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  • Moores Furniture Group is a leading manufacturer of kitchen and bathroom furniture in the UK,supplying furniture into contract markets for social housing developments and private builds. With a number of retail brands,sold in independent retailers throughout the UK, Moores also supply furniture for builders merchants and large DIY stores. In recognition of Moores Furniture’s continuing, direct and significant supply of goods and services to the Royal Households of the Queen over a minimum period of five consecutive years, Moores were granted the Royal Warrant of Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth IIin 1995.Moores is part of US based Masco Corporation which is, with approximately 6,000 shareholders and 32,500 employees, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of products for home improvement and new home construction markets. The ethos at Masco, and indeed Moores, is epitomised by the culture underpinned by the following approach: “Do not be satisfied with average performance, strive for excellence. If you cannotgive your customers a better value and a better product, do not sell the product.”The implementation of sustainability policies and procedures has impacted the new build and refurbishment property sectors and, in response to an element of confusion in the marketplace, Moores has developed this presentation which captures the key requirements.In particular, this presentation will look at the sustainability of kitchens and the role played by manufactures in helping home builders achieve CSH credits as well as highlighting best practice measures which go over and above current sustainability standards.
  • Sustainability is about recognising and addressing the negative impact our short and medium term resource usage will have upon future generations. The concept covers environmental, economic and social dimensions. TheStern Review of Climate Change (2006), considered a defining paper, highlighted the overwhelming body of scientific evidence showing that climate change is a serious and urgent issue. The report outlined that, based on 2004 figures, over a quarter of the UK’s carbon dioxide emissions came from the energy used to heat, light and run domestic homes. The Government responded with the inception of the Climate Change Act (2008) which commits the UK to a 34% reduction on 1990 emission levels by 2020 and an 80% reduction by 2050. The housing sector therefore has a significant role to play is meeting these targets and initiatives such EcoHomes, Code for Sustainable Homes, BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment and carbon footprinting have all been introduced to ensure that new build and refurbishment projects are designed and delivered sustainably.
  • Until the launch of EcoHomes, the Building Regulations were the only consistent and significant guidance addressing environmental issues. However, as sustainability was catapulted up the political agenda, other more specific initiatives emerged which sought to intorduce more challenging targets. The EcoHomes rating system, in recognising that the construction and use of our homes has a range of environmental impacts, was launched to provide a framework for integrating sustainability performance standards into the design of a home. Improving design and sustainability in home building helps to reduce the impact on the planet’s resources, reducing waste and carbon emissions. The rationale behind EcoHomes was that well designed, sustainable homes, as well as environmental benefits, also offer practical and affordable places where people want to live, work and enjoy life.  
  • Each of the main credit categories is broken down into a series of sub-categories which each carry a maximum number of credits. For example, Health and Wellbeing has the following sub-categories and credits available:HEA1 – Daylighting: 3 creditsHEA2 – Sound Insulation: 4 creditsHEA3 – Private Space: 1 credit. The energy category has the most sub-categories (6) and the MAT1 sub-category of Materials carries the most available credits (16). Within the BRE’s EcoHomes (2006) guidance, the following information is provided for each sub-category:Credits availableAimCredit requirementsApplicabilityMain Information to be Provided by the DeveloperGuidanceSupplementary GuidanceFurther InformationBackgroundReferences.
  • Although EcoHomes marked a significant step for the sustainability movement, it was not without problems and, in 2007; in England, Wales and Northern Ireland,it was superseded by the Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH). The Government’s vision is that CSH, which provides a step change in sustainable building practice, will play a key role in enabling the UK to build a future housing stock which both meets our needs and protects the environment. The CSH, prepared by the Government in close working consultation with the BRE and Construction Industry Research and Information Association, and through consultation with a Senior Steering Group consisting of Government, industry and NGO representatives, is intended to be a single national standard to guide industry in the design and construction of sustainable homes.
  • BENEFITS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT● Reduced greenhouse gas emissions:The CSH sets minimum standards for energy efficiency at each level and this contributes towards a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions which reduces the threat from climate change.● Better adaptation to climate change: With minimum standards for water efficiency at each level of the CSH, and other measures in the CSH (i.e. better management of surface water run-off) the future housing stock will be better adapted to cope with the impacts of climate change which are already inevitable.● Reduced impact on the environment overall: Inclusion of measures which, for example, promote the use of less polluting materials, and encourage household recycling, will ensure that our future housing stock has fewer negative impacts overall on the environment.BENEFITS FOR HOME BUILDERS● A mark of quality: Increasing media attention and public concern over the environment has driven demand for sustainable products and services. The CSH can be used by home builders to demonstrate the sustainability performance of their homes, and to differentiate themselves from their competitors.● Regulatory certainty: The levels of performance for energy efficiency indicate the future direction of building regulations, bringing greater regulatory certainty for home builders, and acting as a guide to support effective business and investment planning.● Flexibility: The CSH is based on performance which means it sets levels for sustainability performance against each element but does not prescribe how to achieve each level. Home builders can innovate to find cost-effective solutions to meet and exceed minimum requirements.BENEFITS FOR SOCIAL HOUSING PROVIDERS● Lower running costs: Homes built to CSH standards minimise running costs through greater energy and water efficiency. This helps to reduce fuel poverty.● Improved comfort and satisfaction: Homes built to the CSH will enhance the comfort and satisfaction of tenants. Costs may be saved in dealing with complaints.● Raised sustainability credentials: The CSH will enable social housing providers to demonstrate their sustainability credentials to the public, tenants and funding bodies.BENEFITS FOR CONSUMERS● Assisting choice: The CSH provides valuable information to homebuyers on the sustainability performance of different homes, assisting them in their choice of a new home.● Reducing environmental ‘footprint’: By asking for a new home which meets the CSH standard, consumers will be able to encourage industry to build more sustainable homes, and reduce their own ‘footprint’ on the environment.● Lower running costs: Homes built to CSH standards minimise running costs through greater energy and water efficiency. This helps to reduce fuel poverty.● Improved well-being: Homes built to CSH standards offer a more pleasant and healthy place to live, for example with more natural light, and adaptability for future needs.
  • The CSH is now considered the de facto standard for all new home building. This is, in part, driven by the Local Development Framework’s where local authorities will stipulate that a percentage of any private development will be sought for affordable housing purposes. Other drivers include the Government’s commitment to tightening Building Regulations, the ‘green’ movement within society, increasing domestic fuels costs, availability of feed-in-tariff and competition within the housing market.If the UK is to build the homes required, then by 2050, as much as one-third of the total housing stock will have been built between now and then (Code for Sustainable Homes: A step-change in sustainable home building practice, Dec 2006). Current home building plans therefore offer an important opportunity to incorporate high standards of sustainability into the homes to be used in the future. The CSH will play a pivotal role in enabling the UK to seize this opportunity, and to build a future housing stock which both meets housing needs and protects the environment.
  • The CSH uses a sustainable rating system indicated by ‘stars’ to communicate the overall sustainability performance of a home. A home can achieve a rating from one to six stars, depending on the extent to which it has achieved code standards.The CSH is progressively introducing the star rating system from 2006 to 2016. Ratings run from the minimum of 1 Star, where a house is 10 per cent more efficient than that required by the 2006 Building Regulations standard, to a completely zero carbon home which is rated as 6 Stars. Designers are required to achieve increasingly stringent criteria to reach each level of the code's requirements.
  • The key design categories incorporated within the CSH are:Energy and Carbon Dioxide Emissions– Operational Energy and the resulting emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphereWater – the consumption of potable water from the public supply system or other ground water resourcesMaterials – the embodied environmental impacts of construction materials for key construction elementsSurface Water Run-off – the change in surface water run-off patterns as a result of the development.Waste – waste generated as a result of the construction process and facilities encouraging the recycling of domestic waste in the homePollution – pollution resulting from the operation of the dwellingHealth and Well being – the effect that the dwelling’s design and indoor environment has on its occupantsManagement – steps that have been taken to allow management of environmental impacts in the construction and operation of the homeEcology – the impact of the dwelling on the local eco-system, biodiversity and land use to achieve any of the Code’s ratings it will be necessary to meet the requirements covering a number of these parameters
  • CSH assessments are carried out in two stages: The first assessment is carried out at the design stage and the second after the construction of the dwelling when the final CSH certificate is issued.Formal assessment of dwellings using the CSH may only be carried out using licensed and registered individuals who are qualified ‘competent persons’ for the purpose of carrying out the CSH assessments.
  • The Homes and Communities Agency (HCA), the national housing and regeneration agency for England, requires houses to meet CSH Level 3 in order to qualify for their 2011-15 funding framework. It was anticipated that the minimum requirement set out by the HCA would have been CSH Level 4and, although this has not materialised, there is a statement suggesting that “higher standards than the HCA’s requirements will be advantaged in the assessment process”,subject to offering good value for money. Despite sustainability standards for the new funding regime remaining at CSH Level 3, Local Authorities can specify the required CSH standards to be met (typically between level 3 and level 6) as a condition of planning approval for private home builders.
  • The sustainability rating which a home achieves represents its overall performance across the nine Code design categories. Minimum standards exist for a number of categories. These must be achieved to gain a one star sustainability rating. Energy efficiency and Water efficiency categories also have minimum standards that must be achieved at every level of the Code for Sustainable Homes, recognising their importance to the sustainability of any home. Apart from the minimum requirements, the Code for Sustainable Homes is completely flexible; developers can choose which and how many standards they implement to obtain the ‘points’ under the Code in order to achieve a higher sustainability rating.There is a common misconception that achieving a higher CSH rating requires the installation of expensive and complex added value features. However, this is not the case and by making simple adjustments to the specification of core elements of the design, the quality of the home can improve for little or no additional cost and a higher CSH rating can be achieved.
  • Moores has been able to demonstrate the achievement Energy efficient appliancesHome appliances (i.e. washing machines, tumble dryers and refrigerators) account for a significant proportion ofhousehold CO2 emissions, so the installation of energy efficient productswill cost less to run and help lower CO2 emissions. Tap with flow restrictorWater, our most precious resource, is more and more in demand. As water usage and its costs continue to rise, architects, planners andenvironmentalists are searching for new alternatives. Fitting a water restrictor allows you to control the amount of water a tap uses. Water usage is determined by water pressure and the size of valve in the tap so if there is particularly high pressure a tap could be delivering many unnecessary litres of water per minute. Taps with flow restrictors limit the of volume of litres of water per minute up to a specified pressure. FSC / PEFCForest Stewardship Council certified products have been responsibly managed from the forest right through to the kitchen. Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) is an independent, non-profit, non-governmental organisation which promotes sustainably managed forests. The PEFC certification provides assurance that products and organisations promote the sustainable management of forests.Waste separation binRecycling saves energy, reduces raw material extraction and combats climate change. In order to increase the ease, and therefore propensity to recycle, waste separation bins can be incorporate into a kitchen design. A waste separation bin typically houses 3 compartments and total capacity of 40 litres.Kitchen Furniture BrochureProviding a simple user guide can be an important tool in supporting tenants / occupants to embrace the features within their kitchen. The user guide should provide information relevant to the ‘non-technical’ tenant/ occupant on the operation and environmental performance of their home, together with information that the user guide is available in alternative accessible formats
  • With the HCA contending that “higher standards than the HCA’s requirements will be advantaged in the assessment process”, home builders may be able to leverage further benefits for installing kitchens which exceed the CSH standards.
  • In August 2010, while launching the Energy Technologies Institute, Government’s Chief Construction Adviser Paul Morrell, from the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills, stated the need to upgrade 12,500 homes a week to hit the government's target of achieving an 80% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050 (Climate Change Act, 2008). To date, much of the government and industry effort has been directed at establishing how to reduce energy consumption in our homes. Unfortunately, much of the UK's existing housing stock is old, very inefficient in terms of energy consumption, and will not be replaced within the foreseeable future. The challenge for Government and industry is therefore to fund and deliver a nationwide refurbishment programme which meets the sustainability objectives. The recently launched BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment, which complements CSH, addresses the sustainability challenges for refurbishment projects within existing homes.
  • The standard evaluates the environmental credentials of refurbishment projectsbased upon BREEAM's UKAS accredited certification standards. Properties are measured against such criteria as energy and water use, and then given a score out of 100 and a rating ranging from ‘pass' to ‘outstanding'. Following initial stakeholder workshops, a six-month pilot programme tested the method in properties of varying types and ages, ranging from apartments to traditional houses.  The pilot followed a similar approach to the CSH in evaluating the key sustainability measures that relate to housing. These issues were tuned to the needs of existing housing but still remain at a level that aims to maximise sustainability. Some of the key differences in the approach that were adopted in the pilot version include:Recognising the limited influences on site issues such as water, transport and ecologyRecognising the varying baselines of existing stock from pre 1900’s to post 2002Providing greater differentiation in the Green Guide rating for refurbishment to recognise the small changes made in the refurbishmentEnsuring refurbishment is not penalised by providing flexibility on issues which are hard to improve such as daylighting and sound insulationConsidering future climate change adaptation issues such as flooding and overheating.
  • In the context of this presentation, carbon footprint is a measure of the impact businessactivities have on the environment, and in particular climate change. It relates to the amount of greenhouse gases produced by a business on a day-to-day basis and would include activities such as burning fossil fuels for electricity, heating and transportation.The carbon footprint is a measurement of all greenhouse gases produced by an organisation and has units of tonnes (or kg) of carbon dioxide equivalent.A carbon footprint is made up of the sum of two parts: 1. The primary footprint is a measure of the direct emissions of CO2 from the burning of fossil fuels including domestic energy consumption and transportation (e.g. car and plane). An organisation has direct control over these. 2. The secondary footprint is a measure of the indirect CO2 emissions from the whole lifecycle of productsused - those associated with their manufacture and eventual breakdown.
  • With initiatives such as the CSH and BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment focusing specifically on sustainability practices within the new build and refurbishment of homes, there is an increasing requirement for manufacturers to measure the ‘carbon footprint’ of individual products. Itis expected that future iterations of the CSH will begin to take a more holistic approach where the environmental impact of materials will be considered and credits awarded for the use of resources that are more sustainable. This poses a challenge for manufactures with those able to measure product carbon footprints leveraging fist mover advantage.
  • PAS 2050 is a publicly available specification for assessing product life cycle GHG emissions, prepared by BSI British Standards and co-sponsored by the Carbon Trust and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). PAS 2050 is an independent standard which can be applied to manufacturers. The scope of PAS 2050 is very broad as it was designed to be applicable to a wide range of products. Many organisations and industries use PAS 2050 as a best practice framework for developing more bespoke product carbon footprint assessment methodologies.
  • The Furniture Industry Research Association (FIRA) was established over 60 years ago by the furniture industry for the industry. FIRAprovides a wide range of independent expert services that are not only dedicated to the global furniture supply chain, but also to furniture consumers, and continues safeguarding the industry through managing the Association's membership activity. Within the context of sustainable homes, a best practice approach to specifying furniture will ensure manufacturers actively use FIRA’s furniturefootprinter: a carbon footprint calculator,developed in partnership with leading environmental consultants Best Foot Forward,for the furniture industry. The online toolallows all parties within the furniture supply chain to quickly and easily generate and compare carbon footprints for their businesses and products.
  • Furniture footprinter allows firms to accurately measure the environmental impact of their products, processes or organisations.The website-based tool features a comprehensive and constantly updated database that allows companies to input specific details such as materials and energy costs to calculate carbon footprint. Organisations areable to identify potential troublespots with a view to lowering their environmental impact and the tool also provides an important benchmarking tool.
  • Examples of a best practice activities currently employed within kitchen furniture manufacturers which span the product lifecycle include: Raw MaterialsProcurement policy and promotes the procurement of sustainable raw materialsFSC and PEFC certificationMFC material that contain a high proportion of recycled materialOrganisation’s own waste sent back to the manufacturer for recycling85% of raw carcase materials sourced locally (within 100 miles of factory) ManufactureChallenging environmental objectives and targets for:Energy and water consumptionWaste to landfillRecycled materialFuel usageAccredited with BS EN ISO 14001:2004FISP (Furniture Industry Sustainability Programme) memberConsumer UseWater wastageShallow sinkFlow restrictor tap for reduced water usageA or A+ rated appliances for the maximum efficiencyFinishing100% recyclable handlesLow voltage LED lightingWaste disposal units and waste separation binsFittingDeploy tools to allow worktop to be removed without damaging the wall tilesFactory systems optimised to minimise wasteFactory is heated by renewable (i.e. biomass waste boilers)Disposal / Recyling‘Waste hierarchy’ focused on Eliminate, Reduce, Re-use, Recycle / Recovery and DisposalOptimisation systems for panel (Melamine Faced Chipboard and Medium Density Fibreboard)Worktop cutting programmes to reduce production wasteOut of specification / damaged panels cut down / re-edged for reuseRecycled materials where possible / appropriate, with excess waste wood recycled back into chipboardRecycling schemes for paper, cardboard, metal, plastic, ink cartridges, batteries, aerosol cans and waste oil MFC and worktop waste returned to board manufacturer for recyclingWood waste incinerated if biomass waste boilers in use MDF, PVC foil and MFC panels with 3mm lipping sent to fuel power stationsWRAPInternal events / programmes
  • This presentation has demonstrated that achieving CSH credits does not necessarily have to involve additional cost and complicated amends to the house design. Small, cost effective changes to kitchen specifications can, for example, be made which improve the quality at the same time as gaining CSH credits. By working in collaboration with a leading kitchen manufacturer, developers and landlords can leverage significant benefits by developing a bespoke CSH specification kitchen. A common feature across both the CSH and BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment standard is the increasing focus on product carbon footprints. Manufacturers will have to consider more innovative, sustainable approaches to designing, developing, distributing, installing and disposing of products. Again, developers and landlords should be reviewing the sustainability credentials of their supply chain partners, such as kitchen manufacturers, to ensure that they have robust systems and processes in place to derive genuine reductions in the carbon footprint.  With a robust knowledge of the sustainability agenda, Moores has been able to design and develop a best practice kitchen range which provides developers and landlords with a kitchen that reduces, re-uses, recycles and is responsibly sourced. The ReAction kitchen range has been reviewed by a BREEAM Code for Sustainable Homes Assessor and can contribute to up to 17 credits for the Code for the Sustainable Homes. This range is the current benchmark for sustainable kitchens within the industry.
  • This presentation has demonstrated that achieving CSH credits does not necessarily have to involve additional cost and complicated amends to the house design. Small, cost effective changes to kitchen specifications can, for example, be made which improve the quality at the same time as gaining CSH credits. By working in collaboration with a leading kitchen manufacturer, developers and landlords can leverage significant benefits by developing a bespoke CSH specification kitchen. A common feature across both the CSH and BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment standard is the increasing focus on product carbon footprints. Manufacturers will have to consider more innovative, sustainable approaches to designing, developing, distributing, installing and disposing of products. Again, developers and landlords should be reviewing the sustainability credentials of their supply chain partners, such as kitchen manufacturers, to ensure that they have robust systems and processes in place to derive genuine reductions in the carbon footprint.  With a robust knowledge of the sustainability agenda, Moores has been able to design and develop a best practice kitchen range which provides developers and landlords with a kitchen that reduces, re-uses, recycles and is responsibly sourced. The ReAction kitchen range has been reviewed by a BREEAM Code for Sustainable Homes Assessor and can contribute to up to 17 credits for the Code for the Sustainable Homes. This range is the current benchmark for sustainable kitchens within the industry.

Sustainability presentation Sustainability presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Sustainability within the Furniture Industry 28th September 2011 Insert QR CODE HEREMaking spaces special
  • Agenda Introduction to Moores Background to Sustainability EcoHomes Code for Sustainable Homes BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment Carbon Footprinting Conclusions xxxx Making spaces special 2
  • Introduction to MooresMaking spaces special
  • Introduction to Moores Furniture Group Leading manufacturer and installer of kitchen and bathroom furniture in the UK Supply furniture into contract markets for social housing developments and private builds Operate a number of retail brands which are sold in independent retailers throughout the UK Introduction to Moores Supply furniture for builders merchants and large DIY stores Established in 1947, joining Masco Corporation in 1996 Based on 30 acres in Wetherby, West Yorkshire Factory extends over nearly 600,000 square feet 630 employees Granted the Royal Warrant of Appointment to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 1995 Making spaces special 4
  • Background to SustainabilityMaking spaces special
  • Background to Sustainability The Stern Review of Climate Change (2006) Climate Change Act (2008) EcoHomes Code for Sustainable Homes BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment Carbon Footprinting – PAS 2050:2008 Sustainability – Furniture Industry Research Association furniturefootprinter Making spaces special 6
  • EcoHomesMaking spaces special
  • EcoHomes Launched in 2000 Over 200,000 homes certified since its launch Introduced sustainability principles into the domestic property sector Applicable to new private and social housing schemes, as well as major refurbishment projects Environmental rating scheme has undergone four major revisions EcoHomes – Most recent in 2006 which increased energy efficiency, standards in line with revised Building Regulations Making spaces special 8
  • EcoHomes Under the scheme, credits are given for standards reached in the following areas: – Energy – Transport – Pollution – Materials – Water – Land use and ecology – Health and Wellbeing – Management Weighting system used to rate property as Pass, Good, Very EcoHomes Good, or Excellent Good rating mandatory for social housing in 2003 Very Good rating from 2005 Making spaces special 9
  • Code for Sustainable HomesMaking spaces special
  • Introduction to Code for Sustainable Homes Launched in 2007 to supersede EcoHomes Independently accredited, Government-endorsed, environmental assessment method for rating and certifying the performance of Code for Sustainable Homes new homes Embeds elements of EcoHomes as well as incorporating improvements such as: – Minimum standards for energy and water efficiency – Simplified points system – Increased scope of sustainability measures. Drives continuous improvement, greater innovation and exemplary achievement in sustainable home building Prepares the home building industry for future Building Regulation changes – Implemented to ensure all new build homes are zero carbon by 2016 Making spaces special 11
  • Benefits of Code for Sustainable Homes Benefits of CSH: What are the benefits? Making spaces special 12
  • Requirements Code for Sustainable Homes Mandatory for all new social housing and private housing developments Planning applications accompanied by Design Stage Report or „Pre assessment estimator‟ which: What are the requirements? – Indicate likely rating to be achieved under a formal assessment – Demonstrate that the proposed home(s) will meet the minimum CSH Level as stipulated by the local authority and / or the HCA Failure to do so could result in an application being refused permission Making spaces special 13
  • The Code for Sustainable Homes RatingSystem Uses a sustainability rating system – indicated by „stars‟, to communicate the overall sustainability performance of a home A home achieves a sustainability rating which reflects the extent to which it has achieved CSH standards – One star ( ) is the entry level – above the level of the Building Regulations – Six stars ( ) is the highest level – reflecting exemplar development in sustainability terms Apart from the minimum requirements the CSH is completely The rating system flexible – Developers can choose which and how many standards they implement to obtain „points‟ under the Code in order to achieve a higher sustainability rating – It is therefore possible to achieve an overall level of between zero and six depending on the mandatory standards and proportion of flexible standards achieved Making spaces special 14
  • The Code for Sustainable Homes RatingSystem The sustainability rating which a home achieves represents its overall performance across the nine Code design categories. The table below shows the nine design categories of nine categories of environmental impact and issues: The rating system (M) denotes issues with mandatory elements. Making spaces special 15
  • The Code for Sustainable Homes AssessmentProcess Conducted by BRE accredited independent assessors Initial design stage  Post-completion check assessment – Carried out on a sample basis – Only carried out on each home type – Verify the rating based on: within any development The assessment process o Design stage review – Review documentary evidence and o Confirmation of compliance commitments o Site records and visual inspection – Recommend a sustainability rating – Final Code certificate of compliance issued – Issue an interim Code certificate of compliance o Overall sustainability rating for home o Breakdown of how rating is achieved Making spaces special 16
  • Current Code for Sustainable HomesRequirements HCA announced (in March 2011) its £4.5bn Affordable Homes Framework 2011-15 – To qualify for funding, homes will have to meet CSH Level 3 – Demonstrating a “higher standards than the HCA‟s requirements will be advantaged in the assessment process” The current requirements – Local Authorities require CSH Level 3 (and sometimes higher) for planning permission “New Interim Funding Design and Sustainability Standards for London” requires CSH Level 4 Government keen to deliver a localised approach to the CSH Making spaces special 17
  • Code for Sustainable Homes Kitchens Code for Sustainable Homes - Kitchens The challenge for home builders is: – To comply with mandatory elements – To obtain additional „points‟ within the flexible elements A higher CSH rating does not require the installation of expensive and complex added value features Simple adjustments to the design specification can improve the rating with little or no additional cost A well-planned kitchen can make a significant contribution towards gaining credits Making spaces special 18
  • Code for Sustainable Homes Kitchens Code for Sustainable Homes - Kitchens Specification of a sustainable kitchen can achieve up to 17 credits (from the 107 available) towards the CSH rating The credits, as approved by a BREEAM CSH Assessor, can be gained from the following features: Feature Issue ID Potential Credit Contribution Energy Efficient Appliances ENE5 2 Tap with Flow Restrictor WAT1 5 FSC / PEFC Materials MAT3 3 Waste Separation Bin WAS1 4 Kitchen Furniture Brochure MAN1 3 Making spaces special 19
  • Code for Sustainable Homes Best PracticeKitchens Code for Sustainable Homes - Kitchens Cabinets – BRE whole life costing of 20 years – MFC (melamine-faced chipboard) contains a high proportion of recycled material – ABS (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) edging an environmentally friendly alternative to PVC – Low formaldehyde E1 grade Water wastage – Shallow bowl sink – Flow restrictor tap for reduced water usage Finishing – 100% recyclable handles – Low voltage LED lighting Fitting – Deploy tools to allow worktop to be removed without damaging the wall tiles Making spaces special 20
  • BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment SchemeMaking spaces special
  • BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment SchemeBREEAM Domestic Refurbishment Scheme Refurbishment certification scheme launched in October 2011 Sets a new standard for sustainable refurbishment by promoting: – Moving towards an 80% reduction in CO2 – Impacts on overheating and health – Flood resilience – Embodied impacts of materials – Recycling of refurbishment waste – Water efficiency – Health, security and fire – Good project management and design. Sits alongside the CSH Development informed by the National Refurbishment Centre Piloted on 200 properties by Code for Sustainable Home assessors Making spaces special 22
  • BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment SchemeBREEAM Domestic Refurbishment Scheme Evaluates environmental credentials of refurbishment projects based upon BREEAMs UKAS accredited certification standards Properties measured against specific criteria and then given a score out of 100 Developed as a tool for designers, financiers, policy makers, developers, planning authorities and landlords BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment will give confidence that housing refurbishment meets best environmental practice by – Saving carbon, water and waste – Being adaptable to climate change – Providing a healthy indoor environment for occupants Making spaces special 23
  • Carbon FootprintingMaking spaces special
  • Introduction to Carbon Footprint The „Carbon footprint‟ is the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions caused by: – A particular activity (i.e. manufacturing and installing kitchens) – An organisation as a whole It includes the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), together with families of gases including hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs) Carbon Footprint Understanding emissions, and where they come from, is necessary in order to reduce them Carbon footprint analysis traditionally focused on an organisation‟s own emissions Increasingly concerned with emissions across their entire supply chain Making spaces special 25
  • Product Carbon Footprint „Product carbon footprint‟ refers to the GHG emissions of a product across its life cycle as per the B2C process map below Product Carbon Footprint Measuring product carbon footprint across their full life cycle is a powerful way for organisations to collect the info required to: – Reduce GHG emissions – Identify cost savings opportunities – Incorporate emissions impact into decision making on suppliers, materials, product design, manufacturing processes, etc – Demonstrate environmental/corporate responsibility leadership – Meet customer demands for information on product carbon footprints – Differentiate and meet demands from „green‟ consumers. Making spaces special 26
  • Product Carbon Footprint: PAS2050 Publicly available specification for assessing product life cycle GHG emissions Prepared by BSI British Standards co-sponsored by – Carbon Trust Product Carbon Footprint – Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) Independent standard which can be applied to manufacturers Broad scope as it was designed to be applicable to a wide range of products Many organisations and industries use PAS 2050 as a best practice framework for developing more bespoke product carbon footprint assessment methodologies Making spaces special 27
  • Product Carbon Footprint Best Practice forKitchens Furniture Industry Research Association developed the furniturefootprinter Leading carbon footprint calculator for furniture industry Provides analysis and accounting data to enable manufacturers Best Practice for kitchens to work with their supply chain reduce their carbon footprints The furniturefootprinter: – Calculates the carbon and ecological footprints of products, processes, projects and companies – Compares the impacts of different product or project options – Identifies areas where significant improvements can be made – Creates easy to understand reports and charts – Helps to raise employee awareness – Demonstrates continuous improvement – Stores your data and is continuously updated to reflect the latest footprint figures. Making spaces special 28
  • Product Carbon Footprint Best Practice forKitchens The furniturefootprinter is fully compliant with ISO 14064-1 which, sets out how organisations should monitor and quantify their emissions The protocol takes the approach of identifying emissions by scope„: Best Practice for kitchens – Scope 1 - direct usage on site – Scope 2 - emissions caused by power or energy consumption but emitted off site – Scope 3 - a much wider category of indirect emissions such as transport or emissions from the supply chain. As well as reporting by operational area the furniturefootprinter also reports by Scope for simple standard compliant reporting Making spaces special 29
  • Product Carbon Footprint Best Practice forKitchens Best Practice for kitchens Making spaces special 30
  • ConclusionsMaking spaces special
  • Summary UK Government has set itself ambitious targets for reducing carbon emissions Housing sector, as a major contributor, has been identified as having a key role in taking decisive action CSH introduced to improve sustainability of new homes Maximising the number of CSH credits does not necessarily have to involve additional cost and complicated amends to the house design BREEAM Domestic Refurbishment standard will be in contributing to the overall reduction in carbon emissions Summary Increasing focus on product carbon footprints Best practice Making spaces special 32
  • Contact us For more information on our products and services, please go to www.moores.co.uk You can also follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/MooresFurniture http://twitter.com/#!/mooresgroup http://www.facebook.com/MooresFurniture Insert QR CODE HERE Contact us Making spaces special 33