants are counted and are understood by viewers. And telephone calls or video participants that are muted are also indicated. The reason for these indications is simple: due to security concerns, we want to ensure that everyone is accounted for in a listening situation which may also include people that are connected as just audio or telephone calls only. Whenever there is an audio only participant everyone in the meeting will know that some are listening in to the conversation. When an audio only participant speaks, an indicator is made to show on the right side of the audio-only counter as to which speaker is the active participant speaker, You will know when the conference is encrypted for security purposes as there is an encryption sign on the layout. If audio only attendees are speaking and they have internally linked user names, then their name is displayed; otherwise only the phone number appears.
  • 20. Viewers also will know when the conference is being locked. You have an option to lock the conference so if a meeting leader doesn’t want additional users to connect, he can lock the conference and then no more users can connect. So there is a no entry sign that will seen by those who are already in the meeting . There is also a notification for a start or a stop of presentation. You will see an indication for a person specifically who is presenting. You will also see an indication when someone is muting or un-muting your audio or your video. So if I am the leader of the conference, I can choose to mute someone’s audio or video. And the last one, and perhaps one of the most important things to know is that there are three keys on the remote control: the #, 0, and * (star) keys. The first one is the # sign so that when an endpoint over scans the video and you see the edges of the video being cut off on a display, when you identify the specific user, you just press the # and the MCU will fix this problem automatically and readjust the layout so you can view all participants as you choose. It’s like saying to the MCU listen, the video is over- scanned, please fix this and the MCU will do that. Using the 0 (zero) key—when you press it, you are actually talking with your own personal video layout assistant and you can select whether you want a standard video layout or a different video layout and select how many participants you get to see. So when you press 0 key you can select how many participants you will see, what is showing, etc. You can also select only to see the active speaker and it’s important to emphasize that these layout commands only affect your own personal video layout. The other video participants will see the main video layout as they have already set it up and others are not affected by your layout changes. Here there is also a recording indication so everyone will know when the meeting is being recorded.
  • 21. Slide 16 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Moderator Video Menu Again we want to emphasize our benefits including that our product design aim is to for an easy-to-use system. So the last important command we have taken from remote controller is the star key, and the star key will bring up this menu as an overlay on top of the video. The basic menu has only the first 3 options and the first option is for being a moderator so if you select option number 1 you can become the moderator. This menu will help viewers select additional preferences so they can select what they need for the moderator. So this moderator menu allows you to have complete control over the meeting and select these additional capabilities. This is all set up to provide a flexible and highly ergonomic user experience. Lets discuss roll calls that a moderator may access. When you first join a video meeting and you’re a participant, you need to join the meeting and then the a counter will help take role call. You’ll see the numbers increased by one for each person that joins a meeting in near real time. And on the right side of the icon setup, you will see the appropriate name of that person. When a person calls in audio only you can take roll call via the phone number that is listed; in other words you won’t see their name but you will see their phone number designated. You can set this up internally so that a phone extension is tied to the name of the caller so internal calls can be set up to list the names for a roll call. If the moderator is dropped, then someone else can become the moderator and a call stays up so you could have multiple moderators set up. You can define this type of control via Scopia® Management, the system management software tool and you could also set up control so that when the owner of the virtual room disconnects, the moderator for the conference will also disconnect the session. But if the owner of the
  • 22. call disconnects, it doesn't necessarily mean that the call will end, if this is configured as virtual room in such a way. For design purposes consider that the Elite 5230 MCU can support up to 120 resources and a phone call only uses about a quarter port. And this capability is the maximum number regardless of the increased capacity option.
  • 23. Slide 17 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Continuous Presence – 28 participants The next thing we want to discuss is about the video layout. You can view up to 28 video participants on the same video layout. And this is far more than the competition enables. The competition typically provides for up to 16 participants. We give this specification of 28 participants for a video viewing layout at 480p and higher resolutions. That is this specification we state and we are not using 360p as the baseline for this. And 480p and higher up resolutions look great and many customers— mostly in APAC like in China— take advantage of this type of set up. Businesses in APAC often have a huge of conference attendees and they would like to see as many users and attendees as possible. So this specification is dependent upon the resolution as long as it’s for 480P and up so then you can get up to 28 participants. If the resolution and related bandwidth is lower and slower than for 480P such as using 360p you will get then get 16 as a maximum amount that can be seen on a session. Let’s say we have we have a certain video layout for 28 participants and there are actually 30 participants on the call. Now we need to decide when someone from the outside of the video layout is speaking and how to bring them into the video layout. It’s actually very simple—if someone becomes a participant speaker they will then go into the video layout and the last person to join on the list will be dropped in terms of the video layout picture.
  • 24. Slide 18 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. 60 fps for Reduced Latency See Scopia® Elite 5100 Series MCU Administrator Guide: Available as download via course attachment tab The MCU supports 60 frames per second in 720p only; that is, the MCU does not support 60 frames per second for 1080p resolution. So for High Definition, the choice is between 720p60 and 1080p30, according to the MCU configuration of sharpness vs. motion. For your reference, 720p 60 fps consumes the same resources as 1080p 30 fps. 720p 60 presents a very smooth picture for motion events and also reduces video latency. So if you are playing video that has fast motion, use 720p 60 as the best choice for a very smooth play back. If you use 720p 60fps, the MCU capacity is then limited by half—that is, an MCU 5230 using 720p 60fps now can has a maximum of 15 ports. The decision between 1080p 30fps and 720p 60fps is according to the MCU configuration selections for the MCU where a configuration is set to trade-off between sharpness and full motion. The higher frame rate works well for fast motion or where one needs to see details of full motion events. There is documentation for the MCU called the MCU administrator guide that provides all of the math regarding capacity and port configurations per resolution and motion choices. Please consult this documentation for additional information as needed in your system designs for customers.
  • 25. Slide 19 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. H.264 AVCH.264 SVC Room Systems Telepresence UC Clients SVC Based Devices Rest of the World Comprehensive VC Interoperability UC Clients UC Clients UC Clients Scopia® Elite MCU This diagram shows how almost any type of endpoint can be interoperable with the MCU with appropriate support for SVC or Scalable Video Coding. The Radvision® SVC is aligned with the global standard. That is, it follows all the guidelines defined as by UCIF with regards to SVC implementation. And Radvision MCUs are also able to interoperate with other non-standard endpoints. The MCU actually does video trans-coding between SVC and non-SVC endpoints. This way Radvision devices can connect using SVC and will not be affected by other endpoints that connect without SVC. Each component that’s connected to the MCU can be using SVC as a part of the solution capabilities. Other competitors do not completely support this capability so they will not have this advantage we have here with SVC across the entire system design. SVC is actually an extension to the H.264 codec standard that is used by some of today’s video conferencing devices. Please note: the MCU doesn't support H.264 High-Profile and there are no plans on supporting this video format for now. The bottom line is that with our Radvision Scopia® solutions, one can system design to include endpoints that are SVC standard endpoints and some that are non SVC connected and these endpoints will work transparently together.
  • 26. Slide 20 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. 0 128 256 384 512 640 768 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Bandwidth(Kbps) Time (seconds) Available bandwidth NetSense estimation Net-sense True Bandwidth Management Net-sense is a truly unique feature to Radvision® that allows our solutions to efficiently manage the bandwidth to optimize a video call experience. Basically it’s a patented algorithm to predict when packet loss may occur. Net-sense that was developed in- house, and the MCU uses this algorithm to help predict bandwidth issues on a network. So let’s say someone is connecting from home using available 384 kbps bandwidth. This is the bandwidth that the user understands that he is supposed to have on his network connection. But as time goes by and the user goes into the conference, there is no guarantee that this user will always have this same amount of bandwidth. Quite often the bandwidth starts to decline which will result in packet loss for video and audio streams producing playbacks that are less than optimal. So when the bandwidth dips down, the MCU might start to send packet loss as a result of the lower bandwidth. What the Net-Sense algorithm does is constantly check the actual bandwidth on the users connection line—regardless of the bandwidth that is actually connected to the MCU. If we see the monitored bandwidth starts to decline, then we will automatically take down the bandwidth requirements of the call by supporting a lower video resolution so that a user will not reach a point where severe packet loss occurs. For example, if less bandwidth availability is detected using the Net-sense algorithm, then the user who is using 480p resolution is taken down to 360p resolution. This also means that his connection will not drop to the minimum bandwidth needed, so if for example, 360p can use 450kps if there is that much bandwidth, the video connection will use this bandwidth potential accordingly and it would not be forced to go down to 384 kbps. People really like this feature because it prevents packet loss and keeps things looking good during a video call.
  • 27. Slide 21 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Security and Control AES Encryption for secure conferencing HTTPS, TLS, H.235 PIN protected meetings Moderator PIN Lock down meeting Password protected WEB UI Dual NIC Now let’s discuss security and network control. While interoperability and access are key to Avaya-Radvision®, security and control of the video conference is also critical. This slide identifies the key capabilities that our Infrastructure supports in this important area. This area is another important aspect for our customers—especially for helping to support large enterprises. We support the key standards for media encryption and signaling. That is we support AES encryption for secure conferencing and we can also use TLS and H.235 for the encryption of the actual signaling, and we have HTTPS for secure web browsing. If you want to go into the MCU with a web UI and configure it as you need to from a remote site, you can do it securely. In addition, we have PIN protected meetings so the virtual rooms can be protected for secure meetings with appropriately defined PIN setups so users then must enter a passcode if you choose to set up a PIN protected meeting. And there is a moderator PIN operation to securely set up a meeting for appropriate moderator control. For example, one could lock down a meeting from the moderator control if the moderator wants to lock a meeting once it has started. We also have an option for dual NIC or Network Interface Card connectivity. Basically a dual NIC connection with the MCU can be designed, so one can decide if they want to separate the media and the signaling process from the management process setup. And in that case the Media and signaling can go through the external network firewall and the management control operations can go through a private network because you want to make sure that you’re the only one that sees the management process.
  • 28. Slide 22 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. JITC Certified The Elite MCUs are JITC certified (Joint Interoperability Test Command) – This is important for DoD/Federal Government. JITC professionally tests, operationally evaluates, and certifies IT capabilities for joint interoperability, enabling information dominance and increasing war fighter effectiveness for the nation. Our MCUs were also tested with Radvision S40 Gateway. This testing is a very important point to stress especially for the federal sales teams. This was run through a long evaluation process by different governmental agencies to meet appropriate guidelines and this is officially certified, tested and working in certain secure deployments today.
  • 29. Slide 23 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Auto Attendant Logo Customization Replace the Radvision® logo Multiple languages supported Multi-tenant friendly As requested by many customers, the Auto Attendant Logo can be customized, so here we will discuss the auto attendant logo customizations capability. There are 2 options to connect to the MCU. One way is to you dial directly into a certain conference or secondly an appropriate person can dial into a predefined number that will be going into the auto attendant system. Can also dial using the MCU IP address. For example, a company can set up to dial 0 and get this menu as shown on this slide will call up a list of all the active conferences on the network. Here it is possible to simply select the conference that one needs to join—in case you don’t remember the conference number, for example. Here is also an option for companies or service providers to customize the logo of the auto attendant. So for example, there might currently be a default with Radvision logo but if a service provider or a company wants to change this logo to their own, it’s easy to do. Multiple languages are supported, and the system is Multi tenant friendly. A customer can customize the logo information area to provide certain access information. Service providers usually want to do this so they can sell these video services as multi-tenant services and define the appropriate areas with the right information for their specific customers.
  • 30. Slide 24 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Maintain the Telepresence Experience Telepresence interoperability is a key feature with the Radvision® MCUs and Radvision provides a natural experience in the VC room. Here in this slide, the screen shows the speakers, and at the bottom are the other participants that are viewing the VC room speakers. In the VC room setup, the presentation can be on a floor type monitor screen. Vendors including Polycom, Cisco, Tandberg and Life Size have released new telepresence systems into the market this year and each competitor is typically using some kind of proprietary protocol. Some of the systems that are currently deployed are more proprietary and some of them are less proprietary in terms of their operational protocols. Cisco uses the proprietary protocol TIP which stands for telepresence Interoperability Protocol which they are trying to promote as a key protocol. The Radvision Scopia® MCU design team has put an emphasis on developing support for video systems interoperability, and our MCU components can typically be designed to interoperate in almost any telepresence deployment situation. This most often includes those situations with our competitors’ components already in place. We have implemented all the primary protocols of these four vendors to work with our MCUs. So basically you can sell our Radvision Scopia MCU products into existing environments that already have Polycom, Cisco, Tandberg and Life-size to interoperate transparently with these systems. One caveat regarding the Cisco system with telepresence: when connecting Cisco telepresence systems into the Radvision MCU, you can only see it as a single visual monitor segment on the system unless you include the new Radvision TIP Gateway into your design which provides comprehensive Cisco interoperability support. When it comes to the actual viewer experience, the Radvision MCUs provide the full telepresence experience as if the attendees were in the room. If you are sitting in the
  • 31. room viewing a three or four big screen monitor setup, you will see a video layout on the big screens with the active speaker images and on the bottom of the screens, you will also see other important information with certain session statistics. This way you can see a panoramic image of the telepresence system and connect to other types of clients while understanding important information. You can set up the sessions to see everything you need to see.
  • 32. Slide 25 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Telepresence for Every Endpoint This is a room set up with single monitor client that is connected to a Scopia® Elite MCU conference. This MCU conference also has a telepresence room connected to it. When you sit in such a room with this type of single monitor setup, we try to maintain the telepresence experience so if a telepresence system is in another place that is connected to the meeting, you will see a panoramic image of the telepresence system in the single screen layout and this layout will change to 3 x 3 monitor type set up to accommodate the 3 segments of the telepresence system like you see in this slide. This solution approach enables multiparty communications with telepresence Interoperability between different vendor telepresence systems in addition to standards- based video conferencing endpoints which supports our cost effectiveness approach.
  • 33. Slide 26 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. …Even for The Desktop Here is a Radvision Scopia® desktop connection layout with the video layout. In this example, the meeting has started and there is another image of a client with the telepresence system set up along with the other participants in the meeting. We want to stress that the telepresence experience is always maintained in some capacity regardless of which connection you are using, as we try to support this same type of user experience as much as possible so any telepresence set experience is also provided for desktop like show on this slide.
  • 34. Slide 27 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Tandberg LifeSize CiscoPolycom Telepresence Interoperability So to capsulize our interoperability regarding the MCUs, any standard device endpoint can be connected to the MCU starting with all the Avaya’s latest unified communications products and extending to any other serious vendor endpoints. This is an example of how interoperable it is to connect any device any endpoints and desktop clients to this MCU.
  • 35. Slide 28 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. VoIP VoIP VoIP SIP PBX Room System Telepresence Scopia Mobile Flare / ADVD 3G ONE-X XT Series The Power of Connectivity Scopia® Elite MCU In summary we can fully position to our customers that we offer powerful connectivity and that nearly any device, any endpoints, clients, desktop clients can connect to our Elite MCU system designs.
  • 36. Slide 29 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Gateway for Cisco Telepresence Full TIP implementation Multi-stream video – 3 screens support Complements the Telepresence story Video, Audio and Presentation support Scheduling: CTS-Manager and Scopia Management This is picture of the Scopia® gateway that will enable additional interoperability capabilities with Cisco telepresence systems. And it will provide multi-stream video screen support. This gateway is really required for Cisco TIP telepresence—otherwise, the Radvision video will only show one of the three telepresence screens. The Scopia Gateway for Cisco telepresence is required to inter-connect a Cisco telepresence system with a Scopia Elite MCU to support multi-stream video, audio and content sharing.
  • 37. Slide 30 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Gateways Family H.323 / H.320 Connectivity  ISDN and serial interfaces Available Gateways  Single and Dual PRI Gateway  Quad BRI Gateway  Quad Serial Gateway No compromise on interoperability! The gateways are really our legacy products and have been available for many years now. The basic functionality is described here on this slide: the gateways support H.323 and H.320 over ISDN plus serial interfaces. Please note that SIP is not supported. We have several different gateway products including a Quad BRI gateway, single and dual PRI gateways, and a quad serial gateway. There are three ISDN gateways and one serial gateway and the serial gateway is mainly used for military or certain other related governmental project types. It’s very important to understand that there is no compromise on third party vendor interoperability here so you can connect each of these devices into existing systems and have it work properly.
  • 38. Slide 31 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Serial Gateway Very easy and intuitive to manage and operate Direct connectivity to various encryption devices  KIV7, KIV7/M, STE, KG-194 Four Serial interfaces – up to 1920Kbps Very flexible call connectivity  Signaling or Data triggered Technical Overview Our Serial Gateway is sold primarily for military usage. Let’s discuss some of the specifics of the serial gateway product that are listed, this gateway has been tested thoroughly with governments and international military forces and including the US Army. It can be connected to various encryption types of devices including kiv7, kiv7/M and the latest STE devices for satellite connections and even the older KG 194 specification. Basically the serial gateway was tailored for secure interfacing that will meet governmental or military standards around the world.
  • 39. Slide 32 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. The first and only Video Gateway Qualified for Microsoft Lync and OCS-R2 Scopia® Gateway for MS Lync The Gateway approach we support here with the Radvision Scopia® Gateway for the MS Lync is to leave everything in the Lync network the same, that is just add the gateway and it will do everything it needs to do. So with this approach, we don’t really need to touch any of the customers existing deployment. We simply put the gateway in place and let the gateway do its job. Our solution provides the following benefits: • Preserves Lync user experience • Provides a seamless Lync extension to the existing Video Call installed base • Enables Investment protection for existing deployments • Supports a scalable and affordable architecture
  • 40. Slide 33 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Infrastucture Architectural engineering considerations Now let's further discuss the considerations you should understand to do the architectural engineering to support these systems.
  • 41. Slide 34 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. MCU Cascading Meeting size Geographical location Virtual MCU What is it and when is it needed? One of the most important design considerations to understand is around MCU cascading. What is MCU cascading for creating a Virtual MCU and when is it needed? Cascading is needed in two different scenarios. 1. First of all, it is used in the case of wide geographical system deployments. Let’s say you have a company that has much distances between office branches. Let’s say there is an office in New Jersey and there is an office in Paris and you want to have a conference with the participants from both locations. In this case, the recommendation is to include an MCU in each location geography to optimize the performance of the video sessions. What we are saying is that in the situation where there are several participants in each geo location, all participants in that given location will connect to the local MCU and there will be one cascading link between MCUs. The purpose of such cascading is bandwidth saving. We will discuss this type of design further later in this course. 2. The second reason to use cascading designs is because of a meeting size. There’s 30 ports per MCU maximum in a standard Elite MCU 5230 configuration. If the meeting uses a serious number of ports, then the session can automatically be cascaded across MCUs to balance the session operations. So we want to use cascading when meeting size exceeds the maximum MCU capacity so the meeting is automatically extended to another MCU and the two MCUs are cascaded. The actual meeting number remains the same regardless of the amount of MCUs involved. So using cascading designs across large geographical distances or to support expected large meeting sizes are the primary 2 reasons why cascading is needed in a video system design. There are several things to take into account with a cascading design:
  • 42. When cascading two MCUs, one of the MCUs is the master MCU and the second one is the slave MCU. The difference is mainly around the video experience. Cascading another MCU is not recommended (meaning three level cascading). The cascading link is SVC based like any video connection between two Radvision products. Conference control is available for all meeting participants, regardless of the MCU they are connected to.
  • 43. Slide 35 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Virtual MCU Benefits Increase Scalability Host XXXL Meetings Save Bandwidth Redundancy, Failover Topology Abstraction This slide presents a summary of our overall virtual system MCU benefits as can be positioned for selling opportunities and in competitive situations. As we have discussed, we have provided and designed high flexibility and usability into our infrastructure. This includes increased scalability options with the ability to host even very large video conference meetings. We have designed in tools that can provide support for efficient bandwidth allocation and lots of redundancy in our component and system design solutions.
  • 44. Slide 36 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Serial Gateway Made for the Federal Market ISDN IMUX Dialing Isolator KIV7 Gateway S40 This is a high level diagram to illustrate how we use the serial gateway in our system designs. So there is a local to the serial port. On the other side the port is connected to the encryption device. In some cases there is an option to connect it to a dialing isolator. Again this type of deployment is for certain government or military type designs or where certain types of governmental security designs are required.
  • 45. Slide 37 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. SCOPIA VC240 Enterprise DMZ Partner Company Home Worker Router SCOPIA Management SCOPIA® Gateway for MS Lync Microsoft Lync Video Chat Client Microsoft Lync Client Microsoft Lync Video Chat MS Lync Server MS A/V Edge Server SCOPIA XT1200 + embedded MCU Scopia® Gateway for MS Lync Small Centralized Deployment This slide shows where and how to deploy the gateway. On this slide we have the gateway, the Lync server, and we have the XT1200 with embedded MCU. All the components are within the Enterprise. Only the Edge Server is in the DMZ. With H.323 devices, the firewall traversal is handled by the gateway together with the Edge device. Whenever external users want to connect into the company, they need to be federated over the Lync solution. For a large centralized deployment, everything is ok in the same centralized location. We could also put in an ISDN gateway to emphasize that we could use to connect with ISDN users. Basically it is very similar to this previous deployment but expanded. For example, one can add several gateways and several MCUs. All could be deployed in the same centralized location. Adding an Elite MCU instead of adding just a Lync A/V MCU to a Lync System deployment will provide important advantages such as supporting HD video resolution and support for continuous presence. Another type of design could be created for a distributed deployment. In that case you might have a headquarters where we would use Scopia® Management to integrate the existing solution components and the Lync server. On the DMZ you would have the Edge device and likely a Scopia PathFinder® for Firewall traversal. This allows external endpoints and home workers to connect through the PathFinder. One point to emphasize is if you have multiple Lync servers, one is the master Lync server and others are slaves. Communications, like Registration is done with the master. Why would you have an edge server and PathFinder? That is because PathFinder allows you to connect with external endpoints like H.323.
  • 46. Slide 38 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Infrastucture Licensing, Design configurations This section of the course is about the different bundles, licensing and pricing of our Infrastructure portfolio that should be considered for system designs.
  • 47. Slide 39 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. A La Carte Bundles Elite MCU Purchase Let’s talk a little bit about pricing. When it comes to pricing we have 2 different options for selling and designing MCUs in a Video system. There is an à la carte option and a bundled option. The à la cart option provides pricing for the standalone MCU from the order listing and then one can provide a specific proposal of components around it. The bundle option is a package where one sells the MCU, along with the Scopia® Management system, a Radvision Scopia® desktop client and optionally with mobile clients.
  • 48. Slide 40 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. P/N Model Ports 55546- 00610 Scopia® Elite 5110 10 HD Ports 55546- 00607 Scopia Elite 5115 15 HD Ports 55546- 00606 Scopia Elite 5230 30 HD Ports Elite MCU – A la Carte Let’s take a look at the standalone à la carte models list here. The 5105 is a special case and is not supported in a la carte packaging but only in bundles. Please note that one can purchase the 5110, 5115, or 5230 separately (A la Carte) but that 5105 is only sold as part of a bundle.
  • 49. Slide 41 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. P/N MCU Model 55546-00002 Scopia® Elite 5110 55546-00003 Scopia Elite 5115 55546-00004 Scopia Elite 5230 Telelpresence P/N 55546-00020 Increased Capacity Telepresence provided at no additional cost with purchase of XT Telepresence or Scopia TIP Gateway Elite MCU License Options When you purchase a standalone MCU, there are two license options that you can purchase. The first one is for the increased capacity license option. This actually increases the capacity x2 or x4 as we have previously explained. And the second license option is the telepresence option. That is, this option is for the telepresence functionality described previously. A customer will need a telepresence license to use the MCUs in a telepresence design to support that additional functionality needed for telepresence setups. You should know that when customers purchase the telepresence option, customers looking for optimized telepresence with Cisco and that purchase the new TIP Gateway will receive this license for free.
  • 50. Slide 42 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Elite MCU Bundles Increased Capacity Bundle Increased CapacityElite MCU Scopia® Management Scopia Desktop P/N MCU Model 54546-00007 Scopia® Elite 5105 54546-00005 Scopia Elite 5110 54546-00005 Scopia Elite 5115 54546-00006 Scopia Elite 5230 There are two types of MCU Elite bundles that we sell. The first type is the increased capacity bundle where you get the Elite MCU, Scopia® Management, and Desktop clients, plus the increased capacity key. Please note: the bundle choices also includes the Elite MCU 5105 bundle pricing. The 5105 cannot be purchased a la carte; it can only be purchased in this type of bundle as well the next option we are going to discuss. Scopia Elite 5105 Increased capacity bundle includes: Scopia Elite 5105 MCU with X4 capacity license, Scopia Management suite with internal gatekeeper: • 20 Multipoint Scheduler ports, 40 ports gatekeeper/B2BUA, 200 registrations Scopia Desktop and Mobile, 20 Interactive ports, 600 Streaming ports, 5 Scopia Mobile seats Scopia Elite 5110 Increased capacity bundle includes: Scopia Elite 5110 MCU with X4 capacity license, Scopia Management Suite with internal gatekeeper: • 40 Multipoint Scheduler ports, 80 ports gatekeeper/B2BUA, 400 registrations Scopia Desktop and Mobile: 40 Interactive ports, 600 Streaming ports, 5 Scopia Mobile seats Scopia Elite 5115 Increased capacity bundle includes: Scopia Elite 5115 MCU with X4 capacity license, Scopia Management Suite with internal gatekeeper: • 60 Multipoint Scheduler ports,120 ports gatekeeper/B2BUA, 600 registrations Scopia Desktop and Mobile:, 60 Interactive ports, 600 Streaming ports, 5 Scopia Mobile seats
  • 51. Scopia Elite 5230 Increased capacity bundle includes: Scopia Elite 5230 MCU with X4 capacity license, Scopia Management Suite with internal gatekeeper: • 120 Multipoint Scheduler port, 240 ports gatekeeper/B2BUA, 1200 registrations Scopia Desktop and Mobile: 120 Interactive ports, 600 Streaming ports, 5 Scopia Mobile seats
  • 52. Slide 43 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Elite MCU Bundles Increased Capacity and Mobile Bundle Increased Capacity Elite MCU Scopia® Management Scopia Desktop Scopia Mobile P/N MCU Model TBD Scopia® Elite 5105 TBD Scopia Elite 5110 TBD Scopia Elite 5115 TBD Scopia Elite 5230 The second bundle option is for the increased capacity plus the mobility bundle. So if the client is looking for mobile connectivity and has many mobile users, then this is the price you want to use. This price is slightly higher with the mobility support as it requires additional infrastructure capabilities to be supported for mobility client connections. The Scopia® Elite 5105/20 Increased capacity and Mobile bundle includes: Scopia Elite 5105/20 MCU with X4 capacity license, Scopia Management Suite with internal gatekeeper: • 20 Multipoint Scheduler ports,40 ports gatekeeper/B2BUA, 200 registrations, Scopia Desktop and Scopia Mobile: 20 Interactive ports, 600 Streaming ports, 50 Scopia Mobile seats Scopia Elite 5110 Increased capacity and Mobile bundle includes: Scopia Elite 5110 MCU with X4 capacity license, Scopia Management Suite with internal gatekeeper: • 40 Multipoint Scheduler ports, 80 ports gatekeeper/B2BUA, 400 registrations Scopia Desktop and Mobile: 40 Interactive ports, 600 Streaming ports, 100 Scopia Mobile seats Scopia Elite 5115 Increased capacity and Mobile bundle includes: Scopia Elite 5115 MCU with X4 capacity license, Scopia Management Suite with internal gatekeeper: • 60 Multipoint Scheduler ports, 120 ports gatekeeper/B2BUA, 600 registrations Scopia Desktop and Mobile: 60 Interactive ports, 600 Streaming ports, 150 Scopia Mobile seats
  • 53. Scopia Elite 5230 Increased capacity and Mobile bundle includes: Scopia Elite 5230 MCU with X4 capacity license, SCOPIA Management Suite with internal gatekeeper: • 120 Multipoint Scheduler ports, 240 ports gatekeeper/B2BUA, 1200 registrations Scopia Desktop and Mobile: 120 Interactive ports, 600 Streaming ports, 300 Scopia Mobile seats
  • 54. Slide 44 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Elite MCU 5105 Bundle Upgrade key Elite MCU 5110 Bundle P/N 54546-00007 P/N 54546-00008 Elite MCU 5105 Bundle Upgrade The customer that purchases the MCU 5105 bundle also gains a future option to upgrade the 5105 to a Model 5110 version because both models use the same hardware. So customers with the 5105 can buy this version now and upgrade to the 5110 version in the future in a cost effective manner. The upgrade price also includes the appropriate upgrade support for the Scopia® Management software.
  • 55. Slide 45 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. P/N Gateway Model 55782-00602 Gateway P20 55782-00601 Gateway P10 55785-00601 Gateway B40 55783-00601 Gateway S40 Scopia® Gateways Models This is the Gateway model pricing for Scopia® ISDN/PSTN Gateways and our Serial Gateway. We have logical part numbers for the Single and Dual PRI Gateways choices + the Quad BRI Gateway and our Quad Serial Gateway listed here.
  • 56. Slide 46 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Gateway for MS Lync Ordering When ordering a Lync Gateway, Scopia Management is No Extra Charge  Customer pays for support only P/N Product Name 55548-00001 Lync Gateway – 10 ports 55591-00010 and 88591-00021 Scopia Management – 25 ports 55548-00005 Lync Gateway – 5 ports 55591-00010 and 88591-00021 Scopia Management – 10 ports 55548-00006 Lync Gateway – 5 ports For our Lync Gateway, there are two basic ordering options: • The Lync Gateway with 10 ports • The Lync Gateway with 5 ports Basically these options use the same hardware. Keep in mind that Scopia® Management (formerly iView) is a very important part of the solution so don’t charge additional money for Scopia Management. When ordering the Lync gateway you get Scopia Management for free. We only charge for the support.
  • 57. Slide 47 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Infrastucture Services Services are an important part of our solution. In this chapter we will briefly discuss the available services.
  • 58. Slide 48 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Avaya Services What about Avaya Services Support? For Radvision® products, an Avaya maintenance package is required for a minimum of the first year of operations. There are multiple packages and choices from Avaya Services that can help you and your customers with our video conferencing deployments. With our Radvision portfolio, maintenance is required. Specifically for direct Avaya sales, hardware and software maintenance is required and for indirect channel sales, hardware-only maintenance is required. Contact Avaya Services teams for the different service and maintenance options that are available for customer sales.
  • 59. Slide 49 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Infrastucture Preparing for the customer meeting Now let's overview information about design scenarios in context of engaging our customer meeting discussions.
  • 60. Slide 50 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Questions to Ask CUSTOMER SCENARIO: Prepare your questions  Centralized or Distributed deployment?  How many rooms?  How many employees?  How many video enabled?  Mobile users? Here are some questions that are quite important to ask your customer when you start to design the video system. These are really the basic key questions to get answers for from your customers that will help you plan the design accordingly. first of all, you want to know if the deployment is to be a centralized or a distributed deployment and all the related usage scenario information about the video network deployment specifics. You also want to know how many rooms the customer has for his video conferencing plan, because an HD room is connected to an HD port on the MCU etc. and you need to know how the rooms will be set up with what types of resolution support to map out the right amount of ports. And you want to know how many employees will need to be HD enabled at 720p and 1080p and how many users can be set up using standard video resolutions. You also want to know how many mobile users will be part of the deployment. Taking all that into consideration will provide you with the information tools needed to develop a proper design. Specifically, this information can be used to help you exactly calculate the capacity of the MCU you will need to support for a proposal.
  • 61. Slide 51 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Bandwidth Vs Resolution What video resolution should you expect? Bandwidth* Resolution Up to 384K CIF 384K 360p (352p) 512K 480p 768K 720p30 1.8M and above 720p60 / 1080p30 *H.264 High-Profile isn’t supported by the Scopia® Elite MCU This is a chart that will help you understand bandwidth and resolution capacities to discuss with your customers so you know what resolution you get for what bandwidth that you have to work with. CIF stands for Common Intermediate Format used in lower video resolution formats. This chart is slightly different than the bandwidth capabilities that you’ll get on the XT 5000. For example, the XT 5000 supports the high profile option capabilities that Elite MCU models do not support. So it’s really important to emphasize that this is an important chart to use for these MCU models when doing a system design, and it is different and includes higher bandwidth than the XT 5000 uses.
  • 62. Slide 52 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Polycom Cisco-Tandberg LifeSize Competitive Landscape Let’s turn our discussion to overview today’s competitive landscape for video call infrastructure and how we would position our solutions with our customers. We support key differentiators with our Elite MCU including NetSense® and SVC support that is not available from our competition. With the Elite MCU models, here are 3 main competitors. The first is Cisco, the second one is Polycom and the third one is LifeSize. Cisco offers several different MCU models. Lately they’ve developed a new MCU called the M5300. They also offer models named Codian 4500 and the MSE 8000. Polycom has RMX family starting from the 1500 through the 2000 and the 4000. And Life-size has only one MCU model. Now let’s look at more specifics for each of the competitors.
  • 63. Slide 53 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Cisco - Tandberg Key Differentiators True dynamic resource allocation  Capacity should be statically configured Telepresence interoperability  Only available on the Telepresence Server Virtual MCU SVC + NetSense® Price is way more expensive We will start our discussion with the Cisco MCUs. The Cisco MCUs are a flat capacity MCU. The Cisco MCU models are like the Radvision Scopia® Elite MCUs but without increased capacity option or port scaling so that is the reason why we call these products a flat capacity MCU. This also means that each participant connected to the Cisco MCU will consume one HD port regardless of the resolution to be used in a video call and this cannot be changed. So Cisco has several MCU models from 12 ports up to 40 ports. For the port sizes, this is the maximum capacity. For example with the largest Cisco MCU model, one cannot go above 40 ports. first of all when you want to have a large meeting, you connect only to a single MCU. What they are doing is actually dialing between all of the MCUs in the system and their management system will not do this automatically. The telepresence center is only supported on the biggest chassis – the MC 8000 using a telepresence setup. The 4500 which is the most widespread MCU sold by Cisco, does not have any telepresence support in its capabilities. The price of the Cisco units with SVC support is way higher than our products. Check Cisco links for information regarding their current pricing and capabilities. On the Radvision® site there are detailed presentations about each of our primary competitors, so you can check with those presentations for additional information as needed.
  • 64. Slide 54 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Polycom RMX True dynamic resource allocation  CMA Desktop is always counted as HD call Telepresence interoperability  Cannot connect to some TP vendors Continuous Presence – Size matters  RMX can only do 16 participants SVC + NetSense® Key Differentiators Let’s now discuss Polycom MCUs. There is a family of products from the smallest which is the 1500 Model and the largest MCU which is the 4000. Here’s an important point regarding RMX family of products. When you connect to the CMA desktop client from Polycom and you connect the RMX MCUs, they typically have a problem with the resource calculations. In each use case, each desktop client will consume a full HD port. Like Cisco, Polycom cannot support using a quarter ports like we can. It seems to us that there is a problem with the actual calculation using the common ports. Of course, they also do not support SVC yet and Net-Sense like we do. They say they have increased capacity capabilities and they say this is built into the MCU and you don’t need to buy increased capacity but the increased capacity from Polycom is only for up to 360p type resolution. In any case the Polycom setups will still consume an HD port when you connect. Let’s look at this a bit further: Elite MCU can accommodate up to 120 ports with the increased capacity option and is fully flexible. With the Elite’s dynamic port capacity and resource model, any combination of endpoint capabilities can be supported without complex configuration changes. The Elite is more flexible and allows customers to tailor the solution to their needs. With a pure HD deployment, there is no need to purchase the increased capacity option resulting in a more competitive price point for the Elite. Other customers, who wish to have a hybrid deployment of HD and SD, can purchase the increased capacity option which brings the Elite to about same price as the Polycom RMX. With the Elite, additional calls can be added even after the maximum capacity is reached by automatically re-negotiating the least relevant endpoint’s connection to a lower resolution. This frees up resources for the new endpoint to join and allows the Elite to dynamically accept additional calls. With Polycom, the additional new endpoint
  • 65. would be rejected. Polycom’s solution have two working modes – Fixed and Flexible resource allocation. Polycom’s Flexible Allocation Mode has serious flaws. The RMX was designed as an on-demand platform with scheduling and resource reservations requiring the CMA application. Polycom CMA does not support the RMX in Flexible Allocation Mode. CMA cannot dynamically track the amount of resources the RMX is using as it does not communicate the resource load to CMA. Therefore, the RMX must be configured to Fixed Allocation Mode where the RMX reserves the same amount of resources whether an endpoint is an HD room or a lower resolution desktop. This is an extreme waste of resources.
  • 66. Slide 55 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. LifeSize Bridge Elite MCU has variety of models  LifeSize has only one size – 16 ports  Optional shared encoder for 48 participants Dynamic resource allocation No Mobile connectivity No real scalability Telepresence interoperability SVC + NetSense® Key Differentiators Life-size is fairly easy to compete with. Here on this slide, you see listed some of the of the key differentiators between our products and Life-size. If you really look and compare the products they do not really compare with any of the capabilities and features we have discussed here. It’s very easy to beat the capacity and show our capabilities are better all the way around. Having only one size MCU with 16 ports, makes it easy for us to compete with larger system designs. There is no mobile connectivity and they don’t have interoperability like we do. And of course there is no SVC or Net-sense type of capabilities.
  • 67. Slide 56 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Competitive Edge Scopia® Gateway for MS Lync RADVISION® Polycom Cisco-Tandberg H.323 Endpoints presence  HDX only OCS Only Native Telepresence connectivity Tandberg, Polycom, LifeSize TP   (Polycom only)  (Using MCU ports) Firewall Traversal    Encryption    Scalability Unlimited N/A Up to 6 Gateways MCU Virtual rooms presence  (Pool of MCUs)  (Specific MCU)  (Specific MCU) Auto attendant presence    Virtual MCU support    This slide summarizes the competitive edge we have with with Polycom and Cisco regarding our Lync Gateway. Basically since our solution offers transparent deployment into an existing Microsoft Lync environment, we provide a better value with better interoperability to support key features that a customer wants to have access to.
  • 68. Slide 57 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Frequently Asked Questions Now that we have discussed the competition, on the following pages, we will address some questions your customers may ask about Scopia® Infrastructure.
  • 69. Slide 58 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Question 1 of 8 When will Elite support H.264 High- Profile and 1080p60? There are no plans for supporting those on the current Elite platform. We are looking into possible options for supporting it in future products. When will Elite support H.264 High-Profile and 1080p60? There are no plans for supporting those on the current Elite platform. We are looking into possible options for supporting it in future products.
  • 70. Slide 59 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Question 2 of 8 Yes, Radvision SVC follows all the UCIF guidelines defined by UCIF for SVC implementation. Furthermore, Radvision’s CTO is the UCIF SVC chairman. Is the Radvision® SVC standard? Is the Radvision® SVC standard? Yes, Radvision’s SVC follows all the UCIF guidelines defined by UCIF for SVC implementation. Furthermore, Radvision’s CTO is the UCIF SVC chairman.
  • 71. Slide 60 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Question 3 of 8 Which video resolutions can Elite MCU encode / decode? Elite MCU can encode CIF, 4CIF*, 352p, 480p, 720p and 1080p video resolutions. Decoding is supported for these resolutions along with all the resolutions in-between. Which video resolutions can Elite MCU encode / decode? Elite MCU can encode CIF, 4CIF*, 352p, 480p, 720p and 1080p video resolutions. Decoding is supported for these resolutions along with all the resolutions in-between.
  • 72. Slide 61 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Question 4 of 8 Does Elite MCU support H.239 Transcoding? No! This one is currently not supported. We are looking into possible options for supporting it in future products. Does Elite MCU support H.239 Transcoding? No! This one is currently not supported. We are looking into possible options for supporting it in future products.
  • 73. Slide 62 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Question 5 of 8 Does Elite MCU have an official published API? No! All the Elite MCU functionalities are supported using the Scopia® Management API. This one can be purchased separately. Does Elite MCU have an official published API? No! All the Elite MCU functionalities are supported using the Scopia® Management API. This one can be purchased separately.
  • 74. Slide 63 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Question 6 of 8 Does the Gateway support native SIP? No! It only supports H.323. . Does the Gateway support native SIP? No! It only supports H.323
  • 75. Slide 64 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Question 7 of 8 Is the S40 Gateway JITC certified? No! Elite MCU is JITC certified and it was tested with our S40 Gateway. Is the S40 Gateway JITC certified? No! But the Elite MCU is JITC certified and it was tested with our S40 Gateway.
  • 76. Slide 65 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Question 8 of 8 Does Elite MCU support native TIP? No! Elite MCU does not support native TIP. For TIP connectivity, the Scopia® TIP Gateway is needed. Does Elite MCU support native TIP? No! Elite MCU does not support native TIP. For TIP connectivity, the Scopia® TIP Gateway is needed.
  • 77. Slide 66 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Key Messages for Scopia Infrastructure Interoperable with nearly any endpoint Easily deployed, flexible configurations, options Highly secure, field fixable and available Scalable and distributed User friendly, customizable, high value This slide summarizes key messages that you want to convey to customers to help you close a deal and position differentiation for our solutions. As we have discussed in this course our solutions: • Are highly interoperable with nearly any endpoint you might see being used today • Our MCUs are easily deployed with flexible configuration choices and options • Our MCUs can be integrated into a secure, field fixable and highly available system designs • Systems designs can be scalable and optimized with cascading deployments • Our systems ore the best value on the market today with regard to capabilities and pricing
  • 78. Slide 67 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Infrastucture System Design Case Study Let's take a closer look at a case study of system design that will illustrate a couple of key considerations.
  • 79. Slide 68 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. SVC Geographical Cascading Virtual MCU Let’s examine the design considerations based on an actual example for a large enterprise that has global offices In North America and Asia. This type of system design will benefit from geographical cascading that will create a virtual MCU. There is additional information presented about this type of cascading design in the Scopia® Management course as this product is a key part of the solution too. Let’s start by saying that we have office locations in Asia and we want to have this video conference with our Asian offices based from a North American office in New York. There are 2 options for this type of design. The first option would be if the company decides they want to have all the MCU deployments in New York. In that case all the client endpoints world wide will connect directly to the MCU deployment in New York. All the connections will need to connect over long distances from Asian offices to New York, so they will consume a lot of bandwidth as each office connects across the oceans to the deployment in New York. So here is what we really should do to overcome this bandwidth issue. That is to minimize this issue, we should actually deploy another MCU in a certain office in Asia in a cascading design to create a virtual MCU. Then the local endpoints in other Asian regional offices will connect to the MCU deployed there. When the first participant in the Asian office joins in the meeting, he will connect to a more local Asian MCU automatically. A meeting and virtual room meeting doesn’t care which MCU is being used because all of the attendees are dialing the same virtual room number which are properly integrated and supported by Scopia Management in our cascading design. So as soon as the first participant joins in the MCU, Scopia Management software that has been properly setup will create a cascading link between the MCUs. This cascading link will also be SVC
  • 80. based to help insure the conference performance is good. We are using the SVC benefits of our technology to keep the bandwidth quality optimized over long distances and the users in Asia will connect into the MCU setup in Asia and that entire group will be set up for the video meeting that will link to the North American infrastructure. This cascading design allows that we only consume one time bandwidth across the long distance connection from the Asian office with the MCU to NYC and that MCU compared with multiple endpoints each directly connected to New York from Asia, like in the scenario where there was only one MCU in NYC for the entire session attendees. The cascading design is important to keep in mind for this type of system network design—linking is set up by Scopia Management so this cascading is done transparently for the users. See the Radvision Scopia® Management course for additional details. From the dial plan perspective, everything is the same for all users no matter their location. That is the dial plan doesn’t care about locations and the video experience is maintained as a high-quality experience. Technically, the first MCU is a master CPU and the rest of the MCUs that are in the system design are slaves to the master MCU in NYC. Slave participants will see continuous presence coming from the master, and it will also include the active speaker. There is no option to remove the active speaker like you can with a personal video layout with the master MCU. However this is the small limitation of this type of design, and in reality not much of an issue. We only have one level for cascading; that is, only a master and a slave. So you cannot connect a slave MCU to another slave. But a master can cascade with up to 32 MCU slaves, so large systems can be supported.
  • 81. Slide 69 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Scopia® Infrastucture Summary Additional resources Now let's wrap up and summarize what we have discussed in this course.
  • 82. Slide 70 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved.  An MCU or Multipoint Control Unit hardware infrastructure is a bridge that interconnects video calls from multiple sources  For a multi-party video call with more that 2 people in different geographical locations, each person will dial into the MCU  We currently offer 4 different Scopia® Elite MCU models and 3 families of Gateway hardware infrastructure components  Scopia Infrastructure differentiation includes Flexible Resource Allocation, Increased capacity options, SVC, and NetSense®  You can now recognize the connectivity, cascading designs and the interoperability benefits of Scopia Infrastructure products  You should now understand when and how you can configure a la carte licensing and when to provide bundle pricing  You should be able to ask key questions to help you design, engineer and price an optimized system for your customers  Be able to analyze competitors’ offers and present the benefits that Scopia brings to you and your customer Course Summary You should now understand the components and key features of the Scopia® Infrastructure portfolio including the flexibility of our design such as our flexible resource allocation capabilities. You should recognize the connectivity configuration including cascading designs and the comprehensive interoperability benefits of Scopia Infrastructure products. You are now able to analyze competitors and help your customers understand the real value of our products vs. the limitations inherent in competitive offers and with this information you are now ready to present the benefits that Scopia brings to you and your customer.
  • 83. Slide 71 © 2012 Avaya, Inc. All rights reserved. Resources, Links, and Documentation Product Manager  Itay Reiner itay@avaya.com Please connect to the Avaya Sales Portal for Avaya associates or the Avaya Partner Portal and search for additional Radvision® information Radvision Web Site  http://www.radvision.com/Products/Infrastructure/MCUs/SCOPIA-Elite-5000-MCU/  http://www.radvision.com/Products/Infrastructure/Gateways/  Radvision Youtube Channel http://www.youtube.com/user/RADVISIONCorp The Radvision Partner Portal (RVSN4U)* also includes:  Sales Presentations, Datasheets, H.460 White Paper, Competitive Analysis  Release Notes, Product Manuals, FAQ *Please note: disconnect from Avaya network or VPN to access RVSN4U portal site Here is a list of the online tools we have developed to help you with further information research. You may find some useful information in the Radvision YouTube Channel. This slide provides also contact information for the product manager and links to the product information on the Radvision website and on the Partner Portal. You have now reached the end of this course. We wish you success in selling Scopia® Infrastructure.

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