Storyboarding

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Storyboarding

  1. 1. Stories    Stories  can  be  told  in  many  different  ways—word  of   mouth,  written  word,  movies,  plays.  One  of  the  fastest,   most  universally  understandable  and  information-­‐rich   ways  to  tell  a  story  is  with  a  storyboard.      Storyboards  have  been  used  throughout  history  to  depict   events  through  pictures.  Even  when  created  very  quickly,   storyboards  can  convey  a  wealth  of  information,  showing   a  particular  order  of  events  in  an  interesting  and  easy-­‐to-­‐ understand  way.  (Sova,  2006)  
  2. 2. Storyboards  
  3. 3. How  to  Storyboard?    Tools    Framing  &  Angles    Storyboard  Language    Editing    Planning    Drawing    Tips  &  The  Rule  of  Thirds  
  4. 4. Tools    Light  Table  /  Box    Wooden  Mannequin    Pictures  for  Reference    Pencil,  paper  etc…  
  5. 5. Framing  /  Shot  Length    Extreme  Long  Shot  –  ELS  
  6. 6. Framing  /  Shot  Length    Long  Shot  -­‐  LS  
  7. 7. Framing  /  Shot  Length    Medium  Shot  -­‐  MS  
  8. 8. Framing  /  Shot  Length    Close-­‐up  –  CU  
  9. 9. Framing  /  Shot  Length    Extreme  Close-­‐up  –  EC  
  10. 10. Framing  /  Shot  Length    Medium  Close-­‐Up  –  MCU  
  11. 11. Framing  /  Shot  Length    Two-­‐Shot  
  12. 12. Framing  /  Shot  Length    Over-­‐the-­‐Shoulder  Shot  
  13. 13. Angles    Bird’s  Eye  View  
  14. 14. Angles    High  Angle  
  15. 15. Angles    Low  Angle  
  16. 16. Angles    Eye  Level  
  17. 17. Angles    Oblique  /  Canted  Angle  
  18. 18. Storyboard  Language    PAN:    A  steady,  sweeping  movement  from  one  point  in  a  scene   to  another.     TILT:    Using  a  camera  on  a  tripod,  the  camera  moves  up  or   down  to  follow  the  action.     ZOOM:    Use  of  the  camera  lens  to  move  closely  towards  the   subject.    DOLLY:  A  camera  dolly  is  a  specialized  piece  of  film  equipment   designed  to  create  smooth  camera  movements  on  the   horizontal  axis.    POV  (point  of  view  shot):  A  shot  which  is  understood  to  be  seen   from  the  point  of  view  of  a  character  within  the  scene.  
  19. 19. Storyboard  Language    DISSOLVE:  A  transition  between  two  shots,  where  one  shot   fades  away  and  simultaneously  another  shot  fades  in.     FADE  -­‐  A  transition  from  a  shot  to  black  where  the  image   gradually  becomes  darker  is  a  Fade  Out;  or  from  black  where   the  image  gradually  becomes  brighter  is  a  Fade  In.    JUMP  CUT:  A  rapid,  jerky  transition  from  one  frame  to  the  next,   either  disrupting  the  flow  of  time  or  movement  within  a  scene   or  making  an  abrupt  transition  from  one  scene  to  another.    HAND-­‐HELD:  unsteady  camera  –  no  tripod,  Hand  held  cameras   denote  a  certain  kind  of  gritty  realism,  and  they  can  make  the   audience  feel  as  though  they  are  part  of  a  scene,  rather  than   viewing  it  from  a  detached,  frozen  position.    
  20. 20. Storyboard  Language    REACTION  SHOT-­‐  1.:  A  shot  of  someone  looking  off   screen.  2.:  A  reaction  shot  can  also  be  a  shot  of  someone  in   a  conversation  where  they  are  not  given  a  line  of  dialogue   but  are  just  listening  to  the  other  person  speak.    CRANE  SHOT:  Basically,  dolly-­‐shots-­‐in-­‐the-­‐air.  A  crane  (or   jib),  is  a  large,  heavy  piece  of  equipment,  but  is  a  useful   way  of  moving  a  camera  -­‐  it  can  move  up,  down,  left,  right,   swooping  in  on  action  or  moving  diagonally  out  of  it.      AERIAL  SHOT:  exciting  variation  of  a  crane  shot,  usually   taken  from  a  helicopter  
  21. 21. Editing    Although  editing  happens  in  post-­‐production  for  live  action   films,  storyboards  function  to  draw  up  an  initial  plan  for  editing.   For  animation,  almost  all  of  the  most  important  editing   decisions  are  taken  at  the  storyboarding  phase,  since  there  is  no   additional  coverage  -­‐  animators  will  only  draw  or  render  what  is   planned  in  the  storyboards  and  layout.    Although  there  are  a  few  editing  symbols  that  you  should  learn   to  use  when  storyboarding,  Primarily  you  should  be  thinking   about  editing  in  terms  of  the  decisions  you  make  regarding  the   continuity  (or  not)  between  individual  shots,  their  sequence  and   the  rhythm  of  the  sequence  as  a  whole.    
  22. 22. Planning    Plan  first.  Before  you  start  any  detailed  drawing  of  the   mise  en  scene,  it  is  very  important  that  you  should  plan   your  shots  and  editing  in  detail.    Before  drawing  anything,  annotate  your  blank  storyboards   in  pencil.  Use  the  space  alongside  the  storyboard  to  write   down  the  shots  that  you  want  for  the  sequence.    Now  sketch  the  shot  very  lightly  in  pencil  -­‐  use  stick  figures   without  any  detail.  Review  the  whole  sequence  of  shots  -­‐   try  to  imagine  what  it  will  look  like  when  filmed.  Make  any   changes  to  improve  the  shot  flow.    
  23. 23. Drawing    Whatever  your  purpose,  your  storyboards  will  benefit  from   the  confidence,  fluidity,  and  improvements  in  perception   brought  by  extensive  drawing  practice.      You  can  also  get  by  with  posing  and  taking  photographs  of   artists  wooden  mannequins  or  using  3D  figure  creation   software  such  as  Poser  (some  storyboard  artists  even   report  using  Barbie  and  Ken  dolls!)  
  24. 24. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  25. 25. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  26. 26. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  27. 27. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  28. 28. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  29. 29. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  30. 30. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  31. 31. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  32. 32. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  33. 33. Tips  from:  http://theartcenter.blogspot.com  
  34. 34. Rule  of  Thirds     Unless  your  subject  is  perfectly  symmetrical,  the  screen   should  never  be  divided  exactly  in  half  by  strong  horizontal   or  vertical  lines.  Instead,  it  should  be  divided   approximately  into  thirds.      For  example,  the  horizon  (if  youre  shooting  a  corn  field)   should  be  either  a  third  of  the  way  from  the  bottom  of  the   screen  or  a  third  of  the  way  from  the  top.  With  the   exception  of  titles,  composition  should  not  be  perfectly   symmetrical,  but  should  rather  balance  positive  and   negative  (filled  and  empty)  space  
  35. 35. Too  Low…Too  High  
  36. 36. Rule  of  Thirds  
  37. 37. Rule  of  Thirds  
  38. 38. Rule  of  Thirds  
  39. 39. Rule  of  Thirds  
  40. 40. Rule  of  Thirds  
  41. 41. Rule  of  Thirds  
  42. 42. Rule  of  Thirds  

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