Bringing Our Agenda To Washington

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  • Data retrieved from the National Association for Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies, www.nccrra.org.
  • Data retrieved from the Plan for CCDF Services in CT for period 10/1/09-9/30/11.
  • Bringing Our Agenda To Washington

    1. 1. Bringing a Prosperity Agenda to Washington Access to quality and affordable childcare is a pivotal piece of the puzzle.
    2. 2. Understanding the Issue… <ul><li>Parents are not able to work without access to quality and affordable child care. </li></ul><ul><li>The cost of child care in Connecticut contributes to the challenge of parents accessing child care. </li></ul><ul><li>Child Care assistance is only available to a select few. </li></ul><ul><li>Insufficient funds are budgeted to cover the demand for child care assistance. </li></ul>
    3. 3. The Demand is High… <ul><li>Connecticut </li></ul><ul><li>Number of residents: 3,502,309 </li></ul><ul><li>Children < 6yrs needing childcare, as parents work: 156,783 </li></ul><ul><li>Two-parent families , both in labor force: 104, 930 </li></ul><ul><li>Single-parent families, in the labor force: 51,835 </li></ul><ul><li>US </li></ul><ul><li>Number of residents: 301,621,159 </li></ul><ul><li>Children < 6ys needing childcare, as parents work: 14,498,715 </li></ul><ul><li>Two-parent families, both in the labor force: 8,8776,879 </li></ul><ul><li>Single-parent families, in the labor force: 5,721,863 </li></ul>
    4. 4. Child Care Demand… <ul><li>Percent of requests for care </li></ul><ul><li>Infant toddler care 49% </li></ul><ul><li>Preschool age care 32% </li></ul><ul><li>Before and after school 10% </li></ul>
    5. 5. Child Care Costs <ul><li>Connecticut </li></ul><ul><li>Average, annual fees paid for full-time center care for an infant: </li></ul><ul><li>$ 12,180. </li></ul><ul><li>Average, annual fees paid for full time center care for 4-year old $9,832. </li></ul><ul><li>Average, annual fees paid for full-time care for an infant in family child care home: $9, 055 </li></ul><ul><li>Average, annual fees paid for full time care for a four year old in a family child care home: $ 8,659. </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>$4,560-$15,896 </li></ul><ul><li>$4,056-$11,678 </li></ul><ul><li>$3,582-$10,324 </li></ul><ul><li>$3,380-$9,805 </li></ul>
    6. 6. Income versus Cost <ul><li>Median annual income of married-couple families with children under 18: $102,985. </li></ul><ul><li>Cost of full time care for an infant in a center, as a percent of median income of married couple families with children under 18: 12%. </li></ul><ul><li>Median annual family income of a single parent (female-headed) with children under 18: $30,036. </li></ul><ul><li>Cost of full-time care for an infant in a center, as a percent of median income for single parent (female-headed) families with children under 18: 41%. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Who is receiving assistance? <ul><li>Number of families served 6,200 </li></ul><ul><li>Number of child served 9,700 </li></ul><ul><li>Number of child care provider participating 10,447 </li></ul><ul><li>Percent of children receiving assistance in licensed family child care centers/homes 53% </li></ul><ul><li>Percent of children receiving subsidy in relative care 30% </li></ul><ul><li>Percent of children receiving subsidy in unregulated care is 13% </li></ul>
    8. 8. Key Federal Elements <ul><li>Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG/F), currently up for reauthorization provides funding to state to support child care assistance and quality improvements. </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), currently up for reauthorization in Congress. TANF funds can also be used to supplement the CCDBF funds for child care assistance. </li></ul><ul><li>Head Start and Early Head Start funds go directly from the federal government to local communities to fund child care services. </li></ul><ul><li>American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009(ARRA) provided CT with $13,685,624 in funding for child care. </li></ul>
    9. 9. Key Elements in Connecticut <ul><li>Lead agency overseeing childcare assistance is the Department of Social Services. </li></ul><ul><li>State Department of Education has a key role in the oversight of early care and education. </li></ul><ul><li>The Early Childhood Education Cabinet is the designated State Advisory Council. </li></ul><ul><li>Recent legislation has proposed an Office of Early Care Planning and Coordination. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Your Role… <ul><li>Keep informed. </li></ul><ul><li>Connect with resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Know the agenda of collaborators. </li></ul><ul><li>Are your interests represented? </li></ul><ul><li>Determine the extent to which you are able to participate in advocacy for increased opportunities for early care and education for all. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Connecting with Resources <ul><li>Connecticut </li></ul><ul><li>CAHS: Sherry Linton, [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>The Early Childhood Alliance </li></ul><ul><li>Connecticut Parent Power </li></ul><ul><li>Connecticut Voices for Children </li></ul><ul><li>National </li></ul><ul><li>National Women’s Law Center </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-K Now </li></ul><ul><li>National Head Start Association </li></ul>
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