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Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
Implementation of International Educational Program
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Implementation of International Educational Program

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  • 1. Implementation of International Educational ProgramDr. Mohamed Fawzy Ramadan Hassanien Zagazig University
  • 2. -Program Vision, Mission, Goals and Values-Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)-Program specification-Program report-Course specification-Course report-Examples of Educational Programs
  • 3. Educational programs should be guided byVision,Mission,Goals, andValues.
  • 4. Program Vision
  • 5. Program Vision-Defining the program vision statement-A vision statement is a short and memorabledescription of what a program will look like if itsucceeds in implementing its strategies and if itachieves its full potential.-Stating a vision for a program is not a requiredstep in the assessment documentation system;however, it can be very useful in helping guidethe department in setting goals for its program.
  • 6. Program VisionThe program vision attempts to answer thefollowing questions:-What would you like the program to become?-In what direction(s) would you like the programto move?-What program outcomes would you like to see inthe future?
  • 7. Program VisionExampe of the program vision statement-The Program will be leader in the integration of(a) teaching and learning,(b) advancement of the knowledge base throughresearch and scholarship, and(c) leadership in service and outreach.-The program will be leader in preparingprofessionals who provide leadership and relatedservices to improve (skills, products..etc).
  • 8. Program Mission
  • 9. Program MissionDefining the program mission statement-Stating the mission or purpose of the program is arequired element of assessment plans.-The program mission is a broad statement of what theprogram is, what it does, and for whom it does it.-It should provide a clear description of the purpose ofthe program and the learning environment.-For a given program, the mission statement should, inspecific terms, reflect how the program contributes tothe education and careers of students graduating fromthe program.
  • 10. Program MissionDefining the program mission statement-Mission statements for academic programs shouldreflect how the teaching and research efforts of thedepartment are used to enhance student learning.-The mission should be aligned with theDepartment, College, and University missions.-It is important that the program’s mission statementsupport and endorse institutional mission.
  • 11. Program MissionDefining the program mission statement-Briefly, state the purpose of the academic program.-State the primary purpose of your program and theprimary reason(s) why you perform your major activitiesor operations (e.g. teaching, research, and service).For example, this might include, educating students toprepare them for particular jobs and/or to prepare themfor graduate school.-Indicate the primary functions or activities of theprogram.
  • 12. Program MissionDefining the program mission statement-Highlight the most important functions, operations,outcomes, and/or offerings of your program.-Indicate who the stakeholders are.-Include the primary groups of individuals for whom youare providing your program and those who will benefitfrom the program and its graduates (e.g., students,faculty, staff, parents, employers, etc.).-Does your statement distinguish you from otherprograms or units?
  • 13. Program MissionProgram Mission Checklist1- Briefly, state the purpose of the academic program.2-Indicate the functions or activities of the program.3-Indicate who the stakeholders are.4-Ensure that the mission statement clearly supports theinstitution’s mission.5- The mission should be distinctive.
  • 14. Program Mission Example of program mission statements Program name Purpose StackeholdersThe mission of Hypothetical Engineering B.Sc. degree program isto educate students from diverse backgrounds in the fundamentalskills, knowledge, and practice of Hypothetical Engineering Program Function(through courses and an internship) in order to(1) prepare them for Hypothetical Engineering positions in service or manufacturing industries and(2) prepare them for continuing for advanced degrees in Hypothetical Engineering or related disciplines.The program promotes a commitment to continued scholarship and service among graduates and will foster a spirit of innovation. Also, it promotes an environment that is inclusive and diverse.
  • 15. Program
  • 16. Program Goals-Goals are broad statements that describe the long-termprogram targets or directions of development. They statein broad terms what the program wants to accomplish (interms of student outcomes) or to become over the nextseveral years.-Goals provide the basis for decisions about the nature,scope, and relative priorities of various activities in aprogram. They are used in planning and should help movethe program to attain its vision.
  • 17. Program Goals-In order for program assessment to be successful, thedepartment must reach a general agreement on the goalsof the program and have an understanding of what theprogram is trying to accomplish, as well as how the goalsare addressed in the curriculum.-The goals of a program or unit must be consistent withthose of the school or college, and ultimately with thegoals of the institution.-It is necessary to ensure that agreement is reached onthe mission statement before developing program goals.
  • 18. Program GoalsFormat of a goal statementThe general format of a goal statement is:“To (action verb) (object) (modifiers).”a. To prepare students for graduate school.b. To have students graduate from the program with thenecessary skills and knowledge to succeed in Hypotheticalindustry.c. To prepare students to be successful in Hypotheticalindustry careers.
  • 19. Program
  • 20. Program values-Values are short statements describing the code ofbehavior to which the program adheres or aspires.-Value statements indicate what your program holdsand represents.Some examples of values include:IntegrityRespectCommunityExcellenceTrustInclusiveness
  • 21. Program values-Example of a value statementIntegrity, respect, community, and excellence are thecore values that hold together the program and guidethe conduct, performance, and decisions.-Some examples of guiding principles include:TeamworkInnovate for excellencePlanPartner for more effective operationsBuild community among students
  • 22. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)
  • 23. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)Definition-Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) are specific statements thatdescribe the required learning achievement that must be met onthe way to attaining the degree and meeting the goals of theprogram.-Program outcomes are specific statements that describe thedesired or intended learning outcomes (ILOs) of a single program.-The outcome statements should be derived from the goalstatements, which in turn should be aligned with the university’smission.-Goals are broad statements, while learning outcomes are specificand clear statements about the intended outcomes of a program.
  • 24. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)-SLOs describe specific behaviors that a student shoulddemonstrate after having completed the program.-SLOs statements should focus on the expected knowledge,abilities, values and attitudes of a student after completion theprogram. -Keep in mind when developing learning outcomes that there is a clear distinction between intended and actual outcomes. -Intended outcomes are statements of expectations. -Actual outcomes indicate the results of the assessment process. -Assessment plans should include INTENDED outcomes, statements describing what is expected from graduates of the program.
  • 25. Benefits of Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)-The following are the some of the advantages associatedwith developing and using student learning outcomes.1- Program improvement2- Identification of best practices in instruction3- Course design and revision4- Curricular assessment and change5- Increased awareness of learning (for students)6-Advising tools (for students)7-Targets for assessment and accreditation
  • 26. Guidelines for writing Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)1-SLO statements should be aligned with missionstatements (and goals if applicable).2-SLO statements should clearly indicate the level andtype of competence that is required of graduates of aprogram.-Areas/fields that are the focus of the assessment.-Knowledge, abilities, values and attitudes that a studentin your program is expected to have within thatarea/field.-Depth of the knowledge, abilities, values and attitudesexpected of a student in your program.
  • 27. Guidelines for writing Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)3-SLO statements should be distinctive and specific.4-SLO statements should be framed in terms of theprogram.5-SLO statements should be simple.6-SLO statements should describe intended learningoutcomes and not the actual outcomes.7-SLO statements should focus on the learning result andnot the learning process.8-SLO statements should be stated such that theoutcome can be measured by more than one assessmentmethod.
  • 28. Examples of learning outcome statements1- Graduates will be able to apply and demonstrate theprinciples of engineering design, formulatingrequirements, following an open-ended decisionprocess, and completing a design addressing ahypothetical engineering need.2- Ph.D. graduates of Hypothetical Engineering will beable to conduct high-quality, doctoral research asevidenced by their results of experiments andprojects, dissertations, publications, and technicalpresentations.

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