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Maritime Security and Security Responsibilities

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Maritime Security and Security Responsibilities by Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh.

Maritime Security and Security Responsibilities by Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh.

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  • 1. Maritime Security and Security Responsibilities Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh.
  • 2. 11 September 2001 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 2 In the wake of the tragic events of 11 September 2001 in the United States of America, IMO Secretary-General William A. O’Neil, consulted Member Governments on the need to review the measures already adopted by IMO to combat acts of violence and crime at sea.
  • 3. Resolution A.924(22) (20 November 2001) • Twenty-second Assembly (November 2001): Assembly resolution A.924 called for a review of the existing international legal and technical measures to prevent and suppress terrorist acts against ships at sea and in port, and to improve security aboard and ashore. • The Assembly also contributed to the IMO Technical Co- operation fund to assist States to develop maritime security. - A call for a review of measures and procedures to prevent acts of terrorism which threaten the security of passenger and crews and the safety of ships; - A boost to the Organization’s technical co-operation programme of £1.5 million to help developing countries to address maritime securing issues. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3
  • 4. 4 BACKGROUND
  • 5. MARITIME SECURITY INCIDENTS Santa Maria- January, 1961 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 5 On January 23, 1961, a group of 24 Portuguese and Spanish opposition movement members seized control of the Santa Maria, a 609-foot-long (186 m), 20,900-ton Portuguese luxury cruise liner (600 passengers & 300 crew).
  • 6. MS ACHILLE LAURO- OCTOBER, 1985 On October 7, 1985, four men representing the Palestine Liberation Front (PLF) hijacked the Italian MS Achille Lauro liner off the coast of Egypt, as she was sailing from Alexandria to Ashdod, Israel. The hijacking was masterminded by Muhammad Zaidan, leader of the PLF 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 6
  • 7. USS COLE - OCTOBER, 2000 October 12, 2000, while refueling at a port in Aden, Yemen, the U.S. Navy destroyer Cole was attacked by two suicide bombers navigating a small motorboat full of explosives. In this incident, 17 crew members were killed and wounded 39 others. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 7
  • 8. LIMBURG – OCTOBER 2002 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 8 Further impetus was added by the attack on the tanker LIMBURG off Yemen in October 2002
  • 9. SEABOURN SPIRIT- NOVEMBER, 2005 Pirates fired a rocket-propelled grenade and machine guns on 5 November, 2005 in an attack on a luxury cruise liner “Seabourn Spirit” off the east African coast. Two armed boats approached the Seabourn Spirit about 100 miles off the coast of Somalia and fired as the boats' occupants attempted to get onboard. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 9
  • 10. M STAR - JULY 2010 • The Japanese oil tanker M Star with its damaged hull after the explosion in the Strait of Hormuz. • The report comes two days after a militant group known as the Brigades of Abdullah Azzam, which has links to al-Qaida, claimed responsibility for the attack. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 10
  • 11. Maritime Security Threats • Pilferage and Theft • Illegal migrants and stowaways • Piracy and armed robberies • Hijacking • Sabotage • Illicit drugs smuggling • Terrorism 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 11
  • 12. TERRORISM • Use of violence for political ends including violence for the purpose of putting the public or any section of the public in fear. • Premeditated, politically motivated violence perpetrated against non-combatant targets by sub-national groups or clandestine state agents. • Destroys or damages, or place a device likely to destroy or damage a ship, maritime platform, cargo or navigational facility • Knowingly communicate false information which endangers safe navigation 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 12
  • 13. ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS AND STOWAWAYS Definition: “Stowaway”. A person who is secreted on a ship, or in cargo which is subsequently loaded on the ship, without the consent of the ship owner or the master or any other responsible person and who is detected onboard the ship after it has departed from a port, or in the cargo while unloading it in the port of arrival, and reported as a stowaway by the master to the appropriate authorities FROM 1 JAN TO 31 DECEMBER 2008 494 INCIDENT REPORTED INVOLVING 2052 STOWAWAYS 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 13
  • 14. Background and History of Requirements • UN Resolutions regarding Maritime Security terrorist counter measures after September 11, 2001 • USA introduced measures at the IMO aimed to enhance Maritime Security • IMO developed and adopted new mandatory provisions to enhance Maritime Security: – Conference Resolutions – Amendments to SOLAS, Chapter V and XI – International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 14
  • 15. Background and History of Requirements • The new requirements form the international framework through which ships and port facilities can co-operate to detect and deter acts which threaten security in the maritime transport sector. Difference to safety: • this new legislation imposed for political reasons • not from demands of shipping industry 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 15
  • 16. Diplomatic Conference (December 2002) So, in 1st Conference resolution new Amendments to SOLAS • Chapter V • Chapter XI-1 • Chapter XI-2 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 16 The Diplomatic Conference on Maritime Security held at IMO headquarters in London from 9 to 13 December 2002, developed a new and comprehensive maritime security regime for international shipping. The Conference was attended by 109 Contracting Governments to the 1974 SOLAS Convention. The Conference adopted, under Conference resolution 1, changes to SOLAS including additional provisions in chapters V and XI and the creation of a new chapter XI-2 addressing security.
  • 17. Diplomatic Conference December 2002 (1) Other Conference resolutions: • Resolution 3 .- Further work by the International Maritime Organization pertaining to the enhancement of maritime security; • Resolution 4 .- Future amendments to Chapters XI-1 and XI-2 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention on special measures to enhance maritime safety and security; • Resolution 5 .- Promotion of technical co-operation and assistance; • Resolution 6 .- Early implementation of the special measures to enhance maritime security; 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 17
  • 18. Diplomatic Conference (December 2002) Conference resolution 2 International Ship & Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) Part A – Mandatory Part B - Recommendatory 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 18 The Diplomatic Conference also adopted, under Conference resolution 2, the International Ship & Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) Part A is mandatory. Part B although recommendatory, provides a process and a menu for achieving compliance with part A. [A list of the contents of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code are in the annex to the speakers handed out earlier].
  • 19. Diplomatic Conference December 2002 (2) • Resolution 7 .- Establishment of appropriate measures to enhance the security of ships, port facilities, mobile offshore drilling units on location and fixed and floating platforms not covered by chapter XI-2 of the 1974 SOLAS Convention; • Resolution 8 .- Enhancement of security in co-operation with the International Labour Organization; • Resolution 9 .- Enhancement of security in co-operation with the World Customs Organization; • Resolution 10 .- Early implementation of long-range ship’s identification and tracking; and • Resolution 11 .- Human element-related aspects and shore leave for seafarers. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 19
  • 20. When do the security measures come into force ? 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. No. 20 1 July 2004
  • 21. 21 MARITIME SECURITY REGULATIONS SOLAS AND ISPS CODE
  • 22. NEW MARITIME SECURITY REQUIREMENTS SOLAS amendments adopted in December 2002 Chapter V: -Automated Identifications Systems(AIS) Chapter XI-1: -Ship identification number -Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR) Chapter XI-2: -Measures to enhance maritime security -International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code (Parts A & B) Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002 (MTSA) New Chapter 701 in title 46 of the U.S. Code Aligned with SOLAS and ISPS Code Intend to make Part B mandatory 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 22
  • 23. SOLAS Amendments 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. No. 23 Chapter V Chapter XI-1 Chapter XI-2 AIS IMO Number CSR Application of Code Obligations of Contr. Govern. Requir. for Comp. & Ships Ship Security Alert System Threats to Ships Master s disrection Requirements for Ports Alternative Agreements Control Equivalent Arrangements Communication
  • 24. Automatic identification systems (AISs) In 2000, IMO adopted a new requirement (as part of a revised new chapter V) for all ships to carry automatic identification systems (AISs) capable of providing information about the ship to other ships and to coastal authorities automatically. - AIS to be fitted aboard all ships≥300 gross tonnage engaged on international voyages, - cargo ships≥ 500 gross tonnage not engaged on international voyages - all passenger ships irrespective of size. The requirement became effective for all ships by 31 December 2004. Ships fitted with AIS shall maintain AIS in operation at all times, except where international agreements, rules or standards provide for the protection of navigational information. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 24
  • 25. Auto ati ide tifi atio syste s o t’d The regulation requires that AIS shall: 1. provide information - including the ship's identity, type, position, course, speed, navigational status and other safety-related information - automatically to appropriately equipped shore stations, other ships and aircraft; 2. Receive automatically such information from similarly fitted ships; · monitor and track ships; 3. Exchange data with shore-based facilities. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 25
  • 26. Ship Identification Number In December 2002, the Diplomatic Conference on Maritime Security adopted a number of measures aimed at enhancing security of ships and port facilities. This included a modification to SOLAS Regulation XI-1/3 to require ships' identification numbers to be permanently marked in a visible place either on the ship's hull or superstructure. Passenger ships should carry the marking on a horizontal surface visible from the air. Ships should also be marked with their ID numbers internally. The IMO ship identification number is made of the three letters "IMO" followed by the seven-digit number assigned to all ships by IHS Fairplay (formerly known as Lloyd's Register-Fairplay) when constructed. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 26
  • 27. “hip Ide tifi atio Nu er o t’d This is a unique seven digit number that is assigned to propelled, sea-going merchant ships of 100 GT and above upon keel laying with the exception of the following: - Vessels solely engaged in fishing - Ships without mechanical means of propulsion - Pleasure yachts - Ships engaged on special service (e.g. lightships, SAR vessels) - Hopper barges - Hydrofoils, air cushion vehicles - Floating docks and structures classified in a similar manner - Ships of war and troopships - Wooden ships This number is assigned to the total portion of the hull enclosing the machinery space and is the determining factor should additional sections be added. The IMO number is never reassigned to another vessel and is shown on the ship’s certificates. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 27
  • 28. Ship Identification Nu er o t’d - Permanently marked - Visible on: * stern or side of hull or superstructure * horizontal surface for passenger vessels - Contrasting color - NLT 200 mm; width proportionate to height - raised lettering or by cutting it into or center punching (or other equivalent) 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 28
  • 29. Continuous Synopsis Record • To be issued by the Administration to each ship under its flag • In case of changes, Administration to issue amended record • To be kept on board and available for inspection at all times 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 29
  • 30. CONTINUOUS SYNOPSIS RECORD o t’d - Basic diary of ship or historical record of ship - Issued by Administration, but must be maintained and updated onboard - Information includes: * name of flag state * date of registry * ship’s ID number * name of owners * name of registered demise charterers * name of shipping company * name of classification society(ies) * name of authorities or associations issuing certifications - Left onboard with change of ownership or registry 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 30
  • 31. SOLAS NEW CHAPTER XI/2 • The new Chapter XI-2 titled “ Special Measures to Enhance Maritime Security” • Has 13 regulations on security related requirements for ships and ports. Refers to the ISPS Code Parts A and B 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 31
  • 32. OBLIGATIONS OF CONTRACTING GOVERNMENTS WITH RESPECT TO SECURITY • Administrations shall set security levels and ensure that information on security levels is provided to ships under their flag. • CGs shall set security levels and ensure that information on security levels is provided to port facilities within their territory, and to ships prior to entering a port or whilst in a port within their territory. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 32
  • 33. Requirements for companies and ships • Companies and ships : – Compliance with relevant parts of this chapter and ISPS Code Part A – Guidance in ISPS Code Part B to be taken into account • Ships : – Compliance to be verified and certified as provided for in ISPS Code Part A. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 33
  • 34. Ship Security Alert System • Required to be provided on – All ships constructed on or after 1 July 2004 – Ships constructed before 1 July 2004 : • Oil & chemical tankers, gas & bulk carriers, and cargo HS craft, of  500 GT; Passenger ships including HS passenger craft; not later than the 1st survey of radio installation after 1 July 2004 • other cargo ships of  500 GT and mobile offshore drilling units; not later than the 1st survey of radio installation after 1 July 2006 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 34
  • 35. “hip “e urity Alert “yste o t’d • Shall initiate & transmit alert to a competent authority designated by administration • Shall identify ship, its location and indicate that ship’s security is under threat • Shall not send the alert to any other ship nor raise alarm on board • Shall continue the alert until deactivated or reset • Have activation possible from bridge & at least one other location 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 35
  • 36. Ship Security Alert “yste o t’d - Performance standard; not necessarily requires new equipment installation (eg. Piracy alarm) - Silent ship-to-shore alert * activated from bridge and at least one other location * not heard by other ships * include name and location of ship - Protected from inadvertent initiation - Administration or coastal state notification requirements 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 36
  • 37. Ship Security Alert System 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 37
  • 38. THREATS TO SHIPS • CGs shall, for ships operating in or having communicated an intention to enter their territorial sea : –Ensure provision of security level information –Provide a point of contact for ships to • request advice or assistance • report any security concerns about other ships, movements or communications 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 38
  • 39. THREATS TO SHIPS • Where a risk of attack has been identified, the CGs shall advise the ships concerned and their administrations of –Current security level –Security measures that the coastal state has decided to put in place and those that the ships concerned should put in place. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 39
  • 40. THREATS TO THE PORTS - Criminals - Insiders such as military members, ship’s crew, contractors, civilians, etc. - Groups opposed to country policies or actions - Terrorist organizations and/or individuals - Piracy 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 40
  • 41. MA“TER’“ DISCRETION FOR SHIP SECURITY • Master shall not be constrained, by the Company or others, from taking or executing any decision which, in his professional judge e t, is e essary to ai tai the ship’s safety and security. • This includes denial of access to persons (except those identified as duly authorized by a CG) or their effects, refusal to load cargo including containers or other closed cargo transport units. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 41
  • 42. CONTROL AND COMPLIANCE MEASURES • Controls for ships in a port of another CG : – Such ships are subject to control by officers duly authorized by that CG, who may be same as those carrying out functions of Reg. I/19. – Such controls shall be limited to verifying availability on board, of a valid ISSC or Interim ISSC issued under provisions of Part A of ISPS Code. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 42
  • 43. CONTROL AND COMPLIANCE MEASURES • A valid certificate shall be accepted unless there are clear grounds for believing that the ship is not in compliance with requirements of this chapter or Part A of ISPS Code. • Where no valid cert is produced or when there are such clear grounds, the officers duly authorized may impose control measures. Such measures must be proportionate, taking into account guidance in Part B of ISPS Code. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 43
  • 44. CONTROL AND COMPLIANCE MEASURES • Possible control measures : –Inspection of the ship –Delaying or detention of the ship –Restrictions of operations including movement within port – Expulsion from port –Additionally or alternatively, other lesser administrative or corrective measures. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 44
  • 45. CONTROL AND COMPLIANCE MEASURES • Ships intending to enter a port of another CG : – May be required to provide relevant information to officers duly authorized, before entering the port. – Such information includes the following : • Confirmation of possession of valid certificate • Current security level on board • Security level operated in and any special or additional security measures taken in any previous port • Other practical security related information 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 45
  • 46. CONTROL AND COMPLIANCE MEASURES • Master may decline to provide the information requested on the understanding that this may result in denial of entry into port. • Ships shall keep records of relevant information for last 10 calls at PFs. • If, after receiving the information, officers duly authorized have clear grounds to believe that the ship does not comply with this chapter os ISPS Part A, the officers shall attempt to establish communication with and between the ship & its ADM with a view to rectify the non- compliance. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 46
  • 47. REQUIREMENTS FOR PORT FACILITIES • PFs to comply with relevant parts of this chapter and ISPS Code Part A; guidance in ISPS Code Part B to be taken into account • CGs to ensure that : – PF security assessments are carried out, reviewed and approved in accordance with provisions of Part A of ISPS Code – PFS plans are developed, reviewed, approved and implemented as provided for in ISPS Code Part A • CGs shall designate & communicate measures to be addressed in PFS plan for various security levels; including when a Declaration of Security is to be submitted. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 47
  • 48. ALTERNATIVE SECURITY AGREEMENTS • CGs may conclude in writing, bilateral or multilateral agreements with other CGs on alternative security arrangements covering short international voyages on fixed routes between port facilities within their territories. • Such agreements shall not compromise the level of security of other ships or of port facilities not covered by the agreement. • Any ship covered by such an agreement shall not conduct any ship-to-ship activities with any ship not covered by the agreement. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 48
  • 49. EQUIVALENT SECURITY ARRANGEMENTS • Other security measures equivalent to and at least as effective as those prescribed in this chapter or in Part A of ISPS Code may be allowed : – By an Administration on a particular ship or a group of ships entitled to fly its flag – By a CG in a particular port facility or a group of port facilities located within its territory, other than those covered by an agreement concluded under Reg. 11 • The Administration or the CG, as applicable, shall communicate to IMO particulars of any such equivalent measures allowed. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 49
  • 50. ISPS CODE Implementation
  • 51. ISPS Code: International Ship and Port Facility Security Code • Part A Mandatory requirements: – Ships / Companies – Port facilities – Administration • Part B Guidance: – Background – Compliance – Assistance 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. No. 51
  • 52. ISPS Code - Objectives • To establish An international framework involving co-operation between CGs, Govt agencies, local administrations and shipping & port industries to detect security threats and take preventive measures. • To establish respective roles and responsibilities of CGs, Govt agencies, local administrations and shipping & port industries. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 52
  • 53. ISPS Code – Functional requirements • Gathering & assessing information on security threats & exchanging it with appropriate CGs. • Requiring maintenance of communication protocols for ships & PFs • Preventing unauthorized access to ships, PFs & their restricted areas. • Preventing introduction of unauthorized weapons, incindiary devices or explosives to ships or PFs. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 53
  • 54. ISPS Code – Functional requirements • Providing means for raising alarm in reaction to security incidents. • Requiring ship & PF security plans based upon security assessments. • Requiring training, drills and exercises to ensure familiarity with security plans and procedures. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 54
  • 55. ISPS Code – Declaration of security • Declaration of security : – CGs shall determine when it is required by assessing the risk the ship/port interface or ship to ship activity poses to people, property or the environment – A ship may request completion of DOS – To be completed by the master or the SSO on behalf of ship AND PFSO or any other body identified by CG on behalf of port facility 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 55
  • 56. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 56
  • 57. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 57
  • 58. ISPS Code- Ship Security Assessment • CSO to ensure that SSA is carried out by persons with appropriate skills to evaluate the security of a ship • RSO may carry out SSA • SSA shall be documented, reviewed & retained by the Company • SSA shall include an on-scene security survey 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 58
  • 59. ISPS Code Ship Security Assess e t o t’d • SSA shall include at least the identification of : – existing security measures, procedures and operations – and evaluation of key shipboard operations – possible threats to such operations and the likelihood of their occurrence, in order to establish and prioritise security measures – identification of weaknesses, including human factors in the infrastructure, policies & procedures 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 59
  • 60. ISPS Code – Ship security plan • ADM to approve • RSO may prepare SSP for a specific ship • ADM may entrust review & approval of SSP or its amendments to RSO ( Provided that RSO is not involved in either preparing the SSA or SSP or amendments) • Shall be available on board and protected from unauthorized access or disclosure • Not subject to inspection under control & compliance measures 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 60
  • 61. ISPS Code - Records • Records of following activities addressed in SSP shall be maintained on board : –Training, drills & exercises –Security threats, security incidents & breaches of security –Changes in security level –Communications relating to the direct security of the ship such as specific threats to the ship or to port facilities the ship is at or has been …… o ti ued…… 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 61
  • 62. ISPS Code - Records (cont’d) • Internal audits & reviews of security activities • Periodic review of the SSA • Periodic review of the SSP • Implementation of any amendments to the plan • Maintenance, calibration and testing of security equipment, if any including testing of the ship security alert system 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 62
  • 63. ISPS Code – CSO and SSO • CSO and SSO : – Company shall designate a person or persons as CSO and clearly identify for which ship/s each person is responsible. CSO & appropriate shore-based personnel shall have knowledge and have received training. – A SSO shall be designated for each ship. He shall have knowledge and have received training. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 63
  • 64. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 64 Security Co-ordinator at HQ SSOs for Ships in Group A CSO for Ships in Group A CSO for Ships in Group B SSOs for Ships in Group B COMPANY (Top Mgmt.)
  • 65. ISPS Code – Training, drills & exercises on ship security • Drills shall be carried out at appropriate intervals to ensure effective implementation of the SSP, taking into account : – Ship personnel changes – PFs to be visited – Other relevant circumstances • CSO shall ensure effective coordination & implementation of SSP by participating in the exercises at appropriate intervals. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 65
  • 66. SCOPE OF APPLICATION  Chapter XI-2 of SOLAS and the ISPS Code apply to :  following types of ships engaged on international voyages : Passenger ships, including HS passenger craft Cargo ships, including HS craft, of 500 GT and upwards  Mobile offshore drilling units Port facilities serving such ships engaged on international voyages  Do not apply to : Warships & naval auxiliaries, other ships owned/operated by a CG and used only on Govt. non- commercial service. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh.
  • 67. Relevant National Legislation and Regulations • All relevant legislations and regulations of the flag State must be considered in all security operations of the vessel • CSO must take them into consideration when implementing 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. No. 67
  • 68. Examples of Relevant National Legislation and Regulations (2) • USA – U.S. Maritime Transportation and Security Act of 2002 – U.S. Maritime Security Act of July 2003 – 96-Hour Advanced Notification of Arrival – 24-Hour Advance Cargo Manifest Filing – INS Crewmember Security Plan (important) – NVIC 4-02: Security for Pax-Vessels & Passenger Terminals – NVIC 10-02: Security Guidelines for Vessels 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. No. 68
  • 69. Examples of Relevant National Legislation and Regulations (3) • Canada – Marine Transportation Security Act (1997) – Cruise Ship and Cruise Ship Facility Security Measures (1997) – Memorandum of Understanding – Cruise Ship Security (1998) • UK – Aviation and Maritime Security Act (1990) 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. No. 69
  • 70. DEFINITIONS • Company : a company as defined in regulation IX/I. • Ship/port interface : The interactions that occur when a ship is directly and immediately affected by actions involving the movement of persons, goods or the provisions of port services to or from the ship. • Ship to ship activity : any activity not related to a port facility that involves transfer of goods or persons from one ship to another. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 70
  • 71. DEFINITIONS • Port facility : A location, as determined by the Contracting Government or by the Designated authority, where the ship/port interface takes place. This includes areas such as anchorages, waiting berths and approaches from seaward, as appropriate. • Designated authority: The organization (s) or the administration (s) identified, within the Contracting Government, as responsible for ensuring the implementation of the provisions of Chapter XI-2 pertaining to port facility security and ship/port interface, from point of view of the port facility. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 71
  • 72. DEFINITIONS • Recognized security organization (RSO): An organization with appropriate expertise in security matters and appropriate knowledge of ship and port operations; authorized to carry out an assessment, or a verification, or an approval or a certification activity, required by Chapter XI-2 or by Part A of the ISPS Code. . Security incident : An suspicious act or circumstances threatening the security of a ship, including a mobile offshore drilling unit and a high speed craft, or of a port facility or of any ship/port interface or any ship to ship activity. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 72
  • 73. DEFINITIONS • Ship security officer ( SSO) : “ The person on board the ship, accountable to the Master, designated by the Company as responsible for the security of the ship, including implementation and maintenance of the SSP and for liaison with the company security officer and port facility security officers.” • Company security officer (CSO) : The person designated by the Company for ensuring that a ship security assessment is carried out; that a ship security plan is developed, submitted for approval, and thereafter implemented and maintained and for liaison with port facility security officer and the SSO.” 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 73
  • 74. DEFINITIONS • Port facility security officer (PFSO) : The perso desig ated as respo si le for the de elop e t, implementation, revision and maintenance of the port facility security plan and for liaison with the ship security officers and o pa y se urity offi ers. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 74
  • 75. ISPS Code- Security Responsibilities
  • 76. Security Responsibilities I. Contracting governments II. R“O’s III. The Company IV. The Ship V. The Port Facility VI. SSO VII. CSO VIII. PFSO IX. Vessel Personnel with specific security duties X. Facility Personnel with specific security duties XI. Other Personnel XII. CSI Example 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.76
  • 77. I. Contracting Governments 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.77
  • 78. I. Contracting Governments • Security levels: 1 – 2 – 3 • Higher security levels indicate greater likelihood of occurrence of a security incident. Governments consider different factors in setting the appropriate security level: 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.78
  • 79. I. Contracting Governments 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.79
  • 80. I. Contracting Governments • An administration requiring his ships to set SL 2 or 3 in a port of another Contracting Government shall inform that Contracting Government without delay. • Contracting Governments, when they set security level 3, shall issue appropriate instructions and shall provide security-related information to the ships and port facilities that may be affected. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.80
  • 81. I. Contracting Governments 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.81 SL 3 ! Set SL 2 (3)
  • 82. I. Contracting Governments Other responsibilities as: • Approving the SSP and subsequent amendments ; • Verifying compliance of ships with ISPS Code and issuing the ISSC ; • Determining which port facilities needs a PFSO ; • Ensuring compliance and approval of PFSA and subsequent amendments ; • Approving PFSP and subsequent amendments ; • Exercising control and compliance measures ; • Testing the approved plans (PFSP & SSP) ; • Communicating information to IMO, shipping & port industries. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.82
  • 83. II. R“O’s • Co tra ti g Go er e ts ay authorize a Re og ized “e urity Orga isatio to u dertake ertai se urity-related activities. • An RSO may advise / provide assistance to companies or port facilities on security matters. • This can include completion of an SSA or SSP or PFSA or PFSP • A recognized security organisation who completed an SSA or SSP is NOT authorized to approve that SSP. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.83
  • 84. II. R“O’s What an RSO can do : • Approval of a SSP or amendments thereto on behalf of the Administration ; • Verification and certification of compliance of ships with ISPS Code on behalf of the Administration; and • Conducting PFSA required by Contracting Government 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.84
  • 85. II. R“O’s What a R“O a ’t do : • Setting of security level ; • Determining which of the PF are required to designate a PFSO and to prepare a FFSP; • Approving a PFSA or any subsequent amendments; • Approving a PFSP or any subsequent amendments; • Exercising control and compliance measures and • Establishing requirements for a DoS. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.85
  • 86. III. The Company • The Company must designate a CSO and one SSO per ship. • The Company shall insure that the Master has documents on board relating to : - the crewing of the vessel and - the employment of the vessel. • A d … 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.86
  • 87. III. The Company 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.87
  • 88. IV. The Ship The ship must comply with the requirements of the SSP as per the security level set ! 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.88
  • 89. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 89
  • 90. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 90
  • 91. IV. The Ship 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.91 . OK Ship responsibilities in case of change to security level 2 or 3 by the Flag State “hip’s Ad i istratio : Vessel to acknowledge receipt of the instructions on change of level. Chang e to SL 2 ( or 3)
  • 92. IV. The Ship 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.92 If the vessel (at SL 2/3) enters or is in port with lower SL, ship to advise without delay the competent authority of the Contracting Government and the PFSO to coordinate appropriate actions, if necessary. Ship responsibilities in case of change to security level 2 or 3 by the Flag State (next) : SL 2 (or 3) SL1 PFSO Contracting Government SL1
  • 93. IV. The Ship 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.93 SL 2 (or 3) SL1 PFSO Contracting Government Ship responsibilities in case of change to security level 2 or 3 by other Contracting Government (CG) : Prior entering the port or in the port of the Contracting Government, ship to acknowledge receipt of instruction and to confirm to PFSO the i itiatio of the i ple e tatio of ““P’s pro edures. OK Done SL2 (or 3)
  • 94. IV. The Ship Ship responsibilities in case of change to security level 2 or 3 by Other Contracting Government (CG) : • In case of SL 3, ship to follow instructions issued by CG • Ships to report immediately any information that might affect maritime security in the area. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.94 In case ship has difficulties to implement procedures, SSO to contact PFSO to co-ordinate the appropriate actions.
  • 95. V. The Port Facility • Port facilities shall comply with the requirements of Chapter XI-2 of SOLAS and the ISPS Code • The port facility shall act upon the security levels set by the Administration within whose territory it is located. • Security measures & procedures shall be applied as to cause a minimum of interference with, or delay to, passengers, ship, ship s personnel and isitors, goods and ser ices (Part A, 14) 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.95
  • 96. V. The Port Facility At Security level 1 • Ensuring the performances of all port facility security duties; • Controlling access to the port facility; • Monitoring of the port facility, including anchoring & berthing areas; • Monitoring restricted areas to ensure that only authorized persons have access; • Supervising the handling of cargo; • “uper isi g the ha dli g of ship’s stores, a d • Ensuring that security communication is readily available. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.96
  • 97. V. The Port Facility At security level 2 Additional protective measures, specified in the PFSP shall be implemented for each activity detailed in the previous slide. At security level 3 Further specific protective measures, specified in the PFSP shall be implemented for each activity detailed in the previous slide. Part B of the Code contains a guidance re the additional and protective measures. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.97
  • 98. VI. SSO • The Company shall designate a SSO for each ship • He is responsible for the SECURITY of the ship. This includes the implementation and maintenance of the SSP, the liaison with the CSO and PFSO 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.98
  • 99. VI. SSO Duties & responsibilities of the SSO (but not limited to):  Undertaking regular security inspections of the ship ;  Maintaining & supervising the implementation of SSP;  Co-ordinating security aspects of the handling of cargo & ship s stores ith other crewmembers and relevant PFSO;  Proposing modifications to SSP ;  Reporting to CSO any deficiencies/non-conformities ;  Reporting all security incidents;  Ensuring adequate training to shipboard personnel;  Enhancing security awareness and vigilance on board  Co-ordinating implementation of SSP with CSO and PFSO;  Ensuring that security equipment is properly operated, tested, calibrated and maintained 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.99
  • 100. VII. CSO The Co pa y shall desig ate o e C“O or se eral C“O’s depe di g o the number or types of ships ; Duties & responsibilities of the CSO (but not limited to): • Advising the level of threats to ships ; • Ensuring that SSA is carried out; • Ensuring development/submission/approval/implementation & maintenance of SSP; • Ensuring modification of SSP as appropriate; • Arranging for internal audits/reviews of security activities; • Arranging initial/subsequent verifications by Administration or RSO; 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.100
  • 101. VII. CSO Duties & responsibilities of the CSO (but not limited to): • Ensuring identification of deficiencies & non-conformities; • Enhancing security awareness & vigilance; • E sure se urity trai i g for ship’s perso el; • Ensure effective communication & co-operation between SSO and relevant PFSO; • Ensuring consistency between security requirements and safety requirements; • Ensure that each plan reflects the ship-specific information accurately; 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.101
  • 102. VIII. PFSO  A PFSO shall be designated for each port facility ;  He shall be given the necessary support to fulfil his duties and responsibilities;  His tasks may include : - Conducting an initial security survey of the port facility; - The development and maintenance of PFSP; - The implementation and test of the PFSP; - The regular inspection of the port facility; - The recommendation & incorporation of modifications to the PFSP; - Enhancing security awareness & vigilance of personnel 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.102
  • 103. VIII. PFSO  His tasks may include (next) : - The training of security personnel of the port facility; - The reporting of security threats & maintaining records of occurrences; - Co-ordinating implementation of PFSP with appropriate Company & ““O’s; - Co-ordinating with security services, as appropriate; - Setting standards for security personnel; - Ensuring that security equipment is properly operated, tested, calibrated & maintained; - Assisting SSO in confirming identity of those seeking to board the ship (when requested, not a routine). 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.103
  • 104. VIII. PFSO If the PFSO is advised that  A ship is at a higher security level than the port : the PFSO shall report the matter to the competent authority and shall contact the SSO to co-ordinate appropriate action if necessary.  A ship encounters difficulties in complying/implementing the procedures detailed in the SSP (especially in case of security level 3), PFSO & SSO shall liaise and co-ordinate appropriate actions. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.104
  • 105. IX. Vessel Personnel with specific security duties Shipboard Personnel with Specific Security duties… …a d respo si ilities shall u dersta d their respo si ilities for ship security as described in the SSP and shall have sufficient knowledge and ability to perform their assigned duties. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.105
  • 106. IX. Vessel Personnel with specific security duties Their knowledge & ability should include, as appropriate : • Knowledge of security threats & patterns; • Recognition & detection of weapons, dangerous substances and devices • Recognition of characteristics & behavioural patterns of persons who are likely to threaten security; • Techniques used to circumvent security measures;- • Crowd management & control techniques; • Security-related communications; • Knowledge of the emergency procedures & contingency plans; • Operations of security equipment & systems; • Testing, calibration & at-sea maintenance of security equipment & systems • Inspection, control and monitoring techniques; • Methods of physical searches of persons, personal effects, baggage, cargo and ship s stores 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.106
  • 107. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 107
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  • 109. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 109
  • 110. X. Facility Personnel with specific security duties Port Fa ility Perso el ha i g “pe ifi “e urity duties… …shall u dersta d their duties a d respo si ilities for port fa ility se urity, as described in the SSP and shall have sufficient knowledge and ability to perform their assigned duties. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.110
  • 111. XI. Other Personnel Shipboard personnel and port facility personnel OTHER than personnel ha i g spe ifi se urity duties … … ay ha e a role i the e ha e e t of ariti e se urity … should ha e suffi ie t k o ledge of a d e fa iliar ith rele a t provisions of the SSP. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.111
  • 112. XI. Other Personnel This includes : • The meaning and requirements of the different security levels; • Knowledge of the emergency procedures and contingency plans; • Recognition and detection of weapons, dangerous substances and devices; • Recognition of characteristics & behaviour patterns of persons who are likely to threaten security; • Techniques used to circumvent security measures 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.112
  • 113. U.S. Customs and Border Protection Response to Terrorism
  • 114. CSI is one of several U.S. Customs and Border Protection responses to the events of September 11, 2001 4/24/2014 3.114
  • 115. What is CSI? • C“I, short for Co tai er “e urity I itiati e, is a program that was started by the U.S. Customs Service in early 2002. • CSI puts teams of Customs professionals in ports around the world to target containers that may pose a risk for terrorism. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.115
  • 116. Why is there risk to sea-going containers? • Al Qaeda has stated that one of its goals is to destroy U.S. economic interests. • Containerized shipping is a major vulnerability, and the global economy depends upon it. • Over 200 million cargo containers move between major seaports each year. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.116
  • 117. Why is there risk to sea-going containers? • 90% of world cargo moves by container. • In many nations such as the United Kingdom, Japan and South Korea, over 90% of trade volume arrives or leaves by sea. • In the U.S., almost half of incoming trade (by value) arrives by ship. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 117
  • 118. Why is there risk to sea-going containers? There is definite room for improvement in the area of container security. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.118(Click anywhere to continue or press <Esc> to exit this presentation)
  • 119. Intentions of CSI • Intensify targeting and screen containers at ports worldwide, before those containers are loaded and sent to their final destinations. • Include national security factors in targeting. • Provide additional outreach to U.S. industry for cooperation, idea generation, and data collection. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.119
  • 120. Key elements of CSI • Establish security criteria for identifying containers that may pose a risk for terrorism, based on advance information. • Pre-screen containers at the earliest possible point. • Use technology to quickly pre-screen containers that may pose a risk for terrorism. • De elop se ure a d s art" containers. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh.
  • 121. Key benefits of CSI • CSI significantly increases our ability to intercept containers that may pose a risk for terrorism before they reach U.S. shores. • CSI increases the security of the global trading system. • CSI facilitates the smooth movement of legitimate trade. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 3.121
  • 122. Key benefits of CSI • Protects port infrastructures. • Enhances safety and security for all. • Gives a competitive advantage to the trade. • International reciprocity. • Insurance; deterrence. 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 122
  • 123. References & websites: 1. www.imo.org (SOLAS & ISPS Code) 2. IMO Activities to enhance Maritime Security by Captain Kyung Rae Min 3. NEW MARITIME SECURITY REQUIREMENTS by USCG 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 123
  • 124. ANY QUESTION? THANK YOU! 4/24/2014 Mohd. Hanif Dewan, Chief Engineer and Maritime Lecturer & Trainer, Bangladesh. 124

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