Disability Equality
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With its focus on disability equality theory and the medical and social models of disability, this programme encourages participants to think about how they can tackle disability discrimination at ...

With its focus on disability equality theory and the medical and social models of disability, this programme encourages participants to think about how they can tackle disability discrimination at work. It promotes an organisational response, helping teams to enable the fuller participation of disabled people. By removing physical, attitudinal and systemic barriers and fostering an understanding of disablism, participants are more able to address cultural change within their organisations. Furthermore, the approach to changing environment and culture is consistent with other current theories and guidance that are applied widely across our services.

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Disability Equality Presentation Transcript

  • 1. A Different Perspective on Disability Laura (Mole) Chapman
  • 2. WelcomeWithout certain groups represented in the room, we miss out on the voices we need to hear in order to change.
  • 3. Ground RulesAgreed understandings or socialcontract? What do you need to participate?
  • 4. Shared Outcomes:• Hopes and fears:
  • 5. Respectful languageDisability... the disadvantage or restriction of activity caused by contemporary social organisation which takes little or no account of people who have physical impairments and thus excludes them from the mainstream of social activities. (the Union for of Physically Impaired Segregation1976)
  • 6. Respectful languageImpairment, disabled people use this term to talk about their medical condition or diagnosis or description of their functioning—if there is nothing more formal.
  • 7.   Quadriplegia Examples of Polio Impairment Cerebral palsy Blindness Deafness  Buildings without Examples of ramps Disability Poor health provision Bullying, name-calling Segregated education Workplaces without lifts
  • 8. Respectful language• The person—their name.• Impairment = Functioning• Disability = barriers in society
  • 9. Respectful languageFred Brown (the person) is a man with cerebral palsy (the impairment). When the barriers and discrimination (the oppression) that restrict Fred have been removed from society, Fred will no longer be disabled, but he will still have cerebral palsy and be called Fred.
  • 10. Eastenders Corrie
  • 11. CSIShrek
  • 12. Disability Today?Richard Hawkes, Scope, said the figures were"alarming".•Hundreds of thousands of disabled peoplewill be forced into a cycle of long-termunemployment, poverty and social exclusion.•Disabled people must not be pushed even further backwards in our society by the pursuit of deficit reduction.
  • 13. Culture Change Welcome Invitation Tolerance Acceptance Single /other Diverse Deficit Assets Barriers Boundaries Rigid rules Flexible Principles Compliance Commitment Improvement TransformationChapman, L. 2010 pg. 26
  • 14. DisabilismThe disadvantage or restriction of activity caused by contemporary social organisation which takes little or no account of people who have impairments and thus excludes them from the mainstream of social activities.
  • 15. Articulating DisablismFred Brown (the person) is a man with cerebral palsy (the impairment). When the barriers and disablism (the oppression) that restrict Fred have been removed from society, Fred will no longer be disabled, but he will still have cerebral palsy and be called Fred.
  • 16. Disabling Assumptions The characteristics of disablism
  • 17. OutcomesFeeling Action
  • 18. The Facts• Visually impaired people are four times more likely to be verbally and physically abused than sighted people• People with mental health issues are 11 times more likely to be victimised• 90% of adults with a learning difficulty report being bullied. Scope 2008
  • 19. Compared with non-disabled people, disabled people are:• more likely to be economically inactive – only one in two disabled people of working age are currently in employment, compared with four out of five non- disabled people;• more likely to experience problems with hate crime or harassment – a quarter of all disabled people say that they have experienced hate crime or harassment, and this number rises to 47% of people with mental health conditions;
  • 20. "on the experience of disability, history islargely silent, and when it is discussed at all, it is within the context of the history of medical advances. Just as women and black people have discovered that they must write their own histories, so too with disabled people.” Oliver and Campbell 1996
  • 21. The Medical Model of disability the personal domain• Medical approach to the problem.• Defined by non-disabled professionals• Equated to illness in terms of research and findings.• Care and benefits have been awarded to compensate for personal tragedy.
  • 22. The Social Model of Disability the public domain• The problem owned by the whole community.• It defines the problem in terms barriers: attitudinal, structural and systemic.• Acknowledges the oppression and a requirementfor action.• It recognises disabled people’s voice in distributed or shared leadership.
  • 23. Social JusticeAs stated by Prof. West-Burnham:The principle of equality has to be reinforced and extended by the practice of equity.Equality: every human being has an absolute and equal right to common dignity and parity of esteem and entitlement to access the benefits of society on equal terms.Equity: every human being has a right to benefit from the outcomes of society on the basis of fairness and according to need.Social justice: justice requires deliberate and specific intervention to secure equality and equity. (Chapman, L. and West-Burnham, J. 2010, pg.26)
  • 24. Inclusive practice:Inclusion is a process of identifying and breaking down barriers which can be environmental, attitudinal and institutional. This process eliminates discrimination thus providing all participants with equal access.Is an ongoing process of reviewing and developing practice in order to adjust and celebrate diversity. It is the journey not the destination!(Chapman, L. 2006, pg 4. Unpublished)
  • 25. Growth and Capacity building
  • 26. Barriersattitudinalstructural systemic
  • 27. Equalities Act• Eliminate unlawful discrimination,harassment and victimisation andother conduct prohibited by the Act.• Advance equality of opportunitybetween people who share a protectedcharacteristic and those who do not.• Foster good relations between peoplewho share a protected characteristicand those who do not.
  • 28. Co-ProductionOn a societal level, Co-Production entailsa simple but profound shift inrelationships... Co-Production may meanthe active process of remedying orpreventing whatever would violate oursense of social justice. A social justiceperspective elevates the principle to anImperative’ (Cahn, 2000, p 34-35).
  • 29. PracticeGather evidenceWhat does your community look like?What evidence are you basing this on?What evidence do you need to gather?The change from ‘impact assessment’ to ‘analysis of the effects’ tofocus attention on the quality of the analysis and how it is used indecision-making, and less on the production of a document.
  • 30. PracticeEnable ‘engagement’Or co-production?How do you demonstrate participation?This can assist with development of evidence base…
  • 31. PracticeSet objectivesChallenging and achievableIssues regarding inequality are deep-seated and difficult, and it may take time to fully address these.
  • 32. PracticeInnovate:Design delivery and service
  • 33. PracticeEvaluate the difference made?What works?Who is better off?Shared ownership???
  • 34. Vision and Ethical commitment• To address inequality the approach will need to value everyone’s experience.• Rather than one-off and costly changes, it requires a shift in organisational culture so that people are universally entitled to contribution.A Different Perspective on Equality, pg. 31
  • 35. Positive and Possible• Everyone can do something to contribute towards greater fairness, while not everyone will do the same thing in the same way.• The challenge then is to accept that the change is possible if people are able to appreciate a whole diversity of positive actions.• Rather than a step-by-step approach or a scale of difficulty, an acceptance of diverse routes to a more human experience.A Different Perspective on Equality, pg. 35
  • 36. Good bye! …on Facebook or Twitter For free materials:www.equalitytraining.co.uk