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Koorkin by George Ryan
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Koorkin by George Ryan

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The Koorkin family is available as a suite of OpenType Pro fonts, allowing for the automatic insertion of ligatures, old style figures and a bevy of alternate characters. “These support the …

The Koorkin family is available as a suite of OpenType Pro fonts, allowing for the automatic insertion of ligatures, old style figures and a bevy of alternate characters. “These support the handwritten style of the design,” says George Ryan, Koorkin’s designer. “For instance, a word such as ‘breeze’ set in Koorkin can have three slightly different e’s.” Pro fonts also include an extended character set that supports most Central European and many Eastern European languages – and, in Koorkin’s case, Vietnamese. Ryan, first quickly drew the letters for Koorkin with a felt-tip marker, ensuring that shapes were free-flowing and spontaneous. The result is a playful, full-bodied handwriting script with fluid forms and bold proportions. Koorkin is a delightful confectionary of a typeface design, awash with swashes and deliciously long ascenders and descenders. While strokes are virtually monotone in weight, an ample x-height combined with generous counters guarantees that, even though a handwriting script, Koorkin ranks high on the legibility scale.

To give the design added character, Ryan also created a suite of swash and alternate characters that are available in OpenType format. “I added many ligatures and alternate versions of key characters to the character set,” says Ryan. “For instance, a word with an 'ee’ combination can take advantage of a ligature I designed rather than using two of the same e's to do the job. As a result, a word such as ‘breeze’ will have three slightly different e's in it – making the copy look truly handwritten.”

With all this personality, Koorkin is at home in such diverse places as posters, restaurant menus, social announcements and product brochures.

The complete Koorkin family is available as desktop fonts from the Fonts.com, Linotype.com and ITCFonts.com websites. It is also available as dynamically downloadable Web fonts. Learn more about Koorkin on Fonts.com: http://www.fonts.com/font/monotype-imaging/koorkin

Published in: Design, Technology, Art & Photos
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  • 1. “I originally drew the primary characters with a felt tip marker, scanned them andthen proceeded to noodle on the computer,” says George Ryan of his newtypeface, Koorkin. “Over the years, I’ve designed many original typefaces, but Koorkinhas become one of my favorites. I’ve worked on hundreds of highly structured textfaces. For the most part, the roots of all of them can be found in the handwrittenletterforms we learn as children. I enjoy going back to these shapes whenever theopportunity presents itself. ”The happy result of Ryan‘s felt tip marker sketches and hislove of simple letterforms is a new family of upright and italic scripts in medium andbold weights.
  • 2. The Koorkin family is available as a suite of OpenType Pro fonts, allowing for theautomatic insertion of ligatures, old style figures and a bevy of alternate characters.“These support the handwritten style of the design,” says Ryan. “For instance, aword such as ‘breeze’ set in Koorkin can have three slightly different e’s.” Pro fontsalso include an extended character set that supports most Central European andmany Eastern European languages – and, in Koorkin’s case, Vietnamese.The name Koorkin? It’s an homage to Ryan’s Armenian father-in-law’s first name.
  • 3. George Ryan is now in his fourth decade of designingtypefaces. In 1978 he was managing the production side of aquick print shop on Long Island when he decided it was timeto find a better career. “I went on just one interview,” hesays, “and was hired by Mergenthaler Linotype as a ‘letterdrawer’ – a job title I still like.”After four years at Mergenthaler, Ryan went to work forBitstream, where he stayed for 13 years before joining otherBitstream employees in starting a new digital type foundrycalled Galapagos Design Group. In 2003, Ryan left Galapagosto join Monotype Imaging where, in addition to drawingoriginal designs like the Koorkin typeface, he works oncustom typeface design projects. Other typefaces from Ryaninclude the Oz Handicraft, ITC Kristen, Givens Antiqua andWedding Singer designs.

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