Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Curriculum development new
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Curriculum development new

3,665
views

Published on

For teaching curriculum

For teaching curriculum

Published in: Education

2 Comments
8 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,665
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
263
Comments
2
Likes
8
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Insert a picture of the head leader of your country.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Curriculum Design. A Learner Entered Approach May , 2007 By. Rhys Andrews Planning and Organizing Curriculum
    • 2. MOHAMMEDSAREEF . K B.A., M.A.,B. Ed. ,M. Ed. , M. Phil.
    • 3. Planing and organizing curriculum
      • 1. Curriculum-Concept ,Planing and Organization
      • 2.Time Tabling and School Calendar
      • 3. Planing for Co-curricular Activities
      • 4. Planing for Teaching Aides & Multimedia Programmes
    • 4. Some animals in a forest decided to start a school. The students included a bird, a squirrel, a fish, a dog , a rabbit & a mentally retarded eel. A board was formed and it was decided that flying, tree climbing, swimming, and burrowing would be part of the curriculum in order to give a broad-based education. All animals were required to take all subjects.
    • 5. The bird was excellent at flying and was getting A's but when it came to burrowing, it kept breaking its beak and wings and started failing. Pretty soon, it started making C's in flying and of course in tree climbing and swimming it was getting F's. The squirrel was great at tree climbing and was getting A's, but was failing in swimming. The fish was the best swimmer but couldn't get out of the water and got F's in everything else. The dog didn't join the school, stopped paying taxes and kept fighting with the administration to include barking as part of the curriculum. The rabbit got A's in burrowing but tree climbing was a real problem. It kept falling and landing on its head, suffered brain damage, and soon couldn't even burrow properly and got C's in that too
    • 6. The mentally retarded eel, who did everything half as well became the valediction of the class. The board was happy because everybody was getting a broad-based education. What a broad-based education really means is that the student is prepared for life, without losing their areas of specialization or competence.
    • 7. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES OF EDUCATION 1) Individual Development (2) Social and National Development (3) Social Transformation (4) Modernaisation (5) Acquisition of values (6) Community participation (7) Universalisation
    • 8. Four pillars of education
      • Learning to live together
      • Learning to know
      • Learning to do
      • Learning to be
    • 9. The Learner Family Community Maturity Culture Gender History Supports Socio-economics
    • 10. What are Intended Learning Outcomes?
      • They are a statement of what the student should know
      • and be able to do when they complete a program or course
      • Knowledge
      • Skills
      • Attitudes
      Learning outcomes are related to the needs analysis of the student rather than the needs of the instructor
    • 11. Four important questions for curricular designers
      • What educational purposes do we seek to attain?
      • What educational experiences are likely to attain these purposes?
      • How can these be organised effectively?
      • How can we determine whether these purposes are being attained?
    • 12. WHAT IS CURRICULUM The most common definition derived from the word Latin root, which means “racecourse.”or “to run” “ Curriculum is a race to be run, a series of obstacles or hurdles (subjects) to be passed.”
    • 13. How Do We Define Curriculum? The secondary education commission says A curriculum does not mean only the academic subjects traditionally taught in the school but it includes the totality of experiences that a public receives through the manifold activities that go on in the school,workshop,play ground,library,laboratory and in the informal contacts between teachers and pupils
    • 14. How Do We Define Curriculum?
      • The whole life of the school becomes the curriculum which can touch the life of students at all points and help to form a balanced personalty
      • A curriculum is the instructional programme through the pupils achieve their goals
    • 15. What a curriculum is not
      • A list of subjects to be transmitted and learned
      • that is a syllabus
      • details of methods and times
      • that is a timetable
    • 16. What is a curriculum?
      • More than a syllabus
      • A definition:
      • “ A curriculum is an attempt to communicate the essential principles and features of an educational proposal in such a form that it is open to critical scrutiny and capable of effective translation into practice.” Stenhouse L (1975)
    • 17. How Do We Define Curriculum?
      • Curriculum is all planned learning for which the school is responsible.
      • Curriculum is all the experiences learners have under the guidance of the school.
      • John Delnay (1959.)
    • 18. How Do We Define Curriculum?
      • A curriculum is :
      • “ the public face of a profession’s best educational thinking”
      • Fish 2003
    • 19. How Do We Define Curriculum?
      • Curriculum is that which is taught at school.
      • Curriculum is a set of subjects.
      • Curriculum is content.
      • Curriculum is a sequence of courses.
      • Curriculum is a set of performance objectives.
    • 20. A curriculum will answer
      • What outcomes do we want?
      • What content is therefore needed?
      • How can that best be taught/learned?
      • How do we best assess that?
      • How do we evaluate our process?
    • 21. Components of curriculum
      • A framework of assumptions about the leaner and society
      • Aims and objectives
      • Learning experiences
      • Modes of transaction
      • Evaluation
    • 22.
      • Stating general aims, goals and objectives
      • Selection of content
      • Selection of learning experience
      • Organization and matching learning experience with context
      • Evaluation
      CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
    • 23. STAGES IN CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
      • DIAGNOSIS OF NEEDS
      • FORMULATION OF OUTCOMES
      • SELECTION OF CONTENT
      • ORGANISATION OF CONTENT
      • ORGANISATION OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES
      • DETERMINATION OF WHAT TO EVALUATE AND OF WAYS AND MEANS OF DOING IT
      • PILOT TESTING
      • REVISING AND CONSOLIDATING
      • APPROVAL BY FACULTY. SENATE AND COUNCIL
      • USE OF THE APPROVED CURRICULUM
      • PERIODIC REVIEW
    • 24. ATTRIBUTES OF CURRICULUM
      • Related to an occupation
      • Objective oriented content
      • Planned learning experiences
      • Criteria for evaluation of student’s performance
    • 25. SYLLABUS
      • List of Subjects
      • Content outline for each subject
      • Broad time Allocations
    • 26. DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SYLLABUS AND CURRICULUM
      • the needs of the students,
      • the content (in terms of specific performances) and
      • instructional methodology
      Functionally a ‘Syllabus’ is generally unidimensional in the sense it merely presents the content or the subject matter to be studied. Curriculum is three dimensional, because it takes into account:
    • 27. CONCEPTS IN CURRICULUM AND CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT CONCEPT 1. Content 2. Syllabus 3. Scope 4. Sequence 5. Aims 6. Goals 7. Outcomes 8. Core Curricula 9. Integrated curriculum 10. Teaching Resources 11. Electives
      • APPROXIMATE MEANING
      • 1. Body of knowledge contained in a course
      • 2. List of topics arranged in sequence
      • 3. The level to which a topic can be taught
      • The arrangement of topics in order
      • 5. Broad statement of what is intended to be achieved
      • 6. What is hoped to be attained
      • 7. High-quality, culminating demonstrations of significant learning processes in context
      • 8. Courses/subjects that are of absolute necessity in a programme of study
      • 9. A set of subject fused together in which the traditional boundaries between subject areas are broken
      • 10. Materials and activities used by teachers in their classroom transaction
      • 11. Courses/subjects to be elected by students
    • 28.
      • * Balance between tradition and modernity
      • * Flexible and creative
      • * Leaner-centred and activity oriented
      • * Age and stage specific
      • Individual differences
      • Relevant and life oriented
      • Wholesomeness and comprehensiveness
      Principles of Curriculum Planing
    • 29. Principles of Curriculum Planing
      • Value orientation and character building
      • Four pillars
      • National goals
      • Judicious mix of centralized and localized elements
      • Incorporating the latest developments in various field of knowledge
      • Joyful learning and curriculum load
      • Continuous , periodical change
    • 30. Aims and Objectives Every curriculum is aimed at developing in the learners certain competencies or abilities. The curriculum process must therefore clearly identify the aims that the curriculum is intended to achieve.
    • 31. Aims and Objectives
      • Curriculum aims range from the very broad to the more specific. In fact, that is why we use the terms aims, goals and objectives to refer to them. Aims are broad statements which cover all of the experiences provided in the curriculum; goals are tied to specific subjects or group of contents within the curriculum; while objectives describe the more specific outcomes that can be attained as a result of lessons or instruction delivered at the classroom.
    • 32. Knowledge (intellectual) Cognitive Domain Affective domain Attitudes (values) Skills (Manual) Psycho motor Domain Figure 4: Main categories of Human Behaviour
    • 33. Cognitive
      • KNOWLEDGE
      • UNDERSTANDING
      • APPLICATION
      • ANALYSIS
      • SYNTHESIS
      • EVALUATION
    • 34. NEW TRENDS IN EDUCATION
      • LEANER CENTRED
      • ACTIVITY BASED
      • PROCES ORIENTED –LEARNING EXPERIENCES
    • 35. NEW TRENDS IN EDUCATION
      • SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIVSM
      • MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE
      WAIGODSKI HAWARD GARDNER
    • 36. NEW TRENDS IN EDUCATION
      • Critical Pedagogy
      • Issue Based Instruction
    • 37. What is Critical Pedagogy?
      • Critical pedagogy is a teaching approach which attempts to help students question and challenge domination, and the beliefs and practices that dominate them.
      • It tries to help students become critically conscious.
    • 38. Role of School Head in Curriculum
      • 1 Plan a curriculum
      • 2 Organizing curriculum
      • 3 Implementing curriculum
    • 39. ACTIVITY BASED INSTRUCTION
      • 1 GROUP DISCUSSION
      • 2 SEMINAR
      • 3 PANNEL DISCUSSION
      • 4 SIMPOSIUM
      • 5 DEBATE
      • 6 DRAMATAISATION
      • 7 IDEA MAPPING
      • 8 PROJECT WORK
      • 9 COLLCTION etc..
    • 40. TIME TABLING
      • NEED AND IMPORTNCE OF THE TIME TABLE
      • TYPES OF TIME TABLE
      • PRINCIPLES OF TIME TABLE CONSTRUCTION
    • 41. ASSIGNMENT
      • CRITICALLY EXAMIN NATIONAL CURRICULUM FRAME WORK AND WRITE A SHORT NOTE