Cec top 10_profiles
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Cec top 10_profiles

  • 679 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
679
On Slideshare
679
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Semi Established Champions Hong Community: Reinventing Sundanese Folk Toys and Folk Games to Promote Educational Eco‐Tourism  Despite its rich cultural heritage, over time many of the  traditional Sundanese folk toys, and the stories about  them, have been lost. Modern toys and games are often  too expensive for the average Indonesian family.  Working with the Hong Community based in kampung  Dago Pakar, Bandung, university lecturer and child  educator Zaini Alif is following a radical path by  reinventing Sundanese folk toys and reengineering folk  games. The Hong Community found that Indonesian folk  toys have become increasingly rare in the market. Only a  few craftsmen remain who produce folk toys, and only a  M. Zaini Arif - Hong handful of these conform to international child‐safety  Community standards.  By producing and marketing toys (mostly from bamboo and wood) that meet safety standards, the Hong Community intends to promote Sundanese folk games to improve local tourism. It also plans to replicate this community enterprise model for cultural conservation in other ethnic groups and regions across Indonesia. Decisions on the production and marketing of toys will be made through a forum involving all community members represented in a foundation. This foundation will form a cooperative that is mainly involved in the business development of craft making and folk performances. Strategic direction will be charted by the foundation, while the day‐to‐day operation of the enterprise will be managed by the cooperative.  All craftsmen working for the community will be members of the cooperative and will thus be involved in decision making for of this social enterprise. The short‐term impacts of this project will be an improvement of the incomes of traditional craftsmen in Dago Pakar village, an improvement of their skills in standardized product development and technology. These impacts will strengthen the public acceptance and recognition of traditional toys and games in the region.  The long‐term aims of this project include the provision of a social enterprise model for product development by other craftsmen in other communities; the conservation of Sundanese culture as a valuable aspect of national heritage; as well as the provision of cost‐saving and creative alternatives to expensive/modern toys and games for children.  Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/agf_bc_cec/sets/72157624974180055/   
  • 2. CV Outreach International Bioenergy: Alleviating Poverty through Jatropha Curcas Cultivation  For many years Flores Island has been recognised for its  low‐income farmers. Most of Flores is not suitable for  common food crops because of the low annual rainfall in  the region. Compounding this situation is the fact that so  far no strategies have been successful in improving  poverty indicators among these farmers.   A comprehensive effort is needed to transform non‐fertile  land into productive land, with various means.   CV Outreach proposes an integrated community  development programme, based on several years of  research and development work in Flores, including in  agribusinesses such as growing jatropha seeds, teakwood  Elias T. Moning - CV and farming honey bees.    Outreach CV Outreach will partner with the local farmer cooperative, providing orientation for its programme and technical assistance and guidance, from planting through to harvest.  Under this scheme, Outreach will provide jatropha seeds, while farmers will provide land. Outreach will then buy the products of the farmers’ harvests. In addition to buying the jatropha seeds, the company will return 10 percent of its profits to the farmer cooperative, from the sale of jatropha oil.   In combination with their jatropha plantations, farmers would be able to grow teakwood and farm honeybees, which they would manage and harvest independently, helping them act as independent entrepreneurs.  Since farmers are members of the cooperative, they will automatically be involved in decision making for the enterprise through cooperative board meetings. Local farmers income‐generating capacities will improve with the addition of multiple sources of income, for example from honey and livestock, while they will also gain new skills in jatropha farming and additional income from harvesting jatropha and teakwood.  What has long been a neglected and low‐income farming community will have realized that their non‐fertile land can sustain them through an integrated farming strategy, and growth in the local economy will provide employment opportunities for young people and prevent migration to urban areas. CV Outreach will educate farmers on the objectives of social enterprise through field guidance and workshops. This will help keep farmers motivated to be productive, and eventually sustain their own social enterprises. CV Outreach and the cooperative will also hold an annual meeting involving representatives of the farmers’ community to discuss results of this social enterprise.  Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/agf_bc_cec/sets/72157625098952624/
  • 3. Indonesian Pluralism Institute: Marketing, Preserving Traditional Community Batik   The Indonesian Pluralism Institute (IPI) has researched  the lives, culture and the rise and fall of Lasem batik, one  of Indonesia’s most famous batik styles. Lasem is near  Rembang, in Central Java.   Once a national icon, this batik community has been faced  with deteriorating conditions since 1997. A focus on  cultural conservation has been insufficient, and economic  empowerment and industrial support for people involved  in each batik cluster is needed to restore Lasem batik to its  former glory.  To this end, IPI plans to establish a Centre for Community  Batik Marketing. This centre will provide a physical  William Kwan - IPI marketplace for traders, and serve as a centre for e‐trading. The centre will also serve as a database of specific Lasem Batik motifs.   The institute also plans to partner with Srikandi Jeruk Batik Artisans Community. For any strategic decision making, the IPI director will involve the chairperson and deputy chairperson of the Batik Artisans Community.  This enterprise will improve the batik artisan community economy and develop the community’s skills in management and entrepreneurship and create a business model for the promotion of culture and the preservation of Lasem Batik culture. To ensure the sustainability of this project, specific strategies will be implemented, including the development of a new business model with the capacity to adapt to changing situations in the future, and a mechanism to review future impacts will be established, for example through the documentation of the development of this social enterprise.  Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/agf_bc_cec/sets/72157625098962012/
  • 4. Start Up Champions  Pakpak Bharat Farmer Alliance: Empowering Farmers using Organic Waste  An alliance was founded to organize and help poor  farmers to become a self sustaining‐community.  Through research, the alliance’s technical team  discovered that the use of chemical fertilizers was a  serious problem for the community. Chemical fertilizer  is expensive since it must be shipped in from Medan,  but is also toxic and harms the natural environment.  As Pakpak Bharat Regency has been found to be highly  suitable for rabbit farming, the alliance has proposed a  means to help its farmer members develop their own  eco‐friendly fertilizer using rabbit waste. A successful  rabbit farm nearby will be utilized as a technical Sabam Malau - Pakpak Bharat resource for assistance and guidance.    Aliance Developing a rabbit farming enterprise has the potential to become a new model for community development through farming. The farmer alliance members will form a cooperative. As members of this cooperative, the farmers will have equal rights to be involved in democratic decision making at board meetings. Farmers will spend significantly less without the need to purchase costly chemical fertilizers from external sources. They will also gain innovative skills in transforming rabbit waste into useful products, namely “bokashi” fertilizer.  Based on the success of this project, other communities and regions may adopt this model to help farmers reduce their dependence on dangerous chemical fertilizers. An administrative system will be developed to enable stakeholders to verify and review the progress of this project. With detailed monitoring, this project will be evaluated using several key indicators that will include the improvement of farmers’ income, the improvement of plantation productivity, the improvement of farmers’ social enterprise etc.  Specific tools will also be designed to monitor critical assumptions that will decide the future of the enterprise. If these assumptions are challenged, farmer cooperative members will hold board meetings to discuss the situation and develop contingency plans. Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/agf_bc_cec/sets/72157625098940174/ 
  • 5.   CV Fruitanol: Empowering Farmers with Bio‐ethanol and Fertilizer Technology  Salak fruit is often overproduced and salak farmers  have experienced difficulties finding new markets for  their crops. This excess was first noted in research  findings in 1995 and reached a peak in 1998. The salak  crop in Bangunkerto village alone produces around 1  ton of salak fruit waste every month. This waste is  dumped locally, attracting flies and other insects,  creating an environmental hazard.  Dita Adi Saputra and his colleagues have developed a  pilot project to utilize this fruit in the production of bio‐ ethanol. Salak waste has a proven potential for use as  organic fertilizer. Dita has envisioned an enterprise run  by the community as a commercial vehicle to produce Dita Adi Saputra – CV Fruitanol and sell bio‐ethanol and organic fertilizer. With guidance from a team of consultants, lead by Dita, a community of Salak farmers will be involved directly in the daily operation of this social enterprise. Community heads will become the directors of this enterprise.  Decision making will involve all of the farmers, since they will be the owners of the enterprise. The directors will facilitate, direct and lead any strategic and technical meeting for the farmers’ community in running the enterprise. Farmers will receive additional income from producing and selling bio‐ethanol and organic fertilizer from their fruit waste, and will gain innovative skills in transforming waste into high‐value product. Farmers will also gain valuable tangible assets in the form of equipment, and applied technology, and the local environment will become healthier with a reduction in waste dumped in their own backyards.  Bio‐ethanol energy produced by the community will help farmers in the village and surrounding areas to become energy‐independent, replacing expensive kerosene as an energy source for cooking.  Via the multiplier effect, this enterprise will also create jobs, and improve farmers’ living standards. Some of the potential areas for job creation will be in the design, production and promotion of bio‐ethanol stoves for household use. Such stoves are clean, safe and cost‐effective.  This social enterprise will also monitor the impacts of the project, for example by conducting regular competitor and market analysis, and studying the economic development of the community.    Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/agf_bc_cec/sets/72157625098943740/
  • 6. Wangsa Jelita: Empowering Women Rose Farmers in Lembang  Women rose farmers in Lembang sell their produce  to middlemen. They have no access to markets, no  marketing skills and no other skills to add value to  their produce. They sell their roses very cheaply.  Nadya Saib has formed a pilot project to produce  natural soaps using rose petals. She has already been  successful in soap production and marketing,  including through sales to a limited network of  friends and business colleagues. To expand her  production, she has proposed a partnership with a  community of rose farmers and has received a  positive response. Nadya will provide technical  assistance and guidance to farmers in the production  of soaps, while the farmers will provide the roses.   Nadya Fadila Saib Nadya and her team will train the community in  - Wangsa Jelita how to produce natural soaps for two markets; high‐end consumer and for mass production. Meanwhile, Nadya and her team will be fully responsible for the marketing and sale of the soap produced.  Profit sharing will be determined based on mutual agreement. The technical team and rose farmers community will be equal partners in this enterprise.  The team will only provide full technical advice and marketing support to the community, while the community will produce the soaps and make their own business decisions. Decision making in this social enterprise will be democratic. Twenty‐five farmers will be divided into five working groups, with each group responsible for operational decision‐making.   For strategic decisions, all 25 farmers will be involved. In this way, rose farmers will be involved in a learning process and they will be able to run their own community based‐social enterprise. The rose farmers’ income will be improved, and several jobs will be created (for example in supplying soap materials). The community will gain new skills in value‐added production, management and marketing, and will own new tangible assets including equipment and tools for producing rose‐based natural soaps.  These farmers will also develop their own businesses and will have a marketing network enabling them to remain independent. This model for empowerment could easily be replicated elsewhere in Indonesia, especially in the agribusiness sector. Related stakeholders will carry out monitoring and evaluation of both quantitative and qualitative indicators regularly, as key mechanisms for reviewing impacts in the future. Another mechanism will be by monitoring assumptions through field observations and market surveys.  Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/agf_bc_cec/sets/72157625098948974/
  • 7. Semi Established Finalists CV Piksel Indonesia: Empowering Women Batik Artisans through Creative Tourism  CV Piksel offers a solution to a long‐standing social  problem in the batik industry, namely the large income  gap between traditional batik artisans and batik traders.   Trusmi batik village in Cirebon, West Java, is one area  where such a discrepancy can be seen. With an initial  focus on Trusmi, CV Piksel aims to use their own  internationally recognized batik fractal software to enable  traditional poor female batik artisans to develop their own  designs and keep up with market trends.  With this software artisans can spend more time  developing their own designs and less time painting batik,  Nancy Margried improving the quality of their creations while also  - CV Piksel improving their income, Pixel says. Working in collaboration with a network of hotels, CV Piksel will create an alternative marketplace for batik creators, by opening “batik corners” for tourists. Batik corners will function not only as batik sales outlets, but also provide tourists with opportunities to experience and practice traditional Indonesian batik painting skills, firsthand. With support from CV Piksel, traditional batik artisans will be able to act as batik traders and batik painting instructors.   The artisans will be encouraged to develop hybrid batik designs combining traditional Trusmi batik motifs with contemporary fractal patterns. Selected artisans will be trained to utilize batik fractal innovation software owned and created by CV Piksel. This social enterprise will be owned and managed in equal partnership between CV Piksel and Trusmi BatikVillage Cooperative. All female batik artisans involved in this social enterprise are already members of the cooperative and, as such, would automatically be involved in decision making through the cooperative mechanism’s board meetings. The enterprise will have short‐term impacts in Trusmi by improving product‐development, marketing and IT‐utilization skills. The incomes of female batik artisans will also improve as they tap into the alternative market through this creative tourism venture.  The community will also own new tangible assets in the form of design software and hardware. A marketing network involving boutique hotels in Bandung will be developed.   This project is expected to improve the income disparity between female artisans and batik traders, narrow the technology gap between urban and rural areas and preserve local traditional culture through creative tourism. Meanwhile, the strategy 
  • 8. used to sustain these impacts in the future will be through the enhancement of stakeholders’ engagement and cooperation in the project. In this case, the existing partnership between CV Piksel and Trusmi Batik Village Cooperative will be expanded to include West Java Batik Craft Foundation to help this social enterprise gain a stronger footing in the entire West Java region. The community will also see the regeneration of professional batik artisans.  Along with the empowerment of traditional batik artisans through training and facilitation in design, IT and marketing, this project also aims to change the common perception that traditional batik production is not a well‐paid profession.  Makassar IPPM: Developing Community Economy with Insect‐Breeding Program  The Bantimurung area of South Sulawesi has long been  noted for its numerous varieties of butterfly species. Due  to the illegal poaching and forest destruction, however,  the number of these species and their individual  populations have declined significantly. As in many  conservation areas in Indonesia, environmental protection  is lacking because of local economic conditions – with  many people reliant on forest species to earn a living.  The Makassar Institute for Community Research and  Development (IPPM) proposes to involve the community  in developing a new breeding centre. Through this centre  the community will protect and preserve near‐extinct  Rusfi Idrus species, breeding common species in a shorter time and  - IPPM selling them to the public.  The centre will provide facilitators, trainers and technical assistance. The community will provide their time, energy and commitment to run the new centre. The community near Bantimurung will own the new breeding centre, operated with guidance from the IPPM. The project will improve the community economy through increased income generation from the sale of butterfly souvenirs and through job creation in the marketing of souvenirs, and provide the community with new skills in butterfly‐breeding technology. The community will also gain a tangible asset in the form of the insect breeding centre, which will help sustain this social enterprise. Near‐extinct species of the butterflies will also be protected and conserved as part of Indonesia’s biodiversity, which will serve to support regional economic development. The IPPM will engage with the community through regular meetings and will provide information about its activities in detailed progress reports. The use of field consultants will help critically review the progress of this social enterprise.  
  • 9. Start Up Finalists  Indonesia Yatimpreneurs Movement: An Integrated Training Programme for Children  The founders of Yatimpreneurs orphan entrepreneurs  organization discovered that many orphanages could not  sustain themselves on donations and charity alone. Their  research also revealed that conventional orphanages had  psychological impacts on children as charity recipients,  by nurturing a relationship of dependence rather than  self‐reliance.    Yatimpreneurs is an integrated and practical training  programme for children. The movement will partner  with larger orphanages looking to create dynamic and  entrepreneurial environments for children.   The establishment of Yatimpreneurs Academy will be a  Ridho Saiful critical milestone in the development of this social  - Yatimpreneurs enterprise. In future this movement will also work to establish Yatimpreneurs Endowment Fund to provide Yatimpreneurs Academy graduates with start‐up capital for their own enterprises. Indonesia Yatimpreneurs Movement will make strategic decisions, for example on the development of external partnerships, media communications, network development and human capital development. Once established, the Yatimpreneurs community will take over in this capacity. This social enterprise will create new employment, as new entrepreneurs will need employees to help them run enterprises, thus orphanages will be assisted through a reduction in their dependence on donations and charities. Meanwhile, children will also gain leadership and management skills as well as technical skills related to their chosen products or services.   In the long term, this program could be replicated at other orphanages willing to combine economic empowerment with human‐capital development. Once this model has been applied successfully in other regions, it will contribute to poverty alleviation across Indonesia. Here, two strategies will be applied to sustain this social enterprise; the first will be to transform the movement into a Network Centre for Orphan Entrepreneurs and the second will be to design the Yatimpreneurs Endowment Fund scheme. This hub will have four primary functions: It will serve as a centre for information, data and human resources; innovation, research and development; strategic partnership development; and the network’s financial management.   
  • 10. Urchindonesia: Alleviating Poverty in the Thousand Islands through Sea Urchin Farming  The population of the Thousand Islands regency, to  the north of Jakarta, have long depended on  traditional fishing for a living. The returns on this  enterprise are low, as the cost of fishing is high in  financial terms, since it is dependent on the use of  expensive diesel fuel.   In human terms, a fisherman needs physical and  mental strength. In bad weather conditions, fishing  over long periods does not produce sufficient  returns. This problem is common in Indonesia  where fishermen are among the poorest group in  society. Most fishermen do not have knowledge,  skills or guidance to breed fish on land.  The Thousand Islands is blessed with a natural  Yuri Pratama resource — the sea urchin. Yuri Pratama is  - Urchindonesia committed to bringing fishing communities in this region out of poverty by teaching them how to farm sea urchins.  Members of the community will be trained in integrated aquaculture management. To enable the community to interact freely with the market, Yuri also plans to help the with the establishment of a sea urchin farmer cooperative. This cooperative will manage the breeding and farming aspects of the enterprise. Meanwhile, a company in Jakarta, directed by Yuri, will act as marketing agent for overseas markets. As members of this cooperative, fishermen will be involved in decision making through board meetings. However as the project initiator, the company will play a key role in strategic decision making. The fishermen’s income will be improved, and they will gain new skills in sea urchin farming, thus narrowing the existing economic gap between fishermen and traders in the Thousand Islands.  As sea urchin farming is not well recognized in Indonesia, fishermen will have an opportunity to share their skills with their peers in other regions in Indonesia. If this project is successful, it may be used as a model for empowering poor traditional fishermen in other areas. Empowering the cooperative will be the key strategy to guarantee the sustainability of this project. The cooperative will play a key role in monitoring and evaluating any progress of sea urchin farming in the future.  Performance indicators will be set and well documented to enable the cooperative to monitor impacts. Regular consolidation meetings will be held among stakeholders that will include company, cooperative, association and government institutions to monitor assumptions that have been made.