• Save
corte e costura  vestidos
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

corte e costura vestidos

on

  • 6,122 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
6,122
Views on SlideShare
6,082
Embed Views
40

Actions

Likes
42
Downloads
0
Comments
11

4 Embeds 40

http://www.pinterest.com 30
http://br.pinterest.com 4
http://sigbol.franqui.as 4
http://uk.pinterest.com 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

15 of 11 Post a comment

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • hi,
    pls send me this file,
    thank you very much
    phutailinh.fashion@gmail.com
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Oi Mônica, tudo bem? Eu não sou exatamente profissional nisso, e estou começando a aprender. Será que você se importaria em compartilhar o livro comigo? Se sim, meu e-mail é carolina.rentes@gmail,com. Desculpa pela folga, e muito obrigada desde já.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Nice doc, Thank you so much
    Could you please send me this: hung4eyes@gmail.com

    Thanks a lot,
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • nice doc...
    plz allow me..
    mahady180@gmail.com
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Please send me this file. I'm a teacher and is very, very useful.I can send another book instead, as interesting.
    lilimandi@yahoo.fr
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

corte e costura  vestidos corte e costura vestidos Document Transcript

  • DRESSMAKING
  • ALISON SMITHDRESSMAKINGThe complete step-by-step guide to making your own clothes
  • LONDON, NEW YORK, MELBOURNE, MUNICH, AND DELHIDK UKPROJECT EDITOR Laura PalosuoEditor Hilary MandlebergSENIOR ART EDITORs Jane Ewart, Glenda FisherPROJECT ART EDITOR Hannah MooreDESIGN ASSISTANT Charlotte JohnsonSenior ProductioN EDITOR Jennifer Murraysenior Production Controller Seyhan EsenCreative Technical Support Sonia CharbonnierNew Photography Ruth JenkinsonArt Direction for Photography Jane Ewart, Alison ShackletonSenior jacket creative Nicola PowlingManaging Editor Penny SmithManaging Art Editor Marianne MarkhamPublisher Mary LingArt director Jane BullDK INDIASenior Editor Alicia IngtyEditor Arani SinhaAssistant Editor Neha Ruth SamuelArt Editors Mansi Nagdev, Ira Sharma, Zaurin ThoidingjamManaging Editor Glenda FernandesManaging Art Editor Navidita ThapaPRODUCTION Manager Pankaj Sharmacreative technical support Manager Sunil SharmaSENIOR DTP DESIGNER Tarun SharmaDTP Designers Nand Kishor Archarya, Manish Chandra UpretiDK USUS Editor Margaret ParrishUS SENIOR Editor Shannon BeattyUS Consultant Amy VinchesiFirst American Edition, 2012Published in the United States by DK Publishing375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 1001412 13 14 15 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1001—182909—September/2012Copyright © 2012 Dorling Kindersley LimitedAll rights reserved.Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of thispublication may be reproduced, stored in, or introduced into a retrieval system,or transmitted, in any form, or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying,recording, or otherwise), without the prior written permission of both the copyrightowner and the above publisher of this book.Published in Great Britain by Dorling Kindersley Limited.A catalog record for this book is available from the Library of Congress.ISBN: 978-0-7566-9820-1DK books are available at special discounts when purchased in bulk for sales promotions,premiums, fund-raising, or educational use. For details, contact: DK Publishing SpecialMarkets, 375 Hudson Street, New York, New York 10014 or SpecialSales@dk.com.Color reproduction by Butterfly Creative Services and Opus Multi Media ServicesPrinted and bound in China by Hung Hing Offset Printing Company Ltd.Discover more at www.dk.comINTRODUCTION 6ABOUT THIS BOOK 8TOOLS & MATERIALS 10Basic sewing kit • Needles and pins • Threads• Measuring and marking tools • Cutting tools• Notions • Useful extras • Sewing machine• Serger • Pressing aidsFABRICS 34Wool fabrics • Cotton fabrics • Silk fabrics• Linen fabrics • Synthetic fabricsPATTERNS & CUTTING OUT 50Reading patterns • Body measuring• Altering patterns • Making a toile • Cutting outGENERAL TECHNIQUES 78Stitches for hand sewing • Machine stitches and seams• Reducing seam bulk • Darts • Gathers • Interfacings• Facings • Collars • Waistbands • Sleeves • Pockets• Hemlines • Zippers • Buttons • Hooks and eyes and snapsContents View slide
  • GARMENTS 128The Skirts 130Classic A-line skirt 132Button front A-line skirt 136Classic tailored skirt 138Tailored evening skirt 143Classic pleated skirt 146Topstitched pleated skirt 152The Dresses 154Classic shift dress 156Short-sleeved shift dress 161Square-neck shift dress 164Sleeveless shift dress 167Short sleeveless shift dress 170Classic waisted dress 174Short-sleeved waisted dress 179Sleeveless waisted dress 181Waisted cocktail dress 185Classic empire waist dress 190Sleeveless empire waist dress 195Long empire waist dress 198The Pants 202Classic tailored pants 204Tapered capri pants 208Classic palazzo pants 210Wide-leg shorts 216The Tops 218Classic shell top 220Tie-neck top 224Long-sleeved tunic 226Classic princess-line blouse 228Short-sleeved blouse 233The Jackets 236Classic boxy jacket 238Boxy jacket with collar 242Classic shawl collar jacket 246Lined shawl collar jacket 251MENDING & REPAIRS 254Unpicking stitches • Darning a holeRepairing fabric under a buttonRepairing a damaged buttonholeMending a split in a seamMending a tear with a fusible patchRepairing or replacing elasticRepairing a broken zipperCUSTOMIZING 262Lengthening a skirt with a contrast bandTurning jeans into a skirt • Adding a collar andpockets to a dress • Embellishing a dress withsequins and beads • Embellishing a T-shirt withflowers • Adding a ribbon trim to a cardiganPATTERNS 276GLOSSARY 312INDEX 316ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 320 View slide
  • IntroductionMy passion is sewing. I’m never happier than when I’m in front of my sewingmachine creating a new garment and I wanted to share that enjoymentwith everyone who loves clothes and would like to sew their own. Thisbook offers you twelve basic patterns ranging from skirts and dressesthrough pants and tops to jackets. There are full instructions forscaling the patterns up, or you can access the patterns via adedicated website. The bonus is that the basic patterns can beadapted to make a total of thirty-one fabulous garments. If youmake them all, you will have a complete wardrobe whateveryour age and lifestyle.Beginners can start with the basic patterns and quicklyprogress to the more complex ones. For the more experiencedsewer, there are plenty of new ideas and techniques to try, oryou may feel like making the same pattern several times in differentfabrics for a variety of looks. I’ve also included detailed instructions forthe techniques needed to make every garment in the book. This sectionwill also help you to work with any commercial pattern. And, finally, there aresections dedicated to mending and customizing, enabling you to prolong theuseful life of your clothes.Happy sewing!
  • 8 How to use this bookThis book contains all the information you need to make your own clothes. There are patterns and step-by-step instructions for twelve classic garments, and variations of each. Additional guidance, if needed, is to befound in sections on key dressmaking techniques, tools, fabrics, and pattern alterations. Finally, sections onmending and customizing show how to prolong the life of your garments, both old and new.how to use this bookA guide to using the patterns shows you how toenlarge, photocopy, or download and print thepatterns. A handy size chart helps you find thecorrect size for you.All key dressmaking techniques are shown andexplained, step-by-step, in a self-containedsection. Turn to this section for extra guidancewhen completing a project, or use it as a generalreference for dressmaking questions.Each classic garment is profiled in an introductionspread that tells you what you need to begin yourproject, including materials, fabric ideas, andinformation on where to find the patterns.Every step of making each garment is demonstrated withclose-up photography and explained with clear text.Where further guidance may be needed, you are directedto the appropriate page in the general techniques section.PATTERN GUIDECLASSIC GARMENT OPENERS CLASSIC GARMENT STEP-BY-STEP PAGESGENERAL TECHNIQUESA pattern for each of the garment projects isprinted in the back of the book, and graded forsizes 6–22. Color-coding helps you find the correctsize when using the pattern.PATTERNSCLASSIC GARMENTSA simple A-lineskirt with a narrowwaistband willflatter all figuretypes and all agesthe A-line skirtsSKIRTPATTERN>>p.136>>p.134132 Garments 133LinenCorduroySkirtsDartButtonNarrowwaistbandSide zipperThis skirt is made in a cotton print,but works well in a wide range offabrics. For winter you could choosea cozy corduroy. For summer,linen will keep you cool and fresh.YOU WILL NEED• 51in (1.3m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 39in (1m) waistband interfacing• 39in (18cm) skirt zipper• 1 buttonPREPARING THE PATTERN• This skirt is made using SkirtPattern One (see pp. 280–281)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeThis A-line skirt is shaped by the two darts in the front andback. There is a zipper in the left-hand side. The narrowwaistband is fastened with a button and buttonhole fastening.The finished skirt should sit just above the knee.CLASSICA-LINE SKIRTThis A-line skirt will never go out of style and can be worn at all times of theyear and on all occasions. It is also one of the easiest garments for a beginner tomake. It has only three pattern pieces—a front, a back, and a waistband. The skirtneeds to fit comfortably around the waist and across the tummy, so check yourmeasurements carefully against the pattern.Skirt Pattern OneBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONFRONT BACK134 Garments4Stitch the LH (left hand) side seam, leaving a gap for the zipper.Press the seam open, then insert a zipper (see p.119).5Stitch the RH (right hand) side seam and press the seam open (see p.84).6Attach the waistband interfacing to the waistband (see p.94).1Cut out the fabric and mark the start of thedarts with tailor’s bastes (see p.91). Clip the endof the darts on the raw edge (see p.76).2Make the darts (see p.91) and press toward thecenter of the garment. 3Neaten the side seams on the back and thefront using a 3-thread serger stitch or a smallzigzag stitch (see pp.84–85).HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC A-LINE SKIRT135135Skirts7Attach the waistband to the skirt, matchingthe notches (see p.103). 8Layer the seam allowance by trimming thewaistband side of the seam to half its width(see p.89). Press toward the waistband.9Fold the waistband RS (right side) to RS. Pin,then stitch the ends of the waistband.11Turn the waistband to the RS, pushing the clipped ends out. Foldunder the raw edge, then pin and hand stitch in place.13Make a buttonhole on the overlap of the waistband (see p.125).Sew a button on the underlap (see pp.123–124).12Neaten the hem edge by serging (see p.116). Turn up a 11⁄2in (4cm)hem and hand stitch in place.10Clip the ends of the waistband to reduce bulk.matched notchesoverlap underlap2802 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsSKIRT PATTERN ONEFOLDSKIRT BACKCut 1 on folded fabricWAISTBANDCut 1CBJOIN28134 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Skirt pattern onesize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the grid equals2in at full size. A seam allowance of5⁄8in (1.5cm) is included in the patternpieces. After you have cut out thepattern pieces in your size, you maywish to add seam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cutting lines (see p.278).FOLDSKIRT FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricCFOVERLAPJOINSIZES278 PatternsTo create any of the garments in this book, you will first need to transfer the pattern to paper. You can dothis in one of three ways: draw the pattern by hand onto pattern paper, enlarge it on a photocopier, ordownload it from our website. Before you begin, you will also need to find the correct size for you.Using the pattern sectionFIND YOUR SIZEStitching lineCutting lineSize 6 Size 8 Size 10 Size 12 Size 14 Size 16 Size 18 Size 20 Size 22321⁄4in(82cm)331⁄4in(84.5cm)341⁄4in(87cm)361⁄4in(92cm)38in(97cm)40in102cm)42in(107cm)44in(112cm)46in(117cm)241⁄2in(62cm)251⁄4in(64.5cm)261⁄4in(67cm)281⁄4in(72cm)301⁄4in(77cm)321⁄4in(82cm)341⁄4in(87cm)361⁄4in(92cm)38 in(97cm)341⁄4in(87cm)351⁄4in(89.5cm)361⁄4in(92cm)38in(97cm)40in(102cm)42in(107cm)44in(112cm)46in(117cm)48in(122cm)BustWaistHipPATTERN MARKINGSSEAM ALLOWANCE Cutting linesGrain linesPlace-to-fold lineLengthening and shorteninglinesButtonholeButton positionDartTuckMarkings to be transferred frompattern pieces to the fabric formatching or to indicate detailSingle notchesDouble notchesThe following markings are used on thepatterns in this section.Seam allowance is the amount of fabric thatis taken up by the seam. It is usually given asthe distance between the cutting line and thestitching line.The patterns in this section include 5⁄8in(1.5cm) seam allowance. This means thatto create a garment that matches themeasurements in the table, you will need tocut along the line on the pattern, and stitch5⁄8in (1.5cm) inside the cutting line. An easyway to remember to do this is to mark astitching line onto the pattern pieces beforeyou begin.You may have noticed that your size in the table islarger than what you would buy in a store. This isbecause stores often engage in “vanity sizing.”Find your size by taking your bust, waist, and hip measurements and finding the closest set ofmeasurements in the table below. If you are between sizes, choose the larger of the two.VARIED SIZESThere is no gold standard for garment sizes, but, ingeneral, dressmaking sizes tend to be smaller thansizes in stores.279Using the pattern sectionCOPY OR DOWNLOAD YOUR PATTERNMETHOD 1: DRAWING THE PATTERN BY HANDMETHOD 2: PHOTOCOPYINGMETHOD 3: DOWNLOADING FROM THE INTERNET1Each grid square in the patterns represents a2in (5cm) square at full size. To enlarge thepatterns by hand, you will need pattern paperwith a 2in (5cm) grid.1To enlarge the pattern on a photocopier, beginby copying it at 100%. Find your size in thetable, and draw along the line for your size inmarker or pen. Enlarge the pattern by 200%.1Find your size in the table. Go to website www.dk.com/dressmaking.2Begin by finding the colored line for your sizein the pattern. Enlarge the pattern onto yourpaper, mapping each square of the pattern onto a2in (5cm) square on the pattern paper.2Enlarge the pattern pieces again by 200% toreach full size. If you are using a photocopierthat has a 400% setting, you can use this setting toenlarge the pieces in one step.2Find the correct PDF for your garment andyour size. Download the PDF to yourcomputer. Print out the PDF. The PDFs will belabeled in the order that they fit together.3Depending on the size of your pattern paper,you may need to stick together several sheetsto fit all the pieces for a single pattern. Once youhave copied all the pieces, cut them out.3Once you have enlarged all parts of theoriginal page, piece them together usingthe gridlines as a guide, and tape them down.Cut around your size.3Trim the white margins from the printedpages, and tape the pages together, using theletters and gridlines as a guide. Cut out thepattern pieces.200%200%PDFAEIMBFJNCGKODHLPCBAThe gentlyflaring A-lineskirt of this long-sleeved dress issure to turn headsas you sashay bythe waisted dresses>>p.179>>p.181>>p.185>>p.176DRESSPATTERN174 Garments 175DressesLongset-insleeveCenter-backzipperCLASSICWAISTED DRESSThis dress has a darted bodice fitted into the waist for a smooth, flattering lineat the waist and hips. Choose your pattern by your bust measurement and adjustthe waist and hips if necessary. It is recommended to make the pattern in muslinfirst to ensure a good fit through the bust and waist, and to check the fit of thesleeve in the shoulder area. Lightweight fabrics work well for this dress and willensure that the slightly A-line skirt moves with a nice swirl as you walk.This dress is made in polyesterbrocade, but this style of dresscould be made in a variety offabrics from cotton prints tolightweight wools, or silk.YOU WILL NEED• 98in (2.5m) x 59in (150cm)fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 20in (50cm) lightweightinterfacing• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using DressPattern Two (see pp.288–290)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeThis unlined two-piece dress has waist darts in the bodice andin the skirt. It has long, fitted set-in sleeves and a lower necklinefinished with a facing. There is a zipper in the center back and theA-line skirt sits just on the knee.Dress Pattern TwoWool crepeSilkBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONSkirtwaistdartBodicewaistdartLower necklineA-line skirtFRONT BACK116 General techniques1Put on the skirt or dress but noshoes. With the end of the ruleron the floor, have a helper measureand mark.1Using a 3-thread serger stitch, stitch alongthe raw edge of the hem allowance. 2Gently press the hem upinto position and basteclose to the crease.3Roll back the sergered edge.Using a slip hem stitch, stitch thehem in place.4Press carefully to preventthe serging from beingimprinted on the right side.2Use pins to mark the crease lineof the proposed hem. Make sure themeasurement from floor to pin lineis the same all the way around.1Adjust the dummy to your height andmeasurements. Place the skirt or dresson the dummy.2The hem marker on its stand will hold thefabric. Use the marker to mark the creaseline of the proposed hem.3Slide a pin through the slot in the marker,then gently release the marker.On a garment such as a skirt or a dress it is important that the hemline is level all around.Even if the fabric has been cut straight, some styles of skirt—such as A-line or circular—will “drop,”which means that the hem edge is longer in some places. This is because the fabriccan stretch where it is not on the straight of the grain. Hang the garment for 24 hoursin a warm room before hemming so you do not end up with an uneven hem.One of the most popular ways to secure a hem edge is by hand. Hand stitchingis discreet and, if a fine hand-sewing needle is used, the stitching should not showon the right side of the work. Always finish the raw edge before stitching the hem.MARKING A HEMLINEHAND-STITCHED HEMSUSING A RULERSERGED FINISHUSING A DRESSMAKER’S DUMMYLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *TIPS FOR SEWING HEMS BY HAND1 Always use a single thread in the needle—a polyester all-purposethread is ideal for hemming.2 Once the raw edge of the hem allowance has been neatened by one of themethods below, secure it using a slip hem stitch. Take half of the stitch into theneatened edge and the other half into the wrong side of the garment fabric.3 Start and finish the hand stitching with a double stitch, not a knot,because knots will catch and pull the hem down.4 It is a good idea to take a small back stitch every 4in (10cm) or so to makesure that if the hem does come loose in one place it will not all unravel.HemlinesThe lower edge of a garment is normally finished with a hem. Sometimes the style of the garment dictatesthe type of hem used, and sometimes the fabric.117Hemlines4Turn down thebias over the rawedge and press.1This is a good finish forfabrics that fray or thatare bulky. Turn up thehem on to the wrong sideof the garment and basteclose to the crease line.2Pin the bias bindingto the raw edge ofthe hem allowance.3Open out the crease in the bias and stitch alongthe crease line, keeping the raw edges level. 5Using a slip hem stitch, join the edge ofthe bias to the wrong side of the fabric.Remove the basting and press lightly.BIAS-BOUND FINISHZIGZAG FINISHPINKED FINISH2Turn up the hem on tothe wrong side of thegarment and baste in placeclose to the crease line.3Fold back the zigzag-stitchededge. Using a slip hem stitch,stitch the hem into place.1Use this to neaten the edge of the hem onfabrics that do not fray too badly. Set thesewing machine to a zigzag stitch, width 4.0and length 3.0. Machine along the raw edge.Trim the fabric edge back to the zigzag stitch.4Roll the edge back intoposition. Remove thebasting and press lightly.2Turn up the hem on to thewrong side of the garmentand baste in place close to thecrease line.4Roll the hem edge back intoposition. Remove thebasting and press lightly.1Pinking shears can give an excellenthem finish on difficult fabrics. Machinea row of straight stitching along the rawedge, 3⁄8in (1cm) from the edge. Pinkthe raw edge.3Fold back the edge along the machinestitching line. Using a slip hem stitch,stitch the hem in place.
  • 9How to use this bookAn overview of each type of garment showcasesthe classic garments and all the possiblevariations you can make with the patternsprovided. Use these to see the full range ofoptions available as you plan your next project.A chapter on pattern alterations teaches you tocustomize patterns to fit your body shape—forexample, shortening arms or lengthening a top.These techniques can be used with the patternsin this book or with commercial patterns.At least one possible variation is suggested for each classicpattern, along with alternative fabric choices. Variations beginwith pattern alterations. Detailed step-by-step instructionsthen guide you through sewing the garment.GARMENT OVERVIEWSAll the essential tools and materials you mayneed are contained in a gallery at the beginningof the book. Full-color photographs and cleartext explain the uses of each.ESSENTIAL TOOLSThis section contains all the skills you need torepair worn items. Here you will learn theessentials, such as how to mend tears, darnholes, and replace lost buttons.A beautiful gallery showcases more than 30dressmaking fabrics and explains the uses ofeach. Use it to find more information on thesuggested fabrics for your garment or to findinspiration for future projects.MENDING AND REPAIRSFABRICSGet inspiration on how to update andpersonalize your existing pieces in a section oncustomizing. Six complete projects teach youhow to breathe new life into old garments.CUSTOMIZINGPATTERN ALTERATIONVARIATION PAGESOTHER USEFULSECTIONSCLASSIC GARMENT VARIATIONSskirtsThis section is the perfect place for a beginner to start.It gives instructions for making three fabulous skirts andone simple variation of each. These stylish garments arestraightforward and use a minimum of pattern pieces.thethe skirts... ... and their variationsSkirt pattern oneClassic A-lineskirt>> p.132Skirt pattern onevariationButton frontA-line skirt>> p.136Skirt pattern twoClassictailored skirt>> p.138Skirt patternthreeClassicpleated skirt>> p.146Skirt pattern twovariationTailoredeveningskirt>> p.143Skirt pattern threevariationTopstitchedpleatedskirt>> p.152This variation of the A-line skirt is a little morecomplicated and is the perfect next step for anovice sewer. To make it, you will shorten thebasic pattern and extend the center front tocreate the pleat. The buttons on the pleatare purely decorative. This skirt would makea great winter or fall wardrobe staple.BUTTON FRONTA-LINE SKIRTCotton twillDenimSkirt Pattern One VariationThis skirt is made incorduroy, but denim orcotton twill also work well.This variation of the Classic A-line skirt is shorter. It hasa zipper in the left-hand side and features a stitched pleatto which buttons have been sewn for decoration.YOU WILL NEED• 48in (1.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 39 in (1m) waistband interfacing• 7in (18cm) skirt zipper• 7 buttonsPREPARING THE PATTERN• This skirt is made using SkirtPattern One (see pp.280–281)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeCenter front pleatwith buttonsZipperShorterhemWaistbandDartBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONthe A-line skirtsSKIRTPATTERN>>p.137>>p.132FRONT BACK136 Garments 137Skirts5Open the front of the skirt.To form the pleat, press theCF line onto the stitched line.1To shorten the hem, copy the front and backpattern pieces. Mark the hemline. Mark thenew hemline 4in (10cm) above the old hemline.Draw a new cutting line 11⁄2in (4cm) below thenew hemline.2For the front pleat, mark a fold line 11⁄4in (3cm)to the left of the CF (center front). Mark the newCF 11⁄4in (3cm) to the left of the new fold line.3Cut out the fabric. On the skirt front, markthe fold line and the CF with trace bastes(see p.76). Mark a point on the fold line, 6in(15cm) from the hem edge, with a tailor’s baste.4Matching the fold line markings, pin down the fold line WS (wrongside) to WS to the tailor’s baste. Stitch along the pinned line. 6Complete the rest of theskirt as for the Classic A-lineSkirt steps 1–11.7Neaten the hem edge by overlocking(see p.116). Turn up a 11⁄2in (4cm) hemand hand stitch in place.8Stitch the remainder of the pleat in place,stitching through the hem. Press. 9Sew buttons (see p.123) along the CF.new hemlinenew cutting lineold hemlinenew center front (CF)new fold lineold center front (CF)HOW TO MAKE THE BUTTON FRONT A-LINE SKIRTtracebastestailor’sbastefold linepleat40 FabricsCHAMBRAYCORDUROYDENIMA light cotton that has a coloredwarp thread and white weft thread.Chambray can also be found as acheck or a striped fabric.Cutting out: A nap layout shouldnot be requiredSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on acotton setting; a pressingcloth is not requiredUsed for: Blouses, men’s shirts,children’s wearA soft pile fabric with distinctivestripes (known as wales or ribs)woven into it. The name dependson the size of the ribs: baby orpin cord has extremely fine ribs;needle cord has slightly thickerribs; corduroy has 10–12 ribs per 1in(2.5cm); and elephant or jumbo cordhas thick, heavy ribs.Cutting out: Use a nap layout withthe pile on the corduroy brushingup the pattern pieces from hemto neck, to give depth of colorSeams: Plain, stitched using awalking foot and neatened withserger or zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/16; sharpsor milliner’s for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting; use a seam roll under theseams with a pressing clothUsed for: Pants, skirts, men’s wearNamed after Nîmes in France. Ahard-wearing, twill-weave fabricwith a colored warp and whiteweft, usually made into jeans.Available in various weights andoften mixed with an elastic threadfor stretch. Denim is usually blue,but is also available in a varietyof other colors.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: Run and fell or topstitchedThread: Polyester all-purposethread with topstitching threadfor detail topstitchingNeedle: Machine size 14/16; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting; a pressing cloth shouldnot be requiredUsed for: Jeans, jackets,children’s wear41CottonGINGHAMMADRASA fresh, two-color cotton fabricthat features a check of varioussizes. A plain weave made by havinggroups of white and colored warpand weft threads.Cutting out: Usually an evencheck, so nap layout is not requiredbut recommended; pattern willneed to be matchedSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11/12; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting; a pressing cloth should notbe requiredUsed for: Children’s wear, dresses,shirts, home furnishingsA check fabric made from a finecotton yarn, usually from India.Often found in bright colors featuringan uneven check. An inexpensivecotton fabric.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutand match the checksSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14;sharps for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on acotton setting; a pressingcloth is not requiredUsed for: Shirts, skirts,shorts, home furnishingsJERSEYA fine cotton yarn that has beenknitted to give stretch, makingthe fabric very comfortable towear. Jersey will also drape well.Cutting out: A nap layout isrecommendedSeams: 4-thread sergerstitch; or plain seam stitchedwith a small zigzag stitch andthen seam allowances stitchedtogether with a zigzagThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14; aballpoint needle may be requiredfor serger and a milliner’s for handsewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting since jersey may shrink ona cotton settingUsed for: Underwear, drapeddresses, loungewear, bedding60 Patterns and cutting outRAISING A CURVEDBUST SEAMINCREASING THE WAIST ON A FITTED SKIRT INCREASING THE WAIST ON A GORED SKIRTLOWERING A CURVEDBUST SEAMADJUSTING A SEAM FORA FULL BUSTMost people’s waists and hips are out of proportion when compared to the measurementsof a paper pattern. To alter the pattern to suit your body shape, adjust the pieces for the waistfirst and then do the hip pieces.WAIST AND HIPS1Cut the center front pattern in the shoulderarea and spread the cut pattern pieces apartby the required amount. Tape paper behind thepattern pieces.1Tape paper under the center front and side frontpatterns in the bust area.1Fold a pleat in the shoulder area on the centerfront pattern to raise the bust point by therequired amount.2Fold both the centerfront and the side frontpatterns on the lengtheningand shortening lines by thesame amount.3Redrawthe armhole,raising it by thesame amount.2Divide the totalincrease requiredby two and add thisamount at the point of thebust at each seam line.3Draw new seamlines from thesepoints, taperingthem into the oldseam lines.SidefrontCenterfrontSidefrontCenterfrontSidefrontCenterfront2Cut both the centerfront and side frontpatterns on the lengtheningand shortening lines.Spread the cut patternpieces apart by the amountin the pleat and tape paperbehind them.3Redraw thearmhole,lowering it by thesame amount.1Increase the waistat the side seams.2Tape paper behind thepattern pieces. Dividethe total increase required byfour, since there are four seam lines.3Add this amount on the paperat the waist edge at eachseam line. Draw new seam linesfrom these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.1Tape paper behind the patternpieces. Since there are manyseams, divide the total increaserequired by the number of seam lines.2Add this amount on the paperat the waist edge at eachseam line. Draw new seam linesfrom these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.Side front Front61Altering patternsINCREASING THE WAISTON A FULL-CIRCLE SKIRTDECREASING THE WAIST ONA FITTED SKIRTINCREASING THE WAISTON A FITTED DRESSDECREASING THE WAISTON A GORED SKIRTINCREASING THE WAISTON A PRINCESS-LINE DRESSDECREASING THE WAISTON A FULL-CIRCLE SKIRTCenterfront1Tape paper behind the waist area of the frontand back pattern pieces. Divide the total increaserequired by four, since there are four seam lines.1Tape paper behind the waist area of each patternpiece. Divide the total increase required by thenumber of seam lines.1Decrease the waist at the side seams. Dividethe total decrease required by four, since there arefour seam lines.1As there are many seams, divide the totaldecrease required by the number of seam lines.1Tape paper behind eachpattern piece.1Carefully check the waist circumference onthe pattern against your waist measurement.2Draw a new, lower waist stitching line onthe pattern. Adjust the finished lengthof the skirt if necessary.2Add this amount onthe paper at the waistarea of each seam line. Drawnew seam lines from thesepoints, tapering them intothe old seam lines.3If more increaseis required, thedarts can also bemade narrower.2Add this amount on the paper at the waist areaof each seam line. Draw new seam lines fromthese points, tapering them into the old seam lines.2Mark this amount on the pattern at thewaist edge at each seam line. Draw newseam lines from these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.2Draw a new, higher waist stitching line onthe pattern. Adjust the finished length ofthe skirt if necessary.SidefrontFrontSide front2Mark this amount on the pattern at thewaist edge at each seam line. Draw newseam lines from these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.275Adding a ribbon trim to a cardigan2Taking care not to stretch the cardigan, pina single length of ribbon, wide enough tocover the button band, from the hem of one frontup, around the neck, and down to the other hem.3Machine carefully along both sides of theribbon to hold it in place.4Evenly space assorted buttons, with a diameter no wider than the ribbon,the length of the ribbon, leaving it free of buttons where the two frontswill join. Stitch in place.5Where the two fronts are to join, stitch one half of a snap fastenerbeneath each button and the other half in the corresponding position onthe other side of the ribbon trim.1Carefully remove the buttons using sharpscissors. Take care not to cut the fabric.HOW TO ADD A RIBBON TRIM TO A CARDIGAN274 CustomizingIs your cardigan looking tired and dull? If so, why not add a prettyribbon trim to the front edges and some decorative buttons? Thistechnique could be applied to any style of cardigan. You could evenembellish the neck and cuffs of a sweater in the same way, in whichcase you won’t need the snap fasteners.Adding a ribbontrim to a cardiganYOU WILL NEED• A cardigan• 80in (2m) firm ribbon, thewidth of the button band• 15–20 assorted buttons• Snap fasteners• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing threadBEFORE YOU STARTPlaincardiganAn assortment ofbuttons and a glamribbon trim togethergive a tired oldcardigan a quirky,handmade look.256 Alterations and repairsSMALL SCISSORS SEAM RIPPER PIN AND SCISSORSAll repairs involve unpicking stitches. This must be done carefully to keep from damagingthe fabric because the fabric will have to be restitched. There are three ways you canunpick stitches.If you accidentally catch a piece of jewelry on a sweater or other knitted garment, it maymake a small hole. A moth could make a hole, too. It is worth darning the hole, especially if thesweater was expensive or is a favorite. Holes can also occur in the heels of socks; thesecan be darned in the same way.Repairing a tear in fabric, patching a worn area, or fixing a zipper or a buttonhole can add extra life toa garment. Repairs like these may seem tedious, but they are very easy to do and worth the effort.For some of the mending techniques shown here, a contrasting color thread has been used so thatthe stitching can be seen clearly. However, when making a repair, be sure to use a matching thread.MendingUNPICKING STITCHESDARNING A HOLELEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **Pull the fabric apart and, using very small, sharplypointed scissors, snip through the stitches thathave been exposed.Slide a seam ripper carefully under a stitch and cut it.Cut through every fourth or fifth stitch, and the seamwill unravel easily.On difficult fabricsor on very small,tight stitches, slide apin under the stitchto lift it away fromthe fabric, thensnip through witha pair of sharplypointed scissors.1Even if the hole is small, the sweaterwill be unwearable. 2Work several rows of running stitchesvertically around the hole. 3Complete the repair by working horizontal rowsof running stitches through the vertical stitches.257MendingA button under strain can sometimes pull off a garment. If this happens, a hole will be made inthe fabric, which needs to be fixed before a new button can be stitched on.A buttonhole can sometimes rip at the end, or the stitching on the buttonhole can comeunraveled. When repairing, use a thread that matches the fabric so the repair will be invisible.REPAIRING FABRICUNDER A BUTTONREPAIRING A DAMAGEDBUTTONHOLELEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1On the right side of the fabric, the hole wherethe button has pulled off is clearly visible.2Stitch over the torn edges by handusing a buttonhole stitch.2Turn to the wrong side and apply a patchof fusible interfacing over the hole.3Reinforce the ends usingsmall oversewing stitches.1On the right side of the fabric, the edgesof the buttonhole stitching have tornand come unraveled.4Stitch the buttonback in place.3Work straight machinestitches over the hole onthe right side to strengthenthe fabric.24 Tools and materialsYou can purchase many more accessories to help with yoursewing, but knowing which products to choose and for whichjob can be daunting. The tools shown here are useful aids, althoughthe items you need will depend on the type of sewing you do.Useful extrasEMERGENCY SEWING KITAll the absolute essentials to fix loosebuttons or dropped hems while awayfrom your sewing machine. Take it withyou when traveling.TWEEZERSThese can be used for removing stubbornbasting stitches that are caught in the machinestitching.BEESWAXWhen hand sewing, this will prevent thethread from tangling, and will strengthenit. First draw the thread through the wax,then press the wax into the thread byrunning your fingers along it.LIQUID SEALANTUsed to seal the cut edge ofribbons and trims to preventfraying. Also useful to seal theends of overlock stitching.COLLAR POINT TURNERThis is excellent for pushingout those hard-to-reachcorners in collars and cuffs.14-IN-1 MEASUREA strange-looking tool that has14 different measurements on it.Use to turn hems or edgesaccurately. Available in bothmetric and standard.25Useful extrasTHIMBLEAn essential item for many sewers, to protectthe middle finger from the end of the needle.There are many types of thimble, so chooseone that fits your finger comfortably.LOOP TURNERA thin metal rod with a latch at theend. Use to turn narrow fabric tubes orto thread ribbons through slotted lace.TAPE MAKERAvailable in 1⁄2, 3⁄4, and 1in (12, 18, and 25mm) widths,this tool evenly folds the edges of a fabric strip, whichcan then be pressed to make binding.DRESSMAKER’S DUMMYAn adjustable form that is usefulwhen fitting garments, since itcan be adjusted to personalbody measurements. Excellentto help in turning up hemlines.Available in female, male, andchildren’s shapes and sizes.PATTERN PAPERThis can be plain or printedwith dots and crosses at regularintervals. The paper can beused for drafting patterns orfor altering or tracing patterns.
  • Tools &MaterialsGood-quality basics are essential for successful dressmaking. Scissors, pins, needles,and thread are essentials, as is a sewing machine. This section shows the featuresof your machine and the tools, materials, and extras needed for your project.
  • 12A well-equipped sewing kit will include all of the items shown below and many more, depending onthe type of sewing that you regularly do. It is important to use a suitable container to keep yourtools together, so that they will be easy to access and to keep them neat and tidy.CUTTING SHEARSRequired for cutting fabric.When buying, select a pairthat feels comfortable inyour hand and that is nottoo heavy. See p.20.PIN CUSHIONTo keep your needles and pins safeand clean. Choose one that has afabric cover and is firm. See p.15.NEEDLESA good selection of differenttypes of needle for sewingby hand. They will enableyou to tackle any hand-sewing project. See p.14.TAPE MEASUREEssential, not only to take body measurements, butalso to help measure fabric, seams, etc. Choose onethat provides both metric and standard units. A tapemade of plastic is best, since it won’t stretch. See p.18.SEWING GAUGEA handy gadget for smallmeasurements. The slide canbe set to measure hemdepths, buttonhole diameters,and much more. See p.18.SAFETY PINSIn a variety of sizes.Useful foremergency repairsand for threadingelastics. See p.15.BUTTONHOLE CHISELAn exceedingly sharpmini-chisel that gives a cleancut through machinebuttonholes. Place a cuttingboard underneath whenusing this tool or you mightdamage the blade. See p.21.Tools and materialsBasic sewing kit
  • 13BUILD UP YOURSEWING KITCUTTING TOOLS pp.20–21MEASURING TOOLS p.18MARKING AIDS p.19USEFUL EXTRAS pp.24–25PRESSING AIDS pp.32–33NEEDLE THREADERS p.14• Bent-handledshears• Paper scissors• Pinking shears• Snips• Trimming scissors• Seam ripper• Buttonhole chisel• Cutting shears• Embroideryscissors• Flexible ruler • Other tapemeasures• Wire needlethreader• Automatic needlethreader• Chalk pencil• Drafting ruler• Mechanicalpencil• Tailor’s chalk• Tracing wheel andcarbon paper• Water/air-solublepen• 14-in-1 measure• Beeswax• Collar point turner• Dressmaker’sdummy• Liquid sealant• Emergencysewing kit• Loop turner• Pattern paper• Tape maker• Tweezers• Clapper• Iron• Ironing board• Pressing cloth• Pressing mitten• Seam roll• Tailor’s ham• Velvet matNOTIONSAll the odds and ends a sewer needs,including everything from buttons andsnaps to trimmings and elastic. A selectionof buttons and snaps in your basic kit isuseful for a quick repair. See pp.22–23.ZIPPERSIt is always a good idea to keepa couple of zippers in your sewingkit. Black, cream, and navy arethe most useful colors. Seepp.119–122.THIMBLEThis is useful to protect the endof your finger when hand sewing.Thimbles are available in variousshapes and sizes. See p.25.SEAM RIPPERAlso called a stitch ripper, toremove any stitches that havebeen sewn in the wrong place.Various sizes of seam rippers areavailable. Keep the cover on whennot in use to protect the sharppoint. See p.21.PINSNeeded by every sewer to hold thefabric together prior to sewing itpermanently. There are differenttypes of pin for different types ofwork. See p.15.EMBROIDERY SCISSORSSmall pair of scissors with verysharp points, to clip threadsclose to the fabric. See p.20.THREADSA selection of threadsfor hand sewing andmachine/serge sewingin a variety of colors. Somethreads are made of polyester,while others are cotton orrayon. See pp.16–17.
  • 14 Tools and materialsUsing the correct pin or needle for your work is extremely important, since the wrong choice can damagefabric or leave small holes. Needles are made from steel and pins from steel or occasionally brass. Look afterthem by keeping pins in a pin cushion and needles in a needle case—if kept together in a small containerthey can become scratched and blunt.Needles and pinsMILLINER’S OR STRAW A very long, thin needle with a small, round eye.Good for hand sewing and basting, since it doesn’t damage fabric. A size 8 or 9is most popular.TAPESTRY A medium-length, thick needle with a blunt end and a long eye.For use with wool yarn in tapestry. Also for darning in overlock threads.SELF-THREADING NEEDLE A needle that has a double eye. The threadis placed in the upper eye through the gap, then pulled into the eye belowfor sewing.WIRE NEEDLE THREADERA handy gadget, especiallyuseful for needles with smalleyes. Also helpful in threadingsewing-machine needles.AUTOMATIC NEEDLE THREADERThis threader is operated with a small lever.The needle, eye down, is inserted and thethread is wrapped around.CREWEL Also known as an embroidery needle, a long needle with a long,oval eye that is designed to take multiple strands of embroidery thread.DARNER’S A long, thick needle that is designed to be used with wool orthick yarns and to sew through multiple layers.BODKIN A strange-looking needle with a blunt end and a large, fat eye.Use to thread elastic or cord. There are larger eyes for thicker yarns.SHARPS An all-purpose hand-sewing needle, with a small, round eye.Available in sizes 1 to 12. For most hand sewing use a size 6 to 9.BEADING Long and extremely fine, to sew beads and sequins to fabric.Since it is prone to bending, keep it wrapped in tissue when not in use.BETWEENS OR QUILTING Similar to a milliner’s needle but very short,with a small, round eye. Perfect for fine hand stitches and favored by quilters.CHENILLE This looks like a tapestry needle but it has a sharp point. Use withthick yarns or wool yarns for darning or heavy embroidery.Needles are available for all types of fabric and project. Keep a good selection of needles onhand at all times, whether it be for emergency mending of tears, or sewing on buttons, or addingtrimmings to special-occasion wear. With a special needle threader, inserting the thread throughthe eye of the needle is simplicity itself.NEEDLES ANDTHREADERS
  • 15Needles and pinsThere is a wide variety of pins available, in differing lengths and thicknesses and ranging fromplain household pins to those with colored balls or flower shapes on their ends.PINSHOUSEHOLDAll-purpose pins of a medium lengthand thickness. Can be used for alltypes of sewing.PEARL-HEADEDLonger than household pins, witha colored pearl head. They are easy topick up and use.GLASS-HEADEDSimilar to pearl-headed pins but shorter.They have the advantage that they can bepressed over without melting.PIN CUSHIONTo keep pins clean and sharp. Choose a fabric cover:a foam cushion may blunt pins.DRESSMAKER’SSimilar to a household pin in shape andthickness, but slightly longer. These are thepins for beginners to choose.FLOWERHEADA long pin of medium thickness with a flat,flower-shaped head. It is made to be pressedover, since the head lies flat on the fabric.SAFETY PINSAvailable in a huge variety of sizes and made either of brass or stainlesssteel. Used for holding two or more layers together.EXTRA FINEExtra long and extra fine, this pin is favoredby many professional dressmakers becauseit is easy to use and doesn’t damage finer fabrics.
  • 16There are so many threads available that knowing which ones to choose can be confusing. There arespecialty threads designed for special tasks, such as machine embroidery or decorative stitching. Threadsalso vary in fiber content, from pure cotton to rayon to polyester. Some threads are very fine, while othersare thick and coarse. Failure to choose the correct thread can spoil your project and lead to problems withthe stitch quality of the sewing machine or serger.ThreadsPOLYESTER ALL-PURPOSE THREADA good-quality polyester thread that has a very slight “give,”making itsuitable for sewing all types of fabric and garment. It is the mostpopular type of thread.COTTON THREADA 100% cotton thread. Smooth and firm, this is designedto be used with cotton fabrics.SILK THREADA sewing thread made from 100% silk. Used for machining delicatesilk garments because it can be removed without leaving an imprint,it is also used for basting or temporary stitching in areas that are tobe pressed, such as jacket collars.ELASTIC THREADA thin, round elastic thread normally used on the bobbin of thesewing machine for stretch effects such as shirring.Tools and materials
  • 17TOP-STITCHING THREADA thicker polyester thread used for decorative top-stitching and buttonholes.Also for hand sewing buttons on thicker fabrics.EMBROIDERY THREADMachine embroidery thread is a finerembroidery thread that is usually madefrom rayon or cotton. Also available onlarger spools for economy.SERGER THREADA dull yarn on a larger spool designed to be used on theserger. This type of yarn is normally not strong enoughto use on the sewing machine.ThreadsVARIEGATED MACHINE EMBROIDERY THREADRAYON MACHINE EMBROIDERY THREADLARGE SPOOL OF RAYON EMBROIDERY THREADCOTTON MACHINE EMBROIDERY THREAD
  • 18A huge range of tools enables a sewer to measure accurately. Choosing the correct tool for the task athand is important, so that your measurements are precise. After measuring, the next step is to mark yourwork using the appropriate marking technique or tool.Measuring and marking TOOLSMEASURING TOOLS There are many tools available to help you measure everything from the width of a seamor hem to body dimensions. One of the most basic yet invaluable measuring tools is thetape measure. Be sure to keep yours in good condition—once it stretches or gets snippedon the edges, it will no longer be accurate and should be replaced.FLEXIBLE RULERA sturdy, flexible piece ofplastic, this is perfect formeasuring armholes andcurved shapes. It is also usedwhen altering patterns.TAPE MEASUREAvailable in various colors and widths.Try to choose one that is the same widthas a standard seam allowance (5⁄8in/1.5cm),since this will prove extremely useful.RETRACTABLETAPEVery useful to have inyour handbag whenshopping, since you neverknow when you may needto measure something!SEWING GAUGEA handy small tool about 6in (15cm) long,marked in inches and centimeters, with asliding tab. Use as an accurate measurefor small measurements such as hems.EXTRA-LONG TAPEThis is usually twice the length of anormal tape measure, at 10ft (300cm)long. It is useful for measuring thelength of bridal trains.Tools and materials
  • 19MARKING AIDS Marking certain parts of your work is essential, to make sure that elements such as pocketsand darts are placed correctly and seam lines are straight as drawn on the pattern. With somemarking tools, such as pens and a tracing wheel and carbon paper, it is always a good ideato test on a scrap of fabric first to make sure that the mark made will not be permanent.DRAFTING RULERA plastic curved tool, alsocalled a pattern-markingruler, used primarily whendrafting or altering patterns.CHALK PENCILAvailable in blue, pink,and white. It can besharpened like a normalpencil, so will drawaccurate lines on fabric.CHALK MECHANICAL PENCILChalk leads of different colors canbe inserted into a mechanical pencil,making it a very versatile markingtool. The leads can be sharpened.TAILOR’S CHALKAlso known as French chalk,this solid piece of chalk ineither a square or triangularshape is available in a widevariety of colors. The chalkeasily brushes off fabric.WATER/AIR-SOLUBLE PENThis resembles a felt-tippen. Marks made can beremoved from the fabricwith either a spray ofwater or by leaving toair-dry. Be careful—if youpress over the marks, theymay become permanent.TRACING WHEEL ANDCARBON PAPERThese two items are used together totransfer markings from a paper patternor a design onto fabric. Not suitablefor all types of fabric though, sincemarks may not be easily removable.Measuring and marking tools
  • 20 Tools and materialsCUTTING SHEARSThe most popular type of shear, usedfor cutting large pieces of fabric. Thelength of the blade can vary from8 to 12in (20 to 30cm) in length.SNIPSA very useful, small, spring-loadedtool that easily cuts the ends ofthread. Not suitable for fabrics.EMBROIDERY SCISSORSA small and very sharp scissorused to get into corners andclip threads close to the fabric.TRIMMINGSCISSORSThese scissors havea 4in (10cm) bladeand are used to trimaway surplus fabricand neaten endsof machining.There are many types of cutting tool, but one rule appliesto all: buy good-quality products that can be resharpened.When choosing cutting shears, make sure that they fit thespan of your hand so that you can comfortably open thewhole of the blade with one action. This is very important toallow clean and accurate cutting lines. Shears and scissors ofvarious types are not the only cutting tools required; everyonewill at some time need a seam ripper to remove misplacedstitches or to unpick seams for mending.Cutting tools
  • 21Cutting toolsSEAM RIPPERA sharp, pointed hook to slideunder a stitch, with a small cuttingblade at the base to cut thethread. Various sizes of seamripper are available, to cut throughlight to heavyweight fabric seams.BUTTONHOLECHISELA smaller version ofa carpenter’s chisel,to cut cleanly andaccurately throughbuttonholes. Sincethis is very sharp,use a cutting boardunderneath.PAPERSCISSORSUse these to cutaround patternpieces—cuttingpaper will dull theblades of fabricscissors and shears.PINKING SHEARSSimilar in size tocutting shears but witha blade that cuts witha zigzag pattern. Usedfor neatening seamsand decorative edges.BENT-HANDLED SHEARSThis type of blade has an anglebetween the blade and the handlethat enables the shears to sit flat onthe table when cutting out. Popularfor cutting long, straight edges.
  • 22The term notions covers all of the odds and ends that a sewer needs, for example, fasteners such asbuttons, snaps, hooks and eyes, and Velcro™. But notions also includes elastics, ribbons, trimmings of alltypes, and boning.NOTIONsButtons can be made from almost anything—shell, bone, coconut, nylon, plastic, brass, silver.They can be any shape, from geometric to abstract to animal shapes. A button may have a shankor have holes on the surface so that it can be attached to fabric.Hooks and eyes , snaps, and Velcro™ all come in a wide variety of forms, differing in size, shape,and color. Some hooks and eyes are designed to be seen, while snaps and Velcro™ are intendedto be hidden fasteners.BUTTONSOTHER FASTENERSHOOKS AND EYESSNAPSVELCRO™Tools and materials
  • 23Decorative finishing touches—fringes, strips of sequins, rickrack braids, feathers, pearls, bows,flowers, and beads—can embellish or personalize a garment. Some are designed to be insertedinto seams while others are surface-mounted.From the narrowest strips to wide swathes, ribbons are made from a variety of yarns, suchas nylon, polyester, and cotton. They can be printed or plain and may feature metallic threadsor wired edges.Elastic is available in many forms, from very narrow, round cord elastic to wide strips. The elasticmay have buttonhole slots in it or even a decorative edge.Boning comes in various types and in different widths. You can sew through polyester boning,used in boned bodices, while nylon boning, also used on boned bodices, has to be inserted intoa casing. Specialized metal bones, which may be either spiral or straight, are for corsets andbridal wear.TRIMMINGS,DECORATIONS, FRINGES,AND BRAIDSRIBBONSELASTICBONINGSPIRAL METALBONENYLON BONINGSTRAIGHTMETAL BONEPOLYESTERBONINGNotionsBUTTONHOLE ELASTICBEADED FRINGERIBBON TRIMRICKRACK TRIMNARROW ELASTICWIDE ELASTIC
  • 24 Tools and materialsYou can purchase many more accessories to help with yoursewing, but knowing which products to choose and for whichjob can be daunting. The tools shown here are useful aids, althoughthe items you need will depend on the type of sewing you do.Useful extrasEMERGENCY SEWING KITAll the absolute essentials to fix loosebuttons or dropped hems while awayfrom your sewing machine. Take it withyou when traveling.TWEEZERSThese can be used for removing stubbornbasting stitches that are caught in the machinestitching.BEESWAXWhen hand sewing, this will prevent thethread from tangling, and will strengthenit. First draw the thread through the wax,then press the wax into the thread byrunning your fingers along it.LIQUID SEALANTUsed to seal the cut edge ofribbons and trims to preventfraying. Also useful to seal theends of overlock stitching.COLLAR POINT TURNERThis is excellent for pushingout those hard-to-reachcorners in collars and cuffs.14-IN-1 MEASUREA strange-looking tool that has14 different measurements on it.Use to turn hems or edgesaccurately. Available in bothmetric and standard.
  • 25Useful extrasTHIMBLEAn essential item for many sewers, to protectthe middle finger from the end of the needle.There are many types of thimble, so chooseone that fits your finger comfortably.LOOP TURNERA thin metal rod with a latch at theend. Use to turn narrow fabric tubes orto thread ribbons through slotted lace.TAPE MAKERAvailable in 1⁄2, 3⁄4, and 1in (12, 18, and 25mm) widths,this tool evenly folds the edges of a fabric strip, whichcan then be pressed to make binding.DRESSMAKER’S DUMMYAn adjustable form that is usefulwhen fitting garments, since itcan be adjusted to personalbody measurements. Excellentto help in turning up hemlines.Available in female, male, andchildren’s shapes and sizes.PATTERN PAPERThis can be plain or printedwith dots and crosses at regularintervals. The paper can beused for drafting patterns orfor altering or tracing patterns.
  • 26A sewing machine will quickly speed up any job, whether it be a quick repair or making a dress for a specialoccasion. Most sewing machines today are aided by computer technology, which enhances stitch qualityand ease of use. Always spend time trying out a sewing machine before you buy, to really get a feel for it.Sewing machineAUTOMATIC NEEDLE THREADERA pull-down gadget to aid in threadingthe machine needle.DOG FEEDSThese metal teeth grip the fabricand feed it through the machine.PRESSER FOOTTo hold the fabric in place while stitching.Various feet can be used here to aiddifferent sewing processes. See pp.28–29.BUTTONHOLE SENSORA pull-down sensor that automaticallyjudges the size of the buttonholerequired to fit the button chosen.NEEDLE PLATEA transparent, removablecover reveals the bobbin. Thisplate is gridded to help stitchseams of various widths.SHANKTo hold the variousfeet in place.Tools and materialsTHREADING GUIDESMarkings to help guide you inthreading the upper thread.
  • 27NEEDLEThe machine needle. Replace it regularlyto ensure good stitch quality. See p.28.Sewing machineBUTTONSTo provide various functions,such as reverse, lockingstitch, and needle-in.REMOVABLE FREE ARMThis section of the machine will pullaway to give a narrow work bed thatcan be used when inserting sleeves. Italso contains a useful storage section.LCD SCREENAn illuminated screenthat displays informationsuch as needle positionand stitch type.SPOOLHOLDERTo hold your sewingthread in place.HAND WHEELThis can be turnedtoward you to movethe needle up ordown manually.BOBBIN WINDERWinds the thread fromthe spool onto thebobbin, keeping it undertension. See p.28.STITCH SIZEUsed to increase and decreaselength and width of stitch.TOUCH BUTTONSThese quickly select the most popularstitches such as zigzag and buttonhole.STITCH LIBRARYAll the different stitches this machine canstitch. You just have to key in the number.SPEED CONTROLA slide, to control thespeed of your machine.
  • 28 Tools and materialsYou can purchase a variety of accessories for your sewing machine to make certain sewingprocesses much easier. There are different machine needles not only for different fabrics but alsofor different types of thread. There is also a huge number of sewing-machine feet, and new feetare constantly coming on to the market. Those shown here are some of the most popular.SEWING-MACHINEACCESSORIESPLASTIC BOBBINThe bobbin is for the lower thread. Some machines take plastic bobbins,others metal. Always check which kind of bobbin your machine uses, sincethe incorrect choice can cause stitch problems.OVEREDGE FOOTA foot that runs along the raw edge of the fabric and holdsit stable while an overedge stitch is worked.EMBROIDERY FOOTA clear plastic foot with a groove underneath that allowslinear machine embroidery stitches to pass under.MACHINE NEEDLESThere are different types of sewing machineneedle to cope with different fabrics. Machineneedles are sized from 60 to 100, a 60 being avery fine needle. There are special needles formachine embroidery and also for metallic threads.METAL BOBBINAlso known as a universal bobbin, this is used with many typesof sewing machine. Be sure to check that your machine requiresa metal bobbin before you buy.
  • 29Sewing machineBUTTONHOLE FOOTThis extends so the button can be placed in the back of the foot. The machinewill stitch a buttonhole to fit thanks to the buttonhole sensor.INVISIBLE ZIPPER FOOTA foot that is used to insert an invisible zipper—the foot holds thecoils of the zipper open, enabling you to stitch behind them.BLIND HEM FOOTUse this foot in conjunction with the blind hem stitchto create a neat hemming stitch.ULTRA-GLIDE FOOTA foot made from Teflon™ that glides over the fabric.Useful for synthetic leathers.WALKING FOOTThis strange-looking foot “walks”across the fabric, so that the upper layerof fabric does not push forward. Great for matching checks and stripesand also for stitching difficult fabrics.ZIPPER FOOTThis foot fits to either the right- or left-hand side of the needleto enable you to stitch close to a zipper.
  • 30This machine is often used in conjunction with the sewing machine, since it gives a very professional finishto your work. The serger has two upper threads and two lower threads (the loopers), with integral knivesthat remove the edge of the fabric. Used extensively for neatening the edges of fabric, the serger can also beused for construction of stretch knits.SergerAs the serger works, the threads wrap around the edge to give a professional finish.The 3-thread stitch is used primarily for neatening. A 4-thread stitch can also be used forneatening, but its fourth thread makes it ideal for constructing a seam on stretch knits.SERGER STITCHES3-THREAD SERGER STITCH4-THREAD SERGER STITCHYou can purchase additional feet for the serger. Some will speedup your sewing by performing tasks such as gathering.SERGER NEEDLESThe serger uses a ballpoint needle, which creates a large loop inthe thread for the loopers to catch and produce a stitch. If a normalsewing machine needle is used it can damage the serger.SERGER FOOTThe standard foot used for most processes.Other feet are available for gathering and cording.SERGER ACCESSORIESTools and materials
  • 31TENSION DIALSThere are four tensiondials, one for each thread.HAND WHEELThis can be turned manuallybackward to disengage a stitch.DIFFERENTIALFEED DIALThis dial controlsthe ratio betweenthe two layersof fabric feedingunder the foot.STITCH LENGTHDIALTo set the length ofthe machine stitch.THREAD GUIDESTo guide the threadfrom the reels.THREAD GUIDESTo guide the threadthrough the machine.KNIVESTwo knives inside the machinecut away the fabric edge.Serger
  • 32Successful sewing relies on successful pressing. Without the correct pressing equipment, sewing can looktoo “home-made,”whereas if correctly pressed any sewn item will have a neat, professional finish.Pressing aidsSEAM ROLLThis tubular pressing aid is used topress seams open on fabrics thatmark, since the iron only touchesthe seam on top of the roll. Alsoused for sleeve and pants seams.CLAPPERA wooden aid thatpounds creases intoa heavy fabric aftersteaming. The topsection is used tohelp press collarseams and points.PRESSING CLOTHChoose a cloth made from silk organzaor muslin, since you can see through it.The cloth stops the iron from markingfabric and protects delicate fabrics.Tools and materials
  • 33IRONA good-quality steam iron is a wonderfulasset. Choose a reasonably heavy iron thathas steam and a shot of steam facility.IRONING BOARDEssential to iron on.Make sure the boardis height-adjustable.PRESSING MITTENSlips on to your hand togive more control overwhere you are pressing.VELVET MATA pressing mat with a tufted sideto aid the pressing of pile fabrics,such as velvet.TAILOR’S HAMA ham-shaped pressing pillow that isused to press darts and press theshape into collar and shoulder curves.Also used in making tailored garments.Pressing aids
  • FabricsChoosing the correct fabric for your dressmaking project is vital. Considerations to bearin mind include the suitability of the fabric for the particular project, whether or notthe fabric will need lining, and how easy it will be to care for once it has been made up.
  • 36 FabricsA natural fiber, wool comes primarily from sheep—Australian merino sheep’s wool is considered to bethe best. However, we also get wool fibers from goats (mohair and cashmere), rabbits (angora), camels(camel hair), and llamas (alpaca). A wool fiber is either short and fluffy, when it is known as a woolenyarn, or it is long, strong, and smooth, when it is called worsted. The term virgin (or new) wool denoteswool fibers that are being used for the first time. Wool may be reprocessed or reused and is then oftenmixed with other fibers.WoolPROPERTIES OF WOOL• Comfortable to wear in all climates since it is available in many weightsand weaves• Warm in the winter and cool in the summer, because it will breathewith your body• Absorbs moisture better than other natural fibers—will absorb up to30 percent of its weight before it feels wet• Flame-resistant• Relatively crease-resistant• Ideal to tailor since it can be easily shaped with steam• Often blended with other fibers to reduce the cost of a fabric• Felts if exposed to excessive heat, moisture, and pressure• Will be bleached by sunlight with prolonged exposure• Can be damaged by mothsCASHMERECREPEWool from the Kashmir goat, andthe most luxurious of all the wools.A soft yet hard-wearing fabricavailable in different weights.Cutting out: Since cashmere oftenhas a slight pile, use a nap layoutSeams: Plain, neatened withserger stitch or pinking shears(a zigzag stitch would curl the edgeof the seam)Thread: A silk thread is ideal, or apolyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14,depending on the thicknessof the fabric; sharps forhand sewingPressing: Steam iron on asteam setting, with a pressingcloth and seam rollUsed for: Jackets, coats, men’swear; knitted cashmere yarn forsweaters, cardigans, underwearA soft fabric made from a twistedyarn that produces an unevensurface. Crepe will have stretchedon the bolt and is prone to shrinkageso it is important to preshrink it bysteaming prior to use.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: Plain, neatened with sergerstitch (a zigzag stitch maycurl the edge of the seam)Thread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12; sharpsor milliner’s for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting; a pressing cloth is notalways requiredUsed for: All types of clothing
  • 37WoolFLANNELGABARDINEMOHAIRA wool with a lightly brushedsurface, featuring either a plainor a twill weave. Used in the pastfor underwear.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or zigzag stitch or aHong Kong finishThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting with a pressing cloth;use a seam roll as the fabric isprone to markingUsed for: Coats, jackets, skirts, pants,men’s wearA hard-wearing suiting fabricwith a distinctive weave. Gabardineoften has a sheen and is prone toshine. It can be difficult to handlesince it is springy and frays badly.Cutting out: A nap layout isadvisable since the fabric has a sheenSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threador 100 percent cotton threadNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting; use just the toe of the ironand a silk organza pressing cloth asthe fabric will mark and may shineUsed for: Men’s wear, jackets, pantsFrom the wool of the Angora goat.A long, straight, and very strongfiber that produces a hairy clothor yarn for knitting.Cutting out: Use a nap layout,with the fibers brushing downthe pattern pieces in the samedirection, from neck to hemSeams: Plain, neatened with sergerstitch or pinking shearsThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting; “stroke”the iron over thewool, moving in the direction ofthe napUsed for: Jackets, coats, men’swear, soft furnishings; knittedmohair yarns for sweaters
  • 38 FabricsTARTANTWEEDWOOL WORSTEDAn authentic tartan belongsto a Scottish clan, and each hasits own unique design that canonly be used by that clan.The fabric is made using a twillweave from worsted yarns.Cutting out: Check the designfor even/uneven checks since it mayneed a nap layout or even a singlelayer layoutSeams: Plain, matching thepattern and neatened withserger or zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 14; sharps forhand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting; may require a pressing cloth,so test firstUsed for: Traditionally kilts, but thesedays also skirts, pants, jackets, softfurnishingsA rough fabric with a distinctive warpand weft, often in different colors.Traditional tweed is associated withthe English countryside.Cutting out: A nap layout is notrequired unless the fabric featuresa checkSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitch; can also be neatenedwith pinking shearsThread: Polyester all-purpose threador 100 percent cotton threadNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a steamsetting; a pressing cloth may notbe requiredUsed for: Jackets, coats, skirts,men’s wear, soft furnishingsA light and strong cloth, made fromgood-quality thin, firm filament fibers.Always steam prior to cutting out sincethe fabric may shrink slightly afterhaving been stretched around a bolt.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or zigzag stitch or aHong Kong finishThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14,depending on fabric; milliner’sor sharps for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting with a pressing cloth;use a seam roll to prevent theseam from showing throughUsed for: Skirts, jackets,coats, pants
  • 39CottonOne of the most versatile and popular of all fabrics, cotton is a natural fiber that comes from the seedpods, or bolls, of the cotton plant. It is thought that cotton fibers have been in use since ancient times.Today, the world’s biggest producers of cotton include the United States, India, and countries in theMiddle East. Cotton fibers can be filament or staple, with the longest and finest used for top-qualitybed linen. Cotton clothing is widely worn in warmer climates since the fabric will keep you cool.CottonPROPERTIES OF COTTON• Absorbs moisture well and carries heat away from the body• Stronger wet than dry• Does not build up static electricity• Dyes well• Prone to shrinkage unless it has been treated• Will deteriorate from mildew and prolonged exposure to sunlight• Creases easily• Soils easily, but launders wellEYELETMUSLINA fine, plain-weave cotton thathas been embroidered in sucha way as to make small holes.Cutting out: May need layout toplace embroidery at hem edgeSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitch; a French seam canalso be usedThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on acotton setting; a pressing clothis not requiredUsed for: Baby clothes, summerskirts, blousesA plain-weave fabric that is usuallyunbleached and quite firm. Availablein many different weights, from veryfine to extremely heavy.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11/14,depending on thickness of thread;sharps for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on asteam setting; a pressing clothis not requiredUsed for: Toiles (test garments),soft furnishings
  • 40 FabricsCHAMBRAYCORDUROYDENIMA light cotton that has a coloredwarp thread and white weft thread.Chambray can also be found as acheck or a striped fabric.Cutting out: A nap layout shouldnot be requiredSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on acotton setting; a pressingcloth is not requiredUsed for: Blouses, men’s shirts,children’s wearA soft pile fabric with distinctivestripes (known as wales or ribs)woven into it. The name dependson the size of the ribs: baby orpin cord has extremely fine ribs;needle cord has slightly thickerribs; corduroy has 10–12 ribs per 1in(2.5cm); and elephant or jumbo cordhas thick, heavy ribs.Cutting out: Use a nap layout withthe pile on the corduroy brushingup the pattern pieces from hemto neck, to give depth of colorSeams: Plain, stitched using awalking foot and neatened withserger or zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/16; sharpsor milliner’s for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting; use a seam roll under theseams with a pressing clothUsed for: Pants, skirts, men’s wearNamed after Nîmes in France. Ahard-wearing, twill-weave fabricwith a colored warp and whiteweft, usually made into jeans.Available in various weights andoften mixed with an elastic threadfor stretch. Denim is usually blue,but is also available in a varietyof other colors.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: Run and fell or topstitchedThread: Polyester all-purposethread with topstitching threadfor detail topstitchingNeedle: Machine size 14/16; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting; a pressing cloth shouldnot be requiredUsed for: Jeans, jackets,children’s wear
  • 41CottonGINGHAMMADRASA fresh, two-color cotton fabricthat features a check of varioussizes. A plain weave made by havinggroups of white and colored warpand weft threads.Cutting out: Usually an evencheck, so nap layout is not requiredbut recommended; pattern willneed to be matchedSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11/12; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting; a pressing cloth should notbe requiredUsed for: Children’s wear, dresses,shirts, home furnishingsA check fabric made from a finecotton yarn, usually from India.Often found in bright colors featuringan uneven check. An inexpensivecotton fabric.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutand match the checksSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14;sharps for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on acotton setting; a pressingcloth is not requiredUsed for: Shirts, skirts,shorts, home furnishingsJERSEYA fine cotton yarn that has beenknitted to give stretch, makingthe fabric very comfortable towear. Jersey will also drape well.Cutting out: A nap layout isrecommendedSeams: 4-thread sergerstitch; or plain seam stitchedwith a small zigzag stitch andthen seam allowances stitchedtogether with a zigzagThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14; aballpoint needle may be requiredfor serger and a milliner’s for handsewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting since jersey may shrink ona cotton settingUsed for: Underwear, drapeddresses, loungewear, bedding
  • 42 FabricsSHIRTINGVELVETA closely woven, fine cottonwith colored warp and weftyarns making stripes or checks.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutif fabric has uneven stripesSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or zigzag stitch; a runand fell seam can also be usedThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12; milliner’sfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on acotton setting; a pressingcloth is not requiredUsed for: Ladies’and men’s shirtsA pile-weave fabric, made byusing an additional yarn thatis then cut to produce the pile.Difficult to handle and can beeasily damaged if seams haveto be unpicked.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutwith the pile brushing up fromhem to neck, to give depthof colorSeams: Plain, stitched using awalking foot (stitch all seamsfrom hem to neck) and neatenedwith serger or zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 14; milliner’sfor hand sewingPressing: Only if you have to; usea velvet board, a little steam, the toeof the iron, and a silk organza clothUsed for: Jackets, coatsCHEESECLOTHA fine, plain, open-weave cotton.Can be found in colors but usuallysold as natural/unbleached or white.Makes great pressing cloths andinterlinings. Washing prior to useis recommended.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: 4-thread serger stitchor plain seam, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitch; a French seam couldalso be usedThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11; milliner’sfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting; a cloth is not requiredUsed for: Curtaining and otherhousehold uses
  • 43SilkOften referred to as the queen of fabrics, silk is made from the fibers of the silkworm’s cocoon. This strongand luxurious fabric dates back thousands of years to its first development in China, and the secret of silkproduction was well protected by the Chinese until 300 AD. Silk fabrics can be very fine or thick and chunky.They need to be handled with care, since some can be easily damaged.SilkPROPERTIES OF SILK• Keeps you warm in winter and cool in summer• Absorbs moisture and dries quickly• Dyes well, producing deep, rich colors• Static electricity can build up and fabric may cling• Will fade in prolonged strong sunlight• Prone to shrinkage• Best dry-cleaned• Weaker when wet than dry• May watermarkCHIFFONDUCHESSE SATINA very strong and very fine,transparent silk with a plainweave. Will gather and rufflewell. Difficult to handle.Cutting out: Place tissue paperunder the fabric and pin thefabric to the tissue paper, cuttingthrough all layers if necessary;use extra-fine pinsSeams: FrenchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 9/11; finemilliner’s for hand sewingPressing: Dry iron on a wool settingUsed for: Special-occasion wear,overblousesA heavy, expensive satin fabricused almost exclusively forspecial-occasion wear.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutSeams: Plain, with pinked edgesThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14; milliner’sfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting with a pressing cloth;use a seam roll under the seamsto prevent shadowingUsed for: Special-occasion wear
  • 44 FabricsDUPIONIHABUTAIMATKAWoven using a textured yarnthat produces irregularitiesin the weave.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutto prevent shadowingSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12; milliner’sfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting with a pressing cloth asfabric may watermarkUsed for: Dresses, skirts,jackets, special-occasion wear,soft furnishingsOriginally from Japan, a smooth,fine silk that can have a plain ora twill weave. Fabric is often usedfor silk painting.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: FrenchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 9/11; veryfine milliner’s or betweens forhand sewingPressing: Steam iron ona wool settingUsed for: Lining, shirts, blousesA silk suiting fabric with an uneven-looking yarn. Matka can be mistakenfor linen.Cutting out: Use a nap layout sincesilk may shadowSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or zigzag stitch or aHong Kong finishThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14; milliner’sfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting with a pressing cloth; a seamroll is recommended to prevent theseams from showing throughUsed for: Dresses, jackets, pants
  • 45SilkORGANZATAFFETASATINA sheer fabric with a crisp appearancethat will crease easily.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: French or use a seamfor a difficult fabricThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11; milliner’sor betweens for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting; a pressing cloth shouldnot be requiredUsed for: Sheer blouses, shrugs,interlining, interfacingA smooth, plain-weave fabricwith a crisp appearance. It makesa rustling sound when worn.Can require special handlingand does not wear well.Cutting out: Use a nap layout,with extra-fine pins in seams tominimize marking the fabricSeams: Plain; fabric may pucker,so sew from the hem upward,keeping the fabric taut under themachine; neaten with sergeror pinking shearsThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11; milliner’sor betweens for hand sewingPressing: Cool iron, with a seamroll under the seamsUsed for: Special-occasion wearA silk with a satin weave thatcan be very light to quite heavyin weight.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutin a single layer as fabric is slipperySeams: French; on thicker satins,use a seam for a difficult fabricThread: Polyester all-purposethread (not silk thread as itbecomes weak with wear)Needle: Machine size 11/12;milliner’s or betweens forhand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting with a pressing cloth asfabric may watermarkUsed for: Blouses, dresses,special-occasion wear
  • 46 FabricsLinen is a natural fiber that is derived from the stem of the flax plant. It is available in a variety of qualitiesand weights, from very fine linen to heavy suiting weights. Coarser than cotton,it is sometimes woven withcotton as well as being mixed with silk.linenPROPERTIES OF LINEN• Cool and comfortable to wear• Absorbs moisture well• Shrinks when washed• Does not ease well• Has a tendency to crease• Prone to fraying• Resists moths but is damaged by mildewCOTTON AND LINEN MIXDRESS-WEIGHT LINENTwo fibers may have been mixedtogether in the yarn or there may bemixed warp and weft yarns. It haslots of texture in the weave.Cutting out: A nap layout shouldnot be requiredSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: A steam iron on asteam setting with a silk organzapressing clothUsed for: Summer-weight jackets,tailored dressesA medium-weight linen witha plain weave. The yarn is oftenuneven, which causes slubsin the weave.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or zigzag stitch ora Hong Kong finishThread: Polyester all-purposethread with a topstitching threadfor topstitchingNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting (steam is required toremove creases)Used for: Dresses, pants, skirts
  • 47LinenPRINTED LINENSSUITING LINENFANCY WEAVE LINENMany linens today feature printsor even embroidery. The fabricmay be light to medium weight,with a smooth yarn that hasfew slubs.Cutting out: Use a nap layoutSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting (steam is required toremove creases)Used for: Dresses, skirtsA heavier yarn is used to producea linen suitable for suits for menand women. Can be a firm, tightweave or a looser weave.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or a zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purposethread with a topstitch threadfor topstitchingNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a cottonsetting (steam is required toremove creases)Used for: Men’s and women’ssuits, pants, coatsA linen woven with additionaldecorative yarns such as metallicor lurex.Cutting out: A nap layout isnot requiredSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or a zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purposethread with a topstitch threadfor topstitchingNeedle: Machine size 14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Press carefully as decorativeyarns may melt; use a pressing clothUsed for: Dresses, jackets
  • 48 FabricsThe term synthetic applies to any fabric that is not 100 percent natural. Many of these fabrics have beendeveloped over the last hundred years, which means they are new compared to natural fibers. Somesynthetic fabrics are made from natural elements mixed with chemicals, while others are made entirelyfrom non-natural substances. The properties of synthetic fabrics vary from fabric to fabric.synthetic fabricsPROPERTIES OF SYNTHETIC FABRICS• Durable and usually launder well• Can be prone to static and “cling”to the body• Can dye well and are often digitally printed• Mix well with natural fibersACETATEACRYLICIntroduced in 1924, acetate ismade from cellulose and chemicals.The fabric has a slight shine andis widely used for linings. Acetatecan also be woven into fabricssuch as acetate taffeta, acetatesatin, and acetate jersey.Properties of acetate:• Dyes well• Can be heat-set into pleats• Washes wellCutting out: Use a nap layoutdue to sheen on fabricSeams: Plain, neatened withserger or zigzag stitch,or 4-thread serger stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a coolsetting (fabric can melt)Used for: Special-occasionwear, liningsIntroduced in 1950, acrylic fibersare made from ethylene andacrylonitrile. The fabric resembleswool and makes a good substitutefor machine-washable wool. Oftenseen as a knitted fabric, the fiberscan be mixed with wool.Properties of acrylic:• Little absorbency• Tends to retain odors• Not very strongCutting out: A nap layoutmay be requiredSeams: 4-thread serger stitchon knitted fabrics; plain seam onwoven fabricsThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14,but a ballpoint needle maybe required on knitted fabrics;sharps for hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on a woolsetting (fabric can be damagedby heat)Used for: Knitted yarns for sweaters;wovens for skirts, blouses
  • 49Synthetic fabricsPOLYESTEROne of the most popular of theman-made fibers, polyester wasintroduced in 1951 as a man’swashable suiting. Polyester fibers aremade from petroleum by-productsand can take on any form, froma very fine sheer fabric to a thick,heavy suiting.Properties of polyester:• Nonabsorbent• Does not crease• Can build up static• May “pill”Cutting out: A nap layout is onlyrequired if the fabric is printedSeams: French, plain, or 4-threadserger, depending on the weightof the fabricThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 11/14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron on awool settingUsed for: Office wear, schooluniformsRAYONSYNTHETIC FURSAlso known as viscose and oftenreferred to as artificial silk, this fiberwas developed in 1889. It is madefrom wood pulp or cotton lintersmixed with chemicals. Rayon canbe knitted or woven and madeinto a wide range of fabrics. It isoften blended with other fibers.Properties of rayon:• Absorbent• Nonstatic• Dyes well• Frays badlyCutting out: A nap layout is onlyrequired if the fabric is printedSeams: Plain, neatened with sergeror zigzag stitchThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 12/14; sharpsfor hand sewingPressing: Steam iron ona silk settingUsed for: Dresses, blouses, jacketsCreated using a looped yarn thatis then cut on a knitted or a wovenbase, synthetic fur can be made fromnylon or acrylic fibers. The furs varytremendously in quality and some arevery difficult to tell from the real thing.Properties of synthetic furs:• Require careful sewing• Can be heat-damagedby pressing• Not as warm as real furCutting out: Use a nap layout,with the fur pile brushed fromthe neck to the hem; cut just thebacking carefully and not throughthe fur pileSeams: Plain, with a longer stitchand a walking foot; no neateningis requiredThread: Polyester all-purpose threadNeedle: Machine size 14; sharps forhand sewingPressing: If required, use a cool iron(synthetic fur can melt under a hot iron)Used for: Outerwear
  • patterns &cutting outThe twelve basic patterns in this section can be used to make thirty-one differentgarments. Details are given for making up the basic patterns, followed by theadaptations that are required to produce the variations.
  • 52 Patterns and cutting outMost dressmakers buy a commercial paper pattern to make a garment. A pattern has three maincomponents: the envelope, the pattern sheets, and the instructions. The envelope gives an illustrationof the garment that can be made from the contents, together with fabric suggestions and otherrequirements. The pattern sheets are normally printed on tissue paper and contain a wealth of information,while the instructions tell you how to construct the garment.Reading patternsThe envelope front illustrates the garment that can be made from the contents of theenvelope. The illustration may be a line drawing or a photograph. There may be differentversions, known as views. On the reverse of the envelope there is usually an illustrationof the back view and the standard body measurement chart that has been used for thispattern, plus a chart that will help you purchase the correct amount of fabric for eachview. The reverse of the envelope also includes suggestions for suitable fabrics, togetherwith the notion, which are all the odds and ends you need to complete the project.READING A PATTERNENVELOPENumber ofpattern piece.Pattern codenumber forordering.Description of garment givingdetails of style and differentviews included in pattern.List of pattern sizes in standardand metric measurements forbust, waist, and hips in each size.Suggested fabrics suitablefor garment as well as adviceon unsuitable fabrics.Notions requiredfor each view.Outline drawing of garment, including backviews, showing darts and zipper positions.Garment measurements box givesactual size of finished garment.Chart to follow for required fabric quantity,depending on size, view, and width of fabric.MISSES’UNLINED JACKET, SKIRT, SHORTS, AND PANTS.Unlined, semi-fitted, V-neck jacket has short sleeves, front buttons,optional waistline darts, and optional breast pocket. Straight skirt,above mid-knee, and trousers or shorts with straight legs, havewaistband, front pleats, side seam pockets, and back zip.FABRICS: Jacket, skirt, shorts, and trousers: wool crepe, soft cottons,sheeting, linen, silk, silk types, and lightweight woollens. Skirt, shorts,and trousers also challis, jacquards, and crepe. Unsuitable for fabricsprinted with obvious diagonals. Allow extra fabric in order to matchplaids, stripes, or one-way design fabrics.Use nap yardages/layouts for shaded, pile, or one-way design fabrics.*with nap. ** without napNOTIONS: Thread. Jacket: three 1.2 cm (7⁄8 in) buttons; 6mm (1⁄4 in)shoulder pads. Skirt, trousers: pkg of 3.2 cm (1 1⁄4 in) waistbandinterfacing; 18 cm (7 in) zip; and one hook and eye closure.Garment measurements (6 8 10) (12 14 16) (18 20 22)Jacket bust 92 94.5 97 101 106 111 116 121 126 cmJacket waist 81 83 86 89.5 94.5 100 105 110 116 cmJacket back length 73 73.5 74 75 75.5 76 77 77.5 78 cmSkirt A lower edge 99 101 104 106 112 117 122 127 132 cmSkirt A length 61 61 61 63 63 63 65 65 65 cmShorts B leg width 71 73.5 76 81 86.5 94 99 104 109 cmShorts B side length 49.5 50 51 51.5 52 52.5 53.5 54 54.5 cmPants B leg width 53.5 53.5 56 56 58.5 58.5 61 61 63.5 cmPants B side length 103 103 103 103 103 103 103 103 103 cmFabric needed (6 8 10) (12 14 16) (18 20 22)Jacket 115 cm*/** 1.70 1.70 1.70 1.80 1.80 2.10 2.20 2.20 2.20 m150 cm*/** 1.30 1.30 1.30 1.40 1.70 1.70 1.70 1.80 1.80 mInterfacing 1 m of 55–90 cm lightweight fusible or non-fusibleSkirt A 115 cm*/** 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 2 m150 cm*/** 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 mShorts B 115 cm*/** 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.6 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.9 2 m150 cm*/** 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.3 1.4 1.4 1.5 mPants B 115 cm*/** 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.7 2.7 m150 cm* 2 2 2 2 2.1 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.3 m150 cm** 1.6 1.6 1.8 2 2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.3 mMETRICBody measurements (6 8 10) (12 14 16) (18 20 22)Bust 78 80 83 87 92 97 102 107 112 cmWaist 58 61 63.5 66 71 76 81 86 94 cmHip 81 84 86 91 96.5 102 107 112 117 cmFabric needed (6 8 10) (12 14 16) (18 20 22)Jacket 45 in*/** 17⁄8 17⁄8 17⁄8 17⁄8 2 23⁄8 23⁄8 23⁄8 23⁄8 yd60 in*/** 13⁄8 13⁄8 13⁄8 11⁄2 17⁄8 17⁄8 17⁄8 17⁄8 2 ydInterfacing 11⁄8 yd of 22–36 in lightweight fusible or non-fusibleSkirt A 45 in*/** 13⁄4 17⁄8 17⁄8 17⁄8 2 2 2 2 21⁄8 yd60 in*/** 11⁄4 11⁄4 13⁄8 13⁄8 13⁄8 13⁄8 11⁄2 11⁄2 15⁄8 ydShorts B 45 in*/** 13⁄4 13⁄4 13⁄4 13⁄4 2 2 2 2 21⁄8 yd60 in*/** 11⁄4 11⁄4 13⁄8 13⁄8 13⁄8 13⁄8 11⁄2 11⁄2 15⁄8 ydPants B 45 in*/** 25⁄8 25⁄8 25⁄8 25⁄8 25⁄8 25⁄8 25⁄8 27⁄8 27⁄8 yd60 in* 21⁄8 21⁄8 21⁄8 21⁄8 21⁄4 21⁄4 23⁄8 21⁄2 21⁄2 yd60 in ** 13⁄4 13⁄4 17⁄8 21⁄8 21⁄8 21⁄4 23⁄8 21⁄2 21⁄2 ydGarment measurements (6 8 10) (12 14 16) (18 20 22)Jacket bust 361⁄4 371⁄4 381⁄4 393⁄4 413⁄4 433⁄4 451⁄4 473⁄4 493⁄4 inJacket waist 313⁄4 323⁄4 333⁄4 351⁄4 371⁄4 391⁄4 411⁄4 431⁄4 451⁄4 inJacket back length 283⁄4 29 291⁄4 291⁄2 293⁄4 30 301⁄4 301⁄2 303⁄4 inSkirt A lower edge 39 40 41 42 44 46 48 50 52 inSkirt A length 24 24 24 243⁄4 243⁄4 243⁄4 251⁄2 251⁄2 251⁄2 inShorts B leg width 28 29 30 32 34 37 39 41 43 inShorts B side length 191⁄2 193⁄4 20 201⁄4 201⁄2 203⁄4 21 211⁄4 211⁄2 inPants B leg width 21 21 22 22 23 23 24 24 25 inPants B side length 401⁄2 401⁄2 401⁄2 401⁄2 401⁄2 401⁄2 401⁄2 401⁄2 401⁄2 inBody measurements (6 8 10) (12 14 16) (18 20 22)Bust 301⁄2 311⁄2 321⁄2 34 36 38 40 42 44 inWaist 23 24 25 261⁄2 28 30 32 34 37 inHip 321⁄2 331⁄2 341⁄2 36 38 40 42 44 46 inIMPERIAL567815 piecesABAB
  • 53Reading patternsEach pattern piece will have a seriesof lines, dots, and other symbols printedon it. These symbols help you to alterthe pattern and join the pattern piecestogether. The symbols are universalacross all major paper patterns.PATTERNMARKINGSCutting lineMultisizecutting linesGrainlinesPlace-to-fold lineLengthening andshortening linesSeam line orstitching lineSeam allowanceHem allowanceHemlineButtonholeCombined buttonand buttonholeButton positionDartPleatTuckBust point or hiplineMarkings to betransferred frompattern pieces to thefabric for matchingor to indicate detailSingle notchesDouble notchesTriple notchesZipper placementMany patterns today have more thanone size printed on the tissue paper. Eachsize is clearly labeled and the cutting linesare marked with a different type of linefor each size.Some patterns contain a garment of onesize only. If you are using a single-sizepattern, cut around the tissue paper onthe thick black cutting line before makingany alterations.MULTISIZE PATTERNSSINGLE-SIZE PATTERNSStraight arrow must be placed alongstraight grain, parallel to selvages.Where there is a choice of size lines, follow the desired size line.Where there is one lineonly, it applies to all sizes.Lengthening and shortening linesDartcuttinglineStraight arrowmust be placedon straight grain,parallel to selvages.Notches on both sidesshould match toensure correct edgesare joined together.Open dart is verywide, and fabricis cut away withpattern followingcutting line.Notches are usuallysingle on frontarmhole and doubleon back armhole.Zipper markingsindicate length of seamopening for zipper.Alteration linesindicate bestplace to lengthenor shortenpattern pieces.Darts are marked withlines, and sometimes withdots or circles that matchwhen darts are folded.Pattern pieces withoutgrainline have a place-to-fold line, to be positioneddirectly on fold of fabric,parallel to selvages.}}}}}}
  • 54 Patterns and cutting outTAKING BODY MEASUREMENTSMEASURING YOUR HEIGHTMeasure above the bust, highunder the arms, keeping the tapemeasure flat and straight acrossthe back.This measurement must be takenaround the fullest part of thehips, between the waist and legs.Make sure you are wearinga good-fitting bra and measureover the fullest part of the bust.If your cup size is in excess ofa B, you will probably need todo a bust alteration, althoughsome patterns are now cut toaccommodate larger cup sizes.You will need a tape measure and ruler as well as a helperfor some of the measuring, and a firm chair or stool.Wear close-fitting clothes such as a leotard and leggings.Do not wear shoes.Most paper patterns are designed for a woman 5ft 5in to 5ft 6in(165 to 168cm). If you are shorter or taller than this you may need toadjust the pattern prior to cutting out your fabric.1 Remove your shoes.2 Stand straight, with your back against the wall.3 Place a ruler flat on your head, touching the wall, and markthe wall at this point.4 Step away and measure the distance from the floor to themarked point.Accurate body measurements are needed to determine the correct pattern size to use and to know if anyalterations are required. Pattern sizes are usually chosen by the hip or bust measurement; for tops followthe bust measurement, but for skirts or pants use the hip measurement. If you are choosing a dress pattern,go by whichever of your measurements is the largest.Body measuringThis is the measurement aroundthe smallest part of your waist.Wrap the tape around first to findyour natural waist, then measure.FULL BUSTWAISTCHEST HIPS
  • 55Body measuringTake this just below the waist andjust above the hip bones to give ameasurement across the tummy.Measure around the fullest part ofyour tummy.Hold the end of the tape measureat the base of your neck (where anecklace would lie) and measureto the dent at the end of yourshoulder bone. To find this dentraise your arm slightly.Measure around the neck—snuglybut not too tightly—to determinecollar size.Bend your elbow and place yourhand on your hip, then measurefrom the end of the shoulder overthe elbow to the wrist bone.Take this measurement down thecenter of the back, from the bonybit at the top of the spine, in linewith the shoulders, to the waist.Measure the side of the leg fromthe waist, over the hip, and straightdown the leg to the ankle bone.Sit upright on a firm chairor stool and measure fromthe waist vertically downto the chair.Stand with your legs apart andmeasure the inside of one legfrom the crotch to the ankle bone.HIGH HIPSSHOULDEROUTSIDE LEG INSIDE LEGNECKARM CROTCH DEPTHBACK WAIST
  • 56 Patterns and cutting outThese alterations relate specifically to commercial patterns; the patterns in this book can be altered in asimilar way. Your body measurements are unlikely to be exactly the same as those of your chosen pattern,so you will need to alter the pattern. Here is how to lengthen and shorten pattern pieces, and how to makespecific alterations at the bust, waist and hips, shoulders and back, and to sleeves and pants.Altering patternsIn addition to scissors and pins or tape, you will need a pencil, an eraser, a ruler that is clearlymarked, and possibly a triangle. For many alterations you will also need some paper. Afterpinning or taping the pattern to the paper, you can redraw the pattern lines. Trim away theexcess paper before pinning the pattern to the fabric for cutting out.Using a multisize pattern has many advantages, since you can cut it to suit your uniqueindividual shape—for example, to accommodate a hip measurement that may be two sizesdifferent from a waist measurement, if you are not precisely one size or another.If you are short or tall, or if your arms or legs are shorter or longer than the pattern allows,you will need to adjust the pattern prior to cutting out. There are lengthening and shorteninglines printed on the pattern pieces that will guide you as to the best places. However, you willneed to compare your body shape against the pattern. Alter the front and back by the sameamount at the same points, and always check finished lengths.EQUIPMENTEASY MULTISIZE PATTERNALTERATIONSLENGTHENINGAND SHORTENINGPATTERNSINDIVIDUAL PATTERN ADJUSTMENTSLEEVE BODICEBETWEEN SIZESTo adjust for a widerhip measurement,cut from the smallerpattern size to thelarger, curving the linegently to follow thecontours of the body.If your bodymeasurements fallbetween two patternsizes, cut carefullybetween the twocutting lines for thedifferent sizes.Alter the back neckto waist length belowthe bust dart butabove the waist. Alterthrough the waist dartif there is one.To keep the wrist areaintact on the pattern,alter partway down thesleeve, or at the hem.HemWristBust dartWaistWaist dart
  • 57Altering patternsFITTED DRESS PANTSSKIRTLENGTHENING A PATTERN PIECE1Work out the amount youwant to lengthen by. 3Place some paper behind the pattern andspread the pattern pieces apart to leavea gap of the required amount. Make surethe gap is level along the cut lines.4Pin or tape thepattern piecesto the paper.2Cut through the lengtheningand shortening lines on thepattern, following the lines carefully.Mark between thebust and waist toalter the back neckto waist length.Alter below thehipline if notaltering at the hem.Alter below thehem if not alteringat the hipline.Bust dartWaistHiplineAlter below hiplineor at hem. HiplineHem HemIncrease crotchdepth below thedarts, but abovethe crotchline.Make lengthalterations midwaydown the leg toretain the leg width.Crotchline
  • 58 Patterns and cutting out3Press with your fingers to crease the foldsharply, then secure the fold in the patternwith tape.2Fold the lengthening and shortening line on tothe drawn line so the two lines meet neatly.1Work out the amount you want to shorten by.Mark this amount at intervals above thelengthening and shortening lines, then draw aline through the marks using the ruler as a guide.2Place paperbehind the pattern,making sure that thelines of the dart aresmoothly connected.3Tape or pinin place.1Fold the patternthrough thedart to shorten thepattern piece.1If an adjustment isrequired across adart, cut and lengthenthe pattern piecethrough the dart.2Connect the markswith a line, then cutalong the line to removethe surplus pattern.1Using a ruler asa guide, carefullymeasure the newhemline at intervalsfrom the originalhemline on thepattern piece.2After shorteningacross a dart, thelines of the dart maynot be in line. If this isthe case, redraw thedart from dot to dot,using a ruler to ensurethat the lines are straight.2Using a ruler asa guide, add onthe required amount,marking dots at intervalsalong the pattern paperfirst, then connectingthem with a line.1Place a sheet ofpattern paper underthe tissue at the hemedge and tape down.SHORTENING A PATTERN PIECELENGTHENING ACROSS DARTSLENGTHENING A HEM EDGESHORTENING ACROSS DARTSSHORTENING A HEM EDGE
  • 59Altering patterns1Mark the desirednew bust pointon the pattern.1Cut the patternvertically andhorizontally straightthrough the bust point.1Mark the desired new bustpoint on the pattern. 1Mark the desired new bustpoint on the pattern.1If you have a high bust you may need to raise thepoint of the darts. The bust point is nearly alwaysmarked on the pattern. Mark the desired new bustpoint on the pattern.2Redraw the dart, tapering it to the new,higher, point.2Cut a rectangle outof the bust dart areaand move it up to thenew position.3Tape paper behind and redrawthe side seam.2Spread the cut patternpieces apart by about1/4in (6mm) per cup sizeover a B cup.3Tape paper behind and redraw the cuttinglines as necessary.2Redraw the dart, tapering itto the new, lower point.2Cut a rectangle out of the bust dart areaand move it to the new, lower, position.3Tape paper behind and redrawthe side seam.Dart redrawn tooriginal lengthSome paper patterns today feature various cup sizes, but most are cut to accommodate a B cup,including those in this book. If you are larger than this, you will probably need to adjust yourpattern before cutting out. As a general rule, when spreading the pattern pieces apart, tryadjusting by 1⁄4in (6mm) per cup size over a B cup.BUSTRAISING A BUST DARTLOWERING A BUST DARTRAISING A BUST DARTSUBSTANTIALLYLOWERING A BUST DART SUBSTANTIALLYINCREASING A BUST DARTFOR A FULL BUST
  • 60 Patterns and cutting outRAISING A CURVEDBUST SEAMINCREASING THE WAIST ON A FITTED SKIRT INCREASING THE WAIST ON A GORED SKIRTLOWERING A CURVEDBUST SEAMADJUSTING A SEAM FORA FULL BUSTMost people’s waists and hips are out of proportion when compared to the measurementsof a paper pattern. To alter the pattern to suit your body shape, adjust the pieces for the waistfirst and then do the hip pieces.WAIST AND HIPS1Cut the center front pattern in the shoulderarea and spread the cut pattern pieces apartby the required amount. Tape paper behind thepattern pieces.1Tape paper under the center front and side frontpatterns in the bust area.1Fold a pleat in the shoulder area on the centerfront pattern to raise the bust point by therequired amount.2Fold both the centerfront and the side frontpatterns on the lengtheningand shortening lines by thesame amount.3Redrawthe armhole,raising it by thesame amount.2Divide the totalincrease requiredby two and add thisamount at the point of thebust at each seam line.3Draw new seamlines from thesepoints, taperingthem into the oldseam lines.SidefrontCenterfrontSidefrontCenterfrontSidefrontCenterfront2Cut both the centerfront and side frontpatterns on the lengtheningand shortening lines.Spread the cut patternpieces apart by the amountin the pleat and tape paperbehind them.3Redraw thearmhole,lowering it by thesame amount.1Increase the waistat the side seams.2Tape paper behind thepattern pieces. Dividethe total increase required byfour, since there are four seam lines.3Add this amount on the paperat the waist edge at eachseam line. Draw new seam linesfrom these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.1Tape paper behind the patternpieces. Since there are manyseams, divide the total increaserequired by the number of seam lines.2Add this amount on the paperat the waist edge at eachseam line. Draw new seam linesfrom these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.Side front Front
  • 61Altering patternsINCREASING THE WAISTON A FULL-CIRCLE SKIRTDECREASING THE WAIST ONA FITTED SKIRTINCREASING THE WAISTON A FITTED DRESSDECREASING THE WAISTON A GORED SKIRTINCREASING THE WAISTON A PRINCESS-LINE DRESSDECREASING THE WAISTON A FULL-CIRCLE SKIRTCenterfront1Tape paper behind the waist area of the frontand back pattern pieces. Divide the total increaserequired by four, since there are four seam lines.1Tape paper behind the waist area of each patternpiece. Divide the total increase required by thenumber of seam lines.1Decrease the waist at the side seams. Dividethe total decrease required by four, since there arefour seam lines.1As there are many seams, divide the totaldecrease required by the number of seam lines.1Tape paper behind eachpattern piece.1Carefully check the waist circumference onthe pattern against your waist measurement.2Draw a new, lower waist stitching line onthe pattern. Adjust the finished lengthof the skirt if necessary.2Add this amount onthe paper at the waistarea of each seam line. Drawnew seam lines from thesepoints, tapering them intothe old seam lines.3If more increaseis required, thedarts can also bemade narrower.2Add this amount on the paper at the waist areaof each seam line. Draw new seam lines fromthese points, tapering them into the old seam lines.2Mark this amount on the pattern at thewaist edge at each seam line. Draw newseam lines from these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.2Draw a new, higher waist stitching line onthe pattern. Adjust the finished length ofthe skirt if necessary.SidefrontFrontSide front2Mark this amount on the pattern at thewaist edge at each seam line. Draw newseam lines from these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.
  • 62 Patterns and cutting outDECREASING THE WAISTON A FITTED DRESSINCREASING A FITTEDSKIRT AT THE HIPLINEADJUSTING A FITTED SKIRTFOR A LARGE REAR ENDDECREASING A FITTEDSKIRT AT THE HIPLINEDECREASING THE WAIST ONA PRINCESS-LINE DRESS1Tape paper behind the pattern pieces.Divide the total increase required by four, sincethere are four seam lines.1Cut verticallythrough the dartto the hem on theskirt back pattern.1Divide the total decrease requiredby four, since there are four seam lines.1Divide the total decreaserequired by the numberof seam lines.2Add this amount on the paper at the hipline.Draw new seam lines from these points, taperingthem into the old seam lines.2Cut through thehipline, stoppingbefore you reach theside seam.3Spread the cut patternpieces apart by therequired amount and tapepaper behind them.2Mark this amount on the pattern at the hip oneach seam line. Draw new seam lines straightdown to the hem from these points, tapering themup into the waist.4Redrawthe dart.2Mark this amount on thepattern at the waist on eachseam line. Draw new seam linesfrom these points, taperingthem into the old seam lines.SidefrontFront1Divide the total decrease required byfour, since there are four seam lines.2Mark this amount on the pattern atthe waist on each seam line. Drawnew seam lines from these points,tapering them into the old seam lines.
  • 63Altering patternsMAKING A LARGE INCREASE AT THEHIPLINE ON A FITTED DRESSADJUSTING A FITTED SKIRTFOR EXTRA-LARGE HIPSADJUSTING AT THE HIPLINE TOALLOW FOR A HOLLOW BACKADJUSTING A GORED SKIRTAT THE HIPLINE1Divide the totalincrease requiredby four.1A hollow back requiresa shorter center backseam. Draw a horizontalline on the patternfrom the center backacross the hipline.2Fold along the lineto make a pleat atthe center back thattakes up the requiredreduction. Taper the pleatto nothing at the sideseam. Tape in place.2Make a horizontal cutin each pattern piecethe length of this amountand just below the waist.3Cut vertically fromthis point to the hem.4Spread the cutpattern piecesapart by the requiredamount and tape paperbehind them.5Redraw theside seam.1For an increase over2in (5cm), cut eachpattern piece verticallybetween the dart andthe side seam.1Since there are many seams, divide the totaldecrease or increase required by thenumber of seam lines.3Mark the reductionat the hipline onthe pattern or mark theincrease on the paper.2If increasing, tapepaper behind thepattern pieces.4Draw new seam linesstraight down to thehem from these points,tapering them up intothe waist.2Divide the total increase required by four.Spread the cut pattern pieces apart by thisamount and tape paper behind them.3If the waist is toremain the same,draw in a second dartto remove the increaseat the waist.Side front CenterCenter back seam
  • 64 Patterns and cutting out1Cut along the twodrawn lines (see far left).1Cut along the twodrawn lines (see left).3Tape paper behind.Redraw the line toclose the gap alongthe shoulder.1Draw a vertical line 8in (20cm) long on thepattern from the middle of the shoulder.1Starting at the armhole, slashthe pattern about 11/4in (3cm)below and parallel with theshoulder line, stopping beforeyou reach the neck seam line.2Spread the cut pattern apartto straighten the shoulderline. Tape paper behind.3Redraw the line to closethe gap at the armhole.2Draw a second, horizontal, line fromthe end of the first line to the armhole. 2Spread the cutpattern piecesapart to accommodatethe required increasein shoulder length.2Overlap the cutpieces by the amountrequired to reduce theshoulder length.3Tape paperbehind. Redrawthe shoulder line.1Slash the pattern 11/4in (3cm)below the shoulder line andparallel with it.2Overlap the cut pieces bythe required amount andtape in place.3Lower the armhole by the sameamount, marking the newcutting line on the pattern.4Raise the armhole by theamount added at the shoulder.Mark the new cutting line onthe paper.Alterations can be made to accommodate sloping shoulders, square shoulders, and backsthat may be wider or narrower than the pattern allowances. It’s important to ensure thatthese alterations have a minimum effect on the armhole. Sleeves need to allow for movement,so should not be too tight; pattern pieces can be enlarged as necessary. Alterations canalso be made for thin arms.SHOULDERS, BACK,AND SLEEVESADJUSTING TO FIT SQUARE SHOULDERSPREPARING THE PATTERNFOR BROAD OR NARROWSHOULDER ALTERATIONSADJUSTING TO FITBROAD SHOULDERSADJUSTING TO FITNARROW SHOULDERSADJUSTING TO FIT SLOPING SHOULDERS
  • 65Altering patternsENLARGING A FITTED SLEEVE ENLARGING THE HEAD OF A FITTED SLEEVE1Cut the sleevepattern verticallydown the center.3Tape paperbehind.1Cut the patternpiece vertically downthe center, stoppingbefore you reach thewrist seam line.1Cut the sleeve patternhorizontally fromarmhole to armhole. Cuta second, vertical linealmost to the sleeve head.1Draw a verticalline at the centerof the sleeve patternfrom the sleeve headto the wrist.2Spread the cutpattern piecesapart to accommodatethe required increasein sleeve width.2Spread the cutpattern piecesapart to accommodatethe required increase,tapering to nothingat the wrist.3Tape paperbehind.4You may alsoneed to make thearmhole slightly larger.If this is the case, addhalf the increase addedto the sleeve head toeach bodice side seam.2Fold along the lineto make a pleat thattakes up the requiredreduction. Taper the pleatto nothing at the sleevehead. Tape in place.3Reduce the sideseams on thegarment by half theamount of the reductionon the sleeve.2Pull the outsidepoints of thehorizontal cut upwardto accommodatethe required increasein width.3Tape paper behind.Redraw the sleeveside seams.INCREASING A FITTED SLEEVEAT THE UNDERARMDECREASING A FITTED SLEEVETO ACCOMMODATE THIN ARMS
  • 66 Patterns and cutting out1Tape paper behind the patternpieces. Divide the total increaserequired by eight, since there areeight seam lines.1Divide the total decreaserequired by eight, sincethere are eight seam lines.1Adjust back andfront pants patternpieces by the sameamount. Cut alongthe upper lengtheningand shortening lines.1Adjust back andfront pants patternpieces by the sameamount. Cut along theupper lengthening andshortening lines.2Spread the cutpattern piecesapart to accommodatethe required increaseat the center, tapering tonothing at the side seam.3Tape paperbehind. Redrawthe crotch edge.2Overlap the cutpieces by theamount required toreduce the crotch depthat the center, taperingto nothing at the sideseam. Tape in place.2Add this amount on the paper at thewaist edge at each seam line. Drawnew seam lines from these points, taperingthem into the old seam lines.2Mark this amount on the pattern at thewaist edge at each seam line. Draw newseam lines from these points, tapering theminto the old seam lines.Alterations to pants, to accommodate a large belly, wide hips, or a prominent or flat rear end,can be more complicated than those on other pattern pieces, and need to be done in thecorrect order. Crotch depth alterations are done first, followed by width alterations, then crotchlength alterations, and finally pant leg length. The crotch depth line is only marked on the backpattern pieces.PANTSINCREASING DEPTH AT CROTCH SEAMINCREASING THE WAISTLINEDECREASING DEPTH AT THE CROTCH SEAMDECREASING THE WAISTLINE
  • 67Altering patternsINCREASING ATTHE HIPLINEINCREASING LENGTH AT CROTCH POINTADJUSTING FOR ALARGE REAR ENDDECREASING LENGTH AT CROTCH POINTDECREASING ATTHE HIPLINE1If the pants are too tight betweenthe legs, this alteration may berequired. The crotch length may needto be increased by a different amounton the front and the back. Tape paperunder the crotch seam.1If the pants are too loose between the legs, thisalteration may be required. Mark the inside legseam with the position of the new crotch point.1Tape paperbehind thepattern pieces.Divide the totalincrease requiredby four, since thereare four seam lines.1Cut horizontallythrough the hiplineon the pantsback pattern.1Divide the totaldecrease requiredby four, since thereare four seam lines.3For straightpants, draw thenew seam linesstraight down fromthe hip to the hem.2Spread the cutpattern piecesapart by the requiredamount and tapepaper behind them.3Redraw thecrotch edge.You may wishto combine thisadjustment witha crotch depthadjustment onjust the back.2Draw a new seam linefrom the new crotchpoint, tapering it into theold seam line.2Add the required amountto the inside leg seam on thepaper. Draw a new seam line fromthe new crotch point, tapering itinto the old seam line.2Mark this amounton the patternat the hipline. Drawnew seam linesfrom these points,tapering them intothe old seam lines.2Add this amounton the paper atthe hipline. Drawnew seam linesfrom these points,tapering them intothe old seam lines.
  • 68 Patterns and cutting outWhen using a new pattern for the first time, or if you have made pattern alterations, it is alwaysa good idea to try out the pattern in muslin, making a test garment called a toile. This will tell youif the garment is going to fit you, or whether more alterations are required. It is also a goodopportunity to confirm that the style suits your figure type. You will need a helper, or failing that,a dressmaker’s dummy.Making a toileWhen you try the toile on, if it is too big there will be surplus fabric. Pleat and pin outthe surplus fabric, making the pleating equal on both the left- and right-hand sides ofthe garment. Take off the toile and measure the surplus amount. Alter the patternpieces to match by pinning out the surplus tissue.TOILE TOO BIGTHE WAIST ON THEBODICE AND SKIRTIf the waist is too big, thiscan easily be adjusted bytaking more fabric into thebust dart. If you adjustthe bust dart on the bodice,you will need to alter the skirtdart, too, so they join up.THE HIP ON THE SKIRTIf the hip is too loose, pleat andpin out the surplus fabric on theside seams. Do this equally onboth sides. Measure the surplusamount and take in the hiplineon the pattern pieces accordingly(see Decreasing a fitted skirt at thehipline, p.62).SHOULDER ADJUSTMENTIf the shoulder is too wide itwill need a sloping shoulderadjustment (see page 64).BACK ADJUSTMENTIf the back is too loose, pleatand pin out the surplus fabricparallel to the center back seam.Do this equally on both sides.Make the alteration downthe center back seam on theappropriate pattern pieces.TOILE TOO BIG
  • 69Making a toileIf the toile is too tight, it will require more fabricto cover the contours of the body and you willneed to make further alterations to the patternpieces. For small increases (up to 11⁄2in/4cm),you can adjust the toile as described belowand then alter the pattern pieces accordingly,redrawing the seam lines. For more substantialincreases, after altering the pattern pieces youwill need to make a new toile and try it on.THE HIP ON THE SKIRTUnpick the side seams and measure the increaserequired. When you have adjusted the toile with extramuslin and made sure that the fit is right, you canalter the pattern pieces accordingly (see pp. 62–63).SHOULDER ADJUSTMENTIf the sleeve is tight at the topor at the underarm, it is bestto alter the pattern pieces(see p. 65) and then makea new sleeve for the toile.THE BUST ON THE BODICEIf a small increase is required in the bust, unpick the side seams andmeasure the increase required. Then make the required alteration tothe pattern pieces. If a larger increase is required, the whole patternpiece will need to be recut (see Increasing a bust dart, p.59). To besure the alteration is successful, make a new toile bodice.If the toile is too small, the fabric will“pull”where it is tight. The garment shown belowis too tight over the bust and also over the high hip area. The pattern will need to be adjustedto allow more fabric in these areas. This toile is also snug at the top of the sleeve; thisneeds to be adjusted, too.TOILE TOO SMALLADJUSTING A TOILE THATIS TOO SMALL1Where the toile is too tight, unpick the sideseam on each side, until the garment hangswithout pulling.2Measure the gap at the fullest point betweenthe stitching lines on the opened-out seam.It should be the same on both sides of the body.3Divide this measurement in half—for example,if the gap is 11⁄2in (4cm) at the fullest point,then 3⁄4in (2cm) needs to be added to each sideseam seam line.4Using a f elt-tip pen, mark the top and bottomof the alteration directly on the toile. Alsomark the fullest point of the alteration.5When the toile has been removed, addmuslin to the seam in the given area atthe fullest point, tapering back to the originalseam at each end.6Try the toile on again to be sure youralterations have made it fit properly.Then measure the alterations and makeadjustments to the relevant pattern pieces.
  • 70 Patterns and cutting outGRAIN ON WOVEN FABRICSCutting out can make or break your project. But first you need to examine the fabric in the store, looking forany flaws, such as a crooked pattern, and checking to see if the fabric has been cut properly from the roll—that is at a right angle to the selvage. If it has not been cut properly, you will need to straighten the edgebefore cutting out. If the fabric is creased, press it; if washable, wash it to prevent shrinkage later. After thispreparation, you will be ready to lay the pattern pieces on the fabric, pin in place, and cut out.Cutting outIt is important that pattern pieces are cut on the correct grain; this will make the fabric hangcorrectly. The grain is the direction in which the yarns or threads that make up the fabric lie. Themajority of pattern pieces need to be placed with the straight of grain symbol running parallelto the warp yarn. Some fabrics have a nap due to the pile, which means the fabric shadowswhen it is smoothed in one direction. A fabric with a one-way design or uneven stripes is alsodescribed as having a nap. Fabrics with nap are generally cut out with the nap running down,whereas those without nap can be cut out at any angle.FABRIC GRAINAND NAPYarns that run the length of the fabricare called warp yarns. They are strongerthan weft yarns and less likely to stretch.Weft yarns run crosswise, overand under the warp yarns.The bias grain is diagonal—runningat 45 degrees to the warp and weft.A garment cut on the bias will followthe contours of the body.The selvage is the woven,nonfrayable edge that runsparallel to the warp yarn.WeftBiasSelvage Warp
  • 71Cutting outCUTTING ON A STRIPE LINE TO OBTAIN A STRAIGHT EDGEPULLING A THREAD TO OBTAIN A STRAIGHT EDGENAP DUE TO PILE NAP DUE TO ONE-WAY DESIGN NAP DUE TO STRIPESFabrics such as velvet, corduroy, and velourwill show a difference in color, dependingon whether the nap is running up or down.A one-way pattern—in this case flowers—that runslenthwise in the fabric will be upside down on oneside when the fabric is folded back on itself.If the stripes do not match on both sides when thefabric is folded back, they are uneven and the fabricwill need a nap layout.To check if the fabric has been cut properly from the roll, fold it selvage to selvage and see if itlies flat. If the cut ends are uneven and do not match, use one of the following methods to makethe edge straight. Then press the fabric.FABRIC PREPARATIONOn checks and stripes, cut along the edge of oneof the boldest stripes to achieve a straight edge.1On a loose-woven fabric you can pulla weft thread to get a straight edge.First snip the selvage, then find a singlethread and tug it gently to pull it out.2The fabric will gather along thepulled weft thread until the threadcan be removed completely.3Carefully cut along the space left bythe pulled-out weft thread.
  • 72 Patterns and cutting out1The “to fold”symbol indicatesthe pattern piece is to be pinnedcarefully to the folded edge of thefabric. To check the straight of grainon the other pattern pieces, placethe grain arrow so that it looksparallel to the selvage, then pinto secure at one end of the arrow.Straight of grain arrow Selvages2Measure from the pinned endto the selvage and make a noteof the measurement.3Measure from the other endof the arrow to the selvage.4Move the pattern piece slightlyuntil both measurements arethe same, then pin in place.5Once the pattern is straight,pin around the rest of it, placingpins in the seam allowances.FoldTo fold symbolFor cutting out, fabric is usually folded selvage to selvage. With the fabric folded,the pattern is pinned on top, and both the right- and left-side pieces are cut out at thesame time. If pattern pieces have to be cut from single-layer fabric, remember to cutmatching pairs. If a fabric has a design, lay the fabric design-side upward so that youcan arrange the pattern pieces to show off the design. If you have left- and right-sidepattern pieces, they are cut on single fabric with the fabric right-side up and the patternright-side up.PATTERN LAYOUTPINNING THE PATTERN TO THE FABRIC
  • 73Cutting outGENERAL GUIDETO LAYOUTPlace the pattern pieces on the fabric with the printed sideuppermost. Some pieces will need to be placed to a fold.If a piece has to be cut twice ona fold, this will need to be doneafter the other pieces have beencut and the fabric can be refolded.LAYOUT FOR FABRICS WITH A NAP ORA ONE-WAY DESIGNFold“Top”of fabric, fromwhich direction thenap runsFoldSelvagesSelvagesThe darker shadedpieces are cut outa second timeIf using a single layer of fabric,the pieces will need to be cuttwice, turning the pattern overfor the second piece.If your fabric needs to be cut out with a nap, all the pattern pieces need to beplaced so the nap will run in the same direction in the completed garment.
  • 74 Patterns and cutting out1Place one of the skirt pattern pieceson the fabric and pin in place.1Mark the boldest lines of the stripesor checks around the armhole onthe front bodice pattern.2Place the sleeve pattern onto the armhole, matchingthe notches, and copy the markson to the sleeve pattern.3Place the sleeve pattern on to the fabric, matching themarks to the corresponding bold lines, and pin in place.2Mark on the pattern the positionof the boldest lines of the checksor stripes.3Place the adjoiningskirt pattern piecealongside, with notchesmatching and sideseams even. Transferthe marks to thesecond pattern piece.4Slide the secondpattern pieceacross, matching up thebold lines. Pin in place.For fabrics with a stripe or check pattern, a little more care is needed when laying outthe pattern pieces. If the checks and stripes are running across or down the length of thefabric when cutting out, they will run the same direction in the finished garment. So it isimportant to place the pattern pieces to ensure that the checks and stripes match andthat they run together at the seams. If possible, try to place the pattern pieces so eachhas a stripe down the center. With a checked fabric, be aware of the hemline placementon the pattern.STRIPES AND CHECKSEVEN AND UNEVEN STRIPES EVEN AND UNEVEN CHECKSMATCHING STRIPES OR CHECKS ON A SKIRTMATCHING STRIPES OR CHECKS AT THE SHOULDEREVEN STRIPES When a cornerof the fabric is folded back diagonally,the stripes will meet up at the fold.UNEVEN STRIPES When a cornerof the fabric is folded back diagonally,the stripes will not match at the fold.EVEN CHECKS When a corner of thefabric is folded back diagonally, thechecks will be symmetrical on both ofthe fabric areas.UNEVEN CHECKS When a cornerof the fabric is folded back diagonally,the checks will be uneven lenthwise,widthwise, or both.
  • 75Cutting outLAYOUT FOR EVEN CHECKS ON FOLDED FABRICLAYOUT FOR EVEN STRIPES ON FOLDED FABRICLAYOUT FOR UNEVEN CHECKS OR STRIPES ON UNFOLDED FABRICFabric is foldedto form a doublelayer with checksmatching onboth layersIf fabric hasprominent stripe,align stripe alongstraight seamIf fabric hasa prominentstripe, align thecenter of thesleeve with itCollar is cutlenthwisealong stripeYoke is cutlenthwise, withseam line alignedwith a prominentlengthwise stripeHem foldline is placedon a prominent stripePattern piece is cutout twice from singlelayer of fabricBars align on bothcollar piecesCenter back is aligned withprominent lengthwise stripeCenter frontis alignedwith prominentlengthwise stripeChecks arematched at seamsCenter back is alignedwith the foldPocket and yokecan be cut onbias grain forspecial effectsFoldCollar and cuff can be cuton the lengthwise grainHem foldline is aligned withprominent crosswise barFabric is foldedalong prominentlengthwise stripeSelvageSelvageCuff is cutlenthwisealong stripeFabric is foldedto form doublelayer with stripesmatching onboth layersSelvage
  • 76 Patterns and cutting outCareful, smooth cutting around the pattern pieces will ensure that they join together accurately.Always cut out on a smooth, flat surface such as a table—the floor is not ideal—and be sureyour scissors are sharp. Use the full blade of the scissors on long, straight edges, sliding theblades along the fabric; use smaller cuts around curves. Do not nibble or snip at the fabric.Once the pattern pieces have been cut out, but before you remove the pattern, you will needto mark the symbols shown on the pattern through to the fabric. There are various ways to dothis. Tailor’s bastes are good for circles and dots, or these can be marked with a water orair-soluble pen. When using a pen, it’s a good idea to test it on a piece of scrap fabric first. Forlines, you can use trace bastes or a tracing wheel with dressmaker’s carbon paper.CUTTING OUTACCURATELYPATTERN MARKINGIf you are right-handed, place your left hand on the pattern and fabric to holdthem in place, and cut cleanly with the scissor blades at a right angle to the fabric.These symbols need to bemarked on to the fabric, since theyare matching points. One of theeasiest ways to do this is to cutout the mirror image of the notchesin the fabric. Rather than cuttingout double or triple notchesseparately, cut straight across frompoint to point.You can cut a small clip intothe fabric to mark the dots thatindicate the top of the shoulderon a sleeve. Alternatively, thesecan be marked with tailor’s bastes(see opposite).A small clip or snip into the fabricis a useful way to mark some of thelines that appear on a pattern, suchas the center front line and foldlinesor notches and dart ends.HOW TO CUTMARKING DOTSMARKING NOTCHESTRACE BASTESCLIPPING LINES2Carefully pull away the tissue. Cut through the loops, then gentlyseparate the layers of fabric to show the threads. Snip apart to leavethread tails in both of the fabric layers.1This is a really useful technique to mark center front lines, foldlines, andplacement lines. With double thread in your needle, stitch a row of loopystitches, sewing along the line marked on the pattern.
  • 77Cutting out2Now stitch throughthe dot again, thistime from top to bottomto make a loop. Cutthrough the loop, thensnip off excess threadto leave a tail.1Since there are often dots of different sizes on thepattern, choose a different color thread for eachdot size. It is then easy to match the colors as well asthe dots. Have double thread in your needle,unknotted. Insert the needle through the dot fromright to left, leaving a tail of thread. Be sure to gothrough the pattern and both layers of fabric.3Carefully pull the patternaway. On the top side youwill have four threads markingeach dot. When you turn thefabric over, the dot positions willbe marked with an X.4Gently turn back the twolayers of fabric to separatethem, then cut through thethreads so that thread tailsare left in both pieces of fabric.TAILOR’S BASTESFELT-TIP PENSTRACING PAPER AND WHEEL1This method can onlybe used with a singlelayer of fabric. Press thepoint of the pen into thecenter of the dot markedon the pattern.2Carefully removethe pattern. Thepen marks will havegone through the patternon to the fabric. Be surenot to press the fabricbefore the pen marks areremoved or they maybecome permanent.3Remove the carbonpaper and carefullypull off the pattern. Therewill be dotted linesmarked on your fabric.1This method is notsuitable for all fabrics,since the marks may notbe easy to remove. Slidedressmaker’s carbonpaper against the wrongside of the fabric.2Run a tracing wheelalong the patternlines (a ruler will help youmake straight lines).
  • GeneraltechniquesKnowing the correct type of seam or stitch to use is essential for making a successfulgarment. Here the fundamentals of stitches, seams, and darts are described, as well ashow to make sleeves, collars, and pockets, and adding zippers, buttons, and hooks.
  • 80When sewing by hand, cut your piece of thread to be no longerthan the distance from your fingertips to your elbow. If the threadis much longer than this, it will knot as you sew.The ends of the thread must be secured firmly. A knot (see left) isfrequently used and is the preferred choice for temporary stitches.For permanent stitching a double stitch is a better option.Although modern sewing machines have eliminated the need for a lot of hand sewing, it is still necessaryto use hand stitching to prepare the fabric prior to permanent stitching—these temporary pattern-markingand basting stitches will eventually be removed. Permanent hand stitching is used to finish a garment andto attach fasteners, as well as to help out with a quick repair.Stitches for hand sewingTHREADING THE NEEDLE SECURING THE THREADDOUBLE STITCH1Hold your needle inyour right hand andthe end of the thread inyour left. Keeping thethread still, place theeye of the needle overthe thread.4You are now readyto start your sewing.2If the needle will notslip over the thread,dampen your fingers andrun the moisture across theeye of the needle. Pull thethread through.3At the other endof the thread, tie aknot as shown or securethe thread as shown onthe right.Slip the eye of theneedle over the thread.Pull thethread through.Tie a knot at one end.BACK STITCHLOCKING STITCHMake two smallstitches in thesame place.Start the stitchingwith a knot andfinish by workinga knot at the end.1Takea stitch. 2Go back through the stitch with thethread wrapped under the needle. 3Pull throughto make a knot.General techniques
  • 81A strong, secure stitch tohold two layers permanentlytogether. In addition to beingused for hems, this stitch isoften used to secure biasbindings and linings. Workfrom right to left. Make a short,straight stitch at the edge ofthe fabric.Also called a catch stitch,this is used primarily forsecuring hems. It looks similarto herringbone (right). Workfrom right to left. Take a shorthorizontal stitch into onelayer and then the other.Starting with a knot and, usingsingle thread, make straightstitches, evenly spaced.This stitch gives a very discreetfinish to a hem. Working fromright to left, fold the top edgeof the fabric down and use aslip hem stitch (below left).A very useful stitch, since itis secure yet has somemovement in it. It is used tosecure hems and interlinings.Work from left to right. Takea small horizontal stitch intoone layer and then the other,so the thread crosses itself.Make long stitcheswith a short spacebetween each one.FLAT FELL STITCHSLIP HEM STITCHBASIC BASTESBLIND HEM STITCHHERRINGBONE STITCHLONG AND SHORT BASTESThere are various hand stitches that can be used to hold a hem in place. Whichever of these youchoose, make sure the stitches do not show on the right side.Each of the many types of basting stitch has its own individual use. Basic bastes holdtwo or more pieces of fabric together. Long and short bastes are an alternative version ofthe basic basting stitch, often used when the basting will stay in the work for some time.HEM STITCHESBASTING STITCHESVery similar to basting (seebelow), but used more fordecorative purposes. Work fromright to left. Run the needle inand out of the fabric to createeven stitches and spaces.Often used to highlight theedge of a completed garment,such as a collar. Work from rightto left. Make small stitchesabout 1⁄16in (2mm) long, withspaces between of at leastthree times that length.RUNNING STITCH PRICK STITCHThere are a number of hand stitches that can be used during the construction of a garment.Some are for decorative purposes, while others are more functional.HAND STITCHESStitches for hand sewing
  • 82TIE THE ENDS REVERSE STITCH LOCKING STITCHWhen making a garment, fabric is joined together using seams. The most common seam is a plain seam,which is suitable for a wide variety of fabrics and garments. However, there are many other seams to beused as appropriate, depending on the fabric and garments being constructed.STRAIGHT STITCH ZIGZAG STITCH 3-STEP ZIGZAG STITCH2Pull the loopthrough to the top.1Pull on the top thread; itwill pull up a loop—this isthe bobbin thread.1When starting,stitch a couple ofstitches forward, thenhold in the reversebutton and reverseover them. Continueforward again.1When starting,press the lockingstitch and stitch, thencontinue forward.2At the endof the seam,reverse again tosecure the stitches.2At the endof the seam,press the lockingstich again.3Tie the twothreads together.Used for most applications. The length of thestitch can be altered from 0.5 to 5.0 on mostsewing machines.To neaten seam edges and for securing anddecorative purposes. Both the width and thelength of this stitch can be altered.Made up of small, straight stitches. This stitch isdecorative as well as functional. The stitch lengthand width can be altered.SECURING THE THREADSTITCHES MADE WITHA MACHINEMachine stitches need to be secured at the end of a seam to prevent them from comingundone. This can be done by hand, tying the ends of the thread, or using the machine witha reverse stitch or a locking stitch, which stitches three or four stitches in the same place.The sewing machine will stitch plain seams and decorative seams as well as buttonholesof various styles. The length and width of all buttonholes can be altered to suit the garment.Machine stitches and seamsGeneral techniques
  • 83BLIND HEM STITCHBASIC BUTTONHOLE STITCHDECORATIVE STITCHESOVEREDGE STITCHROUND-END BUTTONHOLESTITCHSTRETCH STITCHKEYHOLE BUTTONHOLESTITCHMade in conjunction with the blind hem foot.A combination of straight stitches and a zigzagstitch (see opposite page). Used to secure hems.Square on both ends. Used on all stylesof garment.Sewing machines are capable of producing decorative linear stitches. These canbe used to enhance the surface of work or a seam as they add interest to edges.Or, when worked as many rows together, they can be used to create a piece ofembroidered fabric.Made in conjunction with the overedge foot. The stitchis used for neatening the edge of fabric. The width andlength of the stitch can be altered.One square end and one round end.Used on jackets.Also known as a lightening stitch. This stitchis recommended for stretch knits but is betterused to help control difficult fabrics.One square end and one end shapedlike a loop. Used on jackets.Machine stitches and seams
  • 841Pin the two piecesof fabric together,right side to right side,matching notches.2Place the pins at rightangles to the rawedge at approx 2–3in(5–8cm) intervals.3Baste the twopieces of fabrictogether about 3⁄8in(1cm) from the rawedge, removing the pinsas you get to them.4Using the seamguide on themachine plate to helpyou, place the fabricunder the machinefoot. Turn the handwheel to place theneedle into thefabric, then lower thepresser foot on thesewing machine.5Machine theseam at 5⁄8in(1.5cm), securing it ateither end by yourchosen technique.6Carefullyremove thebasting stitches.7Press the seamflat as it wasstitched, then pressthe seam open.A plain seam is 5⁄8in (1.5cm) wide. It is important that the seam is stitched accurately at thismeasurement, otherwise the garment being made will come out the wrong size and shape.There are guides on the plate of the sewing machine that can be used to help align the fabric.HOW TO MAKEA PLAIN SEAMThis method of neateningis ideal to use on fabricsthat do not fray badly.Using pinking shears,trim as little as possibleoff the raw edge.All sewing machines willmake a zigzag stitch. It isan ideal stitch to keep theedges from fraying and issuitable for all types offabric. Stitch in from theraw edge, then trim backto the zigzag stitch. Usea stitch width of 2.0 anda stitch length of 1.5.PINKED ZIGZAGGEDLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *SEAM NEATENING It is important that the raw edges of the seam are neatened or finished—this will make theseam hard-wearing and prevent fraying. The method of neatening will depend on the styleof garment that is being made and the fabric you are using.General techniques
  • 851Stitch a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam on the rightside of the fabric. Press open.1Stitch a seam 3⁄16in(5mm) from the edge ofthe fabric, with the fabricwrong side to wrong sideso the seam is on the rightside of the garment.5The first seam willbe enclosed by thesecond seam.3Fold the fabric rightside to right side.4Machine thejoined edge againusing a 3⁄8in (1cm)seam allowance.2Trim the seam slightly,then press open.6Press thecompleted seamflat on the right side.2Trim the side of theseam allowance thatis toward the back ofthe garment down toone-third of its width.3Wrap the otherside of the seamallowance around thetrimmed side and pinin position.4Machine alongthe folded pinnededge through alllayers. Press.5When you turnto the right side,there will be two rowsof parallel stitching.Some garments require a strong seam that will withstand frequent washing and wear and tear.A run and fell seam, also known as a flat fell seam, is very strong. It is made on the right side ofa garment and is used on the inside leg seam of jeans and on men’s tailored shirts.RUN AND FELL SEAMA French seam is stitched twice, first on the right side of the work and then on the wrong side,enclosing the first seam. It is traditionally used on delicate garments and on sheer and silk fabrics.FRENCH SEAMLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **Right side of the fabricRight sideof fabricWrong sideof fabricRight sideof fabricMachine stitches and seamsStitched using three threads on the overlocker. Used to neatenthe edge of fabric to prevent fraying.Made using four threads on the overlocker. Used to neaten edgeson difficult fabrics or to construct a seam on stretch knits.3-THREAD OVERLOCK STITCH 4-THREAD OVERLOCK STITCH
  • 86 General techniques1Join the two pieces of fabric on the wrong sidewith a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam. 2Machine again 3⁄16in (5mm) from the firststitching, using either a very narrow zigzagstitch or a stretch stitch. Press.3Trim the raw edge of the fabric close to thesecond row of stitching.Sheer fabrics require specialized care for seam construction because they are very soft anddelicate. The seam shown below is an alternative to a French seam; it is very narrow whenfinished and presses very flat so is less visible on sheer fabrics.This is a great finish to use to neaten the seams on unlined jackets made from wool or linen.It is made by wrapping the raw edge with bias-cut strips.A SEAM FORSHEER FABRICSHONG KONG FINISH1Cut bias strips of silkorganza 3⁄4in (2cm)wide. Good-quality liningfabric or 3⁄4in (2cm) biasbinding can also be used.4Wrap the pressedraw edge over thestitching to the wrongside of the seamallowance.5Pin the wrappedbias strip to thefabric, then press thefolded edge.6Machine the wrappedbias strip to the seam,from the upper side of theseam, stitching alongsidethe edge of the bias.2Stitch one rawedge of the biasstrip to the raw edgeof the seam allowance.3Press the otherraw edge acrossthe stitching.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **
  • 87Machine stitches and seamsNot all sewing is straight lines. The work will have curves and corners that require negotiationto produce sharp clean angles and curves on the right side. The technique for stitching acorner shown below applies to corners of all angles. On a thick fabric, the technique is slightlydifferent, with a stitch taken across the corner, and on a fabric that frays badly the corner isreinforced with a second row of stitches.STITCHING CORNERSAND CURVESSTITCHING A CORNERSTITCHING A CORNER ON HEAVY FABRIC2Stitch a seam at5⁄8in (1.5cm).1On a thick fabric it is verydifficult to achieve a sharppoint, so instead a single stitchis taken across the corner. First,stitch to the corner.5Lower the presser foot andcontinue stitching alongthe other side.1Pin the fabric together,right side to right side. 4Raise the presser foot and turnthe fabric through 90 degreesto pivot at the corner.3On reaching the corner,insert the machineneedle into the fabric.6The stitching linesare at right anglesto each other, whichmeans the finished cornerwill have a sharp pointwhen turned through tothe right side.2At the corner, insert theneedle into the fabric,then lift the presser foot. Turnthe fabric 45 degrees. Put thefoot down again and makeone stitch.3With the needle in thefabric, lift the foot and turnthe fabric 45 degrees again.Lower the foot and continuestitching along the other side.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **
  • 88 General techniquesSTITCHING A REINFORCED CORNERSTITCHING AN INNERCORNERSTITCHING AN INNERCURVESTITCHING AN OUTERCURVE1On the wrong sideof the fabric, stitchalong one side of thecorner to make a 5⁄8in(1.5cm) seam.6Remove the surplusstitches in the seamallowance by unpicking.2Take the machiningthrough to the edgeof the fabric.3Stitch the otherside of the cornerat a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance, againmachining to the edgeof the fabric.4The two stitchinglines will overlapat the corner.5Stitch exactly overthe first two stitchinglines, this time pivotingat the corner (seeStitching a corner,steps 3–5, p.87).2Clip through theseam allowanceinto the corner.1Machine accuratelyat 5⁄8in (1.5cm) fromthe edge, pivoting atthe corner (see Stitchinga corner, steps 3–5,p.000).1Place the rightsides of thefabric together.1Put the rightsides of the fabrictogether and stitcha 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam.2Stitch a seam at 5⁄8in(1.5cm) from the edge.Be sure the stitching linefollows the curve (use thestitching guides on theneedle plate, p.26, to help).2Follow the curve andkeep the stitching lineat a uniform distance fromthe edge.
  • 89Reducing seam bulkCut along one side of the seam allowanceto reduce the fabric by half to one-thirdof its original width.4Understitch bymaching the seamallowances on to thewrong side (see p.90).3Turn to the rightside and press.1Stitch the seam onthe inner curve. 2Layer the seam(see above), thencut out V notches toreduce the bulk.It is important that the seams used for construction do not cause bulk on the right side. To make sure this doesnot happen, the seam allowances need to be reduced in size by a technique known as layering a seam. Theymay also require V shapes to be removed, which is known as notching, or the seam allowance may be clipped.Reducing seam bulkOn the majority of fabrics, if the seam is on the edge of the work, the amount fabric in the seamneeds to be reduced. Leave the seam allowance closest to the outside of the garment full width,but reduce the seam allowance that lies closest to the body.For an inner curve to lie flat, the seam will need to be layered and notched, then understitchedto hold it in place (see p.90).LAYERING A SEAMREDUCING SEAM BULKON AN INNER CURVELEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *
  • 90 General techniquesAn outer curve also needs layering and notching or clipping to allow the seam to be turned tothe right side, after which it is understitched.REDUCING SEAM BULKON AN OUTER CURVETop-stitching and understitching are two methods to finish edges. Top-stitching is meant tobe seen on the right side of the work, whereas understitching is not visible from the right side.FINISHING EDGESUnderstitching secures aseam on the fabric’s edge. Ithelps stop the seam fromrolling to the right side. First,make the seam, layer (seep.89), turn to the right side,and press. Working from theright side, machine the seamallowance to the facing or thefabric lining. Open the seam;push the allowance over thelayered allowance. Machinethe seam allowance down.A top-stitch is a decorative,sharp finish to an edge. Usea longer stitch length, of 3.0or 3.5, and machine on theright side of the work, usingthe edge of the machinefoot as a guide.TOP-STITCHING UNDERSTITCHINGLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1Make the seam, stitching alongthe outer curve.4Turn through to the right side and press.5Understitch the seam allowances (see below) to finish.2Layer the seam (see p.89).3Clip through the seamallowances to reduce bulk.
  • 91DartsThis is the most common type of dart and is used to give shaping to the bust in the bodice.It is also found at the waist in skirts and pants to give shape from the waist to the hip.Our bodies have curves, and the straight line of the dart may not sit closely enough to our ownpersonal shape. The dart can be stitched slightly concave or convex so it follows our contours.Do not curve the dart out by more than 1/8in (3mm) from the straight line.PLAIN DARTSHAPING DARTS TO FITLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1Tailor baste the dart as marked on thepattern, making one baste at the point andtwo at the wide ends.4Baste along the dart line, joining the tailor’sbastes. Remove the pins.6Sew the machine threads backinto the stitching line of the dartto secure them.8The finished dart on the right side.5Machine stitch alongside thebasting line. Remove the bastes. 7Press the dart to one side(see p.92).2Fold the fabric right sideto right side, matchingthe tailor’s bastes.3Pin through thetailor’s bastesto match them.A dart is used to give shape to a piece of fabric so that it can fit around the contours of the body. Somedarts are stitched following straight stitching lines and other darts are stitched following a slightly curvedline. Always stitch a dart from the point to the wide end since then you will be able to sink the machineneedle into the point accurately and securely.DartsCONVEX DART CONCAVE DARTUse this for fuller shapes.Stitch the dart slightlyinside the normalstitching line, to makea smooth convex curve.This is for thinnerbodies, since it takes upmore fabric. Stitch thedart slightly outsidethe normal stitchingline, in a smoothconcave curve.Point of dart
  • 92 General techniques1Place the fabric,right side down, on thetailor’s ham. The point ofthe dart should be over theend of the ham.2Press the fabric aroundthe point of the dart.3Move the ironfrom the pointtoward the wideend of the dart topress the dart flat,open, or to one side,depending on thetype of dart.This type of dart is like two darts joined together at their wide ends. It is used to give shapeat the waist of a dress. It will contour the fabric from the bust into the waist and then from thewaist out toward the hip.If a dart is pressed incorrectly it can spoil the look of a garment. For successful pressing youwill need a tailor’s ham and a steam iron on a steam setting. A pressing cloth may be requiredfor delicate fabrics such as silk, satin, and chiffon, and for lining fabrics.CONTOUR OR DOUBLE-POINTED DARTPRESSING A DARTLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1Tailor baste the dots on the patternthat mark the dart. 2Cut through the loops in the tailor’sbastes and remove the pattern. 3Bring the tailor’s bastes together, keeping the fabric right side to right side,and pin the bastes together.4Make a rowof bastingstitches just outsidethe pin line.5Machine stitch following thetailor-baste line, starting at oneend and curving out to the widestpoint, then in to the other end. Securethe machine stitching at both ends.6Remove thebasting. 7Clip across the fold in the fabricat the widest point, to allow thedart to be pressed to one side.8Press the dart to one side. Contourdarts are normally pressed towardthe center front or center back.Darts closertogether at waist
  • 93Gathers1Stitch the first gathers at 3⁄8in (1cm) and thesecond at 1⁄2in (1.2cm). Leave long tails ofthread for gathering. Do not stitch over the seams.7When all the gathers are in place,use a standard machine stitch tostitch a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) wide seam.8Stitch with the gathers uppermostand keep pulling them to the sideto stop them from creasing up.2Place the skirt againstthe bodice section, rightside to right side.10Neaten the seam by stitching bothedges together. Use either a zigzagstitch or a 3-thread overlock stitch.3Match the notchesand seams, andhold in place with pins.4Gently pull on the two long tails of threadon the wrong side of the skirt—the fabricwill gather along the threads.9Turn the bodice of the garment inside. Press the seam very carefully toavoid creasing the gathers.5Secure the threads at one end to preventthe stitches from pulling out. 6Even out thegathers and pin.11Press the seam uptoward the bodice.Once all the main seams have been sewn, stitch the two rows of gathers so that the stitchesare inside the seam allowance. This should avoid the need to remove them because doingso after they have been pulled up can damage the fabric. In the example below, we attacha skirt to a bodice.MAKING ANDFITTING GATHERSLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *Gathers are an easy way to draw up a piece of larger fabric so that it will fit on to a smaller piece of fabric.They often appear at waistlines or yoke lines. The gather stitch is inserted after the major seams have beenconstructed. Gathers are best worked on the sewing machine using the longest available stitch length. Onthe majority of fabrics, two rows of gather stitches are required, but for very heavy fabrics it is advisableto have three rows. Try to stitch the rows so that the stitches line up under one another.Gathers
  • 94 General techniquesAn interfacing may be non-fusible (sew-in) or fusible and is only attached to certain parts of a garment. Partsthat are normally interfaced include the collar and cuffs and the facings.Interfacings1Place the fabric on the pressing surface, wrongside up, making sure it is straight and unwrinkled.2Place the sticky side (this feels gritty) of tehchosen interfacing on the fabric.4Place a steam iron, on a steam setting, ontop of the pressing cloth.3Cover with a dry pressing cloth and spray thecloth with a fine mist of water.5Leave the iron in place for at least 10 secondsbefore moving it to the next area of fabric.1Place the interfacing on to the wrong sideof the fabric, aligning the cut edges.6Check to see if the interfacing is fused to thefabric by rolling the fabric. If the interfacing is stillloose in places, repeat the pressing process.2Pin in place.7When the fabric has cooled down, the fusingprocess will be complete. Then pin the patternback on to the fabric and transfer the patternmarkings as required.3Using a basic basting stitch, baste the interfacingto the fabric or facing at 3⁄8in (1cm) within theseam allowance.NON-FUSIBLE INTERFACINGS FUSIBLE INTERFACINGSHOW TO APPLY A FUSIBLE INTERFACINGHOW TO APPLY A NON-FUSIBLE INTERFACINGAll of these interfacings need to be basted to the main fabric around theedges prior to construction of the work or seam neatening.A fusible interfacing is used in the same areas as a sew-in interfacing. To prevent thefusible interfacing from showing on the right side of the work, use pinking shears onthe edge of the interfacing.Lightweight wovenfusible interfacingKnitted fusibleinterfacingMuslin Silk organza Non-woven interfacingNon-woven fusibleinterfacing
  • 95FacingsINTERFACING FOR HEAVY FABRIC INTERFACING FOR LIGHT FABRICAll facings require interfacing. The interfacing is to give structure to the facing and to hold itin shape. A fusible interfacing is the best choice and should be cut on the same grain as thefacing. Choose an interfacing that is lighter in weight than the main fabric.The facing may be in two or three pieces in order to fit around a neck or armhole edge. Thefacing sections need to be joined together prior to being attached. The photographs here showan interfaced neck facing in three pieces.APPLYING INTERFACINGTO A FACINGCONSTRUCTION OFA FACINGFor a heavy-weightfabric use a medium-weight fusibleinterfacing. Removethe seam allowanceon the interfacing onthe inner curve toreduce bulk.Right sideof facingRight sideof facingFor a light- tomedium-weightfabric, choosea lightweightinterfacing andfuse it over thecomplete facing.2Stitch theshoulder seamsand press open.4The right side of the facing, ready to attachto the neckline.Inner edge tobe attachedto neckFusible interfacing3Trim off theouter corners onthe shoulder seams.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *1Baste together the pieces of the facingat the shoulder seams.The simplest way to finish the neck or armhole of a garment is to apply a facing. The neckline can be anyshape to have a facing applied, from a curve to a square to a V, and many more. Some facings and necklinescan add interest to the center back or center front of a garment.Facings
  • 96 General techniquesLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **The outer edge of a facing will require neatening to prevent it from fraying, and there are severalways to do this. Binding the lower edge of a facing with a bias strip makes the garment a littlemore luxurious and can add a designer touch inside the garment. Alternatively, the edge can bestitched or pinked (see below).NEATENING THE EDGEOF A FACING4Working from theright side of thefacing, stitch in the ditchmade by the bias-to-facing stitching.1Making your ownbias strip is easy (seeabove). Open out onefolded edge of the biasstrip and place to theouter edge of the facing,right side to right side.Right sideof fabricFolded edgeof bias2Machine along thecrease line in the bias.3Wrap the biasaround to the wrongside of the work. Baste tohold in place.Fusibleinterfacing5On the right sideof the facing, thebias-bound edge hasa neat, professional finish.CUTTING BIAS STRIPS4Join the strips byplacing them togetherright side to right side at90 degrees to each other.1Fold the fabric on to itself at 45 degreesso the selvage edges are at right anglesto each other. Pin in place.3Cut along these linesto make bias strips. 5Machine across thejoin. There shouldbe a triangle of fabric ateither end of the seam.6Press the seam open.7Press under the edges of the bias strip with theiron by running the bias strip through a 1in(25mm) tape maker.2Using tailor’s chalkand a ruler, marklines 11⁄2in (4cm) apart.
  • 97FacingsThis technique applies to all shapes of neckline, from round to square to sweetheart.ATTACHING A NECKFACING4Pin the facing inplace, matchingaround the neck edge.1Apply fusible interfacing tothe facing; join the pieces atthe shoulder seams (see p.95).6Machine in placeusing a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance.2Lay the neckline area flat, right sideup. Place the facing on top, rightside to right side.3Match theshoulder seams.5Match the shoulderseams on the facingand the bodice.7Trim the facingdown to halfits width.Facing andgarment matchat center backShoulderseams matchLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **The following techniques are popular alternative ways to neaten the edge of a facing.The one you choose depends upon the garment being made and the fabric used.OTHER NEATENINGMETHODSNeaten the outer edge with a 3-thread overlock stitch. Machine stitch 3⁄8in (1cm) from the edge and trimthe raw edge with pinking shears.Neaten the outer edge with a zigzag stitch.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *OVERLOCKED PINKEDZIGZAGGED
  • 98 General techniquesOn sleeveless garments, a facing is an excellent way of neatening an armhole because it isnot bulky. Also, as the facing is made in the same fabric as the garment, it does not show.ATTACHING ANARMHOLE FACING8Clip out V notchesaround the neckedge.10Press the seamallowancetoward the facing.12Turn the facing to the wrong side andpress the finished neck edge.9Clip into thefacing as well. 11Understitch bymachining theseam allowance to thefacing about 3⁄16in (5mm)from the first stitching line.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1Construct the interfacedarmhole facing and neatenthe long edge by your preferredmethod.2Place the facing to thearmhole, right side to rightside. Match at the shoulderseam and at the underarm seam.5Layer the seam allowance bytrimming the facing down tohalf its width.7Turn the facing into positionon the wrong side. Understitchby machining the seam allowanceto the facing.Armhole3Match the single notches at thefront and the double notches atthe back. Pin the facing in place.4Machine around the armholeto attach the facing, taking a5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance.6Clip out some V shapes in theseam allowance to reduce bulk.
  • 99Facings1Cut a bias strip 23⁄4in (7cm) wide(see p.96). 2Pin to the neck edge.3Machine along the neckedge using a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance.4Trim off half theseam allowanceon the garment side.5Clip the seamallowance onthe bias strip.6Fold the raw edge of thebias strip to the wrong side,to touch the line of machining.7Fold the bias strip again tothe same machine stitchesand pin.8Stitch permanently in positionusing a flat fell stitch.9Press the stitchededge. On the rightside the armhole will havea neat finish.Understitching8On the underarmand shoulder seams,secure the facing to theseam allowance withcross stitches.Binding is another way to finish a raw neck edge, especially on bulkier fabrics. In this method thebias strip is cut from the same fabric as the garment.BIAS-BOUND NECK EDGELEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **
  • 100 General techniques1Apply a fusible interfacing to the facing. Neatenthe lower edge of the facing with bias binding.6Press seam allowance toward the facing.8Turn the facing to the inside of the garmentand press the waist edge.10The right side of the waistline.Wrong sideRight side2Pin the interfaced facing to the waist edge,matching notches.3Stitch the facing in place using a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance.7Understitch by machining the seam allowanceto the facing about 1⁄8in (3mm) from the firststitching line.9Clip to reduce the bulk at the top of the dart.Many waistlines on skirts and pants are finished with a facing, which will follow the contours ofthe waist but will have had the dart shaping removed to make the facing smooth. A facedwaistline always fits comfortably to the body. The facing is attached after all the main sections ofthe skirt or pants have been constructed.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **A WAIST WITH A FACING4Layer the seam allowance by trimming thefacing down to half its width.5Clip the seam allowance using straightcuts at 90 degrees to the stitching line.
  • 101CollarsAll collars consist of a minimum of two pieces, the upper collar (which will be on the outside) and theunder collar. Interfacing, which is required to give the collar shape and structure, is often applied tothe upper collar to give a smoother appearance to the fabric.CollarsA traditional-style shirt has a collar that consists of two pieces: a collar and a stand, both ofwhich require interfacing. The stand fits close around the neck and the collar is attached tothe stand. This type of collar is found on men’s and ladies’shirts. On a man’s shirt, the standaccommodates the tie.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY ***TWO-PIECE SHIRT COLLAR3Trim the seam allowancefrom the under collar. 6The fabric at the pointshould not be bulky.If it is, remove more.8Top-stitch the sidesand outside edgeusing the edge of themachine foot as a guide.11Machine the collarto the stand.1Cut the upperand under collar.Apply interfacing tothe upper collar.2Machine the upper and under collartogether, right side to right side, stitchingaround the sides and the outside edge. Stitcha sharp point by pivoting at the corners.4Remove surplusfabric at the point.9Apply interfacing toone side of the stand. 10Place the non-interfaced sideof the collar to the interfacedside of the stand. Match the notches,then pin in place.Collar fits betweenthe tailor’s bastes7Turn the collarto the right sideand press.5Press the seam open, pressing theupper collar seam allowance on tothe collar. Clip as required.
  • 102 General techniques14Baste the collar standto the shirt neck.15Reposition the stand sothat the front edges cometogether right side to right side.18Remove surplus fabricfrom the corner.17Trim away the non-interfacedside of the stand.16Machine along the shirtneck and around thecenter front curve to the collar.19Turn andpress.22Top-stitchthe stand,if required. Thestand fits snuglyunder the collar atthe center front.21Secure thisedge witha flat fell stitch.20Bring the raw edge ofthe stand to the collarand turn under. Pin in place.13Pin the non-interfaced side of the standto the shirt neck, so that there is a collarstand on the right and wrong side of the shirt.12Place the stand to the shirt neck, matching the notches.The seam allowance on the stand will extend at thecenter front. Pin and baste the stand to the shirt neck.
  • 103WaistbandsA waistband is designed to fit snugly but not tightly to the waist. Whether it is shaped, straight, orslightly curved, it will be constructed and attached in a similar way. Every waistband will requirea fusible interfacing to give it structure and support.WaistbandsSpecial waistband interfacings are available, usually featuring slot lines that will guide youwhere to fold the fabric. Make sure the slots on the outer edge correspond to a 5/8in (1.5cm)seam allowance. If a specialized waistband fusible interfacing is not available you can use anymedium-weight fusible interfacing.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **ATTACHING A STRAIGHTWAISTBAND1Cut the waistband andapply the interfacing.Neaten one long edge.2Pin the waistband to the skirt waistedge, right side to right side. Matchthe notches.3Stitch the waistband to the waist edge usinga 5/8in (1.5cm) seam allowance. The waistbandwill extend beyond the zipper by 5/8in (1.5cm) onthe left and by 2in (5cm) on the right.4Press the waistbandaway from the skirt.Waistband extension to be finishedRight side of fabricNeatenedlower edgeWrong side of waistbandOne long edge of the waistband will be stitched to the garment waist. The otheredge will need to be finished, to prevent fraying and reduce bulk inside.FINISHING THE EDGE OFTHE WAISTBANDThis method is suitable for fine fabrics only. Turnunder 5⁄8in (1.5cm) along the edge of the waistbandand press in place. After the waistband has beenattached to the garment, hand stitch the pressed-under edge in place.This method is suitable for heavier fabrics, since itlies flat inside the garment after construction.Neaten one long edge of the waistband witha 3-thread overlock stitch.This method is ideal for fabrics that fray badlyand can add a feature inside the garment. It liesflat inside the garment after construction. Applya 3⁄4in (2cm) bias binding to one long edge ofthe waistband.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *TURNING UNDER OVERLOCK STITCHING BIAS BINDING
  • 104 General techniques8Turn the ends of thewaistband to the rightside. The extension on thewaistband should beon the right-hand back.9Add yourchosen fasteners. 10To complete the waistband, stitch throughthe band to the skirt seam. This is known asstitching in the ditch.6Pin and stitch the left-hand back of thewaistband, as worn, inline with the center back.5Fold the waistband along the crease in theinterfacing, right side to right side. The neatenededge of the waistband should extend 5/8in (1.5cm)below the stitching line.7On the right-hand back, as worn, extend the waist/skirt stitchingline along the waistband and pivot to stitch across the end.11The finishedstraight waistband.
  • 105SleevesSleevesSleeves come in all shapes and lengths and form an important part of the design of a garment.A set-in sleeve should always hang from the end of the wearer’s shoulder, without wrinkles. Thelower end of the sleeve is normally finished by means of a cuff or a facing.A set-in sleeve should feature a smooth sleeve head that fits on the end of your shoulderaccurately. This is achieved by the use of ease stitches, which are long stitches used totighten the fabric but not gather it.INSERTING A SET-INSLEEVELEVEL OF DIFFICULTY ***1Machine the side seams andthe shoulder seams on thegarment and press them open.Armhole withnotchesSingle notch denotesfront of the sleeveDouble notchdenotes backof the sleeve2Machine the sleeve seamand press open. Turn thesleeve to the right side.3Around the sleeve head,machine two rows of longstitches between the notches—one row at 3⁄8in (1cm) from theedge and the second rowat 1⁄2in (1.2cm). These are theease stitches.10Stitch around thesleeve again insidethe seam allowance.4Place the sleeve into thearmhole, right side to rightside. Match the underarm seamsand the notches.5Match the highest point ofthe sleeve to the shoulder.6Pull up the ease stitchesuntil the sleeve fits neatlyin the armhole.7Pin from the sleeve side.11Trim the raw edgesof the sleeve.8Machine the sleevein place, starting at theunderarm seam and usinga 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance.When you machine, have thesleeve on top and keepthe machining straightover the shoulder.9Overlap the machining atthe underarm to reinforcethe stitching.12Neaten the seam witha zigzag or serger stitch,then turn the sleeve throughthe armhole. Do not press or youwill flatten the sleeve head.Right side ofthe garmentSmoothsleeve head
  • 106 General techniques1Machine the sleeve seam,right side to right side, usinga 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance.Press the seam open.3Place the sleeveinto the armhole,right side to right side.5Pull up thegather stitchesto make the sleevehead fit the armhole.4Match theunderarmseams andthe notches.6Pin from thesleeve side.7Working with the sleeve on top,machine the sleeve to the armhole.Use a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance.Overlap the machining at the underarm.8Stitch around thesleeve seam againbetween the first rowof stitching and theraw edge.10Neatenthe seamwith a zigzag orserger stitch.11Turn right side out—all the gatherswill be at the top of the sleeve.9Trim away thesurplus fabricby 3⁄16in (5mm).2Machine two rows of gatherstitches between the sleevenotches, one row at 3⁄8in (1cm)from the raw edge and thesecond row at 1⁄2in (1.2cm).A sleeve that has a gathered sleeve head is referred to as a puff sleeve or gathered sleeve.It is one of the easiest sleeves to insert because the gathers take up any spare fabric.INSERTING APUFF SLEEVELEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **
  • 107Sleeves1Mark the final length of the sleeve witha row of basting stitches.5Turn under the top edge of the hemallowance by 3⁄8in (1cm) and pin. 7Hand stitch the sleeve hem in place using a slip stitch.6Baste to secure.3Turn up the hem along the basted line.4Match the seams. Pin in place.2Remove the excess seamallowance in the hem area.The simplest way to finish a sleeve is with a self hem. Here the edge of the sleeve is turnedup onto itself. Alternative finishes include inserting elastic into a casing or attaching a cuff.SLEEVE HEMSSELF HEMLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **Hem allowanceSeam pressed openFinished hem
  • 108 General techniques1Make up thesleeve and pressthe seam open.5Machine to holdthe turn-up inplace, 1⁄16in (2mm)from the foldededge. Leave a gap oneach side of theseam allowancethrough which youwill insert the elastic.7Cut a piece ofelastic to fit thearm or wrist andinsert it into thesleeve end betweenthe two rowsof machining.8Secure theends of theelastic together,stitching an Xfor strength.9Turn the sleeveto the rightside and check thatthe elasticatededge is even.6Machine thebottom of thesleeve 1⁄16in (2mm)from the edge, togive a neat finish.This will also helpprevent the elasticfrom twisting.4Turn againon to thebasting line.3Turn up 3⁄16in(5mm) at the rawedge and press.2Work a row ofbasting stitcheson the foldline ofthe hem.Gap to insert the elastic.ELASTICATED SLEEVE EDGE
  • 109SleevesBOUND OPENINGThe following finishes can both be used to complete the opening that accompanies a cuff. Usethe bound opening on fabrics that fray easily.OPENINGSLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1Stay stitch thesplit in the sleeve.2Slash between thestay stitching lines.3Working on theright side ofthe sleeve, pin thebias strip alongthe stay stitchinglines. To stitcharound the end ofthe split, open thesplit out into astraight line.Bias strip4Wrap the biasstrip, edgeturned under, to thewrong side and pinin place.6Allow the biasstrip to close. Oneside of the strip will foldunder and the otherwill extend over it.7Secure the topfold in the bias stripwith a double stitch.5Hand stitchto secure.8Tailor baste thecuff end of thebias strip to aid theplacement of the cuff.9The finishedbias-boundopening.
  • 110 General techniquesFACED OPENING1Turn under the long edges and oneshort edge on the facing by about1⁄8in (3mm). Machine stitch to secure.2Place the right sideof the facing to theright side of the sleeveat the appropriatesleeve markings.3Stitch vertically up the center of thefacing. Take one stitch across the endand then stitch down the other side withabout 3⁄16in (5mm) between the stitchinglines at the raw edge of the sleeve.4Slash betweenthe stitching lines. 5Snip withsmall scissorsinto the end.6Turn the facingto the wrong sideof the sleeve and press.7The finished openingon the right side.2Turn under a seamallowance on thenon-interfaced sideand baste to secure.1Apply fusibleinterfacing to thehalf of the cuff thatwill be the upper cuff.3Fold the cuff along the centerline, right side to right side.4Machine stitch down the twoshort ends.5Layer the seam by trimmingone edge, and clip the corners.6Turn the cuff through to theright side and press.Seam allowanceready to stitch onto sleeveSleeve allowancefree on interfacedside of cuffONE-PIECE CUFFThere are various types of cuff that can be attached to sleeve openings. The one-piececuff and the one-piece lapped cuff are both—as their names suggest—cut from the fabricin one piece. Both work well with either a bound or faced opening.ATTACHING A CUFFLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **
  • 111Sleeves1Apply fusible interfacingto the upper half of thecuff. Pin the interfaced halfof the cuff to the sleeveend, right side to right side.UnderlapSeam allowanceextends2Machine the cuff to thesleeve using a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance.3Trim the sleeve sideof the seam allowance tohalf its width. Press the seamtoward the cuff.4Fold the non-interfacededge of the cuff over to thewrong side by 5⁄8in (1.5cm).5Fold the cuff to itself, rightside to right side, so thefolded edge of the cuff comesto the sleeve-to-cuff seam line.6Stitch one short end inline with the opening.7Stitch the other short endalong from the sleeve-to-cuffseam line and then down the cuff.8Trim away the corners.Press the seams open.9Turn the cuff tothe right side. Pushthe corners out to points.10On the inside,hand stitch thefolded edge with a flatfell or blind hem stitch.11Make a buttonholeon the upper sideof the cuff.12Sew a buttonon the undersideof the cuff.ONE-PIECE LAPPED CUFF
  • 112 General techniquesPockets come in lots of shapes and formats. Some, such as patch pockets, are external and canbe decorative, while others, including front hip pockets, are more discreet and hidden from view.You can also have a pocket flap that is purely decorative. This can be made from the same fabricas the garment or from a contrasting fabric. Whether casual or tailored, all pockets are functional.1The flap consists oftwo pieces—a pieceof lining and a piece ofinterfaced fabric. Place thetwo pieces together, rightside to right side.3Stitch the piecestogether alongthree sides, using a 3⁄8in(1cm) seam allowance.Stitch through the tailor’sbastes. Leave the upperedge open.This pocket flap is sewn where the pocket would be, but there is no opening beneath it.This is to reduce the bulk that would arise if there were a complete pocket.POCKET FLAPLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **2Match the tailor’s bastes,then pin to secure.4Layer the seamallowance, trimmingfrom the lining only.5Remove the fabricfrom the point.6Use pinking shearsto reduce the bulkthrough the curve. Press.7Turn the flap throughto the right side. Pushout the point.8Press the liningtoward the backso that it does not show.Press a smooth curve.9Stitch across theupper open edgeto hold together.10Place the flap to thegarment, right side toright side. Match the edgesof the flap to the tailor’sbastes on the garment.11Machine inplace overthe stitching line.13Press the flap into place. Allowthe fabric at the top of the flapto roll gently downward.14Top-stitch across the upperedge to secure.12Reducethe seamallowance byhalf. Press.Smooth curvePOCKETS
  • 113PocketsIf a self-lined patch pocket is likely to be too bulky, then a lined pocket is the answer. It isadvisable to interface the pocket fabric.LINED PATCH POCKETLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1Cut the pocket fabric andapply interfacing. Cut thelining fabric. The lining shouldbe shorter than the pocket.2Place the lining top edge to thepocket top edge and machinetogether. Leave a gap of about 11⁄4in(3cm) in the seam for turning through.3Press thepocket-to-liningseam open.4Bring the bottomedges of pocketand lining together.5Pin throughthe corners andalong the sides.6Stitch aroundthe three opensides of the pocketto attach the liningto the pocket fabric.7Trim away thecorners.8Use pinking shearsto trim the curves.9Turn the pocketto the right sidethrough the gap leftin the seam. Press.10Hand stitch thegap with a flatfell or blind hem stitch.11The lined patch pocket is readyto be attached.
  • 114 General techniquesIn pants and skirts, the pocket is sometimes disguised in the seam line. In the method below, aseparate pocket is attached to the seam, but the pocket shape could also be cut as part of themain fabric.IN-SEAM POCKET1Neaten theseam allowanceon the front ofthe garment.2Neaten thestraight edgeof the pocket.3Place thepocket to thegarment right sideto right side. Matchthe tailor’s bastesand the neatenededges. Pin in place.4Machine thepocket in placeusing a 3⁄8in (1cm)seam allowance.Only stitch betweenthe tailor’s bastes.5Repeat theprocess forthe back ofthe garment.6Open thepocket outand press theseam towardthe pocket.7Place the backsection of thegarment to the front,right side to rightside. Match theseams above andbelow the pocket.8Stitch a 5⁄8in(1.5cm) seam tojoin the front andback of the garmenttogether. Extend theseam stitching 5⁄8in(1.5cm) beyond thepocket stitching.9Stitch around the pocket to join the twopieces together, stopping the stitchingat the pocket-to-garment stitching line.10Neaten theraw edgesof the pocket.11On the garmentback, clip the seamallowance to the pocket-to-garment stitching line.12Press the sideseam open. Pressthe pocket toward thefront of the garment.13On the right side, the pocketopening is discreet.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **
  • 115Pockets1Apply a piece of fusible tape on thegarment along the line of the pocket.10Machine the pocket and liningtogether using a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance. Press.7Top-stitch3⁄16in (5mm)from the edge.6Turn thelining tothe inside.Press so thatthe lining isnot visible onthe outside.11Neaten theraw edges ofthe seam allowancearound the pocket.8On the right side of the garment,pin the front to the side front alongthe placement lines.12Neatenthe sideseam allowance,stitching from thetop down. Makesure that thefabric lies flat onthe side seam.9On the wrong side, pin the side front tothe lining to create the pocket.13The angled front hip pocketfrom the right side.3Machine thelining in place,taking a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance.4Trim the liningside of the seamallowance down tohalf its width.2Place the pocket lining to the frontof the garment, right side to right side.Match any notches that are on the seam.Pin in place.5Open out thelining andpress the seamtoward it.On many pants and casual skirts, the pocket is placed on the hipline. It can be low on the hiplineor cut quite high, as on jeans. The construction is the same for all types of hip pockets. Wheninserted at an angle, hip pockets can slim the figure.FRONT HIP POCKETLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **Wrong side ofgarment frontWrong sideof garment
  • 116 General techniques1Put on the skirt or dress but noshoes. With the end of the ruleron the floor, have a helper measureand mark.1Using a 3-thread serger stitch, stitch alongthe raw edge of the hem allowance. 2Gently press the hem upinto position and basteclose to the crease.3Roll back the sergered edge.Using a slip hem stitch, stitch thehem in place.4Press carefully to preventthe serging from beingimprinted on the right side.2Use pins to mark the crease lineof the proposed hem. Make sure themeasurement from floor to pin lineis the same all the way around.1Adjust the dummy to your height andmeasurements. Place the skirt or dresson the dummy.2The hem marker on its stand will hold thefabric. Use the marker to mark the creaseline of the proposed hem.3Slide a pin through the slot in the marker,then gently release the marker.On a garment such as a skirt or a dress it is important that the hemline is level all around.Even if the fabric has been cut straight, some styles of skirt—such as A-line or circular—will “drop,”which means that the hem edge is longer in some places. This is because the fabriccan stretch where it is not on the straight of the grain. Hang the garment for 24 hoursin a warm room before hemming so you do not end up with an uneven hem.One of the most popular ways to secure a hem edge is by hand. Hand stitchingis discreet and, if a fine hand-sewing needle is used, the stitching should not showon the right side of the work. Always finish the raw edge before stitching the hem.MARKING A HEMLINEHAND-STITCHED HEMSUSING A RULERSERGED FINISHUSING A DRESSMAKER’S DUMMYLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *TIPS FOR SEWING HEMS BY HAND1 Always use a single thread in the needle—a polyester all-purposethread is ideal for hemming.2 Once the raw edge of the hem allowance has been neatened by one of themethods below, secure it using a slip hem stitch. Take half of the stitch into theneatened edge and the other half into the wrong side of the garment fabric.3 Start and finish the hand stitching with a double stitch, not a knot,because knots will catch and pull the hem down.4 It is a good idea to take a small back stitch every 4in (10cm) or so to makesure that if the hem does come loose in one place it will not all unravel.HemlinesThe lower edge of a garment is normally finished with a hem. Sometimes the style of the garment dictatesthe type of hem used, and sometimes the fabric.
  • 117Hemlines4Turn down thebias over the rawedge and press.1This is a good finish forfabrics that fray or thatare bulky. Turn up thehem on to the wrong sideof the garment and basteclose to the crease line.2Pin the bias bindingto the raw edge ofthe hem allowance.3Open out the crease in the bias and stitch alongthe crease line, keeping the raw edges level. 5Using a slip hem stitch, join the edge ofthe bias to the wrong side of the fabric.Remove the basting and press lightly.BIAS-BOUND FINISHZIGZAG FINISHPINKED FINISH2Turn up the hem on tothe wrong side of thegarment and baste in placeclose to the crease line.3Fold back the zigzag-stitchededge. Using a slip hem stitch,stitch the hem into place.1Use this to neaten the edge of the hem onfabrics that do not fray too badly. Set thesewing machine to a zigzag stitch, width 4.0and length 3.0. Machine along the raw edge.Trim the fabric edge back to the zigzag stitch.4Roll the edge back intoposition. Remove thebasting and press lightly.2Turn up the hem on to thewrong side of the garmentand baste in place close to thecrease line.4Roll the hem edge back intoposition. Remove thebasting and press lightly.1Pinking shears can give an excellenthem finish on difficult fabrics. Machinea row of straight stitching along the rawedge, 3⁄8in (1cm) from the edge. Pinkthe raw edge.3Fold back the edge along the machinestitching line. Using a slip hem stitch,stitch the hem in place.
  • 118 General techniquesCURVED HEM FINISHHEMS ON DIFFICULT FABRICSDOUBLE-TURN HEMOn many occasions , the hem or edge of a garment or other item is turned up and securedusing the sewing machine. It can be stitched with a straight stitch, a zigzag stitch, or a blindhem stitch. Hems can also be made on the serger.MACHINED HEMS2Pin in place,then press.1This hem will add weight at the edge. Fold up the rawedge of the fabric once and then fold again.2Baste to secure.1Turn up the hem with a single turn.3Set the machine to a zigzag stitch, width 3.5and length 2.0, and zigzag close to the fold. 4Trim away surplushem allowance. Press.3Machine using a straight stitch,close to the upper fold.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *3Make a row of longmachine stitches, length5.0, close to the raw upperedge of the turned-up hem.1Fold up the hemline and pin,placing the pins vertically tokeep from squashing the fullnessout of the raw upper edge.2Baste the hem into positionclose to the crease line.Remove the pins.4Pull on one of the threads ofthe long stitches to tighten thefabric and ease out the fullness.5Use the steam iron toshrink out the remainderof the fullness. The hem is nowready to be stitched in place byhand or machine.Wrong side
  • 119ZipsLAPPED ZIPPER3Insert the right-handside of the zipperfirst. Fold back theright-hand seamallowance by 1⁄2in (1.2cm).This folded edge will notbe in line with the seam.1Stitch the seam,leaving enough of itopen to accommodatethe zipper.5Using the zipper foot, stitch along the basteline to secure the zipper tape to the fabric.Stitch from the bottom of the zipper to the top.6Fold back the left-hand seam allowance by5⁄8in (1.5cm). Place the folded edge over themachine line of the other side. Pin and then baste.2Secure the endof the stitching.4Place the foldededge against thezipper teeth. Baste.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **A skirt zipper in a skirt or a dress is usually put in by means of a lapped technique or a centeredzipper technique (see p.120). For both of these techniques you will require the zipper foot onthe sewing machine. A lapped zipper features one side of the seam—the left-hand side—lapping over the teeth of the zipper to conceal them.The zipper is probably the most used of all fastenings. There are a great many types available, in a varietyof lengths, colors, and materials, but they all fall into one of five categories: skirt or pant zippers, metalor jeans zippers, invisible zippers, open-ended zippers, and decorative zippers.Zippers7Starting at the bottom of the zipper, stitch acrossfrom the center seam line and then up the leftside of the zipper. The finished zipper should have itsteeth covered by the fabric.
  • 120 General techniquesCENTERED ZIPPERLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1Stitch the seam,leaving a gapfor the zipper.4Center the zipper behind the bastedpart of the seam. Pin and then bastein place along both sides.6Working fromthe right side,stitch down one sideof the dip, across thebottom, and up theother side throughall the layers.8The finished zipper fromthe right side.2Baste the restof the seam. 3Press the seamopen lightly.5Machine the zipper tape to theseam allowance. Make sure bothsides of the tape are secured to theseam allowances. Stitch right to theend of the zipper tape.7Remove thebastes.With a centered zipper, the two folded edges of the seam allowances meet overthe center of the teeth to conceal the zipper completely.
  • 121Zippers4Trim theleft-hand frontof the openingstraight, to measure5⁄8in (1.5cm) fromthe center line.6Fold theleft-hand frontalong the foldline.8Machinealong thefoldline using thezipper foot. Extendthe machiningpast the seamstitching line.9Fold theright-handfront along thefoldline. Placethe foldlineover the zipper andpin to the machinestitching on theleft-hand side.10On theinside, pinthe zipper tape tothe fabric extension.12On theright side,top-stitch aroundthe zipper. Startstitching at thecenter front. Stitcha smooth curve.13Neaten allthe edges ofthe fly-front facing,leaving the topedge raw.14On thewrong side,pin the facing to theleft-hand side seamallowance. Ensurethat the facing fullycovers the zipper.16Attach thewaistbandover the zipper andthe facings. Trimfacing and zipper.18Thewaistbandgoes over the zipperand acts as thezipper stop. Attacha pant hookand eye.2Using tailor’sbastes, mark thecenter front lines.3Trace bastethe foldlines.5Neaten theedges onboth sides.7Place the foldadjacent to thezipper teeth and pinin place. The zippermay be too long; if so,it will extend beyondthe top of the fabric.11Machine thezipper tape tothe fabric along thecenter of the tape.15Machine tothe seamallowance on theleft-hand side.17Securethe loweredge of the facingon the right-handside to the right-handseam allowance.Whether it be for a classic pair of pants or a pair of jeans, a fly front is the most commontechnique for inserting a pant zipper. The zipper usually has a facing behind it to prevent thezipper teeth from catching.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY ***FACED FLY-FRONT ZIPPER1Stitch the seam,leaving a gap forthe zipper.
  • 122 General techniquesThis type of zipper looks different from other zippers because the teeth are on the reverse andnothing except the pull is seen on the front. The zipper is inserted before the seam is stitched.A special invisible zipper foot is required for stitching this zipper in position.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **INVISIBLE ZIPPER3Undo the zipper. Using theinvisible zipper foot, stitch underthe teeth from the top of the zipper.Stop when the foot hits the zipper pulland do two reverse stitches.1Mark theseamallowancewith bastingstitches.4Pull the zipper up. Place the otherside of the fabric to the zipper.Match along the upper edge. Pin theother side of the zipper tape in place.5Open the zipper again. Usingthe invisible zipper foot, stitchdown the other side of the zipper toattach to the other side of the fabric.Remove any basting stitches.6Close the zipper. On the wrong sideat the bottom of the zipper the tworows of stitching that hold in the zippershould finish at the same place.7Stitch the seam below the zipperusing the normal machine foot.There will be a small gap of about 1⁄8in(3mm) between the stitching line forthe zipper and that for the seam.9On the right side, the zipper iscompletely invisible, withonly the pull visible at the top.Apply waistband or facing.8Stitch the last 11⁄4in (3cm) ofthe zipper tape just to the seamallowances. This will keep the zipperfrom pulling loose.2Center the zipperover the basteline, right side ofzipper to right side offabric. Pin in placedown one side.Free endof zipper
  • 123ButtonsButtons are one of the oldest forms of fastenings. They come in many shapes and sizes and can be madefrom a variety of materials including shell, bone, plastic, nylon, and metal. Buttons are sewn to the fabriceither through holes on their face, or through a hole in a stalk called a shank, which is on the back. Buttonsare normally sewn on by hand, although a two-hole button can be sewn on by machine.Buttons5On the reverse of the fabric, buttonhole stitchover the X-shaped thread loops.2Place a toothpick ontop of the button.Stitch up and downthrough the holes, goingover the toothpick.4Wrap the thread aroundthe thread loops underthe button to make the shank.1Position the buttonon the fabric. Startwith a double stitchand double threadin the needle.2Using double thread,stitch diagonallybetween the holes of thebutton to make an X on topof the toothpick.1Position the buttonon the fabric. Placea toothpick on thebutton.4Wrap the thread aroundthe thread loops underthe button to make a shank.5Take the threadthrough to theback of the fabric.6Buttonhole stitchover the loop ofthreads on the backof the work.This is the most popular type of button and requires a thread shank to be made when sewingin place. A toothpick on top of the button will help you to make the shank.This is stitched in the same way as a two-hole button except that the threads make an X overthe top of the button.SEWING ON ATWO-HOLE BUTTONSEWING ON AFOUR-HOLE BUTTONLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **3Remove thetoothpick.3Remove thetoothpick.
  • 124 General techniquesWhether the buttonholes are to be stitched by machine or another type of buttonhole is to bemade, the size of the button will need to be established in order to determine the position ofthe buttonhole on the fabric.POSITIONINGBUTTONHOLES2Work a row of basting stitches alongthe center front line of the right-handside of the garment, as worn.1Place the button on a sewing gauge and use the sliderto measure the button’s diameter.3Work a second row of basting thediameter of the button away.4Lay the buttons between the bastelines. Stitch lines of basting at rightangles to the first two basted rows, tomark the buttonhole positions.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *When sewing this type of button in place, use a toothpick under the button to enable youto make a thread shank on the underside of the fabric.There are some huge buttons available,many of which are really more decorativethan functional. By layering buttons ofvarying sizes together, you can make anunusual feature on a garment.SEWING ON ASHANKED BUTTONOVERSIZED ANDLAYERED BUTTONSLEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **2Using doublethread, stitch thebutton to the fabric,through the shank.1First position the oversizedbutton on the fabric.3Be sure each stitch goes around the toothpickbeneath the fabric. 4Remove the toothpick. Work buttonholestitching over the looped thread shank beneaththe fabric.1Position the button onthe fabric. Hold atoothpick beneath thefabric, behind the button.2Top with a smaller button and stitchthe two together to the fabric.3Place a small one-hole button onthe layered buttons and attach tothe thread using a buttonhole stitch.
  • 125ButtonsThis is also called a tailor’s buttonhole. It hasa square end and a keyhole end and is usedon jackets and coats.A buttonhole featuring one rounded end and onesquare end is used on lightweight jackets.The most popular shape for a buttonholeis square on both ends.Modern sewing machines can stitch various types of buttonhole, suitable for all kinds ofgarment. On many machines the button fits into a special foot, and a sensor on the machinedetermines the correct size of buttonhole. The width and length of the stitch can be altered tosuit the fabric. Once the buttonhole has been stitched, always use a buttonhole chisel to slashthrough, to ensure that the cut is clean.A sewing machine stitches a buttonhole in three stages. The stitch can be varied slightly inwidth and length to suit the fabric, but the stitches need to be tight and close together.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *MACHINE-MADEBUTTONHOLESSTAGES OF ABUTTONHOLEBASIC BUTTONHOLE ROUND-END BUTTONHOLE KEYHOLE BUTTONHOLE2Stitch a bar basteat one end.1Machine the first sideof the buttonhole. 3Machine the second side andbar baste at the other end.Generally, buttonholes are only placed vertically on a garment with a placket or strip to containthe buttonhole. All other buttonholes should be horizontal. Any strain on the buttonhole will betaken by the end stop and keep the button from coming loose.VERTICAL ORHORIZONTAL?HORIZONTAL BUTTONHOLES VERTICAL BUTTONHOLESThese arepositioned withthe end stopon the bastedcenter line.These arepositionedwith thebuttonholecentered onthe bastedcenter line.
  • 126 General techniquesThere are a multitude of different types of hook and eye fasteners. Purchased hooks andeyes are made from metal and are normally silver or black in color. Different-shaped hooksand eyes are used on different garments—large, broad hooks and eyes can be decorativeand stitched to show on the outside, while tiny fasteners are meant to be discreet. A hookwith a hand-worked eye produces a neat, close fastening.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **HOOKS AND EYESATTACHING HOOKS AND EYESHAND-WORKED EYE1Using a double thread, work several small loopsinto the edge of the fabric. 2Buttonhole stitch over these loops.3The completed loop will have a neat rowof tight buttonhole stitches.1Secure the hook and eye in place with a bastingstitch. Make sure they are in line with each other. 3Place a few overstitches underthe hook to stop it from moving.2Stitch around each circular endwith a buttonhole stitch.There are many alternative ways to fasten a garment. The different hooks and eyes shown below arenormally used to finish the top end of a zipper to help prevent it from pulling open, but a row of hooks andeyes can also be used on its own as a decorative way of closing and opening a garment. Snap fasteners aregood for children’s clothing and uniforms, since they are easy to use. They also feature commonly onlightweight jackets, cardigans, and fleece jackets.Hooks and Eyes and Snaps
  • 127Hooks and eyes and snapsA snap is a ball and socket fastener that is used to hold two overlapping edges closed.The ball side goes on top and the socket side underneath. Snaps can be round or squareand can be made from metal or plastic.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **SNAPSPANT HOOK AND EYE2Buttonhole stitch through all the securing holeson both hook and eye.1A hook and eye fastener for pant and skirt waistbands is largeand flat. Baste both the hook and eye in position. Do not baste throughtheir securing holes.1Baste the ball and socket halves of the snap in place.2Secure permanently using a buttonhole stitchthrough each hole in the outer edges of the snap halves.3Remove the bastes. A plastic snap may be white or clear plastic and is usually squarein shape. Stitch in place as for a metal snap.PLASTIC SNAPS
  • The twelve basic patterns in this section can be used to make thirty-one differentgarments. Details are given for making up the basic patterns, followed by theadaptations that are required to produce the variations.garmentsthe
  • skirtsThis section is the perfect place for a beginner to start.It gives instructions for making three fabulous skirts andone simple variation of each. These stylish garments arestraightforward and use a minimum of pattern pieces.the
  • the skirts... ... and their variationsSkirt pattern oneClassic A-lineskirt>> p.132Skirt pattern onevariationButton frontA-line skirt>> p.136Skirt pattern twoClassictailored skirt>> p.138Skirt patternthreeClassicpleated skirt>> p.146Skirt pattern twovariationTailoredeveningskirt>> p.143Skirt pattern threevariationTopstitchedpleatedskirt>> p.152
  • A simple A-lineskirt with a narrowwaistband willflatter all figuretypes and all agesthe A-line skirtsSKIRTPATTERN>>p.136>>p.134132 Garments
  • 133LinenCorduroySkirtsDartButtonNarrowwaistbandSide zipperThis skirt is made in a cotton print,but works well in a wide range offabrics. For winter you could choosea cozy corduroy. For summer,linen will keep you cool and fresh.YOU WILL NEED• 51in (1.3m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 39in (1m) waistband interfacing• 39in (18cm) skirt zipper• 1 buttonPREPARING THE PATTERN• This skirt is made using SkirtPattern One (see pp. 280–281)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeThis A-line skirt is shaped by the two darts in the front andback. There is a zipper in the left-hand side. The narrowwaistband is fastened with a button and buttonhole fastening.The finished skirt should sit just above the knee.CLASSICA-LINE SKIRTThis A-line skirt will never go out of style and can be worn at all times of theyear and on all occasions. It is also one of the easiest garments for a beginner tomake. It has only three pattern pieces—a front, a back, and a waistband. The skirtneeds to fit comfortably around the waist and across the tummy, so check yourmeasurements carefully against the pattern.Skirt Pattern OneBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONFRONT BACK
  • 134 Garments4Stitch the LH (left hand) side seam, leaving a gap for the zipper.Press the seam open, then insert a zipper (see p.119).5Stitch the RH (right hand) side seam and press the seam open (see p.84).6Attach the waistband interfacing to the waistband (see p.94).1Cut out the fabric and mark the start of thedarts with tailor’s bastes (see p.91). Clip the endof the darts on the raw edge (see p.76).2Make the darts (see p.91) and press toward thecenter of the garment. 3Neaten the side seams on the back and thefront using a 3-thread serger stitch or a smallzigzag stitch (see pp.84–85).HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC A-LINE SKIRT
  • 135135Skirts7Attach the waistband to the skirt, matchingthe notches (see p.103). 8Layer the seam allowance by trimming thewaistband side of the seam to half its width(see p.89). Press toward the waistband.9Fold the waistband RS (right side) to RS. Pin,then stitch the ends of the waistband.11Turn the waistband to the RS, pushing the clipped ends out. Foldunder the raw edge, then pin and hand stitch in place.13Make a buttonhole on the overlap of the waistband (see p.125).Sew a button on the underlap (see pp.123–124).12Neaten the hem edge by serging (see p.116). Turn up a 11⁄2in (4cm)hem and hand stitch in place.10Clip the ends of the waistband to reduce bulk.matched notchesoverlap underlap
  • This variation of the A-line skirt is a little morecomplicated and is the perfect next step for anovice sewer. To make it, you will shorten thebasic pattern and extend the center front tocreate the pleat. The buttons on the pleatare purely decorative. This skirt would makea great winter or fall wardrobe staple.BUTTON FRONTA-LINE SKIRTCotton twillDenimSkirt Pattern One VariationThis skirt is made incorduroy, but denim orcotton twill also work well.This variation of the Classic A-line skirt is shorter. It hasa zipper in the left-hand side and features a stitched pleatto which buttons have been sewn for decoration.YOU WILL NEED• 48in (1.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 39 in (1m) waistband interfacing• 7in (18cm) skirt zipper• 7 buttonsPREPARING THE PATTERN• This skirt is made using SkirtPattern One (see pp.280–281)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeCenter front pleatwith buttonsZipperShorterhemWaistbandDartBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONthe A-line skirtsSKIRTPATTERN>>p.137>>p.132FRONT BACK136 Garments
  • 137Skirts5Open the front of the skirt.To form the pleat, press theCF line onto the stitched line.1To shorten the hem, copy the front and backpattern pieces. Mark the hemline. Mark thenew hemline 4in (10cm) above the old hemline.Draw a new cutting line 11⁄2in (4cm) below thenew hemline.2For the front pleat, mark a fold line 11⁄4in (3cm)to the left of the CF (center front). Mark the newCF 11⁄4in (3cm) to the left of the new fold line.3Cut out the fabric. On the skirt front, markthe fold line and the CF with trace bastes(see p.76). Mark a point on the fold line, 6in(15cm) from the hem edge, with a tailor’s baste.4Matching the fold line markings, pin down the fold line WS (wrongside) to WS to the tailor’s baste. Stitch along the pinned line. 6Complete the rest of theskirt as for the Classic A-lineSkirt steps 1–11.7Neaten the hem edge by overlocking(see p.116). Turn up a 11⁄2in (4cm) hemand hand stitch in place.8Stitch the remainder of the pleat in place,stitching through the hem. Press. 9Sew buttons (see p.123) along the CF.new hemlinenew cutting lineold hemlinenew center front (CF)new fold lineold center front (CF)HOW TO MAKE THE BUTTON FRONT A-LINE SKIRTtracebastestailor’sbastefold linepleat
  • A must-have skirt foreveryone’s wardrobe,this classic straightskirt with a back ventwill never go outof fashionthe tailored skirtsSKIRTPATTERN>>p.143>>p.140138 Garments
  • 139139SkirtsCLASSICTAILORED SKIRTA straight skirt is a staple garment in every woman’s wardrobe. It could be thebottom half of a suit, made in a party fabric for a night out, or just be a simple,hardworking everyday skirt. The vent in the center back hemline ensures that youwon’t have trouble walking, whatever the occasion. The skirt should be close-fitting, so choose the pattern size by your hip measurement.Skirt Pattern TwoWool worstedVentCenterback zipperDartThis skirt is made in lightweighttweed, but this style would lookgreat in many fabrics. Choose fromsuitings, cottons, or silks.Matka silkYOU WILL NEED• 39in (1m) x 59in (150cm)fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purpose sewing thread forpattern marking• 20in (50cm) lightweightfusible interfacing• 7in (18cm) skirt zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This skirt is made using SkirtPattern Two (see pp. 282–283)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the pattern inyour sizeThis close-fitting skirt narrows slightly toward the hem and hasa center back vent. One dart in the front and two in the backshape the skirt to the waist and there is a zipper in the center back.The waistline is finished with a facing.BEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONFRONT BACK
  • 140 Garments1Cut out the fabric and markthe darts using tailor’s bastes(see p.91). Clip the end of the dartson the raw edge (see p.76).4Insert a concealed zipper at the CB (see p.122).6Join the front to the back at the side seams and press the seams open.5Stitch the remainder of the CB seam, stopping at the dot marking thetop of the vent. Press the seam open.3Neaten the side and CB (center back) seams using a 3-threadserger stitch or a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85).2Make the darts (see p.91) andpress toward the center of thegarment.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC TAILORED SKIRTraw edge
  • 1418Join the front and back facings and press the seams open. Neaten the loweredge of the facing using a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.9Place the facing to the skirt at the waist edge RS (right side) to RS, matchingthe side seams and matching at the top of the zipper. Pin and machine.7Attach a lightweight fusible interfacing to the waistfacing pieces (see p.94).11Press the seam toward the facing and understitch (see p.90).10Layer the seam allowance by trimming the facing side of the seam tohalf its width. Clip the seam allowance to reduce bulk (see p.89).12Turn the facing to the inside then, at the CB, fold the edge of the facing into meet the zipper tape. Pin and hand stitch in place.front facingback facingsclipped seam allowancelayered seamallowancefacingSkirts
  • 142 Garments16Neaten the hem edge (see pp.116–117). On each side of the vent,remove the surplus fabric in the hem allowance.15From the RS, the top of the vent can be seenas a line of stitching.17Miter the hem at the bottom of the vent. Pin.18Turn up the remainder of the hem, pin andhand stitch in place.14Machine the extension in place.13At the vent, snip through the seam allowance on the LH (left hand)side and press the seam extension to the RH (right hand) side.
  • TAILOREDEVENING SKIRTSkirt Pattern Two VariationFor this version of the skirt you will add a liningfor a more luxurious finish. You will also shortenthe skirt, which means you no longer need acenter back vent to make walking easier. Thisskirt has been made in silk for an evening out,but would also work well in a heavier fabricworn with thick tights.WoolsuitingTweedThis skirt is made in silkdupioni. Other silks, such assilk brocade, tweeds orsuitings could also be used.This lined variation of the Classic Tailored Skirt is shorterwithout a back vent. There is a zipper in the center back. Thewaistline is finished with a facing. The lining is cut from thesame pattern pieces as the skirt.YOU WILL NEED• 36in (90cm) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 36in (90cm) x 59in (150cm)lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 20in (50cm) lightweightfusible interfacing• 7in (18cm) skirt zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This skirt is made using SkirtPattern Two (see pp. 282–283)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeDartsShorterhemCenter backzipper closureBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONthe tailored skirts>>p.144>>p.138SKIRTPATTERNFRONT BACK143Skirts
  • 144 Garments1To shorten the front of the skirt, copy the skirt front pattern piece. Mark thehemline. Mark the new hemline 31⁄4in (8cm) above the old hemline. Drawa new cutting line 11⁄2in (4cm) below the new hemline.2To shorten the back of the skirt, copy the skirt back pattern piece. Shortenthe skirt as for step 1. To remove the vent, extend the CB (center back) seamline to the hemline.4Make the skirtin the silk fabric asfor the Classic TailoredSkirt steps 1–6.5For the lining: makethe darts and neatenthe side and CB seams asfor the skirt.6Stitch the CB (center back) seam in the lining between themarked dots, leaving the seam above open for the zipper. Press open.3Cut out thefabric and liningusing the newpattern pieces.old hemlinenew cutting linenew hemlineold hemlinenew cutting linenew hemlinenew centerback seam lineold centerback seam lineHOW TO MAKE THE TAILORED EVENING SKIRT
  • 145Skirts 1458Pin and baste the lining to the skirt at thewaist edge WS (wrong side) to WS, matchingthe darts and seams.10Neaten the hem edge on the skirt (see pp.116–117). Turn up the hemand hand stitch in place.11Trim the lining level to the finished hem of the skirt and machinea 3⁄4in (2cm) double-turn hem (see p.118).7Join the side seams in the liningand press open.12At the CB, fold the edge of the lining in to meet the zipper tape.Pin and hand stitch in place.9Attach the facing to the skirt and liningas for the Classic Tailored Skirt steps 7–11.zipper tape
  • A pleated skirt isalways stylish. Trythis box-pleated hip-skimming version witha plain sweaterthe pleated skirtsSKIRTPATTERN>>p.152>>p.148146 Garments
  • 147SkirtsCLASSICPLEATED SKIRTIn this skirt you’ll be introduced to making box pleats and adding a yoke. You shouldwork carefully and accurately, since you’ll have to transfer all the marks for the foldsfrom the pattern to your fabric. The flattering yoke over the tummy prevents bulk.Choose your size by your hip measurement to make sure the pleats hang straightand be sure you know the width of your belt before you construct the belt loops.Once you’ve finished, you’ll have a timeless pleated skirt to add to your wardrobe.Skirt Pattern ThreeSuitinglinenZipperYokeFor a winter or fall skirt, choose a fabricthat presses well but isn’t too heavy. Here,a wool with a twill weave has been used,but you could try a lightweight suiting,tweed, or tartan. For summer,a crisp linen print is a good option.TartanYOU WILL NEED• 59in (1.5m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposepolyester sewing thread• 2 spools contrasting all-purposesewing thread in two differentcolors for pattern marking• 7in (18cm) skirt zipper• 20in (50cm) medium-weight interfacingPREPARING THE PATTERN• This skirt is made using SkirtPattern Three (see pp. 284–285)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the pattern inyour sizeThis classic pleated unlined skirt has three box pleats at theback and front. The skirt has a self-lined yoke that sits justbelow the natural waistline, with two belt loops at the frontand back. There is a zipper on the left-hand side.Box pleatBelt loopBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONFRONT BACK
  • 148 Garments1Cut out the fabric and mark the fold lines andcrease lines with trace basting (see p.76), eachtype of line in a different colored thread. Cut throughthe loops in the trace basting.2Remove the pattern carefully so as not topull the trace basting out.5On the WS (wrong side), machine along this baste line to the dot marking on the pattern.4From the RS, the basted pleat can be seenwith its trace basting.7On the RS (right side), baste around the waist to hold the pleats in place.6Press gently on the WS to make the pleat.Repeat for each pleat. For sharp pleats, pressmore heavily, placing a pressing cloth over the fabric.3Fold the fabric RS (right side) to RS and matchbasting of the same color to each other. Pinalong each line of basting. There will be two lines ofpins. Baste through the pins, then remove the pins.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC PLEATED SKIRTtrace bastingbasting stitches
  • 149149Skirts14Top stitch the top and bottom of the belt loops to secure. Removethe tailor’s basting.8Neaten the waist edge, including the top edgeof the pleats, using a 3-thread serger stitchor a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85)11Fold the edges of the belt loops to thecenter WS to WS and press.9Attach a medium-weight fusible interfacing to one set of yokes (see p.94), join the yoke pieces together,press the seams open, and neaten the lower edge using a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.Mark the position of the belt loops with tailor’s basting (see p.77).12Working from the RS (right side), topstitcheach side of the belt carrier.10For the belt loops: Neaten the edges of thebelt loops using a 3-thread serger stitch or asmall zigzag stitch.13Cut the belt loops to the length required to hold your belt.Fold the fabric into a loop and pin at the marked positions.tailor’s basteinterfacing
  • 150 Garments15Place the yoke to the skirt front and back. Pin and machine.Press the seam open.16Press the skirt-to-yoke seam open, then neaten the side seams usinga 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.19Attach a lightweight interfacing to the remaining set of yokes to make the yoke facings (see p.94).Join the facings at the side seams and press the seams open. Neaten the lower edge using either a3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.18Join the RH side seam, matching at theskirt-to-yoke seam. Press open.17Insert a zipper of your choice on the LH (left hand) side (see pp.119–122).Stitch the remainder of the side seam and press open.
  • 151151Skirts24Working from the RS (right side) of the skirtstitch in the ditch—the line produced bythe skirt-to-yoke seam—through all layers. This willsecure the facing on the inside.26Fold the pleats at the hem edge back intoplace and baste together with a large X. Press.Remove any remaining basting and trace basting.21Layer the seam allowance by trimming the facing side of the seam to half its width.Clip the seam allowance to reduce bulk (see p.89).22Press the seam toward the facing and understitch (see p.90).23Turn the facing to the inside then fold the edge of the facing in tomeet the zipper tape. Pin the facing to the skirt-to-yoke seam.20Place the yoke facing to the yoke RS(right side) to RS, matching at the sideseam. Pin and machine.25Neaten the hem edge (see pp.116–117).Turn up and hand stitch in place. Removethe basting in the pleats.layered seamallowanceclipped seamallowancefacing
  • With its contrasting topstitching and shorterlength, this skirt is youthful. The pleats swingout from the thigh and the deep, topstitchedhem gives the skirt a casual feel. Try thisversion in a chunky winter tweed worn withthick tights or leggings; for the summer, acrisp linen would be ideal.TOPSTITCHEDPLEATED SKIRTSkirt Pattern Three VariationLinenTweedFor winter, choose heavyfabrics such as chunky tweedor a wool blend (used here);for summer, light crisp linens.This variation of the Classic Pleated Skirt is shorter. The pleats startlower and they are topstitched below the yoke in a contrastingcolor. The yoke and the deep hem are also topstitched.YOU WILL NEED• 48in (1.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 2 spools contrasting all-purposesewing thread in two differentcolors for pattern marking• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for topstitching• 20in (50cm) medium-weightinterfacing• 7in (18cm) skirt zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This skirt is made using Skirt PatternThree (see pp. 284–285)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) to copy or download thepattern in your sizeYokeShorterhemTopstitchedpleatsTopstitchedhemTopstitchedwaistBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONthe pleated skirtsSKIRTPATTERN>>p.153>>p.146FRONT BACK152 Garments
  • 153Skirts1Copy the front and back pattern pieces and mark the waist seam line, thehemline, and the pleat lines. Mark the new hemline 31⁄2in (9cm) above the oldhemline. Draw a new cutting line 11⁄2in (4cm) below the new hemline. Mark thestart of the pleats on the pleat line and 31⁄4in (8cm) below the waist seam line.2Cut out the fabric and make upas for the Classic Pleated Skirtsteps 1–6.4Continue as for the Classic PleatedSkirt steps 7, 8, 9, and 15 (i.e., omittingthe belt loops).6Continue as for theClassic Pleated Skirtsteps 16–21 to make andattach the yoke facing.8Pin the facing to the skirt-to-yoke seam as instep 23 of the Classic Pleated Skirt. Workingfrom the RS of the skirt stitch in the ditch throughall layers to secure the facing on the inside.9Neaten the hem edge (see pp.116–117) andtopstitch in place using contrasting thread11⁄4in (3cm) from the fold.10Press the pleats from the top to the hem.7Fold the facing to the inside of the skirtand topstitch around the waist. Fold theedge of the facing in to meet the zipper tapeand hand stitch in place.5Topstitch the skirt-to-yoke seam in acontrasting thread.3Working from the RS (right side) ofthe skirt, topstitch around thepleats in a contrasting thread usingthe edge of the presser foot as a guide.oldhemlinenewhemlinenew cuttinglinestart ofpleatpleat linewaist seam lineHOW TO MAKE THE TOPSTITCHED PLEATED SKIRT
  • DRessesThe three classic dresses in this section can be adapted tomake a total of twelve styles, some unlined and some lined.The dresses suit all ages and can take you to any occasion atany time of the year, depending on the fabric you choose.thethe dresses...Dresspattern oneClassic shiftdress>> p.156Dresspattern twoClassicwaisteddress>> p.174Dresspattern threeClassicempirewaist dress>> p.190
  • ... and their variationsDress patternone variationShort-sleevedshift dress>> p.161Dress patternone variationSquare-neck shiftdress>> p.164Dress patternone variationSleevelessshift dress>> p.167Dress patternone variationShortsleevelessshift dress>> p.170Dress patterntwo variationShort-sleevedwaisteddress>> p.179Dress patterntwo variationSleevelesswaisteddress>> p.181Dress patterntwo variationWaistedcocktaildress>> p.185Dress patternthree variationSleevelessempirewaist dress>> p.195Dress patternthree variationLong empirewaist dress>> p.198
  • This simple yet stylish dresscan be worn by a womanof any age and on anyoccasion, dependingon the fabric choosenthe shift dresses>>p.161>>p.164>>p.167>>p.170>>p.158DRESSPATTERN156 Garments
  • 157157DressesCLASSICSHIFT DRESSA classic fitted dress like this never goes out of fashion and you can make it inalmost any fabric. In fact, you’ll love it so much that you’ll want it in several differentones. The dress must fit well across the bust and in the hip area, so choose yourpattern by your bust measurement and alter the waist and hip as required. Aswith any fitted style, it’s best to make the pattern in muslin first and try it out.This dress is made in wool crepebut any fabric from tweed to silk tocotton can be used. Fine suitingworks well for the office and printedstretch cotton makes a greatsummer wedding outfit.Dress Pattern OneSilkWool crepeWaistdartCenter-backzipperYOU WILL NEED• 67in (1.7m) x 59in (150cm)fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purpose sewing thread forpattern marking• 20in (50cm) lightweightinterfacing• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made usingDress Pattern One (seepp.286–287)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeThis unlined one-piece fitted dress has darts at the bust andwaist to ensure a fitted silhouette. It also has a zipper in thecenter back and a center-back vent. It features a high round neckand long set-in sleeves. The hemline just brushes the knee.BEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONBustdartLongset-insleeveVentRoundnecklineFRONT BACK
  • 158 Garments7Neaten the sides and lower edge of both sleeves usingeither a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.1Cut out the fabric and mark the dartsusing tailor’s bastes (see p.77). 2Make the plain and the contour darts(see pp.91–92).4Insert a zipper of your choice in the CB. A concealed zipper is used here (see p.122).5Stitch the remainder of the CB seamstopping at the dot marking the top ofthe vent. Press the seam open.3Neaten the shoulder seam, side seams on the front andback, and the CB (center back) seams, using either a3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85).6Join the front to the back at the shoulderand side seams. Press the seams open.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC SHIFT DRESS
  • 159159Dresses8Machine the sleeve seam and press it open.12Join the facings at the shoulder seams and press the seams open.Neaten the lower edge (see pp.95–97).13Place the facings to the neck edge ofthe dress RS to RS, matching the seams.Pin and machine.14Layer the seam allowance by trimming the facing side of the seam to half its width.Clip the seam allowance to reduce bulk (see p.89).9Using the longest stitch available, machinetwo rows of ease stitches through the sleevehead (see p.105).10Insert the sleeve into the armhole, RS(right side) to RS, remembering to pin andstitch from the sleeve side (see p.105).11Attach a lightweight fusible interfacing to the neck facingpieces (see p.94).ease stitcheslayered seam allowanceclipped seam allowance
  • 160 Garments15Press the seam toward the facing and understitch (see p.90).17At the CB, fold the edge of thefacing in to meet the zippertape. Pin and hand stitch in place.20Neaten the hem edge (see pp.116–117).On each side of the vent, remove a squareof surplus fabric in the hem allowance.21Miter the hem at the bottom of the vent and pin. Turn upthe remainder of the hem and pin.22Hand stitch the miter and hem in place.23Machine through all layers at the top of the vent to secure.18From the RS, the back neck edge should nowlook neatly finished. 19Turn up a 11⁄2in (4cm) hem at the bottomof each sleeve. Pin and hand stitch in place.16Pin and hand stitch the facingto the seam allowance at theshoulder seams.
  • With this garment you’ll be introduced to thetechniques of lining a dress and shortening a sleeve.A lined dress is a pleasure to wear. The lining alsohelps prevent fabrics with a looser weave fromstretching. With fine cottons or linens, the liningwill keep the dress from being see-through.SHORT-SLEEVEDSHIFT DRESSThis lined variation of the Classic Shift Dress has a lower neckline and a shortset-in sleeve. It has a zipper in the center back and a center-back vent. Thelining is cut from the same pattern pieces as the dress.YOU WILL NEED• 67in (1.7m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 67in (1.7m) lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 20in (50cm) lightweight interfacing• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using Dress PatternOne (see pp.286–287)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) tocopy or download the pattern in your sizeWoolsuitingDress-weightlinenDress Pattern One VariationThis dress is made in tweed, butbouclé wools, suiting or linenand cotton would also work well.the shift dressesBEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTION>>p.162>>p.164>>p.167>>p.170>>p.156DRESSPATTERNFRONT BACKShortset-insleeveVentCenter-backzipperBustdartWaistdart161Dresses
  • 162 Garments1Copy the patternfront and mark theseam lines. Mark a pointon the CF (center front)11⁄2in (4cm) below theneck seam line andanother point 2in (5.5cm)from the neck seam linealong the shoulder seamline. Join the points for thenew neck seam line.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance from thenew neck seam line andmark a new cutting line.2Copy the patternback and mark theseam lines. Mark a pointon the CB (center back)3⁄4in (2cm) below the neckseam line and anotherpoint 2in (5.5cm) from theneck seam line along theshoulder seam line. Jointhe points for the newneck seam line. Measurea 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance from the newneck seam line and marka new cutting line.8Make up the lining as for The ClassicShift Dress steps 2–3.9Stitch the lining together at theCB seam leaving a gap for the zipperand another for the vent as marked onthe pattern. Press the seam open.10Make up the remaining liningas for The Classic Shift Dresssteps 6–10.5To make the newback neck facingpattern piece, copy thenew back neck seam lineand cutting line from step 2onto a piece of paper.Measure points 2in (5cm)from the seam line. Jointhese points together tocreate a new cutting line.Cut out along these lines.4To make the newfront neck facingpattern piece, copy thenew front neck seam lineand cutting line from step 1onto a piece of paper.Measure points 2in (5cm)from the seam line. Jointhese points together tocreate a new cutting line.Cut out along these lines.6Cut out the dress fabric usingthe new pattern pieces and cut thelining using the front, back, and sleevepieces. Mark the darts in both fabrics withtailor’s bastes (see p.77).7Make up the dress fabric as forThe Classic Shift Dress steps 2–10.3To shorten the sleeve, copy the sleeveand mark the seam lines. Mark a pointeither side of the sleeve, 6in (15cm) belowthe armhole seam lines. Join these pointstogether to make a new hemline. Draw anew cutting line 5⁄8in (1.5cm) below thenew hemline. (If you have a slightlyfuller arm you may need to extend thenew hemline by 5⁄8in [1.5cm] on each side.Draw new cutting lines, allowing a 5⁄8in[1.5cm] seam allowance.)shoulderseam lineshoulderseam linenew frontneck seamlinenew backneck seamlineold neckseam lineold neck seam linenew cuttinglinenewcuttinglinecenter front (CF) center back (CB)new front neckseam linenew cutting linesnew cuttinglinesnew back neckseam linearmholeseam linenew cutting linenew hemlineHOW TO MAKE THE SHORT-SLEEVED SHIFT DRESSside seam line
  • 163Dresses11Pin the lining anddress together WS(wrong side) to WS at the neckedge, matching the seams.14At the CB, fold the edge of the liningin to meet the zipper tape. Pin andhand stitch in place.12Make thefacings asfor The Classic ShiftDress steps 11–16.18Machine a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) double-turn hem in the lining(see p.118). Fold the lining under around the vent andhand stitch in place.13Hand stitch the lining to the dresson the shoulder seam and side seam,adjacent to the armhole.19Machine through all layers at the top of thevent to secure the lining to the dress.15From the RS (right side), theback neck edge should nowlook neatly finished.16Turn up a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) hem at the bottom of each sleeve.Pin and hand stitch in place. Turn up the hem of thesleeve lining by 5⁄8in (1.5cm) and place the fold 3⁄8in (1cm) abovethe fold of the sleeve hem. Hand stitch in place.17Turn up the dress hem11⁄2in (4cm) and hand stitchin place. Trim the lining level to thehem of the skirt.
  • This dress features a flattering low, square neck. Afteraltering the pattern, make the dress in muslin to checkthe fit and ensure that the neckline isn’t too low orwide. This would make a great dress for a dinner partyor a slightly more formal occasion.square-neckshift DRESSYOU WILL NEED• 87in (2.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric forsizes 6–12 and 134in (3.4m) x 59in(150cm) for sizes 14–20• 87in (2.2m) x 59in (150cm) lining fabricfor sizes 6–12 and 134in (3.4m) x 59in(150cm) for sizes 14–20• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using Dress PatternOne (see pp.286–287)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) to copy or download thepattern in your sizeSilkdupioniLinenDress Pattern One VariationWaistdartCenter-back zipperThe skirt of this second, lined variation of the Classic Shift Dress has been widened intoan A-line. The dress also features a squared-off neckline, long, set-in sleeves, and a zipperin the center back. The lining is cut from the same pattern pieces as the dress.This dress is made in a wool/polyester blend. Other goodalternatives include silk dupioni,linen, cotton, and wool crepethe shift dressesBEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONBustdartSquared-offnecklineA-lineskirtFRONT BACKDRESSPATTERN>>p.161>>p.165>>p.167>>p.170>>p.156164 Garments
  • 165Dresses3Copy the dress back and mark the CB (centerback) and side seam lines. Extend the CB seamline to the hem to remove the vent. Extend the CBcutting line to match. Widen at the hem at the sideseam line as in step 1.1Copy the dress front and mark the side seamline. At the bottom of the side seam line, mark apoint 11⁄2in (4cm) to the left. Extend the hemline tothis point. Join to the existing side seam line, justbelow the hip line to make a new side seam line.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance from thenew side seam line and mark a new cutting line.4Mark a point on the CB 3⁄4in (2cm) below theneck seam line and another point 2in (5cm) fromthe neck seam line along the shoulder line. Join thepoints to make a new neck seam line. Measurea 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance from the newneck seam line and mark a new cutting line.2Mark a point 5in (12cm) below the old neckseam line at the CF (center front) and another 2in(5cm) along the shoulder seam line. Draw an 31⁄4in(8cm) horizontal line from the CF mark toward thearmhole and a second line down from the point onthe shoulder to join it to make a new neck seam line.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance from thenew neck seam line and mark a new cutting line.6Make the plainand the contourdarts (see pp.91–92)in the lining and dressfabric. Press the contourdarts toward the center ofthe body.5Cut out thefabric andthe lining usingthe new patternpieces. Mark thedarts with tailor’sbastes (see p.77).8Make up thedress fabric asfor The Classic ShiftDress steps 4–10.7Neaten the side,shoulder, and CBseams in the dress fabricand lining using eithera 3-thread serger stitchor a small zigzag stitch (seepp.84–85).old sideseam linehemlinenew sideseam lineold neckseam lineextendedcenter-back (CB)seam linenewcuttinglinenew cuttinglinenew cuttinglinecenter-back (CB)seam lineold sideseam linenew sideseam linenewcuttinglineold neckseam linenew neckseam linenew cuttinglinecontourdartnew neckseam lineHOW TO MAKE THE SQUARE-NECK SHIFT DRESSplain dartcenterfront (CF)centerback (CB)
  • 166 Garments12You should now haveone dress made indress fabric and one madein lining fabric.14Place the neck of the liningdress to the neck of the fabricdress RS (right side) to RS, matching theshoulder seams. Pin and machine.15Clip the seam right into the corners of the frontof the neckline. 16Clip around the back of the neckline.18At the CB, fold the edge of the lining in to meet thezipper tape. Pin and hand stitch in place.17Turn the lining to the WS(wrong side) and press aroundthe neck edge. Topstitch around theneck, using a longer stitch length.19Neaten the hem edge of the dress (seepp.116–117). Turn up a 11⁄2 in (4cm) hemand hand stitch in place. Trim the lining level to thefinished hem of the dress and machine a 3⁄4in (2cm)double-turn hem (see p.118).20Turn up a 1in (2.5cm) hem at the bottomof each sleeve. Pin and hand stitch in place.Turn up the hem of the sleeve lining by 5⁄8in (1.5cm)and place the fold 3⁄8in (1cm) above the fold of thesleeve hem. Hand stitch in place.13Machine a row of stay stitches (stitchlength approximately 3.5), 1⁄2in (1.3cm)from the raw edge of the fabric dress aroundthe neckline, pivoting at the corners (see p.87).10Make up the lining fabricas for The Classic Shift Dresssteps 6–10.11Stitch the lining together atthe CB seam leaving a gap forthe zipper as marked on the pattern.stay stitches
  • This sleeveless, lined dress with its topstitchedneck and armholes will easily take you from theoffice straight to a summer’s evening party. Itssimple lines can quickly be dressed up with cleveraccessorizing. A really easy way to insert a liningin this style of garment is shown here.Sleevelessshift dressYOU WILL NEED• 59in (1.5m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 59in (1.5m) x 59in (150cm)lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using DressPattern One (see pp.286–287)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeDress Pattern One VariationPatternedlinenThis dress is wool crepe.Lightweight suitings, cottons,and linens all work wellWoolworstedZipperclosureTopstitchedarmholeBustdartsWaistdartsLowernecklineThis third, lined variation of the Classic Shift Dress is shorter so there is no need for aback vent. This dress has a zipper in the center back and features topstitching at theneck and armhole edges. The lining is cut from the same pattern as the dress.the shift dressesFRONT BACKBEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONDRESSPATTERN>>p.156>>p.161>>p.164>>p.168>>p.170167Dresses
  • 168 Garments1Copy the patternfront and markthe seam lines andhemline. Draw a newhemline 23⁄8in (6cm)above the old hemline.Measure 11⁄2in (4cm)below the newhemline to mark anew cutting line. Marka point on the CF(center front) 11⁄2in(4cm) below the oldneck seam line andanother point 3⁄4in(2cm) from the oldneck seam line alongthe shoulder seamline. Join the points tomake a new neckseam line. Measurea 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance from thenew neck seam lineand mark a newcutting line.2Copy the patternback and markthe seam lines andhemline. Extend theCB (center back) seamline to the hem toremove the vent.Extend the CB cuttingline to match. Shortenthe dress as in step 1.5Make the darts in thedress fabric and lining(see pp.91 –92) and press towardthe center of the garment.7Join the front to the back at the shouldersin both the dress fabric and the lining.Press open.8On the shoulder seam of the dress fabricmake a 1⁄16in (2mm) tuck and pin in place. Thisslightly shortens the shoulder seam and prevents thelining from showing on the finished dress.6Neaten the side and CB seams in thedress fabric and lining using either a3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch(see pp.84–85).4Cut out the dress fabricand the lining using thenew pattern pieces. Mark thedarts on the fabric using tailor’sbastes (see p.76–77).3Mark a point 3⁄4in(2cm) along theshoulder seam linefrom the neck edgeand draw a new neckseam line, tapering itinto the old neckseam line at the CB.Measure a 5⁄8in(1.5cm) seamallowance fromthe new neck seamline and marka new cutting line.shoulderseam line shoulderseamlineold neckseam linenew neckseam lineold neckseam linenewcuttinglinenewcuttinglinenew neckseam linenew hemline newcuttinglineold hemlinecenter-backseam lineextendedcenter-backseam linenew cutting lineHOW TO MAKE THE SLEEVELESS SHIFT DRESScenterfront (CF)
  • 169169Dresses9Place the lining to the dress fabric at the neck andarmholes, RS (right side) to RS and matching at theshoulder seams. Pin and machine.10Clip and trim the neck and armhole seams as forthe Classic Shift Dress step 14. To turn throughto the right side, pull the back of the dress through theshoulders to the front.11Roll the lining to theinside and press.12Insert a zipper of your choice in the CB of justthe dress fabric (see pp.119–122). Stitch theremainder of the CB seam. Stitch the CB seam inthe lining leaving a gap for the zipper.16Topstitch around the neck and armholes.13With RS to RS place the front to the back. Jointhe side seams by stitching through the fabricand lining in one continuous seam. Press the seams open.15Neaten the hem edge of the dress (see pp.116–117). Turn up a11⁄2in (4cm) hem and hand stitch in place. Trim the lining level tothe finished hem of the dress and machine a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) double-turnhem (see p.118).14At the CB, fold the edge of thelining in to meet the zippertape. Pin and hand stitch in place.
  • Omitting the darts and shortening the pattern givesus a simple sun dress or, in a sparkly fabric, it wouldbecome a teriffic little cocktail dress. Alternatively, trymaking the pattern even shorter and you’ll have atunic top to wear with pants.Short sleevelessshift DRESSThis fourth variation of the Classic Shift Dress omits the waist darts and the zipper,and is sleeveless. It is also wider at the hem and shorter than the Classic Shift Dress,so again there is no need for a back vent. The dress is unlined and has no facings,but instead features a bias-binding trim at the neck and armhole edges.YOU WILL NEED• 47in (1.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarkingPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using DressPattern One (see pp.286–287)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeDress Pattern One VariationTaffetaThis dress is madein linen. Try alsocottons, taffetas,satin, or silk brocadeSatinBust dartShorterand widerhemthe shift dressesBEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONLowernecklineBias-boundneck andarmholesFRONT BACKDRESSPATTERN>>p.161>>p.164>>p.167>>p.171>>p.156170 Garments
  • 171Dresses1Copy the patternback and mark theseam lines and hemline.Mark a new hemline 81⁄4in(21cm) above the oldhemline and draw a newcutting line 11⁄4in (3cm)below this. Cross out thedart marking to removethe dress shaping.2At the CB (centerback) draw a straightline through the old seamline and mark thisas a “cut to fold”line.6Copy the patternfront and mark theseam lines and hemline.Shorten the hem and crossout the dart as in step 1.7Alter the armholeas in step 3.9Widen at theside seam asin step 5.8Mark a point onthe CF (centerfront) 5in (12cm) belowthe neck seam line andanother point 11⁄4in(3cm) from the neckseam line along theshoulder seam line. Jointhe points to makea new neck seam line.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance from thenew neck seam line andmark a new cutting line.3Mark a point 3⁄4in(2cm) from the shoulderseam line at the armholeedge and another pointon the side seam line 1in(2.5cm) below the armholeseam line. Join the points tomake a new armhole seamline. Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance from thenew armhole seam line andmark a new cutting line.4Mark a point on theCB 2in (5cm) belowthe neck seam line andanother point 11⁄4in(3cm) from the neckseam line along theshoulder seam line. Jointhe points to makea new neck seam line.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance from thenew neck seam line andmark a new cutting line.“cut tofold”lineold armholeseam lineold armholeseam linenew armholeseam linenewcutting linedartnewcutting lineoldhemlinenew hemlinenew armholeseam lineold hemlinenew cuttinglinecenterfront (CF)dartnew cutting linenew hemlineold neckseamlinenew neck seam linenewcutting lineold sideseam linenew sideseam linenewcuttinglineold sideseam linenew sideseam linenew cuttinglineold neckseam linenew neckseam linenewcuttinglineHOW TO MAKE THE SHORT SLEEVELESS SHIFT DRESS5At the bottom of theside seam line, marka point 23⁄8in (6cm) to theright. Extend the hemlineto this point. Join to the oldside seam line, just belowthe armhole to make a newside seam line. Measurea 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance from the newside seam line and marka new cutting line.shoulder seam lineside seamlinecenterback (CB)centerback (CB)centerfront (CF)
  • 172 Garments16Cut one end of a bias strip square and fold it over WS (wrong side) to WS by 3⁄16in (1⁄2cm). Pin the biasstrip RS to RS around the armhole, starting at the underarm.12Join the front to the back at theshoulder and side seams. Pressthe seam allowances together.13Neaten the seam allowances together usingeither a 3-thread serger stitch or a smallzigzag stitch (see pp.84–85). Press toward the back.14Cut 11⁄2in (4cm) wide bias strips (see p.96).Make enough strips to go around thearmholes and neck.15Join the strips RS (right side) to RS (see p.96).Press the seams open.10Cut out the fabric using the new patternpieces. Mark the bust darts using tailor’sbastes (see p.77) and by clipping the raw edge.11Make the darts (see p.91) and press towardthe waist.
  • 173173Dresses21The finished binding, as seen from the RS,gives the edges a neat finish.18Machine the bias strips around thearmholes and the neck using the edgeof the presser foot as a guide.19Press the seams toward the bias strips andwrap the strips over to the wrong side. Turnthe raw edges under and pin.17When you reach the underarm again, overlapthe end of the bias strip onto the foldedend. Repeat for the other armhole and the neck edge.22Machine a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) double-turn hem(see p.118). Press.20Hand stitch in place.
  • The gentlyflaring A-lineskirt of this long-sleeved dress issure to turn headsas you sashay bythe waisted dresses>>p.179>>p.181>>p.185>>p.176DRESSPATTERN174 Garments
  • 175DressesLongset-insleeveCenter-backzipperCLASSICWAISTED DRESSThis dress has a darted bodice fitted into the waist for a smooth, flattering lineat the waist and hips. Choose your pattern by your bust measurement and adjustthe waist and hips if necessary. It is recommended to make the pattern in muslinfirst to ensure a good fit through the bust and waist, and to check the fit of thesleeve in the shoulder area. Lightweight fabrics work well for this dress and willensure that the slightly A-line skirt moves with a nice swirl as you walk.This dress is made in polyesterbrocade, but this style of dresscould be made in a variety offabrics from cotton prints tolightweight wools, or silk.YOU WILL NEED• 98in (2.5m) x 59in (150cm)fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 20in (50cm) lightweightinterfacing• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using DressPattern Two (see pp.288–290)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeThis unlined two-piece dress has waist darts in the bodice andin the skirt. It has long, fitted set-in sleeves and a lower necklinefinished with a facing. There is a zipper in the center back and theA-line skirt sits just on the knee.Dress Pattern TwoWool crepeSilkBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONSkirtwaistdartBodicewaistdartLower necklineA-line skirtFRONT BACK
  • 176 Garments5Using either a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch, neatenthe CB (center back) seam, the side seams, and the shoulder seamson both the front and the back.6Making sure the waist seams match on either side, insert a zipper of yourchoice in the CB (see pp.119–122). Stitch the remainder of the CB seamand press open.4Neaten the seam allowances together using either a 3-thread serger stitchor a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85). Press up toward the bodice.3Join the front and back skirts to the front and back bodices, matchingthe darts. To ensure they match, you may have to ease the skirt to thebodice by stretching the bodice slightly. Press the seam allowances together.1Cut out the fabric and mark all the darts using tailor’s bastes (see p.77).2Make all the darts (see p.91) and press toward the center of the garment.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC WAISTED DRESSconcealed zipper
  • 177177Dresses10Insert the sleeve (see p.105) and neatenthe raw edges using either a 3-thread sergerstitch or a small zigzag stitch.12Join the facings at the shoulder seamsand press the seams open. Neaten thelower edge using either a 3-thread serger stitchor a small zigzag stitch.11Attach a lightweight fusible interfacingto the neck facing pieces (see p.94).7Join the front to the back at the shoulder andside seams, matching at the waist seam. Pressthe seams open.9Machine the sleeve seam and press open.Using stitch length 5, machine two rows ofease stitches through the sleeve head (see p.105).8Neaten the sides and lower edge of bothsleeves using either a 3-thread serger stitchor a small zigzag stitch.shoulderseamsideseamease stitcheswaistseam
  • 178 Garments13Place the facings to the neck edge of the dress RS (right side) to RS,matching the seams. Pin and machine. 14Layer the seam allowance by trimming the facing side of the seamto half its width. Clip the seam allowance to reduce bulk (see p.89).16Turn the facing to the inside then, at the CB, fold the edgeof the facing in to meet the zipper tape. Pin and hand stitch in place.17Neaten the hem edge (see pp.116–117) and turn up by 11⁄2in (4cm).To ease the fullness out of the hem, make a row of running stitchesclose to the neatened edge (see p.81). Pull the thread to tighten the fabric. Handstitch, then remove the running stitches.15Understitch the seam allowancesto the facing (see p.90).18Turn up a 1in (2.5cm) hem at the bottom of each sleeve.Pin and hand stitch in place.layered seamallowanceclipped seamallowance
  • For a dress with a gathered skirt, your choice offabric is key. Don’t go for anything too heavy: itwon’t gather evenly and could be very bulky atthe waist. The skirt should sit neatly into thefitted darted bodice.short-sleevedwaisted dressYOU WILL NEED• 87in (2.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 20in (50cm) lightweight interfacing• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using DressPattern Two (see pp.288–290)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeIn this variation of the Classic Waisted Dress, a gathered skirt is attachedto the fitted darted bodice. It has short set-in sleeves, a scoop neck, anda zipper in the center back.Dress Pattern Two VariationGatheredskirtDartWool crepeTweedThis dress is made in a cottontweed mix, but lightweightwools such as tweed or woolcrepe are also suitable, as arecottons and silks.the waisted dressesBEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONScoopneck Shortset-insleeveCenter-backzipperFRONT BACK>>p.174>>p.179>>p.181>>p.185DRESSPATTERN179Dresses
  • 180 Garments1Copy the sleeve and mark the seam lines. Marka point on each side of the sleeve and 6½in(17cm) below the underarm seam lines. Join thesepoints together to make a new hemline. Draw a newcutting line 5⁄8in (1.5cm) below the new hemline. (Ifyou have a slightly fuller arm you may need to extendthe new hemline by 5⁄8in [1.5cm] on each side. Drawnew side seam lines and cutting lines allowing a 5⁄8in[1.5cm] seam allowance.)2Copy the front skirt piece and mark the waistand side seam seam lines. Draw a vertical lineparallel to the CF (center front) through the dart fromwaist to hem. Draw a second line 3½in (9cm) awayfrom this line (solid red lines). Repeat on the backskirt piece, drawing the vertical line parallel to the CB(center back) seam.5Stitch two rows of long machine stitches at thewaist edge of the front and back skirt pieces (seep.93). Start and finish the stitching 1in (2.5cm) fromthe CB and side seams.6Place the front skirt to the front bodice RS(right side) to RS, and the back bodice pieces tothe back skirts, RS to RS. Match the notches, pull upthe two rows of stitches, and pin (see p.93).7Machine the waist seam and neaten the seamallowances together using either a 3-threadserger stitch or a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85).8Complete the dress as for The Classic WaistedDress steps 5–17.4Cut out the fabric using the new pattern piecesand mark and stitch the bodice darts as for TheClassic Waisted Dress steps 1 and 2.3Cut through the vertical lines. Spread thepattern pieces apart at the dart by 1½in (3cm)at the waist and ¾in (2cm) at the hem, and at thesecond cut by 2in (5cm) at the waist, and 1½in (4cm)at the hem. Place paper behind the pattern piecesand tape them down. Repeat on the back.new sideseam linenewhemlinenew cutting linenew cuttinglineshemlinesideseam linepapertapedunderneathpatternsideseam linehemlinemachine stitcheswaistseamline waistseamlinecenterfront (CF)centerfront(CF)underarmseam linedartHOW TO MAKE THE SHORT-SLEEVED WAISTED DRESS
  • In this version of the Classic Waisted Dress thesleeves have been removed and a lining added.The dress has the same skirt as the Short-SleevedWaisted Dress. In a patterned fabric, it would belovely for a summer wedding or even an eveningfunction; in plain it would be ideal for office wear.SLEEVELESSWAISTED DRESSThis lined dress has a gathered A-line skirt and a fitted bodice withwaist darts. The dress is sleeveless and has a scoop neck. There is a CB(center back) zipper.Dress Pattern Two VariationLinenThis dress is madein a linen ikat weave,but heavy cotton, linen,polyester, and poly-viscosefabrics are all suitable.Polyesterthe waisted dresses>>p.179>>p.182>>p.185>>p.174DRESSPATTERNYOU WILL NEED• 87in (2.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 87in (2.2m) x 59in (150cm)lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purpose sewingthread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using DressPattern Two (see pp.288–290)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279)to copy or download the patternin your sizeBEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONWaistdartGathersCenter-back zipperA-line skirtFRONT BACK181Dresses
  • 182 Garments3Cut out the bodice front, bodiceback, skirt front and skirt back fromboth the dress fabric and the lining.5Join the front bodice to the back bodice RS (right side) to RS at the shoulderseam in both the dress fabric and the lining. Press the seams open. On theshoulder seam of the dress fabric make a 1⁄16in (2mm) tuck and pin in place.4Mark the darts in both fabrics withtailor’s bastes (see p.77). Make thedarts (see p.91) and press toward thecenter of the garment.1Copy the front skirt piece and mark the waist and side seam lines.Draw a vertical line parallel to the CF (center front) through the dart fromwaist to hem. Draw a second line 31⁄2in (9cm) away from this line (solid redlines). Repeat on the back skirt piece, drawing the vertical line parallel to theCB (center back) seam.2Cut through the vertical lines. Spread the cut pattern pieces apart throughthe dart by 11⁄2in (3cm) at the waist and 11⁄4in (2cm) at the hem, and at thesecond cut by 2in (5cm) at the waist and 11⁄2in (4cm) at the hem. Place paperbehind the pattern pieces and tape them down. (For sizes over a size 12 or formore fullness, double these measurements.) Repeat on the back.HOW TO MAKE THE SLEEVELESS WAISTED DRESSnew cutting linesideseam linehemlinehemlinepaper tapedunderneath patternsideseam linedressliningwaist seam linecenterfront (CF)waist seam linecenterfront (CF)tuck
  • 183183Dresses6Place the dress fabric bodice to the liningbodice RS to RS matching at the shoulderseams. Pin and machine around the armholesand the neck. Clip the seam allowance.7Remove the pin in each shoulder. To turnthrough to the right side, pull the back ofthe dress through the shoulders to the front. Rollthe lining to the inside and press.10Neaten the seam allowances together using either a 3-threadserger stitch or a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–5). Press theseam toward the bodice.8Stitch two rows of long machine stitches,length 5, at the waist edge of the front andback skirt pieces in both the dress fabric and thelining (see p.93). Start and finish the stitching 1in(2.5cm) from the CB and side seams.9In both the dress fabric and the lining place the front skirt to the frontbodice RS to RS, and the back bodice pieces to the back skirts, RS to RS.Match the notches, pull up the two rows of stitches, and pin (see p.93).Machine the waist seam.11Using either a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch,neaten the CB seam and the side seam allowances in boththe dress fabric and the lining.12Insert a zipper of your choice in the CB of just the dress fabric (seepp.119–122). Stitch the remainder of the CB seam in the dress fabric.clipped seamallowancewaist edgewaist seam
  • 184 Garments15Neaten the hem edge ofthe dress (see pp.116–117).Turn up a 11⁄2in (4cm) hem and handstitch in place.16At the CB, fold the edge of the lining in to meet the zipper tape.Pin and hand stitch in place.17Trim the lining level to the finished hem of the dress andmachine a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) double-turn hem (see p.118).18At the waist, turn under the raw edge of the bodice lining.Pin and hand stitch to the waist seam.13Stitch the CB seam in the liningleaving a gap for the zipper. 14With RS to RS place the front to the back. Join the side seams bystitching through the fabric and lining in one continuous seam.Match the seams at the waist and armholes.continuousseam
  • This great little dress could be a cocktail or promdress or just a sundress. If you like a vintage lookyou can wear a net petticoat underneath. Thedress requires some complex pattern alterations.The skirt has been widened to accommodatemore gathers and the bodice has been reshaped.WAISTEDcockTail DRESSThis dress in two contrasting fabrics has a full, gathered skirt, asweetheart neckline and straps. The darted bodice with center back (CB)zipper is lined and trimmed around its upper edge with the skirt fabic.TaffetaSilkDress Pattern Two VariationThis dress is madein polyester crinkletaffeta, but thispattern suits anylightweight taffeta,satin, silk dupionior crepe.the waisted dresses>>p.179>>p.181>>p.186>>p.174DRESSPATTERNYOU WILL NEED• 39in (1m) x 59in (150cm) bodice fabric• 59in (1.5m) x 59in (150cm) skirt fabric• 36in (60cm) x 59in (150cm) lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purpose sewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purpose sewingthread for pattern marking• 39in (1m) x 46in (115cm) woven medium-weight interfacing• 16in (40cm) zipper• 1 hook and eye fastenerPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using Dress Pattern Two(see pp.288–290)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) tocopy or download the pattern in your sizeBEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONZipperclosureGathersDartBoundedgeStrapsFRONT BACK185Dresses
  • 186 Garments1Copy the front skirt piece and mark the waist and side seam lines. Draw avertical line parallel to the CF (center front) through the dart from waist to hem.Draw a second line 31⁄2in (9cm) away from this line. Repeat on the back skirt piece,drawing the vertical line parallel to the CB (center back).3Copy the bodicefront pattern andmark the seam lines.At the side seam linemark a point 1⁄2in (1cm)below the underarmseam line. At the CF linemark a point approx31⁄2in (9cm) below theneck seam line. Jointhese two pointstogether to make thenew bust seam line in acurve over the top ofthe bust. Measure a5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance from thisline and mark a newcutting line.4Copy the bodiceback pattern andmark the seam lines.At the side seam linemark a point 1⁄2in(1cm) below theunderarm seam line.Draw a horizontal lineacross the back to theCB seam line to makea new back bodiceseam line. Measurea 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance from thisline and mark a newcutting line.5Cut out the dressfabric using thenew pattern pieces.Cut out the liningfabric using thebodice pattern pieces.2Cut through the vertical lines. Spread the cut pattern pieces apart throughthe dart by 11⁄2in (3cm) at the waist and by 5in (12cm) at the hem, and at thesecond cut by 23⁄8in (6cm) at the waist and 5in (12cm) at the hem. Place paperbehind the pattern pieces and tape them down. (For sizes over a size 12 or formore fullness, double these measurements.) Repeat on the back skirt piece.sideseam linesideseam linenew cutting linehemlinenew hemlinepaper tapedunderneath patternhemlineunderarmseam linenew cuttinglinecenterfront (CF)sideseam linecenter back (CB)seam linenew cuttinglineside seam linenew backbodiceseam lineHOW TO MAKE THE WAISTED COCKTAIL DRESSwaistseam linecenterfront (CF)waistseam linecenterfront (CF)new bustseam lineunderarmseam line
  • 187187Dresses6Apply fusible interfacing to the front and back bodice pieces (see p.94).Mark the darts using tailor’s bastes (see p.77) and by clipping the raw edge.8Join the bodice front to the bodice back at the side seams.Press the seams open.7Make the darts in the in the front and back bodice pieces (see p.91)and press toward the center of the garment.9Mark and make the darts in the front and back bodice lining piecesand join the side seams.10Stitch two rows of long machine stitches, stitch length 5, at thewaist edge of the front and back skirt pieces (see p.93). Start andfinish the stitching 1in (2.5cm) from the CB and side seams. Neaten the sideseams on the skirt using either a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzagstitch (see pp.84–85).tailor’s basteside seamwaist edgeclipped edgedart
  • 188 Garments12Place the skirt to the bodice RS (right side) to RS. Match the side seams, pull up the two rows of stitches and pin(see p.93). Machine the waist seam and neaten the seam allowances together using either a 3-thread serger stitch ora small zigzag stitch. Neaten the CB seams.14Place the lining to the bodice WS (wrong side) to WS and pin then bastearound the top edge. At the CB, fold the edge of the lining in to meetthe zipper tape. Pin in place.15To make the straps, cut twopieces of fabric 173⁄4in x 4in(45cm x 10cm). Fold each in halflengthwise RS to RS and machinealong the long edge. Trim the seamallowance close to the seamline.16Turn the straps to the RSusing a loop turner (see p. 25).Press flat ensuring that the seam is atthe CB of the strap.13Insert a zipper of your choice in the CB (see pp.119–122). Stitch theremainder of the CB seam. Press the seam open.11Machine the skirt sectionstogether at the side seamsand press open.waistseamtrimmedseamallowancesideseam
  • 189189Dresses17Pin one end of each strap to the front bodice, just to thearmhole side of the dart. Try the dress on to make sure that thestrap will cover your bra strap. Reposition if necessary.19Trim the top of the zipper tape. Fold the bias strip to the WS of thebodice and fold the raw edge under. At the CB, trim the top of thezipper tape, and fold the end of the strip in line with the folded edge of thelining. Pin and hand stitch. Attach a hook and eye to the bias strip.21Finish the hem as for the ClassicWaisted Dress step 17. Try thedress on and attach the straps to theback of the bodice to fit. Hand stitch thestraps to the binding.20To finish the bodice, turn under theraw edge of the bodice lining. Pinand hand stitch to the waist seam. Handstitch the lining to the zipper tape.18To finish the top edge of the dress, cut 21⁄2in (6cm) wide bias strips from theskirt fabric (see p.96). Make a strip that is long enough to go around the top ofthe bodice. Pin the bias strip RS (right side) to RS to the top edge of the bodice andbaste down. Machine using the edge of the presser foot as a guide. Pivot (see p.87) andclip the seam allowance at the CF. Remove the basting stitches.top of bodice
  • The flatteringsilhouette of thisempire waist dresswith its gently flaringA-line skirt will hidea multitude of sinsthe empire waist dresses>>p.195>>p.198>>p.192DRESSPATTERN190 Garments
  • 191DressesCLASSIC EMPIREWAIST DRESSThose ladies of The First French Empire certainly knew a thing or two about howto flatter the figure. The high waist of an Empire Waist Dress helps to conceal a fullerwaistline and the low neck of this version sets off the face and neck. Choose yourpattern size by your bust measurement and check for fit in the hip and waist areas.This is an easy-to-wear day dress that can take you from work to dinner.Dress Pattern ThreeThis dress has been made ina cotton print, but many fabricssuit this style including lightweighttweeds, wool suiting, silks, linens,viscose, or polyester.Dress-weightlinenViscoseYOU WILL NEED• 100in (2.5m) x 59in (150cm)fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 20in (50cm) lightweightinterfacing• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using DressPattern Three (see pp.291–293)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeThis unlined dress has wrist-length sleeves and a wide, low necklinefinished with a facing. The waist darts of the bodice meet the skirtdarts at an under-bust seamline. There is a center back (CB) zipper anda vent in the gently shaped A-line skirt.BEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONSkirtdartCenter-backzipperWrist-lengthsleeveFRONT BACKBodicedartLow necklineVentA-lineskirt
  • 192 Garments5Neaten all the side seams, shoulder seams, and the CB (center back)seam using a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.4Join the front bodice to the front skirt and theback bodice pieces to the back skirts at the waist.Press the seams open.3Neaten the waist seams on all the bodice andskirt pieces using a 3-thread serger stitch ora small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85).1Cut out the fabric and mark the darts usingtailor’s tacks (see p.77).2Make the darts (see p.91) in the bodice and skirtand press toward the center of the garment.6Insert a zip of your choice in the CB (see pp.119–122). Stitch the remainderof the CB seam stopping at the dot marking the top of the vent.waist seamsHOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC EMPIRE WAIST DRESS
  • 193193Dresses7Press the seam and the vent open.8Join the front to the back pieces at theshoulder and side seams. Press the seams open. 9Neaten the sides and lower edge of bothsleeves using either a 3-thread serger stitchor a small zigzag stitch.10Machine the sleeve side seam and press it open. Using the longest stitchavailable, machine two rows of ease stitches through the sleeve head(see p.105). Fit the sleeve into the armhole, RS (right side) to RS. Pin, then stitchthe sleeve into place from the sleeve side (see p.105).11Attach a lightweight fusible interfacing to the neck facing pieces(see p.94). Join the facings at the shoulder seams and press the seamsopen. Neaten the lower edge of the facing pieces (see pp.95–97).shoulder seamsideseambackfacingfront facing
  • 194 Garments12Place the facings to the neck edge of the dress RS to RS, matchingthe seams. Pin and machine. Layer the seam allowance by trimmingthe facing side of the seam to half its width. Clip the seam allowance toreduce bulk (see p.89).13Turn the facing to the WS (wrong side), press and topstitchto hold in place.14Neaten the hem edge (see pp.116–117). On each side of the vent,remove the surplus fabric in the hem allowance. Miter the hemat the bottom of the vent and pin. Turn up the remainder of the hem and pin.Hand stitch the miter and hem in place.15Turn up the sleeve hem by 11⁄2in (3cm), pin and hand stitch in place.16At the CB, fold the edge of the facing in to meet the zipper tape.Pin and hand stitch in place.clipped seamallowancelayered seamallowancetopstitchinghem edge miter
  • Dress Pattern Three VariationThis version of the Classic Empire waist Dressfeatures tucks in the skirt, which give a full yet sleek,smooth line. The dress is lined but also has facings inorder to show an alternative way of inserting a lininginto a sleeveless dress. Made in silk, this dress is idealfor a party, or try a poly-cotton mix for everyday.SLEEVELESS Empirewaist DRESSYOU WILL NEED• 69in (1.75m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 69in (1.75m) x 59in (150cm) lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purpose sewingthread• 1 spool contrasting all-purpose sewingthread for pattern marking• 20in (50cm) lightweight fusible interfacing• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using Dress PatternThree (see pp.291–293)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) tocopy or download the pattern in your sizeThis sleeveless empire waist dress has front and back bodice darts at the waistthat line up with tucks in the skirt. The tucks give a fuller skirt. The dress is linedand the neckline is faced.ViscoseWoolsuitingThis dress is silk dupionibut it could also be madein poly-cotton, viscose, orwool suiting.BEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONBodicedartCenter-backzipperFRONT BACKA-lineskirtSkirttuckFacednecklinethe empire waist dresses>>p.196>>p.198>>p.190DRESSPATTERN195Dresses
  • 196 Garments2Cut through the vertical lines to within 1⁄8in (3mm) of the hem cutting line.Place paper underneath, and spread the cut pattern pieces apart throughthe front waist by 11⁄2in (3cm) and through the back waist by 5⁄8in (1.5cm). Tapethe pattern pieces to the paper. Mark the tuck lines at points 11⁄2in (4cm) belowthe waist, following the original dart seam lines.3Cut out the fabric and the liningusing the new skirt pieces and thebodice pieces.1Copy the skirt front and back and mark the seam lines and hemlines.On the front, draw a vertical line parallel to the CF (center front). On the back,draw a vertical line parallel to the CB (center back) seam through the dart to thehem cutting line. To remove the vent, extend the CB seam line to the hemline.Draw a new cutting line 5⁄8in (1.5cm) to the left of it.4Mark the darts in both the fabricand the lining bodices with tailor’sbastes (see p.77). Make the darts (seep.91) and press toward the centerof the body.5Make the tucks in both thefabric and lining skirt front andskirt backs by bringing the tuck linesat the waist edge together RS (rightside) to RS. Stitch along the tucklines 11⁄2in (4cm). Press toward theside seam lines.centerfront (CF)newcuttinglinepaperunderneathpatternnewcuttinglinesFRONT BACK FRONT BACKHOW TO MAKE THE SLEEVELESS EMPIRE LINE DRESScenterback (CB)extendedcenter backseam linetucklinestucklineshem cutting linehemlinehem cutting linehemline
  • 197197Dresses6Join the front to the back at the shoulder seams in both the fabric and thelining bodices. Press the seams open.8Turn through to theright side, roll the liningto the inside and press.Baste the raw edgestogether around the neck.9Working separately on the fabric and thelining, follow steps 3–7 of the Classic EmpireLine Dress, leaving a gap corresponding to thezipper in the lining. Do not neaten the bodiceseams and ignore the reference to the CB vent.10With RS to RS place the frontto the back. Join the sideseams by stitching through the fabricand lining in one continuous seam.Press the seams open.11Make and attach the neckfacing to the basted raw neckedge as for the Classic Empire LineDress steps 11–12.12Neaten the hem edge of the dress (see pp.116–117). Turn up a 11⁄2in(4cm) hem and hand stitch in place. Trim the lining level to the finishedhem of the dress and machine a 3⁄4in (2cm) double-turn hem (see p.118).7Place the fabric bodice to the lining bodice RS to RS and matching at theshoulder seams. Pin and machine just around the armholes. Clip the seam.clippedseamallowance
  • long empireline dressDress Pattern Three VariationHere the strapless bodice has been interlined and boned, andthe skirt extended to floor length with a small “puddle”train.The bodice requires a snug fit, so you should definitely testyour pattern in muslin first. Try this dress in a crepe or satin forevening wear or a prom, or in silk and lace for a wedding.YOU WILL NEED• 138in (3.5m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 138in (3.5m) x 59in (150cm) lining fabric• 30in (75cm) x 59in (150cm) muslin• 2 spools matching all-purpose sewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purpose sewing thread forpattern marking• 30in (75cm) medium-weight fusible woven interfacing• 79in (2m) sew-in polyester boning 1⁄2in (12mm) wide• 16in (40cm) invisible zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using Dress Pattern Three(see pp.291–293)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) to copy ordownload the pattern in your sizeThe high-waisted, strapless fitted bodice is boned, interfaced, andinterlined. The full-length skirt has been widened and falls into a small“puddle”train. The dress has a center-back (CB) zipper.SatinTaffetaThis dress is made in polyestercrepe, but satin, silk, taffeta, andsatin-backed crepe are all goodfabric choices.the empire waist dresses>>p.195>>p.199>>p.190DRESSPATTERNBEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONBodicedartFitted,bonedbodice“Puddle”trainCenter-backzipperSkirtdartFRONTBACKWidenedskirt198
  • 199Dresses3Copy the front skirt piece. See p.58 to extend the pattern by 18in (46cm)to make the skirt floor length. Add a 11⁄4in (4cm) hem allowance and marka new cutting line. Draw a vertical line parallel to the CF through the dart fromthe waist to the new hem cutting line. Slash along this line and spread thepattern at the hem by 31⁄2in (9cm). Measure the width of the crease thatforms on the side seam line in the hip area and add this amount to the hemon the side seam. Draw in a new curved hemline and cutting line.4Copy the back skirt pieces and mark the CB seam lines and the hemlines.Extend the pattern at the hemline as in step 3. Remove the vent by extendingthe CB seam line to the new hemline. Slash and spread the pattern as in step 3.To create the train, extend the CB seam line by 12in (30cm). At the hemlineextend the hemline horizontally by 23⁄8in (6cm). Join this point with a straightline to the CB seam line in the hip area and extend the other way by at least12in (30cm). On the extended hem, join these new points with straight linesand then draw in curved lines to create the train. Draw in a new cutting line11⁄2in (4cm) below this line.1Copy the bodicefront pattern andmark the seam lines.At the side seam linemark a point 5⁄8in(1.5cm) below theunderarm seam line.At the CF (center front)line mark a point 23⁄4in(7cm) below the neckseam line. Join thesetwo points togetherto make the new bustseam line in a curve overthe top of the bust.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance fromthis line and mark a newcutting line.2Copy the bodiceback pattern andmark the seam lines.At the side seam linemark a point 5⁄8in (1.5cm)below the underarmseam line. Mark anotherpoint on the CB (centerback) seam line 81⁄4in(21cm) below the neckseam line. Join these twopoints together with aslightly curving line tomake the new backbodice seam line.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance fromthis line and mark a newcutting line.newcutting linenew bustseam linenewcuttinglineoldhemlinenewhemlinewidth ofcreaseadded toside seamnewcurvedhemlinenewcuttingline newcuttinglineHOW TO MAKE THE LONG EMPIRE WAIST DRESSdartcenterfront(CF)creasecenterfront(CF)new back bodiceseam lineoldhemlinenew hemlinenewcuttinglinenew curvedhemlinenewcutting linenewcuttinglineunderarmseam linesideseam lineunderarmseam lineside seam linenew CBseam lineextendedhemlinecenterback(CB)new CBseam linenewcuttinglinecenterback (CB)seam lineneck seam linecenterfront (CF)neck seam linecenterback (CB)seam linecenterback(CB)
  • 200 Garments8Make the darts in the muslin and liningbodice sections.13Cut out the skirt front and back piecesfrom fabric and lining. Mark and makethe darts in both.14Neaten the side and CB seams in the fabric andthe lining skirt pieces using either a 3-thread sergerstitch or a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85).15Join the side seams in boththe fabric and the lining skirtpieces. Press the seams open.12Place the WS (wrong side) of the fabric bodice to the RS (right side)of the boned bodice. Baste around the edges.9Join the side seams in the muslin bodice andin the lining bodice sections. Press open. 10Cut the polyester boning to fit the bodice(see step 11) and seal the ends if required.5Cut out the bodice front and back pieces from fabric,muslin, medium-weight interfacing, and lining. Cut theskirt front and back pieces from fabric and lining. Markthe darts with tailor’s bastes (see p.77).6Attach fusible interfacing (see p.94)to the fabric bodice pieces. Make thedarts (see p.91) and press toward thecenter of the body.7Join the interfaced bodice front to theinterfaced bodice back at the side seams.Press the seams open.11Place the boning on the muslin bodice as shown, leaving 3⁄4in (2cm)clearance at the top and bottom. Attach with a zigzag stitch (see p.82).tailor’s baste dartpolyesterboningsealed end
  • 201201Dresses19Attach the bodice lining to the top edge of the boned bodice RS toRS. Cut away the muslin from the seam and clip the seam allowance.20Turn the lining bodice to the inside and press. At the CB, fold the edgeof the lining in to meet the zipper tape. Pin and hand stitch in place. Atthe waist, turn under the raw edge of the bodice lining. Pin and hand stitch to thewaist seam.17Insert a 16in (40cm)invisible zipper in the CB(see p.122). Stitch the remainderof the CB seam.18Machine the lining skirt tothe skirt-to-bodice seamallowances, stopping 11⁄4in (3cm)from the zipper.16Attach just the fabric skirt to the boned bodice. Cut away the muslinfrom the seam and press the seam allowances up toward bodice.21Neaten the hem edge of the dress (see pp.116–117) and turn upa 11⁄2in (4cm) hem, placing the pins vertically in the area of the trainto ease out any fullness. Hand stitch in place.22Trim the lining level to the finished hem of the dress and machinea 3⁄4in (2cm) double-turn hem (see p.118).trimmed seamallowancewaist seambodice liningclipped seamallowanceskirt lining
  • pantsEvery woman needs at least a couple of pairs of pants in her wardrobe. Here aretwo basic styles and a variation of each that will work well for most occasions.Making pants may appear daunting, but the steps are all clearly explained.the
  • the pants... ... and their variationsPants pattern onevariationTapered capripants>> p.208Pants pattern twoClassic palazzopants>> p.210Pants pattern twovariationWide-leg shorts>> p.216Pants pattern oneClassic tailoredpants>> p.204
  • These go-anywhere pantsare sure to appeal. The flatfront ensures a smooth lineover the tummy areaStretchcottonGabardineWe made our pants ina wool flannel but you can alsotry them in a gabardine or apolyester and wool mix. Theywould also work well in a fabricwith a 2 or 3 percent stretch.the tailored pantsPANTSPATTERN>>p.208>>p.206204 Garments
  • 205PantsCLASSIC TAILOREDPANTSThese classic pants with their slanted hip pockets and shaped waistband havea timeless appeal and can be worn at any age. Choose your pattern according toyour full hip measurement (see pp.54–55). To ensure the pants fit well in the crotcharea, check your crotch measurements carefully against the pattern and make thepants in muslin first, altering where necessary before cutting them out of yourfabric. Wearing pants like this, you can go absolutely anywhere.YOU WILL NEED• 100in (2.5m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 12in (30cm) x 59in (150cm) lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 20in (50cm) medium-weightfusible interfacing• 7in (18cm) zipper• 1 hook and eyePREPARING THE PATTERN• These pants are made usingPant Pattern One (see pp.294–295)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeThe pants feature a flatfront with a fly-front zipperopening and a slightlytapered leg. They haveslanted pockets on the hipand a shaped waistbandthat sits just below thenatural waistline.Pants Pattern OneBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONTaperedlegWaistbandZipper flyFrontpocketFRONT BACK
  • 206 Garments1Cut out the fabric and transfer the patternmarkings using tailor’s bastes (see p.91). Mark theCF (center front) line with trace bastes (see p.76).2Make the darts (see p.91) in the pants back andpress toward the CB (center back). 3Place the pocket lining to the pants front,RS (right side) to RS. Pin and machine in place.4Clip the seam allowance.Turn the pocket lining tothe inside and press. Topstitchto secure.5On the RS, pin thepants front to the side front,matching the markings.Pin securely.6On the WS (wrong side), pin and stitcharound the pocket bag. Neaten usinga 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzagstitch (see pp.84–85). Be careful not to sewthrough the front.8Join a front leg to a back leg at the outside and inside leg seamsto make each leg. Press the seams open. 9Join the crotch seams, RS to RS, stopping at the tailor’s baste at the CF.7Neaten the side, crotch, and insideleg seams of the front and back pantlegs using a 3-thread serger stitch or asmall zigzag stitch.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC TAILORED PANTStailor’sbastestrace bastestopstitchingside frontpocketlining
  • 207207Pants10Insert a faced fly-front zipper(see p.121) at the CF. 11Attach medium-weightfusible interfacing (see p.94)to one set of waistbands. Join each setof waistbands at the CB and press theseams open.15The finished waist at the CF from the RS.13Place the remaining waistband to the interfaced waistbandRS to RS and stitch around the waistband.12Attach the waistband to the pants, matching at the CB seams. Layerthe seam allowance by trimming the pant side of the seamto half its width (see p.89). Press toward the waistband.16Neaten the hem edge of the pant legs byserging (see p.116). Turn up a 11⁄2in (4cm)hem and hand stitch in place.17Attach a pant hook to the waistbandextension and an eye to the other end ofthe waistband.14Clip the ends of the waistband to reduce bulk. Turn the waistbandto the RS, fold under the raw edge, pin and hand stitch in place tothe pants-to-waistband seam line.clipped endwaistband CBlayered seam allowancehook eye
  • The pants pattern has been altered to make croppedpants. To decide the length you want, measure fromyour waist down. You can finish the pants just aboveyour ankle or on your calf, as here. These pants areideal to take on vacation.tapered capripantsYOU WILL NEED• 87in (2.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 12in (30cm) x 59in (150cm) lining• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purpose sewingthread for pattern marking• 20in (50cm) medium-weight fusibleinterfacing• 7in (18cm) pant zipper• Pant hook and barPREPARING THE PATTERN• These pants are made using Pant PatternOne (see pp.294–295)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) tocopy or download the pattern in your sizeThe cropped pants have a flat front with a fly-front zipper opening, slanted pocketson the hip, and a shaped waistband that sits just below the natural waistline. Thehem of the leg is tapered and there is a split in the side seam for added comfort.LightweightdenimLinenPant Pattern One VariationThese pants are madein cotton chambray but linenor lightweight denim wouldwork just as well.BEFORE YOU STARTGARMENT CONSTRUCTIONHemlinesplitTaperedlegBacktuckFrontpocketZipperflyFRONT BACKthe tailored pantsPANTPATTERN>>p.209>>p.204208 Garments
  • 209Pants1Copy the back legpattern and markthe seam lines andhemlines. Measuringupward from thehemline draw a line forthe new hemline.Measure 11⁄2in (4cm)below this line andmark a new hemcutting line. To taperthe legs, on the newhemline mark a point3⁄4in (2cm) from theinside leg seam line. Jointhis point to the seamline in the thigh area,and to the new hemcutting line. On theoutside leg, marka point 5⁄8in (1.5cm)along the new hemlineand join this point to thenew hem cutting lineand to the seam line inthe thigh area. To markthe position of the split,mark a point 4in (10cm)above the new hemlineon each leg.2Repeat step 1on the frontleg pattern.3Cut out thefabric usingthe new patternpieces. Mark thedarts and the CF(center front) lines.8Hand stitch the miter and the remainder of the hem and press.5Join a front legto a back legon the inside andoutside leg seams,stopping at themarking for thesplit on the outsideleg. Press theseams open.4Make up as forthe ClassicTailored Pantssteps 2–7.7Neaten the lower edge of the pants (see pp.116–117), and turnup a 11⁄2in (4cm) hem. Miter the hem at the bottom of the splitand pin in place.6Continue makingup as for theClassic Tailored Pantssteps 9–15.new outsideleg seam linenewoutsideleg seamlinetop ofsplittop ofsplitnewinsideleg seamlinenew insideleg seam lineoutside legseam lineoutsideleg seamlineinsideleg seamlineinsideleg seamlineHOW TO MAKE THE TAPERED CAPRI PANTSnewhemlinenewhemlinenewcutting line newcuttinglinenewcutting linenewcuttinglinenewcuttinglinesold hemline old hemlinemiter
  • CrepeMedium-weightdenimThese flowing palazzopants epitomize 1940smovie-star glamourWe made our pants in linen, butyou could try a crepe for evening ora medium-weight denim or printed linenfor daytime. Medium-weight fabrics givemaximum impact for this style.the wide-leg pantsPANTSPATTERN>>p.216>>p.212210 Garments
  • 211PantsCLASSIC PALAZZOPANTSWide-leg, or palazzo, pants are very flattering when worn with a fashionable highheel. These retain their smooth-leg look by having discreet in-seam pockets. Choosethe pattern size by your full hip measurement (see p.55) and be sure to check yourcrotch measurements against the pattern. It is recommended to make the patternin muslin first. These pants would look fabulous in fine wool crepe for evening wearor in linen or heavy cotton—even in lightweight denim—for a more casual look.Pants Pattern TwoYOU WILL NEED• 107in (2.7m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 12in (30cm) x 59in (150cm) lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purpose sewingthread for pattern marking• 39in (1m) fusible waistband interfacing• 1 pant hook and eye• 1 zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• These pants are made using Pants PatternTwo (see pp.296–299)• Follow the instructions (see pp.278–279) tocopy or download the pattern in your sizeThese wide-leg pants have a fly-front zipper opening and a fitted waistband. Belt loopson the waistband take a narrow belt. The pants feature in-seam pockets and front andback tucks at the waist.BEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONFlyfrontBeltloopIn-seampocketFronttuckFittedwaistbandFRONT BACKBacktuck
  • 2121Cut out the fabric and transfer all the pattern markings (see pp.76–77). Mark the CF (center front) line,the front tuck, and the pocket opening with trace bastes (see p.76). 2Make the darts (see p.91) in the pants back andpress toward the CB (center back).5Place the fabric pocket to the pants back,RS to RS. Pin and machine in place with a 3⁄8in(1cm) seam allowance.4Place the pocket lining to the pants front,RS to RS. Pin and machine in place with a 3⁄8in(1cm) seam allowance.3Make the tucks in the pants front by bringingthe tuck lines at the waist edge together RS(right side) to RS. Pin and baste across the top.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC PALAZZO PANTSGarmentsmarkings for front tuckcenter front(CF) line
  • 213213Pants8On the RS, press the side seamopen and press the pocket towardthe pants front.6Neaten the side seams, the inside leg seam, and the CF and CBcrotch seams using a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch(see pp.84–85).7Join the pants front to the pants back at the side seams, leaving openabove the point marked for the pocket opening. Stitch aroundthe edges of the pocket bag and neaten.9Join the legs togetherat the inside leg seam. Pressthe seam open.10Join the crotch seam, stopping at the marked dot on the CF. Inserta faced fly-front zipper (see p.121).faced fly frontzipper
  • 214 Garments11Neaten the edges of the belt loop stripusing a 3-thread serger stitch or a smallzigzag stitch.12Fold the edges of the belt loop strip to thecenter, WS (wrong side) to WS, and press. 13Working from the RS, topstitch eitherside of the belt loop strip.16Attach theother edge ofthe waistband to thepants, RS to RS, stitchingover the ends of the beltloops. Layer the seamallowance by trimmingthe waistband side of theseam to half its width(see p.89). Press towardthe waistband.15Attach fusible interfacing (see p.94) to the waistband. Neaten onelong edge using a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.14Cut the belt loop strip into five pieces as indicated on the pattern. Pin, thenstitch a belt loop to each tuck, to each back dart, and to the CB seam.neatened edgelayered seam allowance
  • 215215Pants17Fold the waistband along the crease in the interfacing RS to RS. At theCF, stitch along the ends of the waistband. 18Turn the waistband to the RS. Turn the raw edge of the free ends of thebelt loops under and topstitch in place.20Neaten the hem edge by serging (see p.116). Turn up a 11⁄2in (4cm) hemand hand stitch in place.19Fold the waistband WS to WS. Pin the free edge of the waistband tothe waistband-to-pants seam. Working from the RS of the pants, stitch inthe ditch—the line produced by the waistband-to-pants seam—through all layersto secure the waistband in place.21Attach a hook and eye to the waistband.waistband-to-pants seam hook eye
  • Here the palazzo pants have been shortened andtheir front tucks widened to give more fullness.The result? A pair of shorts that are super-comfortable to wear. We made ours in cotton witha small polka-dot print, but almost any lightweightfabric would work for this summery style.wide-legshortsThe wide-leg shorts have a fly-front zipper opening and afitted waistband. The pants feature in-seam pockets. Thereare generous front and back tucks at the waist for comfort.MadrasChambrayPants Pattern Two VariationYOU WILL NEED• 48in (1.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 12in (30cm) lining fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 39in (1m) fusible waistbandinterfacing• 7in (18cm) pants zipper• 1 buttonPREPARING THE PATTERN• These shorts are made using PantsPattern Two (see pp.296–299)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your size.Cotton, linen, polyester,chambray, and madras all workwell for these shorts.BEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONZipperflyWaistbandFront tuckFRONT BACKBacktuckthe wide-leg pantsPANTSPATTERN>>p.217>>p.210216 Garments
  • 217Pants1Copy the pantsback pattern andmark the seam lines.Mark a point 81⁄2in(21cm) below thecrotch seam line onthe inside leg seam.Draw a horizontal lineacross the leg fromthis point to makea new hemline,keeping it at 90degrees to thegrain line.2Measure a 11⁄2in(4cm) seamallowance from thisline and mark a newcutting line.5Cut through the vertical line, place paper underneath, and spreadthe cut pattern pieces apart by 3⁄4in (2cm) at the waist and 11⁄4in (3cm)at the hem to make the shorts fuller at the front. Tape the pattern pieces to thepaper. (For sizes over a size 12 or for fuller thighs, you may need to increase thismeasurement by 50 percent.)6Cut out and make the shorts as for the Classic Palazzo Pants, steps 1–18. Youcan add belt loops if you wish.7Machine a 3⁄4in (2cm) double-turn hem (see p.118). Press. 8Make a buttonhole (see p.125)on the waistband overlap andattach a corresponding button(see p.123) to the underlap.4On the pantsfront pattern,draw a vertical linethrough the centerof the tuck to thenew hemline.3Copy the pantsfront pattern andrepeat step 1. Makesure the side seamsare the same length.newhemlinenewhemlineinsidelegseam lineinsideleg seamlineoutsideleg seamlineoutsideleg seamlinecrotchseam linenewcuttinglinenewcuttinglineverticallinethroughtucknewcutting linenew hemlineHOW TO MAKE THE WIDE-LEG SHORTSpaper tapedunderneath pattern
  • topsA quick change of shirt or top can transform a skirt or pairof pants from an outfit for the office into one to wear at aweekend in the country or at a cocktail party. The twobasic styles here form the basis for five different looks.the
  • the tops... ... and their variationsTop pattern onevariationTie-neck top>> p.224Top pattern onevariationLong-sleevedtunic>> p.226Top pattern twoClassic princess-line blouse>> p.228Top pattern twovariationShort-sleevedblouse>> p.233Top pattern oneClassic shell top>> p.220
  • The ultimate shelltop, this versatilelittle number isgreat with a skirtor pants, tuckedin or worn outthe shell topsTOPPATTERN>>p.224>>p.226>>p.222220 Garments
  • 221TopsViscoseSilk satinCLASSICSHELL TOPThe ultimate in simplicity, this style of top is known as a shell top, since it fits theupper body like a shell fits an oyster. The center-back zipper helps ensure a smoothline for a top that is easy office wear, whether under a jacket or on its own. It wouldcomfortably tuck into a skirt or pants, or could be worn untucked. Choose thepattern by your bust measurement and, if necessary, widen at the hip.This top would work well in anylightweight fabric. Ours is in a polka-dotpolyester, but it would also look great inplain silk satin, cotton, or viscose.Top Pattern OneYOU WILL NEED• 69in (1.75m) x 59in (150cm)fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purpose sewing thread forpattern marking• 20in (50cm) x lightweightfusible interfacing• 16in (40cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This top is made using TopPattern One (see pp.300–301)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeThe top is shaped with bust darts and has a round necklinefinished with a facing. It has wrist-length, set-in sleeves thatshould sit comfortably at the end of the shoulder. There is aCB (center-back) zipper for ease of wear.BEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONCenter-back zipperBustdartWrist-lengthsleeveRoundneckFRONT BACK
  • 222 Garments1Cut out the fabric and mark the darts usingtailor’s bastes (see p.77). 3Neaten the CB (center back) seam, using eithera 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch(see pp.84–85).6Neaten the lower edge of both sleevesusing either a 3-thread serger stitch or a smallzigzag stitch.7Machine the sleeve seam. Neaten the seamallowances together using either a 3-threadserger stitch or a small zigzag stitch. Using thelongest stitch available, machine two rows ofease stitches through the sleeve head (see p.105).8Fit the sleeve into the armhole, RS (rightside) to RS, remembering to pin and stitchfrom the sleeve side (see p.105). Neaten the seamallowances together using either a 3-threadserger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.4Insert a 16in (40cm) zipper of your choice inthe CB (see pp.119–122). Stitch the remainderof the CB seam.5Join the front to the back at the shoulderand side seams, RS (right side) to RS. Neaten theseam allowances together using either a 3-threadserger stitch or a small zigzag stitch.2Make the darts in the front (see p.91) and presstoward the waist.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC SHELL TOPease stitches
  • 223223Tops9Attach lightweight fusible interfacing to theneck facing pieces (see p.94). 10Join the facings at the shoulder seamsand press the seams open. Neaten thelower edge (see pp.95–97).11Place the facings to the neck edge ofthe top RS to RS, matching the shoulderseams. Pin and machine.12Layer the seam allowance by trimming the facingside of the seam to half its width. Notch the seamallowance to reduce bulk (see p.89).14At the CB, fold the edge of the facingin to meet the zipper tape. Pin and handstitch in place.16Topstitch around the neck, using stitch length 3.5.15Neaten the lower edge of the top. Pin up11⁄2in (4cm) on the top and 11⁄4in (3cm) onthe sleeves. Press and machine in place.13Turn the facing to the WS(wrong side) and press.backfacingfrontfacingshoulderseamneatenededgeshoulderseamlayered seamallowancenotched seamallowance
  • The shell top has now become a top witha slightly lower neckline, a tie neck, and agathered sleeve. The back no longer features azipper but is cut in one piece. This necklineflatters the face and is easy to wear witha skirt, pants, or jeans.Tie-NECKTOPYOU WILL NEED• 79in (2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matchingall-purpose sewing thread• 1 spool contrastingall-purpose sewing threadfor pattern marking• 20in (50cm) x 3⁄4in (2cm)wide elasticPREPARING THE PATTERN• This top is made using TopPattern One (see pp.300–301)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeThis blouse has bust darts, a self-boundneck opening, a tie neck, and sleeves thatare elasticated to fit the wrist.ChiffonFinecottonTop Pattern One VariationFrontopeningThis top was made inpolyester chiffon, butany soft fabric such as,georgette, or fine cottonwould work just as well.Tie neckBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONFRONT BACKElasticatedcuffBustdartthe shell topsTOPPATTERN>>p.225>>p.226>>p.220224 Garments
  • 225225Tops1To cut the back as one piece,copy the pattern back andmark the CB (center back) seam line.Put a ruler along the seam line andrule a new straight line in its place.This line will be placed to a foldfor cutting.2Copy the pattern front and markthe seam lines. Mark a point on theCF (center front) 13⁄8in (3.5cm) belowthe neck seam line. From here, drawa new neck seam line to the pointwhere the neck and shoulder seamlines meet. Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance from the new neckseam line and mark a new cuttingline. On the CF, mark a point 63⁄8in(16cm) below the new neck seam line.5Make up as for theClassic Shell Top steps5–8, using the seam for sheerfabrics method (see p.86).6Slash the CF of theblouse front to the pointmarked. Cut a piece of biasfabric 11⁄2in (4cm) wide.7Use the bias fabric to bind theslashed opening (see p.109). 8To make the necktie, cut two strips of fabric5in x 39in (12cm x 100cm) on the straightgrain. Join them together at the short end, RS(right side) to RS. Press the seam to one side.9Place the seam in thetie at the CB of theblouse, RS to RS. Machinearound the neck edge. Clipthe seam allowance andpress toward the necktie.4Cut out the fabric using thenew pattern pieces. Mark thedarts using tailor’s bastes (see p.77).Make the darts (see p.91) and presstoward the waist.3To widen the sleeve, copythe sleeve pattern and markthe seam lines. Extend the hemlineby 23⁄8in (6cm) on each side. Drawa slightly curving line from thesetwo points to join them to the sleeveseam lines in the upper arm area.Draw new cutting lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)below the new hemline and at eitherside of the new sleeve seam lines.10Fold the tie, RS to RS.Starting at the slashin the neck, stitch the sidesof the tie together, pivotingat the corners (see p.87). Clipthe corners.11Turn the tie to the RS.Fold the raw edge of thetie under along the neck edge.Pin and hand stitch in place.12Machine a 1¼in (3cm) double-turnhem (see p.118) in the ends of the sleeve.Press. Insert elastic to fit the wrist (see p.108).13Complete as for the Classic Shell Topstep 15.newcut-to-fold linecenterback(CB)oldseamlinenewcutting linesold seamlinenew seam linenew neckseam line old neckseamlinenewcuttinglineHOW TO MAKE THE TIE-NECK TOPcenterfront (CF)shoulderseam lineextended hemlinefrontopening
  • Top Pattern One VariationThis time our pattern has been alteredto make an A-line tunic with a deep,topstitched V-neckline and a widesleeve. It is quick and simple tomake, and you will learn howto cut a neck facing. A tuniclike this makes ideal casualor vacation wear.This A-line, V-necked tunic has wrist-length, set-insleeves. The faced neckline features topstitchingand the tunic and sleeve hems are also machinedin place. There is a CB (center-back) zipper.CottonAcrylic knitYOU WILL NEED• 87in (2.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 24in (60cm) lightweight fusibleinterfacing• 1 zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This top is made using TopPattern One (see pp.300–301)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeThis top has been made inprinted linen, perfect forwearing over jeans orleggings. Alternatively, try itin a cotton for summer or ina knitted fabric for fall.long-sleevedTunicBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONthe shell topsTOPPATTERN>>p.224>>p.227>>p.220TopstitchedV-neckWrist-lengthsleeveCenter-back zipperBustdartFRONT BACK226 Garments
  • 227Tops1Copy the sleeve pattern andmark the side seam lines andthe hemline. Measuring from theside seam lines, extend the hemlineby 13⁄4in (4.5cm) on each side towiden the bottom of the sleeve.Join these points to the old sideseam lines just under the arm.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance from the new side seamlines and mark new cutting lines.5To make the new patterns forthe facings, copy the neck areafrom the new pattern front and back.Copy the new neck seam lines. Onthe front, measure 23⁄4in (7cm) fromthe new neck seam line and mark anew cutting line, curving at the CFas shown.6Make the back neck facingto match.7Cut out the fabric using thenew pattern pieces and markthe darts using tailor’s bastes (seep.77). Make up as for the ClassicShell Top steps 2–10.2Copy the patternfront and markthe seam lines. Mark apoint on the CF (centerfront) 61⁄2in (17cm)below the neck seamline and another point11⁄2in (4cm) from theneck seam line alongthe shoulder seam line.Join the points for thenew V-neck seam line.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance fromthis new line and marka new cutting line.3At the waist add3⁄4in (2cm) to theside seam line. At thehem edge, extend theside seam line 5in (12cm)to make the top longer.Join these two points tomake a new side seamline and taper from hereto the side seam line justbelow the bust dart.Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)seam allowance fromthis new line and fromthe new hemline andmark new cutting lines.8Place the facings to the neckedge of the tunic RS (right side)to RS, matching the seams. Pin andmachine, pivoting at the CF (see p.87).Layer the seam. Turn the facing to theWS (wrong side) and press.9Topstitch around the neck.10Continue as for the Classic ShellTop step 15, remembering thatthe hem allowance on the tunic is now5⁄8in (1.5cm).4Copy thepattern backand mark theseam lines. Add tothe side seam lineand the hem tomatch the front.Mark a point on theCB (center back) 1in(2.5cm) below theneck seam line andanother point 11⁄2in(4cm) from the neckseam line along theshoulder seam line.Join the points forthe new back neckseam line. Measurea 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance fromthis new seam lineand mark a newcutting line.HOW TO MAKE THE LONG-SLEEVED TUNICold sideseam linehemlinenew cutting linenew side seam linenew extendedhemlineold sideseam linenewcutting lineold neckseam linenew side seam linenewcutting lineold sideseam lineold hemlinenew back neckseam linenewcuttinglinenewcutting linenewV-neckseam linenew backneck seam linenew cutting lineshoulderseam linenew V-neckseam linecenterfront (CF)old hemlinenew side seam linecenter-back(CB) seam lineshoulderseam lineold neckseam lineshoulderseam linecenterfront (CF)centerback (CB)shoulderseam linelayeredseamnew hemlinenewcutting linenew hemline
  • A crisp blouse is amust-have for everygirl’s wardrobe.This princess-lineversion has a subtleslimming effectthe princess–line topsTOPPATTERN>>p.233>>p.230228 Garments
  • 229229TopsCLASSIC PRINCESS-LINE BLOUSEThis stylish blouse is very versatile. It will look efficient at the office in a plain fabricor a stripe, or is perfect for a country weekend in a cotton check. The princess linesat the front have a slimming effect that many women will appreciate. Choose thepattern by your bust measurement; you should also check your neck measurementto make sure the blouse is comfortable. Making this blouse will teach you someadvanced sewing techniques, such as how to apply a yoke, collar, and cuffs.Top Pattern TwoMade in striped cotton shirting,this blouse is very suitable foroffice wear, but in printed viscose,cotton check, or a chambray it willhappily accompany you on aweekend in the country.YOU WILL NEED• 94in (2.4m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 30in (75cm) lightweight fusibleinterfacing• Nine 1⁄4in (7mm) diameter buttonsPREPARING THE PATTERN• This blouse is made using TopPattern Two (see pp.302–303)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy ordownload the pattern inyour sizeThe long-sleeved, button-through blouse has princess-line seamsat the front, deep darts at the back, and a one-piece collar. It alsofeatures a shoulder yoke that is topstitched to match thetopstitched collar and buttoned cuffs.Princess-line seamButtonclosureShoulderButtonedcuffDeep backdartBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONCottoncheckChambrayFRONT BACKTopstitched,one-piececollar
  • 230 Garments1Cut out the fabric and transferall the pattern markings(see pp.76–77).9Pin the blouse front to the yoke front, RS to RS,and machine.2Make the darts in the back(see p.91) and press towardthe CB (center back).5Press the seam allowances toward the yoke. Topstitch using a slightlylonger stitch length.7On the blouse fronts, mark the CF(center front) with trace bastes (see p.76). 8Press the facing back into position.6Attach lightweight fusible interfacing (see p.95) to the blouse fronts.Neaten the edges using either a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzagstitch (see pp.84–85).4Layer the seam allowance by trimming the yoke lining side to halfits width (see p.89).3Place one yoke to the back, RS (right side) to RS. Pin the other yoke—theyoke lining—RS of the yoke to WS (wrong side) of the back. The back is nowsandwiched between the yoke and the yoke lining. Pin and machine in place.If using a striped fabric, machine along a stripe.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC PRINCESS-LINE BLOUSElayered seam lineallowanceyokeshirt back
  • 231231Tops10Turn under the seam allowance on both fronts of the yoke lining.Pin and baste.13Join the front to the backat the side seams. Neatenthe seam allowances together usingeither a 3-thread serger stitch ora small zigzag stitch. Press towardthe back.15Place the collar piecestogether, RS to RS. Pin andstitch, leaving the neck edge free.16Layer the seam allowanceby trimming one side to halfits width. Clip the seam allowancesaround the curves.17Turn the collar through to the RS and press. Fold the top halfof the collar down toward the neck edge and press again.14Attach lightweight fusibleinterfacing to both collarpieces and mark the location ofthe button and the buttonholewith tailor’s bastes.12Attach the side front tothe blouse front. Neatenthe seam allowances together usingeither a 3-thread serger stitch ora small zigzag stitch. Press towardthe side.11Topstitch to match the yoke back (see step 5).tailor’s basteclippedseam lineallowancelayeredseam lineallowanceneck edgecollar
  • 232 Garments18Attach the edge of thecollar to the neck edge ofthe blouse, RS to RS, matching thepattern markings.19On the inside, turn under theraw edge of the collar, pin andhand stitch in place to the collar-to-neck seam.23Turn under the raw edge of the cuff andpin. Hand stitch in place to the sleeve-to-cuff seam line.22Attach lightweight interfacing to thewhole cuff. Pin and machine one edgeof the cuff to the sleeve end, RS to RS (see p.111).Turn the cuff RS to RS and stitch the short ends.Clip and turn.25Topstitch the collar to matchthe yoke back (see step 5). 26Make six evenly spaced horizontal buttonholes on the CF of the rightside as worn, as marked on the pattern, one on the collar, and one oneach of the cuffs (see p.125). Attach buttons to correspond (see p.123).27Machine a 5⁄8in (1.5cm)double-turn hem along thebottom of the blouse (see p.118). Press.24Using the longest stitch available, machinetwo rows of ease stitches through thesleeve head (see p.105). Insert the sleeve into thearmhole, RS to RS (see p.105), pin and stitch. Neatenthe seam allowances together.21Stitch the sleeve seam andneaten the seam allowancestogether using either a 3-thread sergerstitch or a small zigzag stitch.20Make a bound opening atthe wrist of the sleeve asmarked (see p.109).clipped end
  • 233PuffsleevesTop Pattern Two VariationIn this variation, the blouse patternhas been altered to eliminate theyoke, the sleeve has beenshortened and widened to makea puffed sleeve, and the points of thecollar have been rounded. This pretty littleblouse would be good to wear in the summerwith jeans or as summer office wear.The button-through blouse is fitted at the back with longback darts. It has a short puff sleeve finished with a band,and a collar with rounded ends.EyeletRayonYOU WILL NEED• 79in (2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 30in (75cm) lightweight fusibleinterfacing• Seven 1⁄4in (7mm) diameter buttonsPREPARING THE PATTERN• This blouse is made using TopPattern Two (see pp.302–303)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeThis blouse has been made ina brushed cotton print. A cottonwith a floral pattern would also workwell, or try a crisp eyelet or a softrayon fabric.Short-sleevedBlousePrincess-line seamRoundedcollarBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONthe princess-line topsTOPPATTERN>>p.234>>p.228BackdartFRONT BACKTops
  • 234 Garments1Copy the collar and mark the seam lines. Using a cup as a guide, round thecorners of the collar to give new seam lines. Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seamallowance from the new seam line and mark a new cutting line.4To shorten the sleeve,copy the sleeve andmark the seam lines.Mark a point on eachside of the sleeve and4in (10cm) below thearmhole seam lines.Join these pointstogether to make a newhemline. Draw a newcutting line 5⁄8in (1.5cm)below the new hemline.5To widen the sleeve,draw six verticallines approximately11⁄2in (4cm) apart fromthe sleeve head to thenew cutting line.3To remove the yoke from the pattern, overlap the yoke-to-back seamlines, matching at the CB (center back). Since the yoke is slightly shaped,slash the yoke through the shoulder so the seam lines lie on top of each other.Tape the pattern pieces together. The shoulder seam now needs to be shortenedby the width of the slash. Measure this amount along the shoulder seam and drawin a new seam line. Measure a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance from the new seamline and mark a new cutting line.2Copy the yoke and blouse back and mark the seam lines.6Cut through the vertical lines, place paper underneath, and spread thecut pattern pieces apart, leaving a gap of 3⁄4in (2cm) between the threemiddle sections at the sleeve head and 11⁄4in (3cm) at the lower edge betweenall sections. Tape the pattern pieces to the paper. Mark dots between thenotches to indicate where the gathers are to go.seam lineseam linepaper tapedunderneath patternnewseamlineslashnewcuttinglineold seamlinenew corner seam lineseam linenewcuttinglinenewhemlinepaper tapedunderneathpatternHOW TO MAKE THE SHORT-SLEEVED BLOUSEnew cutting linecenter back (CB)seam line
  • 235Tops8Join the front to the back at the shoulder seamsand neaten the seam allowances together, usingeither a 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch(see pp.84–85).7Cut out the fabric and transfer allthe pattern markings (see pp.76–77).Make up as for the Classic Princess-LineBlouse steps 2, 6, 7, and 8.13Fold thesleeve, RSto RS, and machinethe sleeve seamright through theband. Fold the bandin half, WS (wrongside) to WS. Turnthe edge of the bandunder by 5⁄8in(1.5cm), pin andhandstitch in placeto the band-to-sleeveseam line.11Using the longest stitch available, machine two rows of ease stitchesthrough the sleeve head and along the lower edge (see p.105). 12Cut a band of fabric, 31⁄2in (9cm) wide with its length equal tothe upper arm measurement plus 11⁄4in (3cm). Attach lightweightinterfacing to the strip and place to the lower edge of the sleeve, RS (right side)to RS. Pull up the ease stitches to fit the edge of the sleeve to the band. Pin andstitch in place. Press the gathers toward the band.15Completethe garmentas for the ClassicPrincess-Line Blousesteps 25–27.9Continue as for theClassic Princess-LineBlouse steps 12–14.10Make andattach thecollar as for the ClassicPrincess-Line Blousesteps 15–19.14Insert thesleeve intothe armhole, RSto RS (see p.105).backshoulderseamfrontneck edgecollarsleeve headlower edgesleeve seam
  • jacketsThe finishing touch for any outfit is the jacket. The four styles hereprove that you do not have to be a tailor to create a head-turninglook. Making these jackets will also add to the repertoire of sewingskills you have now acquired.the
  • the jackets... ... and their variationsJacket pattern onevariationBoxy jacketwith collar>> p.242Jacket pattern twoClassic shawlcollar jacket>> p.246Jacket pattern twovariationLined shawlcollar jacket>> p.251Jacket pattern oneClassic boxyjacket>> p.238
  • A decorativeribbon trim givesthe edge to a littleboxy jacket—inside and out!the boxy jackets>>p.242>>p.240JACKETPATTERN238 Garments
  • 239JacketsCLASSICBOXY JACKETThis simple boxy jacket looks good with pants or a skirt, or even over a dress.Choose your pattern by your bust measurement but note that if you have a fullerbust you may need to make a bust adjustment to make sure that the jacket meetsat the front edges. This unlined jacket looks as good inside as out. The jacket andpocket flaps have been trimmed with grosgrain ribbon, while inside all the seamshave been finished with bias binding.Jacket Pattern OneSilkThis jacket has been made ina medium-weight, firmly wovenmodern tweed. Other goodchoices include wool mixes, boiledwool, or linen. To wear as part ofa wedding outfit, make it in silk.LinenYOU WILL NEED• 69in (1.75m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 2 spools matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 39in (1m) medium-weight fusibleinterfacing• 51⁄2yd (5m) x 3⁄16in (5mm)grosgrain ribbon• 11yd (10m) x 3⁄4in (2cm)bias bindingPREPARING THE PATTERN• This jacket is made using JacketPattern One (see pp.304–307)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeThe jacket featuresprincess lines atthe front and back.It has set-in wrist-length sleeves, a roundneck, and decorativepocket flaps.Princessseam lineDecorativepocket flapSet-in,wrist-lengthsleevePrincessseam lineRoundnecklineFRONTBACKBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTION
  • 240 Garments1Cut outthe fabric.If working witha check fabricsee pp.74–75.2Attach medium-weightfusible interfacing to thefront and back facings. Jointhe facings together at theshoulder seam and press.6Join the front to the back at the shoulders andneaten the seams with a Hong Kong finish.7Machine the sleeve seams, neaten with a HongKong finish, and press the seams open. Usingstitch length 5, machine two rows of ease stitchesthrough the sleeve head (see p.105)8Fit the sleeve into the armhole, RS to RS (seep.105). Join the armhole seam allowancestogether, wrapping them in bias binding and handstitching the long free edge of the bindingto secure (see p.99).9Attach the facing to the edge of the jacket, RSto RS. Pin and stitch. Layer the seam allowanceby trimming the facing side of the seam to half itswidth. Notch the seam. Turn the facing to the WS(wrong side) and press.3Bind the long edge of the facing usinga Hong Kong finish (see p.86) and 3⁄4in (2cm)bias binding. Place the binding to the facing,RS (right side) to RS, and machine stitch in thecrease line of the binding.4Wrap the binding around the raw edge of thefabric and secure by machining from the RSthrough the edge of the binding. Press.5Join the back jacket to the side back, theside back to the side front, and the sidefront to the front. Neaten the seams with a HongKong finish. Press the seams open.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC BOXY JACKETshoulder seamback facingfrontfacingside seamwith HongKong finishshoulder seam withHong Kong finishease stitchessleeveseamnotched seamallowancelayeredseamallowancefrontfacing
  • 241Jackets11Bind the bottom edge of the sleeve using a Hong Kong finish. Pin upa 3⁄4in (2cm) hem and hand stitch in place. Press.12Bind the bottom edge of the jacket but notof the facing, using a Hong Kong finish. Turnup a 11⁄2in (4cm) hem on the jacket, pin, and handstitch in place. At each CF (center front), turn underthe lower edge of the facing, pin, and hand stitch inplace. Press.13Attach medium-weight fusible interfacing(see p.94) to one half of a pocket flap andplace one interfaced flap and one non-interfaced flaptogether, RS to RS (see p.112). Stitch together aroundlower edges using a 1⁄4in (1⁄2cm) seam allowance.Clip, turn the flap to the right side, and press.14Pin decorative ribbon trim to the CF,around the neck, and around the pocket flap.Fold or miter the trim at the corners. Topstitch inplace close to each edge of the trim. Press.17Press the flap into place and hand stitchat each side to secure.15Trim flap to match. Press.16Pin the jacket flap to the jacket front, RS toRS, in a position of your choosing. Machinealong the raw edge of the flap.10Understitch the seam allowances to the facing (see p.90).bound edgeclipped seam allowancefoldedcorner
  • This version of the jacket is lined and has aheavy fringed trim. It would look great witha straight tailored skirt or maybe with thepalazzo pants on pages 210–215. There areno alterations to the pattern piecesbut this time the collar and lining patternpieces are used.BOXY JACKETWITH COLLARGabardineTraditionaltweedJacket Pattern One VariationThis edge-to-edge lined jacket with wrist-length, set-insleeves has princess-line styling. The pocket flaps havebeen omitted and a collar and fringing added instead. Thejacket would also work without the fringing.Wrist-length,set-in sleeveCollarYOU WILL NEED• 87in (2.2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 59in (1.5m) x 59in (150cm) lining fabric• 2 spools matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for pattern marking• 39in (1m) x medium-weight fusible interfacingPREPARING THE PATTERN• This jacket is made using JacketPattern One (see pp.304–307)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeTo get this exact look, usea tweed-type fabric. This jackethas been made in a check tweed.Other tweeds as well as woolsuiting would also work well.Princess-line seamFRONT BACKthe boxy jacketsJACKETPATTERN>>p.243>>p.238BEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTION242 Garments
  • 2437Join the front facing to the frontlining. Press the seam to one side. 8Join the back facing to the back lining and press the seam towardthe lining.5Make up the sleeve as forsteps 7 and 8, omitting the seamneatening. The jacket should nowbe joined together.6Attach a 11⁄4in (3cm) wide stripof medium-weight fusibleinterfacing to the lower edgeof jacket on the WS (wrong side).Clip to fit as required.1Cut out the pattern pieces fromboth the fabric and the lining.If using a check fabric see pp.74–75.Transfer all the pattern markings tothe lining (see pp.76–77).2Make the darts (see p.91) andstitch along the tuck lines. 3Attach medium-weight fusibleinterfacing to the front, front andback facings, and collar (see p.94).4Join the jacket sections as forthe Classic Boxy Jacket steps 5and 6, omitting the seam neatening.Match the checks by pinning asshown. Press the seams open.JacketsHOW TO MAKE THE BOXY JACKET WITH COLLARfrontfacingtailor’sbastestuckdartfrontfrontsidefrontfront facing frontlining
  • 244 Garments10Join the front lining to the back at the sides and press open.9Join the lining/facings at the shoulder seam and press open.11Make up the lining sleeve as for the Classic Boxy Jacket step 7, omittingthe seam neatening. Fit the lining sleeve into the lining armhole, RS(right side) to RS.12To make the fringing, cut strips of fabric approximately 4in (10cm)wide from selvage to selvage or along the straight grain—it dependson the weave of the fabric as to which produces the best-looking fringe. Foldthe strips in half, WS to WS, and zigzag with stitch width 5 and length 2 closeto the fold.14Pin the fringing to the RS of the interfaced collar, makinga tight curve at the corners. Pin and baste in place. 15Place the RS of the non-interfaced collar over the fringingand machine using a 5⁄8in (1.5cm) seam allowance.13Fray the fabric along the raw edge, making enough fringing togo around the collar, around the hem of the sleeves, and around thelower edge and up the front of the jacket.machine stitchfront liningfront facingback facing
  • 245Jackets17Attach the collar to the neck edge of the jacket, WS of collar to RSof jacket. Pin and baste in place.16Clip the seamallowancesaround the curvesand turn the collarto the RS.18Pin more fringing around the hem of the sleeves and around thelower edge and up the front of the jacket. Baste in place.19Place the lining/facings to the jacket, RS to RS, on top of the fringing. Stitch all aroundthe edge leaving a 7in (18cm) gap at the CB (center back). Layer the seam allowances(see p.89) and clip the seam. Turn the jacket to the RS through the gap in the CB and press.20At the CB opening, fold under the raw edgeof the lining to meet the top of the fringing.Pin and hand stitch in place.
  • A relaxed, wear-anywhere-and-with-anythingshawl collarjacket is alwaysa successthe shawl collar jackets>>p.251>>p.248JACKETPATTERN246 Garments
  • 247JacketsCLASSIC SHAWLCOLLAR JACKETThis waist-length, unlined jacket with a simple shawl collar has a relaxed feel; it isalmost like wearing a cardigan. The jacket is secured at the center front with just asingle button, but if you prefer, you could have two or three. Choose your patternaccording to your full bust measurement (see p.54). The shoulder pads make thejacket slightly more structured, helping to balance the width of the shoulders tothe hips. A wide choice of fabrics underlines this jacket’s versatilty.Jacket Pattern TwoFlannelWe made our jacket in a chunky woolboucle fabric, but it would also lookgood in a flannel or a silk suiting.Silksuiting YOU WILL NEED• 79in (2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 39in (1m) lightweight fusibleinterfacing• 1 pair shoulder pads• 1in (2.5cm) buttonPREPARING THE PATTERN• This jacket is made using JacketPattern Two (see pp.308–311)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeThe unlined, waist-length shawl collar jacket features front and back dartsto fit it to the waist. There is a CB (center-back) seam and the wrist-length,set-in sleeve has a shoulder pad. The jacket has a single-button closure.ShawlcollarFrontdartButtonclosureShoulderpadWrist-length,set-in sleeveFRONT BACKBackdartBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTION
  • 248 Garments1Cut out the fabric and mark the patternmarkings using tailor’s bastes (see p.77). 2Make all the darts (see p.91). Press open theslashed dart on the front and press its point tothe CF (center front). Stitch the front shoulder dartonly as far as the shoulder seam line.3Neaten the seam allowances on the CB(center-back) seams and on the back shoulderand side seams, using either a 3-thread serger stitchor a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85). On a chunkyboucle fabric, serger stitches may look uneven; this isnot a problem.5Join the CB seam and join the front tothe back at the side seams and the shoulderseams. Press the seams open.6Neaten the sleeve seam and lower edge ofboth sleeves using either a 3-thread sergerstitch or a small zigzag stitch. Machine the sleeveseam and press it open. Using the longest stitchavailable, machine two rows of ease stitchesthrough the sleeve head (see p.105).4Clip the fabric at the end of the front shoulderdart as shown. Neaten the front shoulderseam using either a 3-thread serger stitch ora small zigzag stitch.HOW TO MAKE THE CLASSIC SHAWL COLLAR JACKETshoulderseamsideseamneatened frontshoulder seameasestitchestailor’s baste
  • 249Jackets7Insert the sleeve into the armhole, RS (right side) to RS (see p.105).Neaten the seam allowances together using either a 3-thread sergerstitch or a small zigzag stitch.8Since this jacket is unlined, the outside of each shoulder pad needs tobe covered. Cut a piece of fabric larger than the pad on the bias(see p.70). Pin to the pad.9Stitch the fabric to the pad using either a 3-thread serger stitchor a small zigzag stitch. 10Place the covered shoulder pad to the sleeve-to-shoulder seam.Pin and hand stitch in place along the armhole seam.11Join the jacket collar pieces at the CB. Press the seam open.12Place the collar to the jacket, RS to RS, matching the CB seams.Pin and stitch. Press the seam open.jacket collar CB seam
  • 250 Garments13Attach lightweight fusible interfacing to the hem facing, the frontfacing, the collar facing, and the back facing (see pp.94–95).14Clip the front facing at the marked dots. Join the back facing tothe front facing, RS to RS, and stretch to fit. Stitch, pivoting (see p.87)at the clips.15Join the lower front facingand the back hem facingto the front facing. Neaten the outeredge using either a 3-thread sergerstitch or a small zigzag stitch.16Join the completed facingto the edge of the jacket,RS to RS. Pin and stitch.18Topstitch around the outeredges of the jacket.17So the collar will roll back,layer the facing side of theseam (see p.89) below the seam inthe facing, and layer the jacket sideof the seam above the seam in thefacing. Clip, turn to the RS, and press.19On the RH (right hand) side ofthe jacket (as worn), make ahorizontal buttonhole as marked(see p.125). Attach a correspondingbutton (see p.123). Turn up the sleevehems by 11⁄4in (3cm) and hand stitchin place.20On the inside of the jacket,hand stitch the seams on thefacings to the jacket seams and securethe end of each shoulder pad to theshoulder seam.
  • This version of the jacket in a fine, boiledwool has been lined, patch pockets havebeen added, and these and the collar edgehave been trimmed with braid. The resultis a more formal jacket that would lookgood with a matching skirt.LINED SHAWLCOLLAR JACKETJacket Pattern Two VariationYOU WILL NEED• 79in (2m) x 59in (150cm) fabric• 59in (1.5m) x 59in(150cm) lining fabric• 39in (1m) x medium-weightfusible interfacing• 2 spools matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposethread for pattern marking• 1 pair shoulder pads• 51⁄2yd (5m) decorative braid• 1in (21⁄2cm) buttonPREPARING THE PATTERN• This jacket is made usingJacket Pattern Two (seepp.308–311)• Follow the instructions (seepp.278–279) to copy or downloadthe pattern in your sizeLinenWe made our jacket in a very fine boiledwool, but you could try a linen for thesummer or a wool suiting for the office.Wool suitingThis lined, waist-length, shawl collar jacket has front andback darts. There is a CB (center-back) seam and thewrist-length, set-in sleeve has a shoulder pad. The jackethas a single-button closure and patch pockets trimmedwith braid to match the collar.BackdartsShawlcollarPatchpocketButtonclosureShoulderpadFRONT BACKthe shawl collar jacketsJACKETPATTERN>>p.252>>p.246BEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTION251Jackets 251
  • 252 Garments1Cut out the patternpieces from both thefabric and the lining.2Mark the patternmarkings on both thelining and the fabric usingtailor’s bastes (see p.77). Makeall the darts in both fabrics(see p.91) as for the ClassicShawl Collar Jacket step 2.5Make the lined patch pockets (see p.113).7Make the darts in the back lining and pin the tuck in the front lining. Jointhe lining at the side and shoulder seams and press the seams open.6Pin and topstitch the decorative trim to the front of the pockets. Pinand hand stitch the pockets to the jacket front in the marked positions.4Pin a shoulder pad tothe sleeve-to-shoulderseam and attach with a largerunning stitch.3Make up the fabric as forthe Classic Shawl CollarJacket steps 5–7 and 11–15,omitting the seam neatening.HOW TO MAKE THE LINED SHAWL COLLAR JACKETshoulder seamsideseam
  • 253Jackets9Attach the interfaced facing to the lining jacket, RS(right side) to RS, matching at the shoulder seams. Donot attach the hem facing to the lining. Remove thepins in the tucks. Press the seams toward the lining.8Make up the lining sleeve and insert it into the lining jacket in the sameway as for the Classic Shawl Collar Jacket steps 6–7.10Continue as for theClassic Shawl CollarJacket steps 16 and 17.11Turn up the raw edge of the lining 5⁄8in (1.5cm) and pin itto overlap the jacket facing. Allow a tiny pleat to form atthe CB (center back) of the lining to ensure the lining does notpull on the jacket. Hand stitch in place. Turn up the sleeve liningand the sleeve hem to match.12Add a decorative trim to the collar, as you didon the pocket. Topstitch the front and bottomedges of the jacket and the end of the sleeves.
  • mending& repairsIt is always useful to know how to make some basic repairs to your clothes.Just a few minutes’work can extend their life by years. The old saying “a stitchin time saves nine”is very true, so do repairs as soon as they are needed.
  • 256 Alterations and repairsSMALL SCISSORS SEAM RIPPER PIN AND SCISSORSAll repairs involve unpicking stitches. This must be done carefully to keep from damagingthe fabric because the fabric will have to be restitched. There are three ways you canunpick stitches.If you accidentally catch a piece of jewelry on a sweater or other knitted garment, it maymake a small hole. A moth could make a hole, too. It is worth darning the hole, especially if thesweater was expensive or is a favorite. Holes can also occur in the heels of socks; thesecan be darned in the same way.Repairing a tear in fabric, patching a worn area, or fixing a zipper or a buttonhole can add extra life toa garment. Repairs like these may seem tedious, but they are very easy to do and worth the effort.For some of the mending techniques shown here, a contrasting color thread has been used so thatthe stitching can be seen clearly. However, when making a repair, be sure to use a matching thread.MendingUNPICKING STITCHESDARNING A HOLELEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **Pull the fabric apart and, using very small, sharplypointed scissors, snip through the stitches thathave been exposed.Slide a seam ripper carefully under a stitch and cut it.Cut through every fourth or fifth stitch, and the seamwill unravel easily.On difficult fabricsor on very small,tight stitches, slide apin under the stitchto lift it away fromthe fabric, thensnip through witha pair of sharplypointed scissors.1Even if the hole is small, the sweaterwill be unwearable. 2Work several rows of running stitchesvertically around the hole. 3Complete the repair by working horizontal rowsof running stitches through the vertical stitches.
  • 257MendingA button under strain can sometimes pull off a garment. If this happens, a hole will be made inthe fabric, which needs to be fixed before a new button can be stitched on.A buttonhole can sometimes rip at the end, or the stitching on the buttonhole can comeunraveled. When repairing, use a thread that matches the fabric so the repair will be invisible.REPAIRING FABRICUNDER A BUTTONREPAIRING A DAMAGEDBUTTONHOLELEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **1On the right side of the fabric, the hole wherethe button has pulled off is clearly visible.2Stitch over the torn edges by handusing a buttonhole stitch.2Turn to the wrong side and apply a patchof fusible interfacing over the hole.3Reinforce the ends usingsmall oversewing stitches.1On the right side of the fabric, the edgesof the buttonhole stitching have tornand come unraveled.4Stitch the buttonback in place.3Work straight machinestitches over the hole onthe right side to strengthenthe fabric.
  • 258 Alterations and repairsA split seam can be very quickly remedied with the help of some fusible mending tapeand new stitching.Tears easily happen to clothing, especially children’s wear. There are several methodsfor mending a tear. Most use a fusible patch of some kind, which may or may notbe seen on the front.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *FUSIBLE APPLIQUÉ PATCHMENDING A SPLITIN A SEAMMENDING A TEAR WITHA FUSIBLE PATCH1Where the split has occurred in theseam, unpick the stitching on eitherside. Press the fabric back into shape.2Apply a strip of fusiblemending tape over thesplit and the seam on eitherside of the split.4The repair will not be visibleon the other side.1Place a fusible appliqué overthe tear and pin in place. 2Apply heat to fuse the decorativepatch in place.3Restitch theseam using athread color tomatch the fabric.
  • 259MendingFUSED PATCH ON THE RIGHT SIDE1Measure the tear in the fabric.2Cut a piece of fusible mending fabric thatis slightly longer and wider than the tear.4Using a zigzag stitch, machine all around the edge of the patchon the right side of the work.3Fuse the fabric in placeon the right side.5On the reverse side of the fabric, the tear will be firmly stuck to themending patch, which will prevent the tear from getting any bigger.
  • 260 Alterations and repairs1Measure the length of the tear.Cut a piece of fusible mending tape to fit. 2On the wrong side of the fabric,fuse the mending tape over the tear.3Using a zigzag stitch, width 5.0 and length 0.5,stitch over the tear on the right side of the fabric. 4On the wrong side, the zigzag stitchingwill have gone through the fusible tape.FUSED PATCH ON THE WRONG SIDE
  • 261Mending1Where there are broken teeth on the zipper,the zipper pull will be attached to one sideonly. Move the pull up so it is alongside thegap in the teeth on the other side.2Carefully feed the teeth on the brokenside into the top of the zipper. 3Just above the broken area, hand stitch overthe zipper teeth using double thread. This makesa stop for the zipper pull. The zipper will now have anextended life.Broken teethBrokenpart ofzipper2Pull the oldelastic throughthe gap in the seamand cut through it.1Carefully unpick a seamin the elastic casing. 4Secure the endson the new elastic.Old elastic3Attach new elastic tothe old with a safetypin. Pull the old elasticthrough the casing. It willpull the new elastic with it.5Hand stitch theunpicked seamback together.Elastic can frequently come unstitched inside the waistband, or it may lose its stretchand need to be replaced. Here is the simple way to reinsert elastic or insert new elastic.Zippers can break if they come under too much strain. Sometimes the zipper has to be removedcompletely and a new zipper inserted. However, if only a few teeth have been broken low downon the zipper and it can still be opened sufficiently, you can make this repair.LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY *LEVEL OF DIFFICULTY **REPAIRING ORREPLACING ELASTICREPAIRING ABROKEN ZIPPER
  • CustomizingIf you have a favorite garment that is looking tired, there is no need to throw it out.This section is full of quick and easy ideas for revamping and updating the clothesyou already have, or any you may find for a bargain price at a thrift store.
  • 264 CustomizingIs last season’s skirt just too short this year? Do you want to coordinatea skirt with a new jacket or with a top you have made? This simpletechnique shows you how to add a deep contrast band to the hemof a simple A-line or straight skirt.Lengthening a skirtwith a contrast bandYOU WILL NEED• Skirt• 20in (50cm) contrasting fabric ofsimilar weight to the skirt• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing threadBEFORE YOU STARTAdd a splash of colorwith a contrast band atthe bottom of a simpleskirt and perhapscomplete your ensemblewith a jacket orcardigan to matchSimple A-lineskirt
  • 265Lengthening a skirt with a contrast band3Pin the raw edges of the doubled contrast bands to the front and backhems of the skirt, RS (right side) to RS. Don’t worry if the bands overhang atthe sides of the skirt.1To make this project really easy, you will work on the front and back of theskirt separately, then join them at the side seams. Start by unpicking theskirt hem and 2–31⁄4in (5–8cm) of the side seams.4Machine the strips to the front and back hems. Neaten the seams usinga 3-thread serger stitch or a small zigzag stitch (see pp.84–85).2For the skirt front, cut a piece of contrasting fabric 9in (22cm) wide andat least 11⁄4in (3cm) longer than the front of the skirt is wide. Do the samefor the back of the skirt. Fold the two pieces in half and press.5Machine the skirt together at the sides, WS (wrong side) to WS, followingthe line of the original side seams. 6At the hem edge, pin under the ends of the seam allowances.Hand stitch in place.HOW TO LENGTHEN A SKIRT WITH A CONTRAST BAND
  • 266 CustomizingTurning old jeans that are too short or have ripped legs into a little skirtis so easy. You don’t even have to make a hem; a row of stitches at thebottom edge is enough to stop it from fraying. Wear it with a T-shirt for acasual yet trendy vacation outfit.TURNING jeansINTO A SKIRTYOU WILL NEED• Pair of jeans• 1 spool topstitching sewing threadto match topstitching on jeansBEFORE YOU STARTDon’t throw out thoseold jeans. Just a fewcuts and topstitchedseams will give youa sporty, casual skirtin no time at all.Oldpair ofjeans
  • 267Turning jeans into a skirt1Decide the length you want for your skirt and measure down from thewaist of the pants by that amount. Add 11⁄4in (3cm) allowance for thehem, and cut through each leg at that point.2Carefully unpick the inside leg seams and the curved sectionof the crotch seam.3Cut off the curved part of the crotch seam on the front and back.4Cut through the side seams on one of the leg sections that you removedin order to make a single layer of fabric.5Place a piece of this leg fabric under eachof the unpicked sections, front and back, to fillin the gap created by cutting away the crotch seam.Pin in place.6Starting at the crotch and matching thestitching lines, topstitch together using a longermachine stitch. Turn under a double-turn hem(see p.118), pin, and topstitch.7Remove any surplus fabric on the inside.HOW TO TURN JEANS INTO A SKIRT
  • 268 CustomizingIt’s easier than you think to add a contrasting collar to a simple round-neckeddress. You can really dress it up if you add a pair of fake pockets, too. Try thison a simple cotton print dress for a retro look.adding A collar andpockets to a dressYOU WILL NEED• Dress• 20in (50cm) contrasting fabric forcollar and pockets• 1 spool matching all-purpose sewingthread• See-through nonwoven fabric• 20in (50cm) lightweightfusible interfacing• 20in (50cm) x 3⁄4in (2cm)bias bindingBEFORE YOU STARTSimpledressGive a plain shift dressa new lease on life witha neat little Peter Pancollar and oh-so-simplefake pockets.
  • 269Adding collars and pockets to a dress2Pin some see-through nonwoven fabric to theneck edge and draw on the shape of your collar.We made our collar 23⁄8in (6cm) deep.1Fold the dress in half, pin around the neck andmark the CF (center front) with a thread marking.5Place the collars together RS (right side) to RSand stitch around the outside edges. Layerthe interfaced side of the seam and clip.3Remove the drawing and add seam allowancesof 5⁄8in (1.5cm). Do not add a seam allowance atthe neck edge. Draw in the grain line at the CF.6Turn the collar to the RS and press. Pin thecollar to the neck, raw edge to finisheddress neck edge.4Using this as your pattern, cut two left and tworight collars. Attach lightweight fusibleinterfacing to one pair.7Pin bias binding to the raw edge of the collar, RS to RS, and machine inplace. Wrap the binding to the WS (wrong side) and hand stitch. 8To make the false pockets, cut two pieces of fabric 8in (20cm) wide by53⁄4in (14cm) deep and interface with lightweight fusible interfacing. Foldin half, RS to RS, along the length and machine the short ends. Clip the corners.Turn to the RS and press.9Try the dress on to determine the position of the false pockets, then pin andstitch them in place working from the RS. 10Turn the pocket upward over the stitching. Pin in place then stitchdown the ends. The effect will be one of a pocket that is open at the top.HOW TO ADD A COLLAR AND POCKETS TO A DRESScenterfront (CF)clipped seamallowancelayered seamallowanceclippedcornerstitchedend
  • 270 CustomizingThis is a fabulously simple and inexpensive way to bling up a day dressand turn it into a cocktail outfit in just an hour or so. All the sewing isdone by hand, so settle down in a comfy chair with some soothingmusic and get creative!embellishing a dresswith sequins and beadsYOU WILL NEED• Plain dress• Assorted sequins, pearls,and beads• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing threadBEFORE YOU STARTMake a grandentrance in thissparkly little numbercreated from a simpleday dress. Cinderellawill go to the ball!Plaindress
  • 271Embellishing a dress with sequins and beads2Mark the placement of the row ofembellishment at the neck edge withpins. Make sure the pins are evenly spaced.1Choose some beads, pearls, and sequins that you like and scatter them on the dress to seewhich show up best.5Add a scattering of beads and sequins to form a panel below the neckedge. Stitch from bead to bead without finishing the thread after each one,but don’t attach more than 10 beads with one thread in case the thread breaks.6Add beads and sequins in the same way to create a border at thebottom of the dress.3Hand stitch a sequin at each pin and adda small bead on top of each sequin. 4Continue adding sequins and beads all the way around the neck edge of the dressat the marked positions.HOW TO EMBELLISH A DRESS WITH SEQUINS AND BEADS
  • 272 CustomizingFor an up-to-the minute look, try this idea to breathe new life into atired old long-sleeved T-shirt. The sleeves have been cut up to makea dainty flower corsage for the neckline. The flowers are so simpleyou’ll want to make more and embellish other garments, too.Embellishing a t-shirtwith flowersYOU WILL NEED• Long-sleeved T-shirt• Paper• 1 spool matching all-purpose sewingthreadBEFORE YOU STARTLong-sleevedT-shirtMatching flowers atthe neckline turn aplain T-shirt intoa pretty-as-a-pictureone with just a coupleof hours’ work.
  • 273Embellishing a T-shirt with flowers2Make a 3⁄8 in (1cm) hem at the bottom of eachsleeve and hand stitch in place.3Cut through the side seams of the sleeves that you removed in order to make single layersof fabric. Draw a flower shape onto paper to use as a template. Cut it out, and use it to cutflowers from the sleeve.4To make a flower, pinch the center to bring thepetals together. Secure with a stitch.5Scatter the flowers on the front of the T-shirt to help you decide where to position them.Pin them in place. 6Stitch each flower down using a small stitch:this will be hidden by the petals.1Cut the sleeves off your T-shirt—we cut ours to leave a small cap sleeve.HOW TO EMBELLISH A T-SHIRT WITH FLOWERS
  • 274 CustomizingIs your cardigan looking tired and dull? If so, why not add a prettyribbon trim to the front edges and some decorative buttons? Thistechnique could be applied to any style of cardigan. You could evenembellish the neck and cuffs of a sweater in the same way, in whichcase you won’t need the snap fasteners.Adding a ribbontrim to a cardiganYOU WILL NEED• A cardigan• 80in (2m) firm ribbon, thewidth of the button band• 15–20 assorted buttons• Snap fasteners• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing threadBEFORE YOU STARTPlaincardiganAn assortment ofbuttons and a glamribbon trim togethergive a tired oldcardigan a quirky,handmade look.
  • 275Adding a ribbon trim to a cardigan2Taking care not to stretch the cardigan, pina single length of ribbon, wide enough tocover the button band, from the hem of one frontup, around the neck, and down to the other hem.3Machine carefully along both sides of theribbon to hold it in place.4Evenly space assorted buttons, with a diameter no wider than the ribbon,the length of the ribbon, leaving it free of buttons where the two frontswill join. Stitch in place.5Where the two fronts are to join, stitch one half of a snap fastenerbeneath each button and the other half in the corresponding position onthe other side of the ribbon trim.1Carefully remove the buttons using sharpscissors. Take care not to cut the fabric.HOW TO ADD A RIBBON TRIM TO A CARDIGAN
  • This section contains all the fabulous patterns that are needed to make the garmentsin this book. The patterns come in a range of sizes, enabling you to choose the sizethat suits you best. Full instructions explain how to transfer the patterns to paper.patternsthe
  • 278 PatternsTo create any of the garments in this book, you will first need to transfer the pattern to paper. You can dothis in one of three ways: draw the pattern by hand onto pattern paper, enlarge it on a photocopier, ordownload it from our website. Before you begin, you will also need to find the correct size for you.Using the pattern sectionFIND YOUR SIZEStitching lineCutting lineSize 6 Size 8 Size 10 Size 12 Size 14 Size 16 Size 18 Size 20 Size 22321⁄4in(82cm)331⁄4in(84.5cm)341⁄4in(87cm)361⁄4in(92cm)38in(97cm)40in102cm)42in(107cm)44in(112cm)46in(117cm)241⁄2in(62cm)251⁄4in(64.5cm)261⁄4in(67cm)281⁄4in(72cm)301⁄4in(77cm)321⁄4in(82cm)341⁄4in(87cm)361⁄4in(92cm)38 in(97cm)341⁄4in(87cm)351⁄4in(89.5cm)361⁄4in(92cm)38in(97cm)40in(102cm)42in(107cm)44in(112cm)46in(117cm)48in(122cm)BustWaistHipPATTERN MARKINGSSEAM ALLOWANCE Cutting linesGrain linesPlace-to-fold lineLengthening and shorteninglinesButtonholeButton positionDartTuckMarkings to be transferred frompattern pieces to the fabric formatching or to indicate detailSingle notchesDouble notchesThe following markings are used on thepatterns in this section.Seam allowance is the amount of fabric thatis taken up by the seam. It is usually given asthe distance between the cutting line and thestitching line.The patterns in this section include 5⁄8in(1.5cm) seam allowance. This means thatto create a garment that matches themeasurements in the table, you will need tocut along the line on the pattern, and stitch5⁄8in (1.5cm) inside the cutting line. An easyway to remember to do this is to mark astitching line onto the pattern pieces beforeyou begin.You may have noticed that your size in the table islarger than what you would buy in a store. This isbecause stores often engage in “vanity sizing.”Find your size by taking your bust, waist, and hip measurements and finding the closest set ofmeasurements in the table below. If you are between sizes, choose the larger of the two.VARIED SIZESThere is no gold standard for garment sizes, but, ingeneral, dressmaking sizes tend to be smaller thansizes in stores.
  • 279Using the pattern sectionCOPY OR DOWNLOAD YOUR PATTERNMETHOD 1: DRAWING THE PATTERN BY HANDMETHOD 2: PHOTOCOPYINGMETHOD 3: DOWNLOADING FROM THE INTERNET1Each grid square in the patterns represents a2in (5cm) square at full size. To enlarge thepatterns by hand, you will need pattern paperwith a 2in (5cm) grid.1To enlarge the pattern on a photocopier, beginby copying it at 100%. Find your size in thetable, and draw along the line for your size inmarker or pen. Enlarge the pattern by 200%.1Find your size in the table. Go to website www.dk.com/dressmaking.2Begin by finding the colored line for your sizein the pattern. Enlarge the pattern onto yourpaper, mapping each square of the pattern onto a2in (5cm) square on the pattern paper.2Enlarge the pattern pieces again by 200% toreach full size. If you are using a photocopierthat has a 400% setting, you can use this setting toenlarge the pieces in one step.2Find the correct PDF for your garment andyour size. Download the PDF to yourcomputer. Print out the PDF. The PDFs will belabeled in the order that they fit together.3Depending on the size of your pattern paper,you may need to stick together several sheetsto fit all the pieces for a single pattern. Once youhave copied all the pieces, cut them out.3Once you have enlarged all parts of theoriginal page, piece them together usingthe gridlines as a guide, and tape them down.Cut around your size.3Trim the white margins from the printedpages, and tape the pages together, using theletters and gridlines as a guide. Cut out thepattern pieces.200%200%PDFAEIMBFJNCGKODHLPCBAThe gentlyflaring A-lineskirt of this long-sleeved dress issure to turn headsas you sashay bythe waisted dresses>>p.179>>p.181>>p.185>>p.176DRESSPATTERN174 Garments 175DressesLongset-insleeveCenter-backzipperCLASSICWAISTED DRESSThis dress has a darted bodice fitted into the waist for a smooth, flattering lineat the waist and hips. Choose your pattern by your bust measurement and adjustthe waist and hips if necessary. It is recommended to make the pattern in muslinfirst to ensure a good fit through the bust and waist, and to check the fit of thesleeve in the shoulder area. Lightweight fabrics work well for this dress and willensure that the slightly A-line skirt moves with a nice swirl as you walk.This dress is made in polyesterbrocade, but this style of dresscould be made in a variety offabrics from cotton prints tolightweight wools, or silk.YOU WILL NEED• 98in (2.5m) x 59in (150cm)fabric• 1 spool matching all-purposesewing thread• 1 spool contrasting all-purposesewing thread for patternmarking• 20in (50cm) lightweightinterfacing• 22in (56cm) zipperPREPARING THE PATTERN• This dress is made using DressPattern Two (see pp.288–290)• Follow the instructions(see pp.278–279) to copyor download the patternin your sizeThis unlined two-piece dress has waist darts in the bodice andin the skirt. It has long, fitted set-in sleeves and a lower necklinefinished with a facing. There is a zipper in the center back and theA-line skirt sits just on the knee.Dress Pattern TwoWool crepeSilkBEFORE YOU START GARMENT CONSTRUCTIONSkirtwaistdartBodicewaistdartLower necklineA-line skirtFRONT BACK
  • 2802 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsSKIRT PATTERN ONEFOLDSKIRT BACKCut 1 on folded fabricWAISTBANDCut 1CBJOIN
  • 28134 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Skirt pattern onesize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the grid equals2in at full size. A seam allowance of5⁄8in (1.5cm) is included in the patternpieces. After you have cut out thepattern pieces in your size, you maywish to add seam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cutting lines (see p.278).FOLDSKIRT FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricCFOVERLAPJOINSIZES
  • 2822 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsSKIRT PATTERN TWOCut 1 on folded fabricCut 1 interfacingCFZIPCBFRONTFACINGSKIRT BACKCut 2 fabric
  • 28334 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Skirt pattern twosize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the gridequals 2in at full size. A seamallowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm) isincluded in the pattern pieces.After you have cut out the patternpieces in your size, you may wishto add seam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cutting lines (see p.278).BACKFACINGSKIRT FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricCFFOLDCBCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingSIZES
  • 2842 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsSKIRT PATTERN THREEFOLDSKIRT BACKCut 1 on folded fabricBACK YOKECut 2 fabricCut 1 interfacingCut 1 fabricBELT LOOPS
  • 28534 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Skirt pattern threesize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in thegrid equals 2in at fullsize. A seam allowance of5⁄8in (1.5cm) is includedin the pattern pieces.After you have cut outthe pattern pieces in yoursize, you may wish to addseam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cutting lines(see p.278).FRONT YOKECut 2 fabricCut 1 interfacingFOLDSKIRT FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricSIZES
  • 2862 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsDRESS PATTERN ONEFOLDDRESS FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricDRESS BACKCut 2 fabricFRONTFACINGCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingFOLDCBCut 1 on folded fabricCut 1 on folded interfacingBACKFACINGJOINJOIN
  • 28734 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Dress pattern oneDRESS FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricDRESS BACKCut 2 fabricSLEEVECut 2 fabricsize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the gridequals 2in at full size. A seamallowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm) isincluded in the pattern pieces.After you have cut out the patternpieces in your size, you may wishto add seam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cutting lines (see p.278).JOINJOINSIZES
  • 2882 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsDRESS PATTERN TWOSKIRT BACKCut 2 fabricSKIRT FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricFOLDCB
  • 28934 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Dress pattern twoBODICE BACKCut 2 fabricBODICE FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricCBFOLDsize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the grid equals 2in atfull size. A seam allowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm)is included in the pattern pieces. After youhave cut out the pattern pieces in yoursize, you may wish to add seam lines 5⁄8in(1.5cm) inside the cutting lines (see p.278).SIZES
  • 2902 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsSLEEVECut 2 fabricFOLDCut 1 on folded fabricCut 1 on folded interfacingCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingFRONTFACINGBACKFACINGCB
  • 29134 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Dress pattern threeDRESS PATTERN THREESLEEVECut 2 fabricFOLDCut 1 on folded fabricCut 1 on folded interfacingFRONTFACINGBACK FACINGCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingCBsize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the gridequals 2in at full size. A seamallowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm) isincluded in the pattern pieces.After you have cut out thepattern pieces in your size,you may wish to add seamlines 5⁄8in (1.5cm) inside thecutting lines (see p.278).SIZES
  • 2922 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsSKIRT BACKCut 2 fabricSKIRT FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricFOLDCB
  • 29334 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Dress pattern threeBODICE BACKCut 2 fabricBODICE FRONTCut 1 on folded fabricFOLDsize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the gridequals 2in at full size. A seamallowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm) isincluded in the pattern pieces.After you have cut out the patternpieces in your size, you may wishto add seam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cutting lines (see p.278).CBSIZES
  • 2942 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsPANT PATTERN ONEFRONT WAISTBANDCut 4 fabricCut 2 interfacingBACK WAISTBANDCut 4 fabricCut 2 interfacingPANT FRONTCut 2 fabricFLY FRONT FACINGCut 2 fabricPANT BACKCut 2 fabricCFCBJOINJOIN
  • 29534 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Pant pattern onePANT FRONTCut 2 fabricPANT SIDEFRONTCut 2 fabricPOCKETLININGCut 2 liningPANT BACKCut 2 fabricCFsize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the grid equals 2in atfull size. A seam allowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm)is included in the pattern pieces. After youhave cut out the pattern pieces in your size,you may wish to add seam lines 5⁄8in(1.5cm) inside the cutting lines (see p.278).JOINJOINSIZES
  • 2962 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsPANT PATTERN TWOPANT BACKCut 2 fabricFLY FRONT FACINGCut 2 fabricJOIN
  • 29734 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Pant pattern twosize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22PANT BACKCut 2 fabricPANTPOCKETCut 2 fabricCut 2 liningNOTE: One square in the gridequals 2in at full size. A seamallowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm) isincluded in the pattern pieces.After you have cut out thepattern pieces in your size, youmay wish to add seam lines5⁄8in (1.5cm) inside the cuttinglines (see p.278).JOINSIZES
  • 2982 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsPANT FRONTCut 2 fabricWAISTBANDCut 1 fabricBELT LOOPCut 1 fabricJOINJOIN
  • 29934 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Pant pattern twoPANT FRONTCut 2 fabricWAISTBANDCut 1 fabricTUCKCB CFLEFT HAND FRONTJOINJOIN
  • 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsTOP PATTERN ONETOP BACKCut 2 fabricCBFOLDTOP FRONTCut 1 on folded fabric
  • 30134 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Top pattern oneSLEEVECut 2 fabricFOLDsize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22Cut 1 on folded fabricCut 1 on folded interfacingCBCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingNOTE: One square in the grid equals 2in atfull size. A seam allowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm) isincluded in the pattern pieces. After you havecut out the pattern pieces in your size, youmay wish to add seam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cutting lines (see p.278).FRONTFACINGBACKFACINGSIZES
  • 3022 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsTOP PATTERN TWOTOP BACKCut 1 on folded fabricFOLDCOLLARCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingYOKECut 2 fabricFRONTFRONTSLEEVECut 2 fabric
  • 30334 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Top pattern twosize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22SIDE FRONTCut 2 fabricTOP FRONTCut 2 fabricInterfaceCFFRONT INTERFACINGCut 2 interfacingCUFFCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingFOLDFOLDNOTE: One square inthe grid equals 2inat full size. A seamallowance of 5⁄8in(1.5cm) is included inthe pattern pieces.After you have cut outthe pattern pieces inyour size, you maywish to add seamlines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cuttinglines (see p.278).SIZES
  • 3042 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsJACKET PATTERN ONEFOLDBACK LINING(Variation only)Cut 1 on folded liningFRONT LINING(Variation only)Cut 2 liningFRONT FACINGCut 2 fabricTUCKTUCK
  • 30534 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Jacket pattern oneJACKET BACKCut 2 fabricSIDE BACKCut 2 fabricSIDE FRONTCut 2 fabricJACKET FRONTCut 2 fabricsize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the grid equals2in at full size. A seam allowance of5⁄8in (1.5cm) is included in the patternpieces. After you have cut out thepattern pieces in your size, you maywish to add seam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm)inside the cutting lines (see p.278).Use size 6 notch forsizes 8 and 10SIZES
  • 3062 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsSLEEVE LINING(Variation only)Cut 2 liningCOLLAR(Variation only)Cut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacing
  • 30734 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Jacket pattern oneSLEEVECut 2 fabricCut 1 on folded fabricCut 1 on folded interfacingCut 4 fabricCut 2 interfacingFOLDCBBACKFACINGPOCKETFLAP
  • 3082 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsJACKET PATTERN TWOCBTUCKCut 2 fabricCut 2interfacingBACKFACINGJACKET BACK LINING(Variation only)Cut 1 lining
  • 30934 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Jacket pattern twosize 6size 8size 10size 12size 14size 16size 18size 20size 22NOTE: One square in the gridequals 2in at full size. A seamallowance of 5⁄8in (1.5cm) isincluded in the pattern pieces. Afteryou have cut out the pattern piecesin your size, you may wish to addseam lines 5⁄8in (1.5cm) inside thecutting lines (see p.278).JACKET BACKCut 2 fabricJACKET FRONTCut 2 fabricSIZES
  • 3102 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 3002 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30024681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638PatternsFRONT LINING(Variation Only)Cut 2 liningLOWER FRONT FACINGCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingBACKHEMFACINGPOCKET(Variation Only)Cut 2 fabricCut 2 liningUPPER FRONT FACINGCut 2 fabricCut 2 interfacingTUCKUse size 6 forsizes 8 and 10Cut 1 fabricCut 1 interfacing
  • 31134 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603234 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 603224681012141618202224262830323436382468101214161820222426283032343638Jacket pattern twoSLEEVECut 2 fabricSLEEVE LINING(Variation Only)Cut 2 lining
  • 312 GlossaryAcetate Man-made fabric widely used for linings.Acrylic Man-made fabric resembling wool.Armhole Opening in a garment for the sleeveand arm.Back stitch A strong hand stitch with a doublestitch on the wrong side, used for outlining andseaming.Basting stitch A temporary running stitchused to hold pieces of fabric together or fortransferring pattern markings to fabric.Belt loop Loop made from a strip of fabricthat is used to support a belt at the waistedge of a garment.Bias 45-degree line on fabric that falls betweenthe lengthwise and the crosswise grain. Fabriccut on the bias drapes well. See also Grain.Bias binding Narrow strips of fabric cut onthe bias. Used to give a neat finish to hems andseam allowances.Binding Method of finishing a raw edge bywrapping it in a strip of bias-cut fabric.Blanket stitch Hand stitch worked along theraw or finished edge of fabric to neaten it, and fordecorative purposes.Blind hem stitch Tiny hand stitch used toattach one piece of fabric to another, mainlyto secure hems. Also a machine stitch consistingof two or three straight stitches and one widezigzag stitch.Bobbin Round holder beneath the needleplate of a sewing machine on which the threadis wound.Bodice Upper body section of a garment.Boning Narrow nylon, plastic, or metal strip,available in various widths, that is used forstiffening and shaping close-fitting garments,such as bodices.Box pleat Pleat formed on the wrong sideof the fabric, and fuller than a knife pleat.See also Pleat.Buttonhole Opening through which a buttonis inserted to form a fastening. Buttonholes are usuallymachine stitched but may also be worked by hand orpiped for reinforcement or decorative effect.Buttonhole chisel Very sharp, small chiselthat cuts cleanly through a machine-stitchedbuttonhole.Buttonhole stitch Hand stitch that wraps overthe raw edges of buttonholes to neaten andstrengthen them. Machine-stitched buttonholesare worked with a close zigzag stitch.Button shank Stem of a button that allowsroom for the buttonhole to fit under the buttonwhen joined.Cashmere The most luxurious of all wools.Casing Tunnel of fabric created by parallel rowsof stitching through which elastic or a drawstringcord is threaded. Often used at a waist edge.Sometimes extra fabric is required to make acasing; this can be applied to the inside or outsideof the garment.Catch stitch See Slip hem stitch.Center back The vertical line of symmetry of agarment back piece. Often marked as CB.Center front The vertical line of symmetry of agarment front piece. Often marked as CF.Challis Fine woolen fabric with uneven surfacetexture.Chambray A light cotton with a colored warpthread.Cheesecloth Fine, plain, open-weave cotton.Chiffon Strong, fine, transparent silk.Clapper Wooden aid that is used to poundcreases into heavy fabric after steaming.Contour dart Also known as double-pointeddart, this is used to give shape at the waist of agarment. It is like two darts joined together. Seealso Dart.Corduroy A soft pile fabric with distinctive ribs.Cotton Soft, durable, and inexpensive fabricwidely used in dressmaking. Made from thefibrous hairs covering the seed pods of thecotton plant.Crease Line formed in fabric by pressing a fold.Crepe Soft fabric made from twisted yarn.Cross stitch A temporary hand stitch used tohold pleats in place and to secure linings. It canalso be used for decoration.Cutting line Solid line on a pattern piece usedas a guide for cutting out fabric.Darning Mending holes or worn areas in a knittedgarment by weaving threads in rows along thegrain of the fabric.Dart Tapered stitched fold of fabric used on agarment to give it shape so that it can fit aroundthe contours of the body. There are differenttypes of dart, but all are used mainly on women’sclothing.Darted tuck A tuck that can be used to givefullness of fabric at the bust or hip. See also Tuck.Denim Hard-wearing twill weave fabric with coloredwarp and white weft.Double-pointed dart See Contour dartDrape The way a fabric falls into graceful folds;drape varies with each fabric.Dressmaker’s carbon paper Used togetherwith a tracing wheel to transfer pattern markingsto fabric. Available in a variety of colors.Duchesse satin Heavy, expensive satin fabric.Dupioni Fabric with a distinctive weft yarn that istextured; made from 100 percent silk.Ease Distributing fullness in fabric when joiningtwo seams together of slightly different lengths,for example, a sleeve to an armhole.Ease stitch Long machine stitch, used to easein fullness where the distance between notchesis greater on one seam edge than on the other.glossary
  • 313GlossaryEdge to edge A garment, such as a jacket, inwhich the edges meet at the center front withoutoverlapping.Enclosed edge Raw fabric edge that is concealedwithin a seam or binding.Eyelet A fine plain-weave cotton embroidered tomake small decorative holes.Facing Layer of fabric placed on the inside of agarment and used to finish off raw edges of anarmhole or neck of a garment. Usually a separatepiece of fabric, the facing can sometimes be anextension of the garment itself.Filament fibers Very fine synthetic thread,manufactured using plant materials and minerals.Flannel Wool or cotton with a lightly brushedsurface.Flat fell seam See Run and fell seam.Flat fell stitch A strong, secure stitch used tohold two layers together permanently. Oftenused to secure linings and bias bindings.French dart Curved dart used on the front ofa garment. See also Dart.French seam A seam traditionally used on sheerand silk fabrics. It is stitched twice, first on theright side of the work and then on the wrongside, enclosing the first seam.Fusible tape Straight grain tape used to stabilizeedges and also replace stay stitching. The heat ofthe iron fuses it into position.Gabardine Hard-wearing fabric with a distinctiveweave.Gathers Bunches of fabric created by sewing twoparallel rows of loose stitching, then pulling thethreads up so that the fabric gathers and reducesin size to fit the required space.Gingham Two-color, checked cotton fabric.Grain Lengthwise and crosswise direction ofthreads in a fabric. Fabric grain affects how afabric hangs and drapes.Grosgrain Synthetic, ribbed fabric often usedto make ribbons.Habutai Smooth, fine silk originally from Japan.Hem The edge of a piece of fabric neatened andstitched to prevent unraveling. There are severalmethods of doing this, both by hand and by machine.Hem allowance Amount of fabric allowed forturning under to make the hem.Hemline Crease or foldline along which a hem ismarked.Herringbone stitch Hand stitch used to securehems and interlinings. This stitch is worked fromleft to right.Herringbone weave A zigzag weave wherethe weft yarn goes under and over warp yarnsin a staggered pattern.Hong Kong finish A method of neatening rawedges particularly on wool and linen. Bias-cutstrips are wrapped around the raw edge.Hook and eye fastening Two-part metal fasteningused to fasten overlapping edges of fabric wherea neat join is required. Available in a wide varietyof styles.Interfacing A fabric placed between garmentand facing to give structure and support. Availablein different thicknesses, interfacing can be fusible(bonds to the fabric by applying heat) or nonfusible(needs to be sewn to the fabric).Interlining Layer of fabric attached to the mainfabric prior to construction, to cover the insideof an entire garment to provide extra warmth orbulk. The two layers are then treated as one. Oftenused in jackets and coats.Jersey Cotton or wool yarn that has been knittedto give stretch.Keyhole buttonhole stitch A machine buttonholestitch characterized by having one square end whilethe other end is shaped like a loop to accommodatethe button’s shank without distorting the fabric.Often used on jackets.Layering Trimming one side of the seam allowance tohalf its width to reduce bulk at the seam.Linen Natural fiber derived from the stem of theflax plant, linen is available in a variety of qualities andweights.Lining Underlying fabric layer used to give aneat finish to an item, as well as concealing thestitching and seams of a garment.Locking stitch A machine stitch where the upperand lower threads in the machine “lock”togetherat the start or end of a row of stitching.Madras Brightly colored, unevenly checkedcotton fabric from India.Matka A silk suiting fabric with uneven yarn.Miter The diagonal line made where two edgesof a piece of fabric meet at a corner, producedby folding. See also Mitered corner.Mitered corner Diagonal seam formed when fabricis joined at a corner. Excess fabric is cut away before orafter stitching.Mohair Fluffy wool yarn cloth used for sweaters,jackets, and soft furnishings.Multisize pattern Paper pattern printed with cuttinglines for a range of sizes on each pattern piece.Muslin A plain weave, usually unbleached fabric.Nap The raised pile on a fabric made during theweaving process, or a print pointing one way.When cutting out pattern pieces, ensure the napruns in the same direction.Needle threader Gadget that pulls thread throughthe eye of a needle. Useful for needles with small eyes.Notch V-shaped marking on a pattern pieceused for aligning one piece with another. AlsoV-shaped cut taken to reduce seam bulk.Notion An item other than fabric needed tocomplete a project, such as a button, zipper, orelastic. Notions are normally listed on thepattern envelope.
  • 314 GlossaryOrganza Thin, sheer fabric made from silk orpolyester.Overedge stitch Machine stitch worked overthe edge of a seam allowance and used forneatening the edges of fabric.Pattern markings Symbols printed on a paperpattern to indicate the fabric grain, foldline, andconstruction details, such as darts, notches, andtucks. These should be transferred to the fabricusing tailor’s chalk or tailor’s bastes.Pile Raised loops on the surface of a fabric, forexample, velvet.Pinking A method of neatening raw edges offray-resistant fabric using pinking shears. This willleave a zigzag edge.Pinking shears Cutting tool with serrated blades,used to trim raw edges of fray-resistant fabrics toneaten seam edges.Pivoting Technique used to machine stitch acorner. The machine is stopped at the cornerwith the needle in the fabric, then the foot israised, the fabric turned following the directionof the corner, and the foot lowered for stitchingto continue.Placket An opening in a garment that providessupport for fasteners, such as buttons, snaps,or zippers.Plain weave The simplest of all the weaves; theweft yarn passes under one warp yarn, then overanother one.Pleat An even fold or series of folds in fabric, oftenpartially stitched down. Commonly found in skirtsto shape the waistline, but also in soft furnishingsfor decoration.Pocket flap A piece of fabric that folds down tocover the opening of a pocket.Polyester Man-made fiber that does not crease.Presser foot The part of a sewing machine thatis lowered on to the fabric to hold it in place overthe needle plate while stitching. There are differentfeet available.Pressing cloth Muslin or organza cloth placedover fabric to prevent marking or scorching whenpressing.Prick stitch Small spaced hand stitch with largespaces between each stitch. Often used to highlightthe edge of a completed garment.Raw edge Cut edge of fabric that requires finishing,for example, using zigzag stitch, to prevent fraying.Rayon Also known as viscose, rayon is oftenblended with other fibers.Reverse stitch Machine stitch that simply stitchesback over a row of stitches to secure the threads.Right side The outer side of a fabric, or the visiblepart of a garment.Rouleau loop Button loop made from a stripof bias binding. It is used with a round ball-typebutton.Round-end buttonhole stitch Machine stitchcharacterized by one end of the buttonhole beingsquare and the other being round, to allow forthe button shank.Run and fell seam Also known as a flat fellseam, this seam is made on the right side of agarment and is very strong. It uses two linesof stitching and conceals all the raw edges,reducing fraying.Running stitch A simple, evenly spaced straightstitch separated by equal-sized spaces, used forseaming and gathering.Satin A fabric with a satin weave.Satin weave A weave with a sheen, where theweft goes under four warp yarns, then over one.Seam Stitched line where two edges of fabricare joined together.Seam allowance The amount of fabric allowedfor on a pattern where sections are to be joinedtogether by a seam; usually this is 5⁄8in (1.5cm).Seam edge The cut edge of a seam allowance.Seamline Line on paper pattern designated forstitching a seam; usually this is 5⁄8in (1.5cm) fromthe seam edge.Seam ripper A small, hooked tool used for undoingseams and unpicking stitches.Seam roll Tubular pressing aid for pressing seamsopen on fabrics that mark.Selvage Finished edge on a woven fabric.This runs parallel to the warp (lengthwise)threads.Set-in sleeve A sleeve that fits into a garmentsmoothly at the shoulder seam.Serger Machine used for quick stitching,trimming, and edging of fabric in a single action;it gives a professional finish to a garment. Thereare a variety of accessories that can be attachedto an serger that enable it to perform agreater range of functions.Serger stitch A machine stitch that neatens edgesand prevents fraying. It can be used on all types offabric.Sewing gauge Measuring tool with adjustableslider for checking small measurements, such ashem depths and seam allowances.Sharps All-purpose needle used for hand sewing.Shirting Closely woven, fine cotton with coloredwarp and weft yarns.Silk Threads spun by the silkworm and used tocreate cool, luxurious fabrics.Slip hem stitch Similar to herringbone stitch butis worked from right to left. It is used mainly forsecuring hems.Snaps Also known as press studs, these fastenersare used as a lightweight hidden fastener.Snips Spring-loaded cutting tool used for cuttingoff thread ends.Staple fibers These include both natural andmanufactured fibers such as cotton, wool, flax,and polyester. They are short in length, andrelatively narrow in thickness.
  • 315GlossaryStay stitch Straight machine stitch workedjust inside a seam allowance to strengthen itand prevent it from stretching or breaking.Stitch in the ditch A line of straight stitchessewn on the right side of the work, in the ditchcreated by a seam. Used to secure waistbandsand facings.Stitch ripper See Seam ripper.Straight stitch Plain machine stitch, used formost applications. The length of the stitch canbe altered to suit the fabric.Stretch stitch Machine stitch used for stretchknits and to help control difficult fabrics. It isworked with two stitches forward and onebackward so that each stitch is worked threetimes.Taffeta Smooth plain-weave fabric with a crispappearance.Tailor’s buttonhole A buttonhole with onesquare end and one keyhole-shaped end, usedon jackets and coats.Tailor’s chalk Square- or triangular-shaped pieceof chalk used to mark fabric. Available in a varietyof colors, tailor’s chalk can be removed easilyby brushing.Tailor’s ham A ham-shaped pressing cushionthat is used to press shaped areas of garments.Tailor’s bastes Loose thread markings used totransfer symbols from a pattern to fabric.Tape maker Tool for evenly folding the edgesof a fabric strip, which can then be pressed tomake binding.Tape measure Flexible form of ruler made fromplastic or fabric.Tartan Fabric made using a twill weave fromworsted yarns. Traditionally used for kilts.Thimble Metal or plastic cap that fits over thetop of a finger to protect it when hand sewing.Toile A test or dry run of a paper pattern usingmuslin. The toile helps you analyze the fit of thegarment.Topstitch Machine straight stitching workedon the right side of an item, close to the finishededge, for decorative effect. Sometimes stitchedin a contrasting color.Topstitched seam A seam finished with a rowof topstitching for decorative effect. This seamis often used on crafts and soft furnishings aswell as garments.Trace basting A method of marking fold andplacement lines on fabric. Loose stitches are sewnalong the lines on the pattern to the fabric beneath,then the thread loops are cut and the patternremoved.Tracing wheel Tool used together with dressmaker’scarbon paper to transfer pattern markings on tofabric.Tuck Fold or pleat in fabric that is sewn in place,normally on the straight grain of the fabric.Often used to provide a decorative addition toa garment.Tweed Traditional tweed is a rough fabric witha distinctive warp and weft. Modern tweed is amix of chunky and bobbled wool yarns, often inbright colors.Twill weave Diagonal patterned weave.Understitch Machine straight stitching throughfacing and seam allowances that is invisible fromthe right side; this helps the facing to lie flat.Velvet Luxurious pile-weave fabric.Waistband Band of fabric attached to the waistedge of a garment to provide a neat finish.Warp Lengthwise threads or yarns of a wovenfabric.Warp knit Made on a knitting machine, this knitis formed in a vertical and diagonal direction.Weft Threads or yarns that cross the warp of awoven fabric.Weft knit Made in the same way as hand knitting,this uses one yarn that runs horizontally.Welt Strip of fabric used to make the edges ofa pocket.Wool A natural animal fiber, available in a rangeof weights, weaves, and textures. It is comfortableto wear, crease-resistant, and ideal for tailoring.Wool worsted A light, strong cloth made fromgood quality fibers.Wrong side Reverse side of a fabric; the insideof a garment or other item.Yoke The top section of a dress or skirt from whichthe rest of the garment hangs.Zigzag stitch Machine stitch used to neaten andsecure seam edges and for decorative purposes.The width and length of the zigzag can be altered.Zipper Fastening widely used on garmentsconsisting of two strips of fabric tape, carryingspecially shaped metal or plastic teeth that locktogether by means of a pull or slider. Zippers areavailable in different colors and weights.Zipper foot Narrow machine foot with a single toethat can be positioned on either side of the needle.
  • 316 Index3-step zigzag stitch 823-thread serger stitch 854-thread serger stitch 8514-in-1 measure 24Aacetate 48acryclic 48alpaca 36altering patterns 56–67angora 36armhole facings 98–9arms, measuring 55artficial silk see rayonBbackback waist, measuring 55toile alterations 68back stitch 80basting stitchesbasic bastes 81long and short bastes 81tailor’s bastes 76, 77beading needles 14beeswax 24bent-handled shears 21betweens 14bias bindingcutting strips 96hems 117neck edges 99seams 86waistband edges 103blind hem foot 29blind hem stitch 81, 83blouses see topsbobbinsmetal 28plastic 28bodicesattaching skirts to 93boning 23pattern alterations 56bodkins 14body, measuring 54–5boning 23box pleats 146–53bustdarts 59measuring 54pattern alterations 59–60seams 60toile alterations 69buttonhole chisels 12, 21buttonhole foot 29buttonhole stitches 83basic buttonhole stitch 83keyhole buttonhole stitch 83round-end buttonhole stitch 83buttonholesdamaged buttonholes, repairing 257horizontal buttonholes 125machine-made 125positioning 124vertical buttonholes 125buttons 22, 123–4four-hole button, sewing on 123oversized and layered buttons 124repairing fabric under 257shanked button, sewing on 124two-hole button, sewing on 123Ccamel hair 36carbon paper 19, 77cardigan, adding a ribbon trim to 274–5cashmere 36centered zippers 120chalkmechanical pencils 19pencils 19tailor’s chalk 19chambray 40check fabrics, matching 74–5cheesecloth 42chenille needles 14chiffon 43clappers 32collar point turners 24collars 101adding a collar to a dress 268–9two-piece shirt collar 101–2contour darts 92corduroy 40, 71cornersheavy fabric 87inner corners 88reinforced corners 88stitching 87–8cotton and linen mix fabrics 46cotton fabrics 39–42cotton thread 16crepe 36crewel needles 14crotch depthmeasuring 55pattern alterations 66, 67cuffs 110–11one-piece cuff 110one-piece lapped cuff 111curved hems 118curved seamsbust seams 60inner curves 88, 89outer curves 88, 90pattern alterations 60reducing seam bulk 89–90cutting out 70–7fabric preparation 70, 71how to cut 76pattern layout 72–5pattern marking 76–7cutting shears 12, 20cutting tools 13, 20–1Ddarner’s needles 14darning holes 256darts 91–2bust darts 59, 91contour or double-pointed darts 92pattern alterations 58–9plain darts 91pressing 92shaping darts to fit 91waistline darts 91, 92denim 40dots, marking 76, 77double-pointed darts 92double-turn hems 118drafting rulers 19dress-weight linen 46dresses 154–201adding a collar and pockets 268–9classic empire waist dress 190–4, 291–3classic shift dress 156–60, 286–7index
  • 317classic waisted dress 174–8, 288–90long empire waist dress 198–201pattern alterations 57, 61, 62, 63sequin and bead embellishment 270–1short sleeveless shift dress 170–3short-sleeved shift dress 161–3short-sleeved waisted dress 179–80sleeveless empire waist dress 195–7sleeveless shift dress 167–9sleeveless waisted dress 181–4square-neck shift dress 164–6waisted cocktail dress 185–9dressmaker’s dummy 25, 116dressmaker’s pins 15duchesse satin 43dupioni 44Eedgesfacings 96–7seams 84–6, 90sleeves 107–8waistbands 103see also hemselastic 23repairing/replacing 261elastic thread 16embroidery foot 28embroidery scissors 13, 20embroidery thread 17emergency sewing kit 24extra-fine pins 15extra-long tapes 18eyelet 39eyeshand-worked 126hooks and eyes 22, 126–7Ffabrics 34–49cotton 39–42cutting out 70–7grain 70linen 46–7nap 70, 71, 73preparation 70, 71silk 43–5straight edge 71synthetic fabrics 48–9wool 36–8facings 95–100armholes 98–9bias binding 96construction 95cuffs 110–11fly-front zippers 121interfacings 95neatening 96–7neck 95, 97–8, 99sleeve openings 110waistlines 100fancy weave linen 47fasteners 22buttons and buttonholes 22, 123–5hooks and eyes 22, 126–7snaps 22, 127Velcro™ 22zippers 13, 119–22flannel 37flaps, pocket 112flat fell stitch 81flexible rulers 18flowerhead pins 15fly-front zippers 121French seams 85fringes 23fur fabrics, synthetic 49fusible interfacings 94, 95fusible patches 258–60Ggabardine 37garments 128–251customizing 262–75dresses 154–201jackets 236–53pants 202–17skirts 130–53tops 218–35gathered sleeves 106gathers 93gingham 41glass-headed pins 15grain, fabric 70Hhabutai 44hand stitches 80–1back stitch 80hem stitches 81basting stitches 81locking stitch 80prick stitch 81running stitch 81height, measuring 54hem stitches 81blind hem stitch 81flat fell stitch 81herringbone stitch 81slip hem stitch 81hems 116–18bias-bound hems 117curved hems 118difficult fabrics 118double-turn hems 118hand-stitched hems 116–18machine-stitched hems 118marking a hemline 116serged finish 116pattern alterations 58pinked finish 117sleeves 107zigzag finish 117see also edgesherringbone stitch 81hip pockets 115hipsmeasuring 54–5pattern alterations 56, 62–3, 67toile alterations 68, 69Hong Kong finish 86hooks and eyes 22attaching 126–7hand-worked eyes 126horizontal buttonholes 125household pins 15Iinside leg, measuring 55interfacings 94, 95applying to facings 95fusible 94, 95nonfusible 94invisible zipper foot 29invisible zippers 122ironing boards 32–3irons 33Jjackets 236–53boxy jacket with collar 242–5classic boxy jacket 238–41, 304–7classic shawl collar jacket 246–50, 308–11lined shawl collar jacket 251–3jeans: turning jeans into a skirt 266–7jersey 41Kkeyhole buttonhole stitch 83, 125knitted fabrics 48, 49Llapped cuffs 111lapped zippers 119layering a seam 89
  • 318 Indexlaying out a pattern 72–5lengthening and shortening patterns 56–9linen fabrics 46–7liningsjacket 251–3patch pocket 113liquid sealant 24locking stitch 80, 82long and short bastes 81loop turners 25Mmachine needles 28machine stitches 82–33-step zigzag stitch 82blind hem stitch 83buttonhole stitches 83decorative stitches 83locking stitch 82overedge stitch 83reverse stitch 82securing the thread 82straight stitch 82stretch stitch 83zigzag stitch 82machine-made buttonholes 125machine-stitched hems 118madras 41marking aids 13, 19, 77matka 44measurements, body 54–5measuring tools 13, 18, 24mending and repairs 254–61milliner’s needles 14mohair 36, 37muslin 39, 42toiles 68–9Nnap 70, 71, 73neatening facings 96–7bias binding 96serged edges 97pinked edges 97zigzagged edges 97neatening seams 84–5, 863-thread serger stitch 854-thread serger stitch 85Hong Kong finish 86pinked edges 84zigzagged edges 84neckbias-bound edges 99facings 95, 97–8, 99measuring 55needle threaders 13, 14automatic 14, 26wire 14needles 12, 14machine needles 28serger needles 30threading 80nonfusible interfacings 94notches, marking 76notching 89notions 13, 22–3see also boning; buttons; elastic; snaps;trimmingsOone-way fabric designs 70, 71, 73organza 32, 45outside leg, measuring 55overedge foot 28overedge stitch 83serger 30–1needles 30serger foot 30threading 24serger stitches 30serger thread 17Ppants 202–17classic palazzo pants 210–15, 296–9classic tailored pants 204–7, 294–5hooks and eyes 127pattern alterations 57, 66–7tapered capri pants 208–9wide-leg shorts 216–17see also waistlinespaper scissors 21patch pockets 113pattern envelopes 52pattern paper 25patterns 50–77, 276–311altering 56–67layout 72–5multisize patterns 53, 56pinning the pattern to the fabric 72reading 52–3single-size patterns 53sizes and measurements 54–5symbols 53, 72, 76toiles 68–9see also cutting outpearl-headed pins 15pin cushions 12, 15pinking shears 21hem finishes 117neatening facings 97neatening seams 84pins 13, 15plain seams 84pockets 112–15adding pockets to a dress 268–9flaps 112front hip pocket 115in-seam pocket 114lined patch pocket 113polyester all-purpose thread 16polyester fabrics 49pressing aids 13, 32–3pressing cloths 32pressing darts 92pressing mats 33pressing mittens 33prick stitch 81printed linens 47puff sleeves 106Qquilting needles 14Rrayon 49reading patterns 52–3reinforced corners 88retractable tapes 18reverse stitch 82ribbon trim 23, 274–5fraying, preventing 24threading 25rickrack trim 23round-end buttonhole stitch 83, 125run and fell seams 85running stitch 81Ssafety pins 12, 15satin 45scissors and shearsbent-handled shears 21cutting shears 12, 20embroidery scissors 13, 20paper scissors 21pinking shears 21snips 20trimming scissors 20seam rippers 13, 21, 256seam rolls 32seamsbust seams 60corners 87–8curves 60, 88, 89–90
  • 319French seams 85in-seam pockets 114layering 89neatening 84–6, 90pattern alterations 60plain seams 84reducing seam bulk 89–90run and fell seams 85sheer fabrics 86split seams, repairing 258securing threads 80, 82self-threading needles 14selvage 70, 71sequins and beads 270–1sewing gauges 12, 18sewing kitbasic kit 12–13emergency kit 24sewing machines 26–7accessories 28–9sharps 14sheer fabrics, seams in 86shirt collar 101–2shirting 42shouldersmatching stripes or checks 74measuring 55pattern alterations 64toile alterations 68, 69shrinkage 70silk 43–5silk thread 16skirts 130–53attaching to bodices 93button-front A-line skirt 136–7classic A-line skirt 132–5, 280–1classic pleated skirt 146–51, 284–5classic tailored skirt 138–42, 282–3lengthening a skirt with a contrast band264–5matching stripes or checks 74pattern alterations 57, 60–1, 62–3tailored evening skirt 143–5topstitched pleated skirt 152–3turning jeans into a skirt 266–7see also waistlinessleeves 105–11bound openings 109cuffs 110–11elasticated sleeve edge 108faced openings 110fitted sleeves 65hems 107pattern alterations 56, 65puff sleeves 106set-in sleeves 105slip hem stitch 81snaps 22, 127snips 20stitcheshand stitches 80–1machine stitches 82–3securing threads 80, 82serger stitches 30unpicking 256straight stitch 82straw needles 14stretch stitch 83striped fabrics 70, 71matching 74, 75suiting linen 47synthetic fabrics 48–9TT-shirt: flower embellishment 272–3taffeta 45tailor’s chalk 19tailor’s ham 33tailor’s bastes 76, 77tape makers 25tape measures 12, 18tapestry needles 14tartan 38tears, mending 258–60thimbles 13, 25threads 13, 16–17securing (hand stitches) 80securing (machine stitches) 82tangles, preventing 24threading the needle 80toiles 68–9tools and materials 10–33basic sewing kit 12–13cutting tools 13, 20–1marking aids 13, 19measuring tools 13, 18, 24needles and pins 12, 13, 14–15notions 13, 22–3serger 30–1pressing aids 13, 32–3sewing machines and accessories 26–9threads 13, 16–17useful extras 13, 24–5tops 218–35classic princess-line blouse 228–32, 302–3classic shell top 220–3, 300–1long-sleeved tunic 226–7short-sleeved blouse 233–5topstitching 90topstitching thread 17tie-neck top 224–5trace bastes 76tracing paper 19, 77tracing wheels 19, 77trimming scissors 20trimmings 23fraying, preventing 24tweed 38tweezers 24Uultra-glide foot 29understitching seams 90unpicking stitches 256VVelcro™ 22velour 71velvet 42, 71vertical buttonholes 125viscose see rayonWwaist, measuring 54waistlinesdarts 91, 92edges, finishing 103facings 100gathers 93pattern alterations 60–2, 66straight waistband, attaching 103–4toile alterations 68walking foot 29warp yarns 70water/air-soluble pens 19weft yarns 70wool fabrics 36–8wool worsted 38Zzigzag stitch 82hem finishes 117neatening facings 97neatening seams 84zipper foot 29zippers 13, 119–22broken zipper, repairing 261centered zippers 120invisible zippers 122fly-front zippers 121lapped zippers 119
  • 320 AcknowledgmentsAlison Smith trained as an Art and Fashion Textile Teacher before becoming Head of Textiles atone of the largest schools in Birmingham, England. Alison left mainstream teaching to have afamily, but missed teaching so much that she soon established the Alison Victoria School ofSewing. The school is now the largest of its kind in the UK, with students attending from allover Europe and beyond. Alison specializes not only in teaching dressmaking but also tailoringand corsetry. In addition to her own school, Alison lectures at various sewing shows across theUK. Alison has brought her passion for sewing to TV, on series such as From Ladette to Lady.Alison lives in Leicestershire with her husband Nigel and has two adult children.AUTHOR’S ACKNOWLEDGMENTSNo book could ever be written without a little help. I would like to thankthe following people for their help in making all the garments: JackieBoddy, Averil Wing, Jenny Holdam, Christine Scott, Angela Paine, andJoan Culver. My darling husband, Nigel, and our children, Kathryn andOliver, for all their support and endless cups of tea! Thanks must also goto the companies that have continued to support me: Janome UK, CoatsCrafts, Fruedenberg-nw, Fabulous Fabric, Simplicity patterns, and MIG.Thank you to my editors Laura Palosuo—and Hilary Mandleberg, who Ithink I have inspired to take up sewing again!DK ACKNOWLEDGMENTSDK would like to thank all the people who helped in the creation of thisbook: Alison Shackleton for art direction, and Paula Keogh for skills assewing technician on the first photo shoot; Jane Ewart for art directionon the second photo shoot, Ruth Jenkinson and her assistant Carly forphotography, and Rebecca Fallowfield for production assistance. We areimmensely grateful to our models Kate and Charlotte. A big thank yougoes out to Bob at MIG for demystifying the art of pattern creation.Finally, we would like to thank Claire Cross for editorial assistance,Angela Baynham for proofreading the book, and Marie Lorimer forcreating the index.about the authorAcknowledgments