Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Using A Calculator 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Using A Calculator 1

  • 12,453 views
Published

Presenation originally wrtten to support the teaching of OCR GCSE Mathematics Module 6, chapter 1: Using a calculator effectively. …

Presenation originally wrtten to support the teaching of OCR GCSE Mathematics Module 6, chapter 1: Using a calculator effectively.

BIDMAS/BODMAS (PEMDAS) and negative numbers.

Published in Education , Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
12,453
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
67
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • This presentation was adapted from one that I used with my class. There is also a set of work cards, designed for students to use in groups as they work on a chapter. All the resources are available to download via www.morethanmaths.com/m6

Transcript

  • 1. We Are Learning:
    • How some of the basic function keys on a scientific calculator work
    • How to use a calculator to calculate with brackets and negative numbers
    • (brackets are also known as parentheses)
  • 2. Important Advice:
    • Different makes and models of calculator have different designs of keys. Yours might not look like the examples in this presentation.
    • Ask your teacher for advice about
    • how your calculator works.
    • This presentation was made for students in the United Kingdom. I’ve tried to include alternative terms for students from outside the UK –sorry if there are any problems!
  • 3. What Type of Calculator?
    • The first thing that you need to do is work out what type of calculator you are using.
      • Try typing this into your calculator:
      • What answer does your calculator give?
      • In what order has it done the calculation?
    3 + 2 x 5 =
  • 4. Basic Calculators
    • Most non-scientific calculators are Left to Right calculators
    • This means that the calculator does the calculation in the order that the keys are pressed
  • 5. Scientific Calculators
    • Most scientific calculators are BIDMAS calculators (Some people call this BODMAS OR PEMDAS )
    • This means that the calculator follows these rules for deciding the order for the steps in a calculation:
    • (1) Brackets (another name for parentheses)
    • (2) Indices (another name for powers or exponents)
    • (3) Division and
    • Multiplication
    • (4) Addition and
    • Subtraction
  • 6. Brackets
    • You can use brackets on your calculator
    • Most scientific calculators have brackets keys. Can you find them on your calculator?
    • Try this calculation:
    • What do you notice?
    3 + ( 2 x 5 = )
  • 7. Challenge Yourself
    • Here are some calculations and answers. Some are correct, but some need brackets. Can you put the brackets in the correct places?
      • (a) 3 + 6 x 5 = 45
      • (b) 3 + 6 x 5 = 33
      • (c) 5 + 3 x 6 - 2 = 21
      • (d) 5 + 3 x 6 - 2 = 32
      • (e) 5 + 3 x 6 - 2 = 46
    • Use your BIDMAS calculator to help you check the answers!
  • 8. Challenge Yourself: Answers
    • How many did you get right?
    • (a) ( 3 + 6 ) x 5 = 45
      • (b) 3 + 6 x 5 = 33
    • In (b), you can put brackets around the 6 x 5, but you don’t really need them.
      • (c) 5 + ( 3 x 6 ) - 2 = 21
      • (d) ( 5 + 3 ) x ( 6 - 2 ) = 32
      • (e) ( 5 + 3 ) x 6 - 2 = 46
  • 9. Negative Numbers
    • Your calculator should have one of these buttons:
    • Can you find this on your calculator?
    (-) +/-
  • 10. Negative Numbers
    • Let’s start with the first one. (If your calculator doesn’t have this type of button, skip this slide.)
    • Try pushing these keys:
    • What do you see on the display?
    • What happens if you use a different number instead of 5?
    • Can you work out what the (-) key does?
    (-) 5
  • 11. Negative Numbers
    • Now lets try the other type of button. Try pushing these keys:
    • What do you see on the calculator display?
    • What do you think the +/- key does?
    6 +/-
  • 12. Negative Numbers
    • Now try this:
    • Keep pushing the +/- key a few more times.
    • What happens?
    • What happens if you use a different number instead of 6?
    • What does the +/- key do?
    6 +/- +/-
  • 13. Challenge Yourself:
    • Can you work these out on your calculator?
    • (a) -2 + 7
    • (b) -5 x -6
    • (c) -30 ÷ 5
    • (d) 3 + 2 x -4
    • (e) -10 + -6 - -8
  • 14. Challenge Yourself: Answers
    • How many correct answers did you get?
    • (a) -2 + 7 = 5
    • (b) -5 x -6 = 30
    • (c) -30 ÷ 5 = -6
    • (d) 3 + 2 x -4 = -5
    • (e) -10 + -6 - -8 = -8
  • 15. Summary:
    • You should know that most scientific calculators follow the rules of BIDMAS (also called BODMAS or PEMDAS)
    • You should be able to use the brackets (or parentheses) keys on your calculator
    • You should be able to calculate using negative numbers