Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Admin report latest version revising formats version 10 working 2

118

Published on

Published in: Sports, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
118
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Page |1 1
  • 2. Page |3 ApublicationoftheEducationalPlanningDivision,MinistryofEducation LayoutanddesignbytheCorporateCommunicationsDivision,MinistryofE ducation ©MinistryofEducation,June2013 Allrightsreserved. Nopartofthispublicationmaybereproducedorredistributedinanyfor mwithoutthepriorwrittenpermissionofthepublishers. 3
  • 3. Page |5 Foreword “ Iknowofnomoreenco uragingfactthan theunquestionableability ofmantoelevatehislifeby conscious endeavour ” -HenryThoreau A sMinisterofEducationIampleased topresenttheachievements oftheMinistryfortheperiod1stOcto ber 2011to30thSeptember2012inaccordancew ithSection66Dof the ConstitutionoftheRepublicofTrinidadandT obagowhichchargestheHonourableMiniste rofEducationwiththeresponsibilitytosubmi ttoHisExcellencythePresidentoftheRepubli cofTrinidadandTobagoareportontheexercis eoftheHonourableMinisters‟functionsonan annualbasis. ItiswithgreatpleasurethatIreportontheseco ndyearofmystewardshipovertheMinistryw hichcommencedwiththeexecutionofthevar iousnewpolicieswhichwereestablishedasth efoundationofthenewstrategicdirectionund ertakenbytheMinistryfrom20102011,whichin essenceplacedthechildatthecentreofalliniti atives. Followingfromthestrategicassessment,anu mberofissueswereidentifiedwhichrequires hort,mediumandlongterminterventionsifth eoverarchingstrategicgoalsoutlinedintheA chievementReportare tobe realised.Moreover, thevision fortheidealchildwasidentifiedintheValue Outcomesforourchildren. Inpursuitofthevisiontherefore,theMinistrys oughttoaddressthepriorityareascriticaltoac hievingqualityeducation.Theachievements identifiedinthisreportarebasedontheseprior ityareasanddemonstratetheMinistry‟scom mitmenttothenation‟schildren. 5 5 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 4. TheMinistryhas,overtheperiodunderreview ,madegoodonitspromisetointegrateICTsint heeducationanddevelopmentprocessthrou ghitslaptopinitiative.Insodoing,itprovideda ccesstoallForm1studentstothebenefitstobe gainedfrome-learning. Underthepriorityarea,“ImprovingInfrastru ctureinSchools”,theMinistryhasbeenableto utilisemoderntechnologiestosubstantiallyr educethecostof,andthetimeframefor,school construction.Thisredoundstotheadvantage ofthestudentswhowereabletobenefitfromst ateoftheartfacilitiesbeingcompletedinrema rkablyshortertimeframes. Theconsultationprocessfortherecommende dreformoftheprimaryschoolcurriculumwas alsocompleted, andtheresultantfeedbackenabledustodevel opamorerelevantcurriculumalignedtotheac hievementofourgoals,withtheintroduction oftheContinuousAssessmentComponentof theSecondaryEntranceAssessmentexamsb eingundertaken. Reflectingonfiscalyear20112012,thetransformationoftheeducationsyst emhascertainlynotonlybegun,buthasbeco mewellentrenchedaspolicyattheMinistryof Education. Dr.theHonourableTimGopeesingh,MP MinisterofEducation AcrosstheentiresectorfromEarlyChildhooda ndCareEducation(ECCE)tosecondarylevel s,from thefiscal, administrative andpolicymethodsusedtoexecutetheMinist ry‟smandateofdeliveryandservicetothepeo pleoftheRepublicofTrinidadandTobagothr oughthecrucialeducationsector,sweepingp ositivechangeshave takenplace Wehavenodoubtaswemoveforward, thattheimplementationoftheplansandstrate giesintheMinistry‟sStrategyReport20112015,willgivenewlifetothesystemandaffor dallchildrenabetterchancetosucceed. Throughtheeffortsandsupportofthehardwo rkingmembersofourstaffattheMinistry,reco rdlevelsofachievementwereaccomplishedi nthepastyearandwe anticipatemuchmoreinthefuture.Theseachi evements,togetherwiththeplansfortheyears ahead,arehighlightedinthisAdministrativeR eportforfiscal2011-2012. AlongsidethestaffattheMinistryofEducati onandindeedalleducationstakeholders,Ire mainresoluteinmyeffortstoensurethesucce ssofeverychild.
  • 5. Page |7 Contents FOREWORD 1 EXECUTIVESUMMARY 10 INTRODUCTION 13 CHAPTER1:DESIGNANDDEVELOPAQUALITYEDUCATIONSYSTEM 1. IntegratingInformationCommunicationTechnology(ICT)inEducation-eCal LaptopInitiative 2. EarlyChildhoodCareandEducation(ECCE) 3. ImprovingInfrastructureinSchools 4. CurriculumReform 5. EnhancedLiteracyandNumeracy 6. MovementofSecondaryEntranceAssessment(SEA)fromMarchtoMay 7. ExpansionoftheTechnical/VocationalProgramme 8. TeachingandTeacherDevelopment 9. ImprovingStudentsOverallAcademicPerformance 10. TestingandNeuro-DiagnosticsofChildren 11. ContinuousAssessment 12. CareerGuidanceandDevelopmentinSecondarySchools 13. SocialProgrammes 18 CHAPTER2:TRANSFORMINGTHEMINISTRYINTOAHIGHPERFORMINGORGANIZATION 2.1 OrganizationalRestructuringandInstitutionalStrengthening 2.2 HumanResourceManagementandStrengthening 2.2.1Staffing TeachingService CivilService 48 49 50 50 51 53 CHAPTER3:ENGAGESTAKEHOLDERSINTHECHANGEANDTRANSFORMATIONPROCESS 3.1 EngagingStakeholders 3.2 CommunityParticipation 3.3 ConsultationwithECCEProviders 56 57 58 60 CHAPTER4:FINANCIALREVIEW 4.1 RecurrentExpenditure 4.2 DevelopmentExpenditure 62 63 66 CHAPTER5:THEWAYFORWARD 70 19 23 26 30 30 30 31 33 34 42 44 44 45 7
  • 6. ListofKeyBoxes,TablesandFigures LISTOFKEYBOXES Box1: PrioritiesfortheattainmentofaQualityEducationSystem 18 LISTOFKEYTABLES Table1 LocationofNineteen(19)EarlyChildhoodCareandEducationSites 24 Table2 NumberandPercentageofStudentsPlacedinSecondarySchoolsbySchoolType:SEA2008–2012 37 Table3 NumberandPercentageofStudentsinvitedtoRepeatSEA:2008-2012 38 Table4 CSEC2012:Numberofstudentsattainingfive(5)ormoresubjectsincludingMathematics andEnglishAatgovernmentandgovernmentassistedsecondaryschools 40 Table5 CAPEUnitIandII–2008–2012[GradesI–IV] 41 Table6 PilotSchoolsre: TestingandNeuro-DiagnosticsofChildrenProject 43 Table7 DistributionofmealsbylevelandcostasatMay31st,2012 46 Table8 MinistryofEducation’sFinancialAllocation(2008-2012) 62 Table9 SummaryofRecurrentExpenditurefortheMinistryofEducation(2011–2012) 64 Table10 Majorrecurrentexpenditureundersub-headsforfiscal2011-2012 65 Table11 SummaryofDevelopmentExpenditureforfiscal2011-2012 67 Table12 BudgetaryAllocationforfiscal2012-2013 68 inReport2
  • 7. Page |9 LISTOFKEYFIGURES Figure1 EducationandDevelopmentSystemModel 9 Figure2 ValueOutcomesforourChildren 16 Figure3 MinisterofEducationDr.theHonourableTimGopeesingh[centre]withstudents duringthedistributionoflaptops 19 Figure4 ParticipantsatECCEConsultation 23 Figure5 St.Barbara’sSpiritualBaptistPrimarySchool 26 Figure6 Ministry’sExecutiveTeamwiththePresentersat“TheLeaderinMe”Conference 30 Figure7 ThepercentageofStudentswhoregisteredforCSECovertheperiod2011-2012 35 Figure8 ThetotalnumberofBoysandGirlswhowroteCSECin2012 35 Figure9 CSEC2012–GradesI–IIIAwardedbySubjectEntries 36 Figure10 MinistryofEducationOfficials,CXCOfficialsandStudentsatAwardsCeremony 38 Figure11 CelebrationsattheMinistryofEducation 50 9
  • 8. Acronyms&Abbreviations AIDS AcquiredImmuneDeficiencySyndrome ASJA AnjumanSunnat-Ul-JamaatAssociation CAC ContinuousAssessmentComponent CAPE CaribbeanAdvancedProficiencyExamination CARICOM TheCaribbeanCommunity CCETT Caribbean CentreofExcellenceforTeacherTraining COLA CostofLivingAllowance CSEC CaribbeanSecondaryEducationCertificate CSO CentralStatisticalOffice CVQs CaribbeanVocationalQualifications CXC CaribbeanExaminationsCouncil DERE DivisionofEducationalResearchandEvaluation eCal e-ConnectandLearn ECCE EarlyChildhoodCareandEducation EFCL EducationFacilitiesCompanyLimited EPD EducationalPlanningDivision GCE A’Level GeneralCertificateofEducation– AdvancedLevelGCEO’Level GeneralCertificateof Education–OrdinaryLevelGDP GrossDomesticProduct GER GrossEnrolmentRatio GORTT GovernmentoftheRepublicofTrinidadandTobagoHIV HumanImmuno-deficiencyVirus IDB Inter-AmericanDevelopmentBank ICT InformationandCommunicationsTechnology JBTE JointBoardof TeacherEducation MOE MinistryofEducation MOU MemorandumofUnderstanding NCSE NationalCertificateofSecondaryEducation minReport
  • 9. P a g e | 11 NEC NationalExaminationCouncil NGOs Non-Governmental Organizations NOSTT NationalOpenSchoolofTrinidadandTobago NPTA NationalParent-TeacherAssociation NSDSL NationalSchoolsDietaryServicesLimited NTA NationalTrainingAgency PISA ProgrammeforInternationalStudentAssessment PMAP PerformanceManagementandAppraisalProcess PTA Parent-TeacherAssociation PTSC PublicTransport ServiceCorporation SEED SouthEasternEducationDistrict SESP SeamlessEducationSystemProgramme SEA SecondaryEntranceAssessment SEMP SecondaryEducationModernizationProgramme SERVOL ServiceVolunteeredforAll SSSD StudentSupportServicesDivision SSTs SchoolSupportTeams TII/III TeacherII/III TEST TertiaryEducation,ScienceandTechnology TETPPU TeacherEducationandTeacherPerformanceProjectUnitTI A TackveeyatulIslamicAssociation TML TrinidadMuslimLeague TTDD TeachingandTeacherDevelopmentDivision TTUTA TrinidadandTobagoUnifiedTeachers’Association TVET Technical/Vocational,Educationand TrainingTVI/II/III/IV Technical/VocationalTeacherI/II/III/IV UNESCO UnitedNationsEducational,ScientificandCulturalOrganisationUT T UniversityofTrinidadandTobago VPA ViolencePreventionAcademy 11
  • 10. Vision,Mission,Educationand DevelopmentoftheChild Vision TheMinistryisahighperforminganddynamicorganizationleadingaqualityeducationsystemthatisres ponsivetothediverseneedsof21stcenturylearnerstocontributetotheeducationandversatilityofholisti callydevelopedchildrenwhoareabletosatisfythehumancapitalneedsandsustainabledevelopmentofs ociety. Mission Toeducateanddevelopchildrenwhoare:abletofulfiltheirfullpotential;healthyandgrowingnormally; academically balanced; well-adjusted socially and culturally;and emotionally mature andhappy. AdminReport2-12
  • 11. P a g e | 13 AdminReport Figure1:EducationandDevelopment SystemModel 13
  • 12. ExecutiveSummary verthelasttwoandahalfyearstheMinistryofEducationon behalfoftheGovernmentofTrinidadandTobagolaidastrong foundationforthere-engineeringoftheeducationsystem. GuidedbyitsEducationSectorStrategicPlan2011– 2015andthesixteenprioritiesforthedevelopmentoftheeducationsystem,th eMinistryhassoughttobuildaqualitysystemontheblocksoftransparency, accountabilityandcollaborationwithstakeholdersandthegeneralpublic.Th roughtheprocessofpeopleparticipationandcollaboration,theMinistrysucc eededinimplementingseveralinitiativesoutlinedinitsstrategicplanandcon ceptualizedunderthesixteenpriorityareas. O
  • 13. P a g e | 15 Bythecloseoffiscal20112012,theMinistryhadmadesignificantprogressi nthemajorityofthepriorityareaswhicharehighli ghtedhere. TheLaptopInitiativeandeConnecta ndLearnProgramme Thisprogrammerepresentsacomprehensive setofprojectsintheministry‟sICTinitiativeforstu dentsand teachers. One of these initiativesisthedistributionoflaptopstostudents enteringsecondaryschools.Fortheacademic year2012-2013,seventeenthousandandfiftyeight(17,058)laptopsweredistributedtoFormIst udentswhoenteredschoolinSeptember2012.Me anwhile,eightthousandfourhundred(8,400)teac hersweretrainedinanumberofICTrelatedcourse stoequipthemwiththenecessaryskillstoinfuseI CTintotheirteaching andlearningstrategies.AstheeCalprogrammeex pands,trainingandtheprovisionofdigitalcontent forteachersandstudentsisongoingandgearedto wardsthedevelopmentofstudents‟creativity,crit icalthinkingandproblemsolvingskillsrequiredf oratechnologydrivenskillsbasedeconomy. EnsuringtheAttainmentofUniversalEarl yChildhoodCareandEducationWorkconti nuedonthemeasuresadoptedbytheMinistrytopr ovideuniversalearlychildhood careandeducationby2015.Todate,twenty nine(29)ECCECentreswereconstructedandano therfifty(50)areexpectedtobeconstructedbyAu gust2013.Theestablishmentoftheseseventynin e(79)newcentreswillresultinover 5,000additional children receiving anearlychildhoodeducation. Apartfromtheco nstructionofECCECentres,otheroptionsarebein gexploredtocreatemoreplacesforchildren, amongthem, the conversion ofspacesatunderutilizedprimaryschoolsintoEC CEroomsandapublic/privatepartnershiparrange mentwithECCEproviders.TheMinistryisalsocon tinuingitsdrivetolocatesuitable landforconstructionofmoreCentres. ImprovingandExpandingTeacherTraini ng Teachertrainingremainscriticaltothesuccessof thetransformationalinitiativessuchaschanges incurriculaandtheexpansionofeducationaloppo rtunitiesforstudents.Therearepresentlyover15, 000teachersintheschoolsystem.Coupledwithin houseprofessionaltraining,theMinistryhasbeen collaboratingwithprivatetertiaryinstitutionstod evelopcomprehensive andrelevanttrainingprogrammesforallteachers. Workisongoinginthisarea. Implementing Curriculum ReformFollowing extensive consultations bothnationallyandateachoftheeig ht(8)educationdistricts in Trinidad and Tobago involvingvarious stakeholders and members of thepublic,acomprehensivereviewoftheprimary schoolcurriculawasundertaken. An integrated thematic primaryschoolcurriculumincludingnine(9)subj ectareas (EnglishLanguageArts,Mathematics,Science,S ocialStudies,AgriculturalScience,VisualandPe rformingArts,PhysicalEducation,SpanishandV alues,CharacterandCitizenshipEducationwasd esigned.Keyareassuchas literacy,numeracy,ICTinfusion,assessmentforl earninganddifferentiatedinstructionare tobestrengthened.Thenewcurriculumwillbeim plementedfromSeptember2013inInfantsYearI &IIandStandardI,impacting57,000studentsinit ially. TestingandNeuroDiagnosticsofChildren TheMinistryhasembarkedonapilotproject insixteen(16)selectedschools[eight(8)ECCEC entresandeight(8)PrimarySchools]acrosstheed ucationdistrictsinTrinidadandTobago.Itisexpec tedthatapproximatelythree thousand(3000)studentswillbescreened.Thepr ogrammewhichwillcommenceinJanuary2013,i nvolvestheidentification,assessmentandprovisi 15
  • 14. onofinterventionservicesforstudentsforaperi odofone(1)yearandwill
  • 15. P a g e | 17 providethebasisforfurtherdiagnosisandinterve ntionforstudents. ExpandingtheCaribbeanVocationalQ ualificationProgramme(CVQ)toallSec ondarySchools To ensure that all students acquire an occupationalskillaspartoftheirgeneraleducatio n,theMOEhasmadeitmandatoryforallstudentsi nsecondaryschooltopursueatleastoneCVQskill. InSeptember2012,CVQwasintroducedinsixtyn ine(69)additionalschools.Inaddition,five hundred(500)Information,TechnologyandTech nicalVocational Teachersweretrainedas partofthecapacitybuildingofstafftomeettheexp ansionoftheCVQprogramme. ImprovingInfrastructureinSchoolsTheM inistrycontinuesitseffortstoprovidesafeandsec ureschoolbuildingsthroughtheconstructionofn ewfacilities,installationofpre-engineered structuresand refurbishmentofexistingschoolplants.Theseeff ortshave resultedinthecompletionoftheconstructionoftw elve(12)neworreplacementprimaryschools, including Tunapuna Government,PenalRockRoadSDMSand St.Barbara‟sSpiritualShouterBaptistPrimarywit hinthelasttwo(2)years. Ten(10)schoolsincludingEnterpriseGo vernment, ParaminR.C and Barrackpore A.S.J.A arecurrently under construction.Plans areunderwaytore-buildfortytwo(42)schoolsasameasuretoreplacethoseprim aryschoolsthatareoveronehundred(100)yearsol d. For theperiod underreview theMinistryformallyopenedfour(4)secondarysch ools:MarabellaSouth,AranguezNorth,CouvaWes tandFiveRivers.Also,workcontinuedontheconstr uctionofeight(8)additionalsecondaryschoolsnam ely:BaratariaNorth,MtHope,CarapichaimaWest, St. Joseph,StAugustine,PrincesTownEast,Pleasantvi lleandSipariaEast. EnhancingLiteracyandNumeracy Acomprehensiveliteracyandnumeracystrategy hasbeendevelopedthatwillseektoimprove students‟competenciesinthesekeyareas.Teache rsare beingtrained todiagnoseandremediateliteracyandnumeracyd eficiencies.Additionally,eighty(80)masterteac hersofReadingwillbeemployedtosupportteache rsattheprimarylevel. ImprovingAcademic PerformanceTherewasasignificantimprove mentintheperformanceofprimaryschoolsasme asuredbytheAcademicPerformanceIndex(API) basedontheNationalTests. In2012,thenumberofschoolscategorizedasexce llingrosetoonehundredandtwentyone(121)fromfifteen(15)in2011,whileschools underacademicwatchdeclinedfromonehundred andtwenty(120)in2011totwentyeight(28)in2012. PerformanceattheCaribbeanAdvancedProficie ncyExamination(CAPE)continuestobehighwith morethan96%ofstudentsobtaining passinggradesatbothUnitIandUnitII. MovingtheSecondaryEntranceAssess ment(SEA)ExaminationtoMay 2012 Thisaccomplishmentwasindeedahistoric milestonefortheMinistryandwasdoneincollabo rationwithandsupportfromkeystakeholders.Th emaingoalwastoeasethestressoftheSEAExami nationonstudentsandtheirparentsbygivingmore timeforpreparation.Theexaminationwasheldon the10thMay2012andwasindeedaredletterdayin thehistoryofSEA. Continuous AssessmentProgramme(CAP) During the last fiscal year, the Ministry embarkedonanumberofactivitiestowardstheim plementationoftheContinuousAssessmentCom ponent(CAC)oftheSEAinacademicyear 17
  • 16. dminReport2011-2012
  • 17. P a g e | 19 2012– 2013.Amongtheactivitiescompletedwasthetraini ngofonethousand,sevenhundred(1,700)teachersi nstandardsIVandVandtheacquisitionofextensive resourcesto supporttheimplementationofCACinvarioussubje ctareas.AdditionallytheCaribbeanExaminationC ouncil(CXC)providedtrainingforseventyfive(75)curriculumofficersandsupervisorstosupp ortthisprogramme. he StandardVStudentswritingSEAin2013willwrite Mathematics,EnglishandLanguageArts.Bothsubj ectscombinedwillcontributeavalueof80%ofthest udents‟totalmarkswhilecreativewritingwillaccou ntfor20%ofthemarks.TheCACisaschoolbasedass essmentforprimaryschool students. EnhancingCareerGuidanceandDevelop ment inSecondary SchoolsWork continued on a number of initiativesthatwillprovidetherequiredguidance andcounsellingtostudentsthatwillassistintheirc areerdevelopmentandtransitionfromschoolinto theworldofwork. Thisinitiativewillbeimplemented in2012-2013 through districtcareerfairstargetingstudentsinformsIII,I V,VandVI. OrganisationalRestructuringandI nstitutionalStrengthening TheMinistryisfunctioninginahighpace environmentatthenational,regionalandinternati onallevels.Thismeansthatthesystemsandproces sesoftheministrymustbemodernisedandreengineeredtoremainrelevantespeciallytoeffecti velypursuetheVision,Mission,StrategicObjecti veandValue Outcomesforourchildren.Tothisend,anewtopor ganisationalstructurewasdevelopedandapprov edbytheSeniorExecutiveTeam(SET).Also,indi vidualorganisationalstructureswere significantlyadvancedforDivisionssuchas EducationalServicesDelivery,andTeachingand TeacherDevelopment.Inaddition,thecapacityof the Programmes andProjects, Planning andManagementUnit(PPPMU)whichservesast 19
  • 18. majormanagerforallprogrammesandprojects oftheMOEwasfurtherexpanded. DevelopingandMarketingthe MinistrythroughaCorporate CommunicationStrategy Steps havebeen taken to strengthen the communicationsarmoftheMinistrythrough thedevelopmentofacomprehensive CommunicationStrategy.TheStrategyisdesig nedtoimprovethewaytheMinistrysharesinfor mation,andobtainsfeedbackfromitsstakehold ersandhowsuchfeedbackcanbechannelledtoi mprovetheoverallimageandperformanceofth eMinistry. DevelopingandManagingtheHuman Resources TheeffectivenessoftheMinistryperformance dependsnotonlyonavailableresourcesbutalso onthequalityandcompetencyofitshumanresou rces.TheengagementofaConsultanttoleadthet ransformationofthemanagementoftheMinistr y‟shumanresourcesiscurrentlybeingpursued. EngagingandInvolvingParentsand OtherKeyStakeholders The engagementof stakeholders including parents,teachers,studentsandthegeneralpubli cisvitalforthesuccessoftheeducationsector.Th eMinistryhasbeenabletogainthepublic‟strusta ndsupportforitstransformationinitiativesthro ughtheconductofseveralmeetingsandconsulta tionswithitsmany stakeholders.Thepositiveoutcomesfromthese activitiesincludedstakeholderssupportforthei mplementationoftheCAC,andthestrengthenin gofrelationshipswithseveralofourstakeholder sincludingthedenominationalboards,TTUTA ,NPTAandnongovernmentalorganisations.Workwillcontinu einthefuture tomaintainandsustaintherelationshipandtrust developed.
  • 19. P a g e | 21 Inthecomingmonthsthe Ministrywillcontinuetorolloutitsannual Business Planfortheperiod2012/2013withcollaborationfromitsstakeholdersasitseekstobuildan Educationsystemthatoffershopeandopportunitiesforourchildren. 21
  • 20. Introduction heMinistryofEducation‟sAnnualAdministrativeReportprese ntstheprogrammes,projects,initiativesandoperationsunderta kenintheeducationsystemforthefiscal year2011/2012.Theachievementsaretheresultsofactivitiesundert akentoimplementthesixteen(16)priorities.Thepriorityareaswerei dentifiedin2010andsincethentheworkstartedandhascontinuedun abated.Muchemphasisisplacedontheseareas sincetheyholdthekeytothetransformationandreengineeringoftheeducationsystem.Notwithstanding,therewereke yoperationsandfunctionsthatwereexecutedduringthelastyearthat willbecoveredinthisreport. T
  • 21. AttheheartofallthatisdoneattheMinistryarethevalueoutcomesforourchildrenthatwillcontribu tetothedevelopmentoftheidealchild.Figure2below;highlightsthecharacteristicsoftheidealchi ldcomingoutoftheEducationandDevelopmentprocess. Figure2:ValueOutcomeforourChildren Alltransformationalinitiativestobepursuedwillbealignedtowardsthesatisfactionofthese ValueOutcomes(Ref:EducationSectorStrategicPlan2011–2015]. TheAnnualAdministrativeReport20112012isstructuredaroundtheMinistry‟sthreegoalsfortheEducationsystemandtherespectiveprioritie sthatwillsupporttheattainmentofthosegoals. Thegoalsa reto:1. DesignandDevelopaQualityEducationSystem. 2. TransformtheMinistryintoaModern,High-PerformingOrganization. 3. EngageStakeholdersintheTransformationoftheEducationSystem Thesixteenpriorityareaswhicharehighlightedandexpandeduponinthechapterswhichfollowar eexpectedtocontributetotheattainmentnotonlyofthesegoals,butthevalueoutcomesforourchil dren,andultimatelytheGORTT‟smaindevelopmentalpillar–“PeopleCentredDevelopment.“ 2011-2012
  • 22. CHAPTERONE Goal 1 DesignandDevelopaQualityEducationSystem
  • 23. DesignandDevelopaQualityEducationSystem qualityeducationsystemwillundoubtedlyfosterthesociala ndeconomicdevelopmentofthecountryandbyextensiontheharm ony,respect,disciplineandproductionneededforacohesivesociety . Assuchtheinputsandtheprocessesthatareinextricablylin kedtothemakingofaqualityeducationsystemsuchasqualifiedteac hers,neworimprovedschool infrastructure and relevant curriculum, appropriate legislation,enablingteachingandlearningenvironmentetcare currentlybeingaddressed. Theseissuesarebeingaddressed throughtheMinistry‟ssixteenpriorities.Twelveprioritiesare aimedatimprovingthequalityoftheteachingandlearning anddirectlysupportourgoalto“DesignandDevelopaQuality EducationSystem” A EducationalPriorities 1.IntegratingICTsinEducation– LaptopInitiative 2.UniversalEarlyChildhoodCareandEd ucation 7. ExpansionoftheTechnical Vocational Programme 8. TeacherTrainingandDevelopment 3.ImprovingInfrastructureinSchools 9. ImprovingStudentsOverall AcademicPerformance 4.CurriculumReform 10. TestingandNeuroDiagnosticsofChildren 5. Enhanced Literacyand Numeracy 11. ContinuousAssessmentProgramme 6.MovementoftheSecondaryEntranceAs sessmenttoMay 12.CareerGuidanceandDevelopmentin SecondarySchools. Box1:Priorities for the attainment ofaQuality Education System Thelastfiscalyearsawsteadyprogresstowardsfulfillingthesepriorities. Thegainsaswellaschallengesarereportedaccordingly.
  • 24. 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 25. 1. IntegratingInformationCommunicationTechnology(ICT)i nEducation-eCaLLaptopInitiative andlearningandthedevelopmentof21stCentury Skillsinstudents; 1.1 LaptopDistribution TheMinistryofEducationhasdevelopedandimp lementedtheeConnectandLearn(eCaL)Progra mme.TheeCalprogrammewasinitiatedintheyea r2010.OneofthemajoroutcomesoftheeCaLprog rammeistransformationofEducationinTrinidad andTobagothroughtheuseofcontemporaryinstr uctionalstrategiesandcuttingedgeInformationa ndCommunicationTechnology(ICT) solutions.Thegoals ofthisProgrammeareto: iii) reducetheinequityinaccesstocomputersand informationbetweenstudentsfromwealthyan dpoorfamilies; iv) raisestudentachievementthroughspecificinte rventionssuchasimprovingstudents‟understa ndingviatheuseofeducationsoftware;and environment ever-changing v) facilitatethedevelopmentofcollaborationbet ween peers within schools, amongschools and between teachers and students. ii) improvethequalityofinstruction andsupport the infusion of ICT in teaching ThisProgrammerepresentsacomprehensive setofProjects,oneofwhichisthedistributionofLa ptopstoStudentsenteringSecondarySchool. i) improvethe learning forstudents in an informationage; Figure3:MinisterofEducationDr.theHonourableTimGopeesingh[centre]with studentsduringthedistributionoflaptops 2012 27
  • 26. Overthethree(3)yearsofexistenceofthiseCaLPr ogrammeapproximatelyfiftyfivethousand(55,000)studentsandfourthousan d(4,000)teachershavebeenprovidedwithlaptop s.Includedinthesefigures,aretheseventeenthou sandandfiftyeight(17,058)laptopsthatweredistributedtoFor mOnestudentsin152secondaryschoolsfortheac ademic year2012/2013whichcommencedonthe3rdSept ember,2012.Alllaptopswereimagedwithprodu ctivityandeducationsoftwareincludingbutnotli mitedtoMicrosoftMathematics4.0,MicrosoftC hemistryAddinforWordandBingMaps.Withthematurityand continuousimprovementofthiseCaLProgramm estudentsnowhaveaccesstoawiderarrayofinfor mationandlearningresourcesforsubjectareasoft hetaughtcurriculum. Training in the infusion of Information Communication Technology (ICT) into curriculum delivery was conducted by the National Energy Skill Company (NESC) for Heads of Departments, Vice Principals, Principals, Curriculum Officers and School Supervisors III. Duringthethree(3)yearperiodofexistenceoftheeC aLProgramme,approximatelyeightthousand,four hundred(8,400)teacherswere trainedinaseriesofcoursesaimedatequippingstaff withthenecessaryskillstoinfuseICTsintotheirteac hingandlearningstrategies. The first eCAL ICT in Education Innovative Award which rewards excellence in ICT integration in teaching and learning in schools was held in 2011. Four teachers attended the Caribbean and Latin America Forum in Santiago de Chile. One teacher from Trinidad and Tobago emerged winner and later participated at the Global Forum, Washington in November, 2011. 1.2 ICTTrainingforTeachers The Laptop Initiative or the eConnect and Learn Programme was expanded to include the provision of a digital education portal, teaching training, and wireless connectivity in secondary schools, educational content software and the infusion of technology into the curriculum. InsupportofthiseCaLProgramme,teachersare beingencouragedandtrainedtodevelopICTenhan cedteachingstrategies.Thisisnecessaryfortheinte grationofICTsintothecurriculum andintoclassroomlearningandinstructional strategies.Teachersarechargedwiththeresponsibil itytoprovidequalityteachingintheir classrooms while making creative useoftheresourcestodevelop21stcenturyskillsins tudents.Thisisimportantasweseektoprepareourna tion‟sstudentstocompeteinanICTdrivenglobaleco nomy. 1.3 AssessmentoftheeCalProgramm e Inadditionto thedistribution of LaptopstostudentsenteringFormOne,theeCalpr ogrammealsocomprisednumerousotherproject sallgearedtowardachievingintegrationofICTsin tothecurriculumandeducationaltransformation .Theseotherprojectinitiativesincluded: 1. LaptopRollout; 2. ExpansionofSecondarySchools‟Connect ivity; 3. DigitalPortal; 4. DigitalResourcesandContent; 5. PolicyandGuidelines; 6. MarketingandCommunications; 7. MonitoringandEvaluation; 8. TeacherTraining;and 9. InfusionofICTintoCurriculumDelivery. ToascertainthebenefitsderivedfromthisProgra mmeaswellastheareasforimprovement,theEdu cationalResearchandEvaluationDivisionundert ookanassessmentofsameintheyear2011. AdminReport
  • 27. n(2,217)parents. The Survey was undertaken to determine the following: 1. ICT competence levels of key stakeholders, namely principals, teachers, students, parents; 2. The extent of use and access to technology; 3. Stakeholders knowledge and understanding of the Ministry‟s ICT policies/guidelines; and 4. Stakeholders level of support for the eCALprogramme. Alongwiththeassessment,therewasaMonitorin gandEvaluationcomponentwhich29aximizean outcomebasedframeworkforevaluationoftheProgramm e.TheoutcomesofeachProjectstreamwereidenti fiedandusedtodevelop questionnaireswhich were inturnreadministeredtotrackchanges,ifany,inuseandacc essofICTs.Italsolookedat behavioural changes towardsthe use of ICTamongstakeholders.Theexpectedoutcomes identifiedineachProjectstreamwereadaptedfor thepurposeof administeringtheInitialSurveyandfurthermodif iedtodeterminetheimpact,ifany,onkeystakehol ders. Thesurvey‟stargetedpopulationisdelineatedbel ow: 1. ThePrincipalsofsixtyseven(67)secondaryschools; 2. 3. 4. Studentsoftwo(2)randomlyselectedclass es from each of the sixty-seven (67)secondaryschools; Parentsoftheseselectedstudents;and Form1teachersintheeight(8)coresubjects (EnglishLanguage,IntegratedScience,M athematics,Physical Education,SocialStudies,Spanish,Techn ologyEducation,Visual&PerformingArt s). Ofthistargetpopulation,datawerereceivedfromt hefollowingforanalysis: 1. Fifty-eight(58)Principals; 2. Sevenhundredandtwentynine(729)teachers; 3. Threethousand,twohundredandninetysix(3,296)students;and 4. Twothousand,twohundredandseventee Thedatafromeachofthesurveyswereanalysedtod eterminetheimpact,ifany,oftheeCalProgrammeo nstakeholderswithinthehomeandschoolenviron ments.Moreoverthedatawasexaminedtoascertain whetherthereisanincreaseordecreasein: • Stakeholders‟useofandaccesstodigitalr esourcesandcontent,thatis,whetherther eisanincrease/decreaseinthepercentage of teachers,students andparentsusingandaccessingrelevantd igitalcontent,throughuseofthelaptops; • An increase/decrease in the levelofawarenessofdigitaltechnologies amongstakeholders; • EnhancementinthelevelofICTskillsam ong teachersintheirteaching methods,andstudentsintheirlearning withintheclassroom; • Theextentofactivestudentparticipation and students‟performanceintheclassr oom; • Teachers‟abilitytoinfuseorintegrateIC Tintheirclassroomteaching; • Thelevelofadherencetopolicycomplian cebyteachers,parentsandlearnerswithi mplementationoftheeCalProgrammew ithinthenation‟sschools;and • Thelevelofparentalinvolvementinthech ildren‟seducation. Thefindingsfromthesurveyindicatedthefol lowing: 1. Thatteachersalreadypossessthebasicco mputerliteracyskills;and 2. Mostteachersstillusethewholegroupan dtextbookmethodsofclassroominstruct ion.
  • 28. Based on these findings, the followingrecommendationsweremade: 1. Trainingshould completedinthefollowingareas: be 1.1 useofavarietyof strategiesfor infusing/integratingICTtec hnologyintothecurriculum; 1.2 fordevelopingsubjectrelatedICTresources; 1.3 forprovidingteacherswithskillsr elatedtoclassroomteaching,and methodsofusingthecomputers/ laptops/Internettoinfuseorintegr ateICTintoeverysubject teachingunit; 1.4 intheuseoftheInternettoengage individualandsmallgro upsofstudentsinorderto30aximi zestudentparticipation/involve ment; 1.5 howtoteachstudentstoapplystrate giesforsolvingproblems usingthelaptops,andhowtouseapp ropriatetoolsforlearning,collabor ating,andcommunicatingusingIC T; 1.6 useofBlogsandWikissoteachersca nencourageactiveparticipationam ongstudentsduringlessonpresenta tions; 2. Classsizes should be keptat levels thatallowteacherstogivelearnersindivid ualand/orsmall group attentionforfullandeffectivelearning; 3. Thereshouldbegreatercommunicationb etweenhomeandschool(relevanttostude ntperformance)usinge-mail; 4. Moreemphasisshould be placed onusingthelaptopsforremediallearning andtrackingofstudentperformancelevel s;and 5. Thereshouldbefurtherexpansionofthein frastructureintermsofgreateraccessibilit y to Internet within the AdminReport classroom.(ReferenceeConnectandLearnReportSummaryJuly 2011MinistryofEducation,TrinidadandToba go). Theinsightsobtainedfromthisassessmentcould beusedasguidelinesfortheoverallimprovement andenhancementoftheprogramme. 1.4 Themajoraccomplishmentsforthe laptopinitiative are as follows: Fiscal 2010/2011 Nineteen thousand, six hundred and sixtyseven (19,667) laptops were distributed to sixteen thousand and fifty-nine (16,059) Form 1 students in Trinidad; six hundred and eight (608) Form 1 students in Tobago and three thousand (3000) teachers in Trinidad and Tobago. Fiscal 2011/2012 Seventeen thousand, three hundred (17,300) laptops were distributed to Form 1 students for the academic year 2011/2012. The students received Lenovo laptops with carrying cases and fourteen (14) software packages provided by Microsoft as opposed to only seven (7) packages in 2010. These software packages include Office 2010 Professional, the visualization of Mathematics from basic to pre-calculus and the laws of Trinidad and Tobago. Also the laptops were equipped with improved security and monitoring features. This represented a total of thirty-six thousand, nine hundred and sixty-seven (36,967) laptops distributed over the two year period The Government was able to reduce its expenditure on laptops in 2011/2012 as each laptop purchased cost approximately US$460; US$100 less than fiscal year 2010/2011. The total expenditure by Government to provide every child going on to secondary school from the SEA with his or her own laptop in 2011/2012 was an estimated $53 million which was about $30 million less than fiscal year in 2010/2011. A total of four hundred and sixty seven
  • 29. (467) laptops were distributed to primary school principals in December 2011. The laptops are equipped with packages on instructional materials and other digital information. Research and procure suitable eLearning Software to aid the development of ICT in the education system Incorporate ICT into all schools to aid in • • • • • • Trainedeightthousand,fourhundred(8, 400)teachersinICTrelatedcourses; CollaboratedwithMicrosofttohostthee CalICTinEducationInnovativeAwardc ompetitiontorecognisethe effortsofteachersininfusingICTintothe curriculum; developing various areas such as teaching/ learning tools and software to positively impact students Provide hardware and software to support a web-based School Based Management Trainedthirty-five(35)Curriculum Officers,withthesupportoftheDistance EducationUnit,tosupporttheintegratio nofICTsincurriculum delivery; System (SBMS) that will capture data on DevelopedICTintegratedinstructional packagesforForms13studentsinseven(7)subjectareas; Procure hardware and peripheral equipment Overthirteenthousand(13,000)FormIstu dentsregisteredwithNALIStoaccesseresourcesontheNALISwebsite,aspartoft heeCalprogramme;and Conductedapostevaluationexerciseoft heeCalprogramme. students, teachers and schools to inform policy making for the outfitting of the Ministry's offices Provide internet services which include full connectivity for Schools and Corporate Offices (Wi-Fi for locations where hardwiring is too costly or not possible) Promote Cyber safety measures in schools through ICT training of HoDs to facilitate/ support safe student ICT research activities PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: Continue and expand the eCALProgramme throughout the entire secondary school system to include Form 5 Conduct an on-going review of the eCALProgramme to assess the level of success in relation to the Programme‟s goals and objectives
  • 30. 2. EarlyChildhoodCareandEducation(ECCE) 2.1 ConstructionofCentres TheMinistryofEducationhasbeenworkingassid uouslytoachievethePrimeMinister‟smandateto attainuniversalEarlyChildhoodCareandEducat ion(ECCE)by2015.Whileitseemstobeahercule anundertaking,oneoftheimmediateapproaches adoptedbytheMinistrytocreate“schoolspace”fo rstudentsmakesitanachievabletarget.Theappro achisnamely:thetraditionalconstructionofECC ECentres;public/privatepartnershipswithprivat e ECCEprovidersandthe conversionofspacesatunderutilizedprimarysch oolsintoECCErooms. WithrespecttotheconstructionofnewCentres,ov erthepasttwoyearstheMinistry has completedtheconstruction oftwenty-nine (29)ECCECentres. Thes e are: St. Augus ti ne Nort h, R oyst oni a, M araval , Oropune, La Goya, Val enci a, Bon Ai r West [Ar ouca], M al abar, La Horquett a Sout h, Cl arke R ochard , Coconut Dri ve, Edi nburgh South, Harm ony Hall , R et rench, M araj Hill , R aghunanan R oad, Egypt Vi ll age Trace, C arl s en Fi el d, Gol conda, Welli ngt on Road, St. M ary‟s , Uni on Hall, Phoeni x Park, Lis as Gardens, Mil ton, Aranguez, Lower C um uto, C us he. AspartoftheIDBfundedSupportforaSeamlessEdu cationProjectfifty (50)CentresareexpectedtobeconstructedbyAug ust2013.Withrespecttothetwentyfour(24)CentresinPhaseI,constructionhascom mencedonthenineteen(19)sitesidentifiedinTabl eIbelow,whilestaffareworkingtirelesslytoresol vethesiterelatedissuesfortheremaining fivesites.Itisexpectedthatconstructionwillcom menceonatleasttwoofthesebytheendofDecemb er2012. Sites have been identified for the construction of an additional twenty-six (26) IDB/GORTT funded ECCE Centres, including five (5) centres earmarked for construction in Tobago Figure4:ParticipantsatECCEConsultation Status of the Phase II - twenty six (26) IADB ECCE centres is as follows: Twenty-six (26) sites have been deemed unencumbered and can proceed for mobilization and construction works. These sites have been forwarded to the EFCL for the commencement of the Design/construction phase. Construction of the Phase II ECCE centres is scheduled for completion in June 2014 Five (5) of these sites are located in Tobago. In the financial year 2012 the Ministry of Eeducation commissioned and opened thirteen (13) fully functional state-of-the-art ECCE Centres. AdminReport
  • 31. Table1:LocationofNineteen(19)EarlyChildhoodCareandEducationSites No. ECCE CENTRE EDUCATION DISTRICT 1 ArimaNewGovernmentECCE St.GeorgeEast 2 AroucaPineHavenS.D.A. St.GeorgeEast 3 Bamboo ECCE St.GeorgeEast 4 MaloneyGardens II St.GeorgeEast 5 BaratariaA.C.ECCE St. GeorgeWest 6 BuenIntentoECCE Victoria 7 CorinthHillECCE Victoria 8 CunupiaA.CECCE Caroni 9 JacobHillECCE St.GeorgeEast 10 MadrasECCE Caroni 11 Palmiste ECCE Caroni 12 QuarryECCE St.Patrick 13 SalazarTraceECCE St.GeorgeEast 14 MalabarECCE St.GeorgeEast 15 MountHopeECCE St.GeorgeEast 16 SouthernGardens St.Patrick 17 LaRuffinECCE Nariva/Mayaro 18 BrothersECCE Victoria 19 PleasantvilleECCE Victoria 2011-2012
  • 32. 2.2 Public/PrivatePartnership Agreements InanefforttomeetthedemandforplacesatECCE Centres,theMinistryisattheexploratorystageofit sproposaltopartnerwithprivateECCEproviders. Tothisend,aseriesofpublic consultationswereheldduringthelastfiscalyeart ogatherinformationfromstakeholders.The consultations aimed at engaging private Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) providers to partner with the Ministry to achieve Universal Education (ECCE) by 2015. The consultations were scheduled as follows:• Group 1 – ECCE Centres in the following Education Districts: Port of Spain and Environs, St. George East and North Eastern • Group 2 - ECCE Centres in the following Education Districts: Caroni, South Eastern, Victoria and St. Patrick • Group 3 - ECCE Centres in Tobago • Status of the Phase I - twenty four (24) IADB ECCE centres is as follows: o Eighteen (18) ECCE Centres are projected for completion, by August 2013, under the GORTT-IDB Seamless Education System Programme: Arouca Pine Haven SDA, Barataria AC, Corinth Hills, CunupiaSt. Ambrose AC, Madras, Malabar, Mount Hope, BuenIntento, Salazar Trace, Jacob Hill, Palmiste, Bamboo, Arima New, Southern Gardens, Pleasantville, Brothers, La Ruffin, Maloney Gardens No.2 and Quarry Village. o Six (6) additional ECCE Centres are projected for completion, by December 2013, under the GORTT-IDB Seamless Education System Programme: St. Ann‟s, La Ruffin, Enterprise, Mendez/Penal Quinam, Rancho Quemado and Fyzabad AsaconsequenceofthoseconsultationstheMinis tryisatthestageoffinalisingdifferentprivate/pub licpartnershipmodels.Someofthekeyconsiderat ionsinselectingthefinalmodelwillbethefinancia lcost,thereadinessofprivateprovidersinmeeting theECCEstandardsoftheMinistryregardingcurr iculumandschoolbuildingsandthesustainability oftheproject. AdminReport 2.4 Training for ECCE Teachers 2.3 ConversionofSpacesatunderutili zedPrimarySchoolsforEarlyChil dhoodCareandEducation(ECCE) TheMinistryiscurrentlyexploringthefeasibilityof usingthespacesatunderutilizedprimaryschoolsfo rthepurposeofearlychildhood education.Itwasenvisionedthatthisapproachwou ldmaximizetheuseofunderutilizedspaces,cutthec ostofconstructionofnewCentresandprovidefeede rCentresfortransitiontoexistingprimaryschools. Aninitialphysicalassessmentofapproximatelyfor tyfiveprimaryschoolswasundertakenbyEducationa lFacilitiesCompanyLimitedfortheproject.Asares ultofasecondassessmentdonebyrepresentativeso ftheMOE,thirteen (13) governmentprimaryschoolsqualifiedforcon siderationsincetheyhadavailablelandspace.Thet hirteen(13)governmentprimaryschoolsare:Chag uanasNorth,Chatam,Cocoyea,D‟Abadie,Beetha mGardens,Enterprise,EgyptVillage,Hardbargain ,Marabella,Nariva/Manzanilla,Preysal,PenalQui namandRanchoQuemado.Disqualificationofther emaining thirtytwo(32)siteswasduetothechallengesandconstrai ntsthatemergednamely: • Additionalspaceisrequiredtofacilitateth eintroductionoftheContinuousAssessm entComponent(CAC)ofSEA,therefore those spaces that were earlieridentifiedarenolongeravailableto accommodateECCEactivities • Inspiteofavailablelandspace,thetopogra phyofthelandinsomecasescannotsuppo rttheconstructionofcentres • Theavailablelandspaceinsomeinstance sistoosmalltoaccommodatetheconstruc tionofcentres • ContinueddialogueisneededwiththeDe nominationalBoardstoensure accesstolandinpossessionoftheBoards.
  • 33. From August 2011, the Ministry in collaboration with the Ministry of Science Technology and Tertiary Education, The Accreditation Council of Trinidad and Tobago and Six tertiary level institutions namely: UTT, UWI, CREDI, USC, ROYTEC and SERVOL, commenced discussions to harmonize the training of ECCE teachers at the Certificate Level. As at March 2012, the Ministry concluded these discussions and has ensured the alignment of the Curriculum for ECCE Teacher Training and Certification at the tertiary level. These standards are comparable to those established by the Organization of American States and CARICOM. The Ministry of Education has also commenced discussions to harmonize training at the Bachelor of Education level for all primary school teachers. In August 2012, approximately two hundred and fifty (250) teaching staff (teachers, teacher assistants, auxiliaries and Administrators) employed at government and government-assisted centres attended professional development sessions at the RudranathCapildeo Learning Resource Centre in Mc Bean, Couva PROJECTIONS FOR 2013-2015 Complete the construction of fifty(50) ECCE Centres under the IDB/ GORTT funded Support for a Seamless Education Project Commence the roll-out of the plan to convert excess space in under-utilized primary schools for use as ECCE centres Establish and manage an effectively functioning Public Private Partnership System (engage in 200 Public Private Partnerships) Complete and sign the contractual agreements for public private partnership with sixty-eight (68) private ECCE providers by 2013-2014 Engage ECCE practitioners towards the creation of an education research database, through which research papers, knowledge and research interests would facilitate a sustained forum for dialogue and exchange Recruit (advertise, short list and interview) teaching and non-teaching personnel for ECCE centres Complete the construction of twenty-four (24) ECCE Centres under the GORTTIDB Seamless Education System Programme Phase 1 Complete IDB Phase 2, construction of twenty-six (26) ECCE centres of which five (5) of these sites are located in Tobago
  • 34. 3. ImprovingInfrastructureinS chools 3.1 PrimarySchools Oneofthemajorchallengesfacingprimaryschool sisthedilapidatedconditionofanumberofprimar yschoolbuildingswhichare wellover100yearsold.TheMinistrycontinuesto addressthesechallengesprimarilythrough theconstructionofnewschoolsandupgradestoex istingbuildings.Inthepasttwo(2)years theMinistryofEducationcompletedtheconstruc tionoftwelve(12)primaryschoolsas follows:1. St.Barbara‟sSpiritualShouterBaptistPrim arySchool(Figure5) 2. TunapunaGovernment 3. BalmainPresbyterian 4. CharlievillePresbyterian 5. RiversdalePresbyterian 6. BichePresbyterian 7. PenalRockRoadSDMS, 8. LenguaGovernment 9. PaloSecoGovernment 10. ArimaNewGovernment 1 2011-2012 AdminReport 11. Mt.PleasantGovernment 12. TulsaTraceHindu Anotherten(10)schoolsarecurrentlyunderconst ruction:1. EnterpriseGovernment 2. MonkeyTownGovernment 3. FannyVillage Government 4. FebeauGovernment 5. RosehillR.C. 6. EcclesVillageGovernment 7. NewGrantGovernment 8. ParaminR.C. 9. BelmontBoys‟R.C. 10. BarrackporeA.S.J.A. Further,theMinistryinits20122014constructionprogrammehasscheduledthec onstructionoffortytwo(42)replacementprimaryschools.Notably,c onstructionhasalreadycommencedonseven(7)o ftheseprimaryschools.
  • 35. 2 6 3 7 4 8 St.Babara‟sSpiritualShouterBaptist 4 BalmainPresbyterian 6 CharlievillePresbyterian 7 Figure5:St.Barbara’sSpiritualShouter BaptistPrimarySchool 2 5 2012 1 3 5 8 RiversdalePresbyterian
  • 36. 9 10 11 12 10 BichePresbyterianLengu 11 12 aPresbyterianArimaNew 13 Government 9 13 AdminReport20112012
  • 37. 3.2 SecondarySchools OverthepasttwoyearstheMinistryofEducationh ascompletedtheconstructionoffour(4)secondar yschoolsnamely: (1) MarabellaSouthSecondary,2)AranguezNor thSecondary(Figures7);3)CouvaWestGovernm entSecondaryand4)FiveRiversSecondary. 2 Duringthelastyearworkcontinuedonthe following(8)eightsecondaryschoolswhichareatva riousstagesofconstruction:BaratariaNorth,Mt.Ho pe,CarapichaimaWest,St.Joseph,St.Augustine,Pr incesTownEast,PleasantvilleandSipariaEast. 3 3 4 1 2 MarabellaSouthSecondary 3 4 AranguezNorthSecondary 1 AdminReport2011-2012
  • 38. 3.3 SchoolRepairsProgramme TheMinistryhasimplementedacomprehensive schoolrepairprogrammefortherepairandmainte nanceofallschools.Everyeffortismadetoschedu letheserepairsduringtheAugustschoolvacation periodinordertoavoiddisruptionofclasses.Over thelasttwoyearstheMinistryofEducationhasrep airedapproximatelythreehundredandfifty(350) primaryandsecondaryschools.Seventyseven(77)primaryandsecondaryschoolswere repairedduringtheJulyAugust2012vacationperiod. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: Construction will commence on Shiva Boys‟ Hindu and Parvati Girls‟ Hindu Colleges Additional blocks will be constructed for: o Vishnu Boys SDMS Hindu School o Charlieville ASJA Boys‟ o Charlieveille ASJA Girls‟ o Sangre Grande SWAHA Hindu College o Complete or advanced construction at eight (8) secondary schools currently under construction Complete construction of forty-two (42) replacement primary schools Complete construction of additional blocks to schools already selected Complete construction of Libraries and District Offices (these include the construction/completion of fifteen (15) public libraries) 4. CurriculumReform Anothermajorinitiativeisthe reformoftheprimaryschoolcurriculum.Thisne wcurriculumwillserveastheblueprintforthedev elopmentoftheidealchild/citizenwewant toproduce.CurriculumWritingwillcommencein October2012.Initiallyseven(7)subjectareas werecardedforreview;howevertwomore subjectareaswereadded,namely,AgriculturalSc ienceandCharacterEducation.Thehiringoflocalc urriculumwritersforthevarioussubject areasisexpectedtobeeffectedearlyinthenextfiscal year. The Ministry of Education held several consultations in order to obtain input from all relevant persons in its Curriculum review exercise. A two (2) day National Consultation on the Primary Schools‟ Curriculum was held in April, 2011. Approximately seven hundred (700) persons participated in this consultation. Eight (8) District Consultations; seven in Trinidad and one in Tobago on the Primary School Curriculum were held. Approximately two thousand and ninety (2,090) students, parents, teachers, administrators and Ministry personnel were in attendance. Two (2) subject-specific stakeholder consultations were held on the inclusion of non-traditional subject areas such as the Visual and Performing Arts and Physical Education at the primary level up to Standard Five. Seventy (70) persons, including fifteen (15) contributors, participated and shared their views on the importance of both subjects to holistic child development. In addition, all relevant documents of the Primary Schools‟ Curriculum were posted on the Ministry‟s website to elicit the widest communication and feedback possible. A Consultant was hired to commence the revision of the primary schools‟ curriculum in nine (9) subject areas. The contract commenced in June 2012 and will continue to August 2013. The subject areas for review and revision have been expanded to include Agricultural Science and Character Education. All required resources were provided to primary schools to support the delivery of the
  • 39. Health and Family Life Education (HFLE) component of the curriculum. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013-2015 Procurement of the required equipment for the writing teams and the schools in which curriculum will be tested Creation of a website for the hosting of curriculum materials Recruitment of a firm to print the new curriculum guides and materials Implementation of the new primary school thenationalandregionalexaminationsshowsthat studentperformanceinthesetwosubjectsisbelo waverage.Inordertoimprovestudents‟literacyan dnumeracyskillsaliteracyandnumeracyplanwa sdevelopedforimplementationinschools.Thislit eracystrategy willmonitorthosestudentsatriskoffallingbehind andwillprovidetargetedinterventions.Elements ofthePlaninclude: • Theconductofapilotprojectinselectedsc hools • Collectionandanalysisofdata • Trainingofnumeracycoaches • Literacyteamstobeformedandteacherst oworkintheirrespectiveschools. curriculum by September 2013. Complete The Project Plan for improving literacy and numeracy levels in students enrolled in Infants the review/rewrite of the Secondary Department to Standard I was approved by the School‟s Curriculum which addresses the Strategic Executive Team of the Ministry of Education. need for the ideal child/citizen Implement the new secondary school Twenty (20) pilot schools throughout the eight (8) curriculum nationally throughout all education districts were selected for the conduct of a pilot programme towards the preparation of a Forms detailed training plan. Provide for curriculum development workshops for all CSEC & CAPE In 2010/2011 under the Centre of Excellence for Teacher Training, the project designed to improve Technical/ Vocational subjects the reading skills of students in primary schools; Infuse ICT into the primary and secondary reading workshops were held for three hundred schools curricula (include the core subject (300) teachers and one hundred (100) principals. areas and other subjects areas developed in the reformed curricula) 5. EnhancedLiteracyan dNumeracy Asolidfoundationinliteracyandnumeracyopen supawholenewworldtostudentstotakeadvanta geofthefullrangeofcurriculachoicesinschoola ndbeyond.Cognisantofthisimportance,theMi nistryhasgivenitscommitmenttoimproveourst udentsreading,mathematicsand writing skills. An analysis ofstudentperformanceinEnglish/LanguageAr tsandMathematicsat All Primary School Principals have been requested to assign their best teachers to Infants Year I and II and Standard I to ensure that there is effective foundational development for our students from an early age A decrease was recorded in the percentage of students scoring 30% and under in the SEA by 0.8 points, i.e. from 9.9% (2011) to 9.1% (2012) A Literacy and Numeracy Plan focusing on raising the level of achievement of students from the Infants to Standard 1 levels was developed. Elements of the Plan include:
  • 40.     The conduct of a pilot project in select schools Collection and analysis of data Training of numeracy coaches The formation of literacy teams with teachers working in their respective schools. Forty (40) Literacy and forty (40) Numeracy Coaches were trained. The Literacy Coaches included graduates of the M.Ed. Reading Programme. Sixty-two (62) young persons graduated with improved reading skills from the NALIS Youth Literacy Programme – ALTA, The National Young Adult Quiz Competition 2012 was held. Nineteen (19) schools participated in this initiative which was aimed at promoting positive reading habits among the youths of the nation. To date, eighty (80) master teachers of reading have been trained and will be employed to support teachers. Further, teachers ate being trained to diagnose and remediate deficiencies in literacy and numeracy. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: Train 2,300 persons (teachers and other stakeholders) Reduce the extent of under achievement at the Primary level by addressing literacy and numeracy challenges in teaching and learning at the Primary level. (80 literacy and 40 numeracy coaches have been identified and trained and are operating within the primary school system).
  • 41. 6. The Movement of Secondary Entrance Assessment from March to May Ministry placedapriorityonthemovementoftheSEAfrom MarchtoMay withtheaimofimprovingtheoverallperformanc eofstudentsattheSEAexitexaminations.Thisis premised ontheneedtoprovideadditionaltimetothestude ntstohelpthemtobebetterprepared fortheexamination.Throughsuccessfulnegotia tionswiththeCaribbeanExaminations Council(CXC)andotherstakeholders,allsyste mswereputinplacetofacilitatethemovementoft heexamination.Asaresultoftheseefforts,theSE AwasheldonMay10th, 2012 PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: n2008,therehasbeenasteadyincreaseinthenumb erofschoolsand studentsexposedtorelatedskillsbasedsubjects.TheMOEhasmovedbeyondandh assincemadeitmandatorythatallstudentswillund ertakeatleastoneCVQskill.Theimplementation ofthisinitiativeshouldensurethatallstudentsacqu ireaspecificoccupationalskillaspartoftheirgener aleducation. TheCVQProgrammehasbeenfacedwithseveralch allenges. CVQbyitsverynaturenecessitatesaconstantinflowofattentionandinputsinorderforittothrive. However,thelongtermbenefitsthataretobederiv edfaroutweighanydifficultythatmaybeexperien cedintheinitialstages.Therearesomeminimumf actorsthatarecrucialtothesuccessofaprogramof thisnaturewhichhaveaffectedtheprogramtodate .Thesefactorsare: 7. • TheacceptabilityandmarketvalueofCVQ Certification; • Increase the number of student scoring above 30%. Stakeholders“buyin”andacceptanceoftheprogrammena mely:-parents; TTUTA;schooladministrators;teachers; students; tertiaryleveleducationalinstitutions;ot herorganizationsandthecommunity; • Adequatequalifiedteacherstoimpartsp ecializedskills; • AdequateSupportOfficersmostnotably CurriculumOfficerstoassistwiththemo nitoringoftheprogram; • Abilitytoutilizetheattainedcertificatio nformatriculationpurposesattertiaryle veleducationinstitutions; • Certificationusedasacriterionforemplo ymentbygovernmentministriesandstat utorybodies ExpansionoftheTechnical/V ocationalProgramme ThroughtheexpansionoftheTechnical/Vocational Programmeinschools,theMinistryofEducationex pectstoseeanincreaseinthenumberofstudentspurs uingsubjectsintheTechnical/Vocationalarea.Byex tensionthere shouldbeanincreaseinthenumberofstudentsreque stingcertificationfortheachievementoffullCaribb eanVocationalQualification(CVQ)Standardsand anincreaseinthevarietyofStandardsonoffertostud entsatthesecondaryschoollevel.Thisisnotedinthe MinistryofEducation‟sStrategic Plan 2011– 2015, whichidentifiesthatchildrenatsecondaryschoolss houldbeexposedtoamorevariedcurriculum includingtheexposuretoskills-basedsubjects. TheCaribbeanVocationalQualificationisanaward thatrepresents achievementof a setofcompetencieswhichdefinethecoreworkpract icesofanoccupationalareaconsistentwiththelevels articulatedwithintheregionalframeworks.Thestud entwhoachievesafullstandardawardatLevelIisdes cribedasasemiskilledworkerwhoisabletoperformasignificantran geofvariedworkactivitiesinalimitedvarietyofcont exts.SincetheintroductionoftheCVQprogrammei MOEsupportintermsoffinance andothersupport; • PresentationofCVQresultsprovesdiffic ultforprincipalstointerpret.
  • 42. • • • • • • Supportiveadministratorswithatechnical /vocationalunderstandingorknowledge; Upgrading of physical infrastructure to accommodate skill-based subjects; Health and Safety awareness and practices in the whole school; Updating of pertinent/ relevant data on a timely basis on all schools:; InabilitytoaccessCVQresultsinatimelyman nerbothbystudentsandTVETUnit,CPDD,Mo E; The CVQ programme requires timely and regular funding. The MOE is also working with MIC and will collaborate with UTT towards having a Bachelor‟s programme developed combining the pedagogy and specialized craft components. In June 2012, eighty four (84) government schools were given funding in the sum of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) for CVQ programmes. The Curriculum Division has the mandate to ensure these funds are utilized for the CVQ Programme. Inspiteofthesechallenges,thefollowingwere achieved:- In 2010, one thousand, seven hundred and eighteen (1,718) students wrote the CVQs while in 2011, forty-four (44) secondary schools involving 1,400 students participated in the CVQ standards/units in twenty-three (23) occupational areas including: Air conditioning and refrigeration, Automechanics, Beauty therapy, Information technology usage and support, Food preparation and Poultry rearing. Infiscal2011to2012theMOEdeveloped apartnershipwiththeNationalTraining Agency(NTA)forthetrainingofTVETt eachersatsecondaryschoolstobecome AssessorsandHeadsofDepartmentsasI nternalVerifiers.BytheendofJuly2012,f ifty(50)personshadbeentrainedasInter nalVerifiersandonehundredandthirtyone(131)teachersasAssessors. GovernmentandGovernmentAssiste dschoolswereeachgivenagrantofone hundredthousanddollars($100,000)f orCVQexpansion. By the end of 2011-2012 academic year forty six (46) schools were registered to do CVQ exams. Out of this number, forty four (44) actually offered candidates for the exams. Fivehundred(500)InformationTechn ologyandTechnicalVocational Teachersweretrained. One thousand and eighty three (1083) candidates wrote the CVQ exams in twentyfive (25) occupational areas. A total of four thousand, four hundred and ninety-seven (4,497) units were awarded. Five hundred and eighty three (583) persons obtained full units. At present, the MOE is collaborating with MIC for training of teachers in the specialized craft areas. 2011CXCresultsindicatedthatfivehund redandtwentyfour(524)studentsreceivedfullCVQaw ardsandninethousandandfourhundred( 9,400)receivedUnitAwardsinvarioussu bjectareas. Sixtyfive(65)secondaryschoolscurrentlyof ferCVQsubjects;forty-eight(48) government schools; seventeen(17)denominational ectsfromSeptember2012. schools. Sixtynine(69)willbeofferingCVQsubj • Ofthesixty-
  • 43. five(65),nine(9)governmentandsixteen (16)g o v e r n m e n t - a s s i s t e d are interested in expanding their CVQ programme. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: 1. Executionofchangemanagementstrategy regardingstakeholders‟perceptionoftheT echnical/Vocational Programme. 2. Recruitmentofqualifiedinstructors. 3. Assessmentoffacilities– Auditsoffacilitiesarescheduledfortheperio dSeptembertoDecember2012forallsecond aryschoolsthatwillbeexpandingtheirCVQo ptions. 4. Aspecialcommitteewillbeformedtocome upwithacomprehensiveproposalincludin gfinancialresourcingforCVQexpansionb eyondSeptember,2012. 5. Roll Out ofamonitoringandevaluationframeworkf ortheCVQprogramme.Inthisregard,theM inistryplans tohiremorecurriculumofficerswithspecia lization invariousfieldstomonitortheexpandedp rogramme 6. Lay the foundations foundationfortheregistrationof approximatelytwentythree(23)additional schoolsby2014,thusincreasingthenumb erofschoolsofferingCVQsfromsixtynine(69)in2012toninety-one(91)by 2014 7. Increase thenumberofstudentsenrolledintheCVQ programmefromonethousand,fivehundre dandsixty(1,560)tooverthreethousand (3000) 8. Lay the groundwork foranincreaseinthenumberofoccupationa lareasfromtwenty-six(26)tothirtyone(31). 9. Develop and implement a policy to support the implementation of CVQ in all secondary schools, including denominational schools 10. Incorporate CVQ programmes throughout the entire secondary school system 11. Provide assessor training and retraining of teachers for the technical and vocational programme assessment process 12. Develop a training program and train support officers, most notably Curriculum Officers, to assist with the monitoring of the CVQ program
  • 44. 8. TeachingandTeacherDe velopment Teachersarepivotaltoaqualityeducationsy stem.Theyhowever,needtobemotivated,hi ghlyqualifiedandknowledgeabletomakea differenceinthelivesofstudents.Inseekingt oensurethatteachersareadequatelyqualifie dtheMOEembarkedonaninitiativetoreva mptheteachingsector.Tofacilitatethisexer cisetheMOEproposedtoestablishtheTeac hingandTeacherDevelopmentDivision(T TDD)whichreplacestheformerTeacherEd ucation&Teacher Performance Project Unit (TETPPU). ThemandateoftheTTDDistoproduceanda dvanceteacherswhoarecompetentandade quatelyequippedto: 1. efficientlyandeffectivelyimplemen tschoolcurriculum; 2. improvestudentperformance; 3. helpstudentstoachievethevaluesout comesconsistentwiththenationalvi sionforourchildren WithrespecttotheBaselineSurvey,thefollo wingactivitieswerecompleted • • • OrientationsessionswereheldforallP rincipalsofthe60samplesschools TrainingsessionswereheldforPrin cipalsandVicePrincipalsintheuse oftheipadtoconducttheTeacherM onitoringProtocol(TMP)Surveyi nTrinidad Surveyinstrumentsweredistribute dtoandcollectedfromthe60sampl e schools. Inkeepingwithitsefforttodevelopacritica lmassofleaderstoguidethetransformatio ninitiatives,theMinistryheldaleadership conferenceforschoolprincipalsandadmi nistrators.Thethemeofwhichwas„TheLe aderinMe”.Theobjectivewastoenhancet heskillsofkeypersonnelentrustedwiththe responsibilityoffacilitatingandsupportin gthetransformationinitiative.Figure9isa groupphotographoftheMOEStrategicEx ecutive Team(SET)andconferencepresenters. Aneworganizationalstructurehasbeendesi gned.Effortstowardtheestablishmentofthe Divisionwillbepursuedinfiscal2013. InApril2012,acontractfortheconductofaB aselineSurveyofTeacherPerformance,Par entandStudentAttitudesandAchievements commencedandwillconcludeinMarch201 3.Thisconsultancyisexpectedto facilitatetheevaluationoftheeffectiveness oftheinterventionstrategiesthat were designed toenhancethequalityofteaching.Through thisconsultancythe MOE willbe assisted inthedevelopmentofprofilesforteacherper formance,parentandstudentattitudeandstu dentachievement. Figure 6: Ministry’s ExecutiveTeam withPresenters at‘The Leaderin Me’Conference Someoftheothermajoractivitiesaccomplishedi nfiscal2010/2011 and 2011/2012 areasfollows: • Fifteencurriculumofficersandtea chersoflanguageartsreceivedvoic
  • 45. eandspeechtraininginAugust,201 2   • Conductedprofessionaldevelopm enttrainingforthirtyfive(35)Curriculum Officers to support teachers in the deliveryoftheHealthandFamilyLi feEducation(HFLE)curriculum • Trainedonehundredandfifty(150)Se condarySchoolTechnology Education and CVQteachersthroughworkshopscon ducted bytheMinistryofEnergyandEnergyA ffairsinitsRenewableEnergyandEne rgyEfficiencyProgramme • Completed discussions with TTUTA withrespecttoaPerformanceManag ement Appraisal Process Manual • ICT Infusion Training was conducted for approximately six hundred and sixty-two (662) Administrators and Supervisors.  Forty-eight (48) principals  Sixty-four (64) vice-principals  Thirty-two (32) School Supervisors Five hundred and nine (509) IT Heads of Department and teachers Three (3) TETPPU staff members The Fourth Annual Professional Development Teacher Training Workshop was conducted. Approximately four hundred and twenty (420) teachers were trained in fifteen (15) different areas. Eighty (80) Primary School and eighty (80) Secondary School teachers were trained in order to improve their skills in the assessment of the national curriculum in all eight (8) core subjects The reclassification process for the teaching staff at the secondary level commenced. This is an integral part of the Government‟s thrust to modernize the education system and improve the overall standard of teaching at the nation‟s schools.
  • 46. 9. ImprovingStudentsOverallA cademicPerformance Themainindicatorsusedtomeasurestudents‟ac ademicperformancearetheresultsofthelocalan dregionalexaminationsadministeredtostudent sattheprimaryandsecondarylevels.Duringthel astacademicyearstudentsattheprimarylevelfr omStandardsItoIwrote theNationalTestswhilethestudentsofStandard VwrotetheSecondaryEntranceAssessmentfor transitiontothesecondarylevel.Studentsatthes econdarylevelwrotetheNCSE,theCSEC and CAPEExaminations andthe CVQ.Ingeneral,whileimprovementsinstudent s‟performanceinsomeoftheexaminationshave beenachieved,thereisstillroom forfurtherimprovementparticularlyinCSECM athematicsandEnglish.Theperformanceofstu dentsatvarious levels andin the various examinations ispresentedhereunder:-
  • 47. 9.1 NationalTestPerformanceof StudentsinMathematicsandLangu ageArts In2012,eighteenthousandfivehundredandfortytwo(18,542)studentsinStandard1andnineteent housandninehundredandfortyeight(19,948)studentsinStandard3wrotetheNat ionalTestinMathematicsandLanguageArts.The rehasbeenanoverallincreaseinthepercentageofs tudentsattainingorexceedingstandards(Levels3 and4)requiredforstandards1and3inMathematic sandLanguageArtsin2012whencomparedtothe combinedperiod2008to2012.InMathematicsth erewasabout40% improvement in Standards 1 and 3, whileliteracylevelsimprovedbyabout50%inSta ndards1and3.Thefindingsareasfollows: Mathematics Standard1 • • In2012,68%ofthestudentswritingMathe maticsinStandard1metorexceededtheac ceptablestandards(levels3and4)compar edto51%in2011. In2012,therewascorrespondingreductio ninstudentsnotmeetingtheacceptablesta ndards. Standard3 • 65%ofstudentswritingMathematicsinSt andard3metorexceededtheacceptablest andards(levels3and4)in2012comparedt o48%in2011. • LanguageArts Standard1 • 55%ofstudentsinStandard1writingLang uageArtsmetorexceededtheacceptables tandards(Levels3and4)in2012compare dto38%in2011. • In2012,therewasalsoasignificantreducti oninstudentsnotmeetingtheacceptablest andardsinLanguageArts. Standard3 • 67%ofstudentsinStandard3writingLang uageArtsmetorexceededtheacceptables tandards(Levels3and4)in2012compare dto42%in2011. • In2012,therewasalsoasignificantreducti oninstudentsnotmeetingtheacceptablest andard. • In2012,68%ofthestudentswritingMathe maticsinStandard1metorexceededtheac ceptablestandards(levels3and4)compar edto51%in2011. • In2012,therewascorrespondingreductio ninstudentsnotmeetingtheacceptablesta ndards. Standard3 • 65%ofstudentswritingMathematicsinSt andard3metorexceededtheacceptablest andards(levels3and4)in2012comparedt o48%in2011. In2012,therewasalsoasignificantreducti oninstudentsnotmeetingtheacceptablest andards. 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 48. 9.2 PerformanceofPrimarySchoolsattheNati onalTests –AcademicPerformanceIndex(API) There has been a significant improvement inperformanceofschoolsin2012comparedtothepe riod2009to2012asmeasuredbytheirAcademicPer formanceIndex.Aschool‟sscoreorplacementonth eAPIisdesignedtobeanindicatorofaschool‟sperfor mancelevelandiscalculatedannually usingthe percentageofstudents ateachachievementlevelfor MathematicsandLanguageArtsatStandards1and3 .Literacyandnumeracyareimportantareasforovera llschooleffectivenessandfutureacademicachieve ment.Thecompositescorewhichvariesfrom0to56 0isusedtoplaceschoolsinfourcategories:• EXCELLING(401-560)– Extremelyhighproportionsofstudentsmeet ingorexceedingstandardsinbothclassesan dareasoflearning. • MOSTLYEFFECTIVE(241-400)–Adequate tohighproportionsofstudentsmeeting orexceedingstandardsinbothclassesand areasoflearning. • ACADEMIC WATCH (81-240) – Inadequate numbers of students meetingorexceedingstandardsinone ormoreclassesorareasoflearning.Requir esimmediateattentiontospecificchallen gesfacedbyschool. • ACADEMIC EMERGENCY (0–80) Inadequatenumbersofstudentsmeetingo rexceedinginbothclassesandareasoflear ning.Requiresurgent andimmediate intervention.There hasbeenan improvementinthe schoolsbasedontheacademicperforman ceindexduringtheperiod2009–2012. In2012,there wasa significant increase inthenumberofschoolsthatwereplaced under the Excelling band of the API Category.Correspondingly,therehasbeenadecli nein 2011-2012 AdminReport thenumberofschoolsnotmeetingtherequiredsta ndardandcategorizedasbeingunderacademicw atchovertheperiod2011–2012:Asummaryofthisinformationisprovidedbelow • ThenumberofschoolsplacedunderAcad emicWatchdecreasedfromonehundreda ndtwenty(120)in2011totwentyeight(28)in2012. • Therewasanincreaseinthenumberofsch oolsintheexcellingbandfromfifteen(15) in2011toonehundredandtwentyone(121)in2012. • NoschoolsfellintotheAcademicEmergen cycategory. • Theresultsthereforeshowedasignificant improvementintheperfor manceofprimaryschoolsin2012withala rgeshiftinthenumberofschoolsunderAc ademicwatchmovingintotheMostEffect ivecategoryandschoolsinthemostlyeffe ctivecategorymovingintotheexcellingb and.
  • 49. APICategory 2011 2012 No.ofSc hools % NoofSc hools % AcademicWatch 120 22.3 28 5.2 MostlyEffective 394 73.2 384 71.4 Excelling 15 2.8 121 22.5 Total 529 98.3 533 99.1 • Schoolsexcellingimprovedby800%from2011to2012. • Reductionofschoolsunderacademicwatchbyabout80%. 9.3 Secondary EntranceAssessment(SEA) TheSecondaryEntranceAssessmentwasadmini steredforthefirsttimeonthe10thMay,2012.Thisw asdonetoprovidestudentsandteacherswithaddit ionaltimetopreparefortheexaminationandultim atelyresultintheoverallimprovementofstudents ‟performance.Atotalofseventeenthousand,eigh thundredandsixtythree(17,863)studentsweretestedontheirskillsi nMathematics,LanguageArtsandCreativeWriti ngforplacementintoasecondaryschoolbasedont heindividualscoresachieved. Table2highlightsthenumberofstudentswhowro tetheexaminationandwereplacedatsecondarysc hoolsovertheperiod20082012.Thetrendsoverthefiveyearperiodindicatet hatthenumberofstudentswritingtheSEAaverag edoverseventeenthousand(17,000)andapproxi mately94%ofthestudentswere placedatthefiveandsevenyeargovernmentandgovernmentassistedsecond aryschools.From2008to2012therewasasmallin creaseinthepercentageofstudentsplacedatsecon daryschools.Thetablealsoshowsthattherehasbe enasteadydeclineinthenumberofstudentsplace datPre-VocationalCentres. Table2:NumberandPercentageofStudentsPlacedinSecondarySchoolsbySchoolType:SEA2 008–2012 Year NumberPlacedbyTypeofSchool TotalPlaced Total Number/P Entered ercentage 7 &5-Year Private Pre-Voc. Government Schools Centres No. 2010 17268 2011 2012 17280 17863 17024 % 94.2 3.4 2.4 95.3 16100 367 497 16964 % 94.9 2.2 2.9 96.3 15962 506 399 16867 % 94.6 16042 3.0 483 2.4 347 97.7 16872 % 95.1 2.9 2.0 No. 17615 409 No. 2009 580 No. 17855 16035 No. 2008 16684 476 332 97.6 17492 % 95.3 2.7 1.9 97.9 Source:DivisionofEducationalResearchandEvaluation 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 50. Table3providesinformationonthenumberofstu dentswhore-wrotetheSEAoverafive yearperiod20082012.Itisobservedthattherehasbeenasteadydecl ineinthenumberofstudentsrewritingtheSEA.In2008,there wereeighthundredandthirtyone(831)(4.7%)repeaterswhileby2012thefigur eshaddroppedsignificantlytothreehundredands eventyone(371)(2.1%).OverthefiveyearperiodtheMin istrysoughttomakeseveralinterventionstosupp ortstudentsandhelpthemtoimprove theirperformance.Amongtheseeffortswere thePerformanceEnhancementProgrammeandt heCETT.Theoutcomesofthesemeasuresare becoming increasinglyevident with thedecliningnumberofstudentsrewritingtheSEA. 9.4 Table3:NumberandPercentageof StudentsInvitedtoRepeatSEA:2008-2012 Year No.Wrote No.Placed No.&%ofR epeaters 2008 17855 17024 831 (4.7%) 2009 17615 16964 651 (3.7%) 2010 17268 16867 401 (2.3%) 2011 17280 16872 408 (2.4%) 2012 17863 17492 371 (2.1%) Source:DivisionofEducationalResearchandEvaluation CaribbeanSecondaryEducationCertificateExamination[CSEC]2012 NationalPerformanceataGlancere:CSEC • Atotalof30,791candidateswereregisteredfor35subjectsatthe2012CaribbeanSecondaryEd ucationCertificateExamination(CSEC)ascomparedto33,318in2011and33,254in2010(Fig ure10). • 23,942candidatesactuallywrotetheexaminationofwhich41.2%(9,866)weremalesand5 8.8%(14,076)werefemales(Figure11). • Ofthetotal110,795subjectentries,59.5%(65,936)obtainedGrades1-III. Ofthis amount13.8%(15,239)obtainedGrade1,20.3%(22,475)obtainedGradeIIand25.5% (28,221)obtainedGradeIII (Figure 12). • Whentheresultsaredisaggregatedbygender,56.0%ofthemalestudentsand62.2%oft hefemaleswhowrotetheexaminationachievedGradesI-III. • 42.8%ofthestudentsweresuccessfulinfiveormoresubjectswhile thepercentageofstudentswhoobtainedfiveor more subjects with EnglishA and Mathematicswas42.3%.In31ofthe35subjectswritten,50%ormoreofthestudentsobtaineda passinggrade-GradesI-IIIwith9ofthesubjectsreflectingapassrateof75%ormore.PhysicalEducationandSportrecord edthehighestpassrateapproximately92.4%. • AgriculturalScience(DoubleAward),Mathematics,VisualArtsandHumanandSocialBi ology(HSB)fellbelowthe50%benchmarkwithAgriculturalSciencebeingthelowest.InA griculturalScienceapproximately16.0%obtainedGradesIIII,inVisualArts40.7%,Mathematics41%,andHSB46.4% AdminReport
  • 51. 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 52. Asummaryoftheperformanceofstudentswhowrot efiveormoresubjectsandattainedfiveormoresubje ctsincludingEnglishAandMathematicsattheCSE C2012ispresentedinTable4.Oftheeight(8)educati onaldistricts,justtwodistricts(PortofSpainandVictoria) showedthat50% of the students gained 5or more subjects including English A and Mathematics.Inthreeeducationaldistricts,fewer than30%ofthestudentsgained5ormore subjects includingMaths and EnglishA.Overallthenationalaveragewas42.2 %.Theseresultsprovidecriticaldatathatwillinfor mstrategiestobedevelopedandimplementedtoi mprovestudents‟performanceinthesetwosubjec tareas. Figure7:ThepercentagesofStudentswhoregisteredforCSEC overtheperiod 2010-2012 Figure8:ThetotalnumberofBoysandGirlswhowroteCSECin2012 11-2012 AdminReport
  • 53. Figure9:CSEC2012:GradesI–IIIAwardedbySubjectEntries Table4CSEC2012:Numberofstudentsattainingfive(5)ormoresubjectsincludingMathematicsandEng lishAatgovernmentandgovernmentassistedsecondaryschools EducationalDistrict Attempted5ormorew ithEnglishAand Mathematics Attained5ormorew ithEnglishAand Mathematics %attained5ormorewi thEnglishAand Mathematics Caroni 1625 659 40.6 NorthEastern 527 127 24.1 Port-of-Spain 2129 1105 51.9 Victoria 1613 844 52.3 SouthEastern 1190 354 29.7 StGeorgeEast 2648 1198 45.2 StPatrick 1150 401 34.9 Tobago 574 160 27.9 National 11,456 4,848 42.3 Source:DivisionofEducationalResearchandEvaluation 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 54. 9.5 CaribbeanAdvancedProfic iencyExamination(CAPE) StudentscontinuedtoexcelattheCAPE.Theperf ormanceofstudentsatthisexamination hasbeenconsistentlyhighovertheperiod20082012.TheresultspresentedinTable5showthatov er90%ofthestudentsgainedpassinggradesinUni tIandUnitIIoverthefiveyearperiod,exceptforthe year2010,when88%gainedpassinggradesinUni tsIandII. annualcostfortheawardofallthreehundredandse ventytwo(372)nationalscholarshipsisfiftythreemillio n,sevenhundredandtwothousanddollars($53,70 2,000.00).Scholarshipswereawardedinten(10)s ubjectgroupswhichincludedBusiness,Environ mentalScience,Languages,Mathematics,Mode rnStudies/Humanities,NaturalSciences,Techni calStudies,TechnologicalStudies,GeneralStudi esandVisualandPerformingArts. Table5:CAPEUnitI&UnitII–2008–2012(GradesI–IV) SubjectEntries UnitI Year SubjectEntries UnitII No. %Passed No. %Passed 2008 22,084 93.5 1,455 93.0 2009 23,415 91.8 1,564 90.6 2010 26,180 88.0 12,073 88.0 2011 26,294 92.8 12,350 93.3 2012 22,378 94.0 10,617 93.2 Source:DivisionofEducationalResearchandEvaluation 9.6 AwardofNationalScholarshipsb asedonCAPEResults In2012,theGovernmentawardedthreehundred andseventytwo(372)NationalScholarshipscomprisingse venty(70)openandthree hundredandtwo(302)additionalscholarshipsb asedontheCAPE2012. TheGovernmentincreasedthenumberofnation alscholarshipsfromthreehundredandtwentynine(329)in2010andthreehundredandfiftyfour(354)in2011tothreehundredandseventytwo(372)in2012,basedontheriseinthenumber ofstudents qualifying for such.The estimated AdminReport Additionally,twoPresident‟sMedalswere awardedtothehighestperformingstudentsint heexaminations.Thesestudentswere MarcusIsaacBelascoofNaparimaCollege,Sa nFernando,whowasthetopperformingstuden tinMathematics,NaturalSciencesandEnviro nmentalStudies,andBradBachuofPresentati onCollege,Chaguanaswhowasthetopperfor merinBusiness,Languages,ModernStudies, TechnicalStudies,TechnologicalStudies,Vis ualandPerformingArtsandGeneralStudies. 9.7 Regional Awards Based on the CAPE
  • 55. and CSEC Results One student from St Joseph‟s Convent, St Students from Trinidad and Tobago captured Joseph received the CSEC award for the Most several of the top CXC awards for outstanding Outstanding Candidate in Visual Arts 3- performance on the CAPE and CSEC 2012. Dimensional Students won eight (8) of the nine (9) Regional Expressive Form in 2012. Sculpture and Ceramics Top Awards in CAPE as follows: the most outstanding overall candidate and the most outstanding candidate in Natural Sciences, Technical Studies, Business Studies, PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: Develop national testing and assessment system for both the primary and Environmental Science, Mathematics, Modern secondary levels of education Languages and Humanities. Melissa Persad of Procure textbooks and learning materials St Joseph‟s Convent, St Joseph received the to support changes in the new secondary Dennis Irvine Award, the symbol of academic schools curriculum excellence for the Most Outstanding Candidate Overall. Create and develop a policy for After School Study Centres (ASSC) for existing and new school study centres 2011-2012 Figure10:MinistryofEducationOfficials,CXCOfficialsandStudentsatAwardsCeremony AdminReport
  • 56. 10. TestingandNeuro-DiagnosticsofChildren , Consistentwithitsvisionforthehealthy,happyan dnormaldevelopmentof children,theMinistryhasprioritizedthedelivery ofspecializedservicestopreparechildrenforlear ningandeducationdevelopmentso astotreatwiththeneurologicalandeducationalde velopmentofstudents.Withthispurposein mind,theTestingandNeuroDiagnosticsofChildrenprojectwasinitiated. The objectives of the Testing and NeuroDiagnostics Project are to: Conduct a pilot exercise with eight (8) ECCE Centres and eight (8) Primary schools which will comprise screening, assessment and intervention of children. Table 6 shows the schools selected for the pilot exercise Provide appropriate education programmes and interventions for children assessed with learning needs, to help them to achieve their diverse levels of development Develop a plan for the continued universal screening, testing and intervention planning for the treatment of children Design and develop a programme to address the main factors affecting the child and his/her development including school, parents/guardians/ caregivers, teachers/ principals and classroom interactions. Audio/visual tests were conducted over the period September 2012 to December 2012 for ninety percent (90%) of Infant Year I AdminReport students entering primary school. This was done in conjunction with the Ministry of Health. Some of the benefits to be derived from this project include: Comprehensive provision of specialized services to students catering to specific diagnosed conditions Establishment of a specialized services delivery system to cater to students‟ needs Individualized plans developed for children diagnosed with difficulties, mental challenges, developmental disorders etc. To date technical assistance was procured through the award of a contract for the development and implementation of appropriate strategies, plans and structures for children understanding, to address the needs of all children, and for the design and delivery of suitable children services. The next steps for the project include the preparation of a project charter and work plan by the consultant, launching of the project at national and educational district levels in January 2013 and site visits to the selected pilot schools by consultants and project team members.
  • 57. DISTRICT PRIMARYSCHOOL ECCE CENTRE StGeorgeEast El SocorroSouthGovernment ElSocorroSouthECCECentre PortofSpain LaPuertaGovernment LaPuertaECCECentre NorthEastern SangreGrandeGovernment SangreGrandeECCECentre Caroni CarapichaimaRomanCatholic StSylvanAnglicanECCECentre Victoria LaRomaineGovernment LaRomaineECCECentre StPatrick SantaFloraGovernment SantaFloraECCECentre SouthEastern St.Mary’sGovernment St.Mary’sECCE Tobago BuccooGovernment BuccooECCECentre Table6.PilotSchoolsre;TestingandNeuro-DiagnosticsofChildrenProject PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: Develop a policy for assessment and intervention for testing and neurodiagnostics of children Implement this policy nationwide to all schools in the education system Provide programmes appropriate and education interventions for children assessed with learning needs Provide learning materials for children at all levels, who are diagnosed with various types of learning disorders 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 58. 11. TheContinuousAssessmentComponent(CAC)o ftheSecondaryEntranceAssessmentispartofaser iesoftransformationalinitiativesoftheMinistryo fEducationintendedtorealize thefiveValueOutcomesofeducationforourchildr en.Inordertoequipstudentswith21stcenturyskills ,itisnecessarytochangeteaching andlearningstrategiesandassessmentmethods.T heCACseekstoaddressthediverse backgrounds,aptitudesandlearningstylesofourst udentstoensurethattheyaregiveneveryopportuni tytosucceed. TheCACprogrammeconsistsofspecifiedcurricu lumobjectivesforachievingskillsand competenciesnot previously subject toassessmentonanationalscale.Thesecompeten ciesandskillswillbegainedbystudentsastheypart icipateinactivehands-onlearning supportedby detailedfeedbackprovidedthroughtheirteachers frompracticeassessments.Assessmenttaskswill seestudentsengagedinspecificactivitiesandthea pplicationofstandardscoringguides. Theassessmentswillbemonitoredandmoderated byMinistryofficialstoensure adherencetonationalstandards. TheCACwillbeimplementedinStandard5forthe firsttimeintheacademic year20122013.StudentswritingtheSEAin2013willwritet hetraditionalMathematicsandtheEnglishLangu ageArtspapersonly.Bothsubjects combinedwillcontributeavalueof80%ofthestud ents‟totalmark.Studentswillhavetheopportunity toaccumulatetheother20%overtheentireyearfro mtheCACinCreativeWriting.TheMinistryoffici alsenvisagethatstudentswillbeaffordedagreater chancetodeveloptheirwritinginarelaxedmanner andwillnolongerbemarkedonjustonepieceofwri ting.Duringthelastacademicyear,theactivitiesco mpletedtoensurethattheimplementationoftheC ACisonscheduleincludeinteralia:• AdminReport scoringtoensureobjectivityinmarkingofstud ents‟writing ContinuousAssessment Thetrainingofprimaryschoolteachersina processapproachtowritingand • Allteachersweretrainedtousethesamemark ingschemesuppliedbytheMOE • CXCtrainedthirtyfour(34)CurriculumOfficers one(41)School Supervisors andforty- • Theimplementationofasensitization programmeforPrincipalsandotherstakehol ders through theconductof conferences,fraternitymeetings,cluster groupmeetings,facetofaceinterviewsandte lephonecalls.Alsoprintedpresentationswit hbackgroundinformationandimplementati onplans,Administrators‟booklets,memora ndaandQuestionandAnswerbookletswere developedforschoolprincipals. • Writingnotebooks(portfolios)were providedtostudentsatnoadditionalcosttopa rents. • Teacherswereprovidedwithcopiesofatext whichutilizesCaribbeanbasedthemesand methodologiestosupporttheteachingofwri ting. 11.1Achievements for 2010/2011  On December 31st, 2011, Physical Education and VAPA were included as part of the curriculum. On January 31st, 2012 a framework was developed for the introduction of CAP in primary schools and on March 31st, 2012, CXC was engaged for the inclusion of CAP in SEA.  The Ministry introduced a system of School Based Assessment for primary school students. This will ensure that students are assessed over a period of time, in subjects such as Physical Education; Visual and Performing Arts (Music, Visual Arts, Dance, Theatre);
  • 59. Citizenry Development; Health and Family Life Education; Social Studies; Agri-Science; Morals; Values and Ethics; Language Arts and Mathematics. This initiative will be introduced in the 2012/2013 academic year to Standard 4 and Standard 5 students. Effectively the CAP will contribute to forty percent (40%) of the SEA score by 2014. Students will no longer be faced with „do or die‟ final exit exam thus greatly relieving the stress the students undergo while ensuring they receive a more holistic education. During the last year the MOE successfully administered on December 4th 2012, the first Writing Practice Assessment of the CAC English Arts for Standard five students. The Second Practice Assessment is scheduled for 31st January, 2013. A draft agreement is being considered between CXC and Ministry of Education for assessment support. A workshop was held on July 30th, 012 to review the plan for CAC, its status and further planning and resourcing requirements. The MoE secured the agreement of CXC and finalized the framework for inclusion of CAP in the SEA in March 31, 2012 An intensive training programmewas implemented to support the introduction of CAC in September 2012. The contents of the training programme covered the process approach to writing and scoring to ensure objectivity in marking of students writing and the use of marking schemes supplied by the Ministry of Education The personnel trained include o Seventy-two (72) Facilitators o o Eight hundred and twenty-eight (828) Standard V Teachers Six hundred and nine (609) Standard IV Teachers Eleven thousand (11,000) training manuals and three thousand (3,000) CDs were developed for distribution as teaching aids Resources at five hundred and fiftyseven (557) primary schools were enhanced to support the delivery of the expanded curriculum Primary school teachers were trained in a process approach to writing and scoring to ensue objectivity in marking of students writing as well as to use the same marking scheme supplied by the MOE Thirty-four (34) Curriculum Officers, forty-one (41) School Supervisors and a group of one hundred and twentyone (121) persons were trained as CAC monitors by CXC Additional administrative support was provided to school principals through the placement of over one thousand (1,000) On-The-Job trainees Principals and other stakeholders were sensitized through the conduct of conferences, fraternity meetings, cluster group meetings, face to face interviews and telephone calls. Also printed presentations with background information and implementation plans, Administrators‟ booklets, memoranda and Question and Answer booklets were developed for school principals. AdminReport
  • 60. 13. Writing note books /portfolios were provided to students at no additional cost to parents. Teachers were provided with copies of a text which utilizes Caribbean based themes and methodologies to support the teaching of writing. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: Train 42,290 persons (teachers and other stakeholders) Implement an assessment system at the Primary level to provide alternative strategies to assess the abilities and competencies of students as a component of the SEA. 12. CareerGuidanceandDevelopm entin S condarySchools e TheMinistryisproposingtoprovidetherequiredg uidanceandinstructiontostudentsthatwillassisti ntheircareerdevelopmentandtransitionintothew orldofwork.Fortheacademicyear2011/2012,sixt ypercent(60%)ofsecondaryschoolshaveparticip atedintheCareerGuidanceProgrammeoftheMini stry.InJanuary2013,theMinistryincollaboration withtheMinistryofTertiaryEducationandSkillsT rainingwillbehostingaseriesofCareerFairsacros stheeducationdistrictsincludingTobago.Thiswil lgivestudentstheopportunitytoreceiveinformati ononcareerchoicesaswell asvisitthejobsandcareercoachesthatwillbeavail ableatthevariouslocations. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: Host Career Fairs across all the Education Districts. Increase participation by over 60% of secondary schools in the Career Guidance Programme. AdminReport SocialProgrammes 13.1 TextbookLoanProgramme TheTextbookLoanProgrammeisadministered bytheMinistry‟sTextbook ManagementUnit.Thisisjustoneof theprogrammesthatseektocreateequityofopportu nityineducation.Theprovisionoftextbooksandoth erlearningmaterialstostudentsatalllevelsofthesys temensuresthatstudentsare equippedfortheteachinglearningsituation.TheEducationFacilitiesCompa nyLimited(EFCL)wasresponsiblefortheprocure mentanddistributionofalltextbooksandlearning materialstoECCE,primaryandsecondaryschools. Inanefforttoreducewastageandimprove theefficiency and effectivenessoftheprogramme,the Ministry undertookaninventoryauditinMay2012.Theaudit wasaimedatcollectingdataonallexcesstextbooks orunusedtextbooksintheprimaryandsecondarysc hoolsystemwithaviewtoredistributethebookstoschoolsinneed. Howeversomeofthechallengesencounteredweret hepoorresponsefromschoolsaswellasthelackofre sourcestobothcollectandredistributethebooks.Forfiscal2011/2012thefollow ingwereprovided: 13.1.1 InfantsIandInfantsII Textbooksinfive(5)subjectareas-Mathematics, LanguageArts,Reading,ScienceandSocialStudies,a swellasworkbooks,inthethree(3)subjectareasofLan guageArts,ScienceandReading. 13.1.2 Standard1toStandard5 Textbooksinfive(5)subjectareas-Mathematics, LanguageArts,Reading,Science,andSocialStudie s,andone(1)dictionaryforstudentsofStandard1an done(1)AtlasforstudentsofStandard3. 13.1.3 Forms1,2 and3 Each studentwas provided with one (1) textbookforeachoftheseven(7)coreareasofthec urriculumnamelyMathematics,English,Spanis h,SocialStudies,IntegratedScience,PhysicalEd ucation,andVisualandPerformingArts(VAPA). Inaddition,allstudentsenteringForm1,wereprov idedwithanAtlas,aSpanishdictionaryandanEng lishdictionarytoberetainedbythestudentsuptoex
  • 61. amination level. 13.1.4 TheSchoolNutritionProgrammecurrentlyprovi desapproximatelyonehundredandfiftyseventhousand,threehundredandsixtyone(157,361)breakfastandlunch Forms4and 6 One(1)textbookineachofthesubjectareas, pursuedby thestudent. mealstostudentsthroughouttheeducationsyste m.Thisrepresentsanoverallincreaseoftwothous and,threehundredandsixtyone(2,361)mealseachdayoverthepreviousfinan cialyear.ThefollowingTable7reflectsthebreakd ownofthebeneficiariesofschoolmealsbyeducati onlevelsasatMay31,2012. Thetextbookstobeusedinschoolswere selected by thePrincipals, in conjunction withthesubjectteachers. 13.2 SchoolNutritionProgramme Table7:DistributionofmealsbylevelandcostasatMay31st,2012 EducationLevel Breakfast perday Lunch perday BreakfastandLunch perday Costperday Pre-school 456 7,551 8,007 $68,273.78 Primary 43,394 66,965 110,359 $927,048.06 Secondary 13,047 20,998 34,045 $286,828.06 SpecialSchool 611 897 1,508 $11,952.53 1,497 1,945 3,442 $28,558.81 Technical/Vocational Total 59,005 98,356 157,361 $1,322,661.23 TotalexpenditurefortheperiodOctober2011toMay2012was$196,513,559comparedto $170,835,465spentoverthesameperiodinFiscal2011. InanefforttoimprovetheoveralleffectivenessandefficiencyoftheProgramme,theNationalSchoolsDietar yServicesLimited(NSDSL)hasprioritizedthefollowingactionsthatneedtobeimplementedinfiscalyear20 13.Theseareasfollows: • DefinitionandprioritizationoftheNSDSL • AchievingmodelSchoolNutritionProgrammestatus • ConductofResearch • Commencenegotiationofnewmealprices(paymenttocaterers) 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 62. CHAPTERTWO Goal 2 TransformingtheMinistryintoa HighPerformingOrganization AdminReport
  • 63. TransformingtheMinistryintoa HighPerformingOrganization rogressineducation depends on effective governanceandadequatenationalpolicies.Mindfulofthis,three(3)o rganizational priorities have been developed for thetransformationoftheMinistryintoahighperfor mingorganization. Theseare: P • OrganizationalRestructuringandInstitutionalStrengthe ningwhichincorporatesdevelopmentofInformationCo mmunicationTechnology • CorporateCommunicationStrategy • HumanResourceManagementandStrengthening AdminReport
  • 64. 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 65. 2.1 OrganizationalRestructuringandInstitutionalStrengthening Thethrustofthesetransformationinitiativesistowardsimprovinginternalpractices,processesandservic edelivery.Workcontinuedapacein2012toreengineertheoperationsoftheMinistryinordertoimprovethequalityandtimeliness ofservicesbeingdelivered.To thisend,thecapacityoftheProgrammeandProjectsPlanningandManagementUnit(PPPMU)wasfurthe rexpandedin2011/2012. ThisUnitservesasthemainpointofmanagementforallprogrammesandprojectsoftheMOE.Themajorbe nefitsfromthisapproachincludeharmonisationofefforts,commonuseofprojectsandchangemanageme ntmethodologies,developmentanduseofcore andsupportbusinessprocesses.Additionally,thisapproachwillallowtheMinistrytofocusonitscoreresp onsibilitiesandefficientandeffectivedeliveryofgoals(valueoutcomes), whichleadstowardsensuringvalueformoney spentontheeducationsystem. Central to the success of the Ministry‟stransformationisthecreationofasuitable organisationalstructure.In thisregard, effortswerepursuedtodevelopthenewtoporganisationalstructurewhichhasbeenapprovedbytheSenior ExecutiveTeam.Alleffortsweremadetoensurethatthestructure wasreflectiveofandwouldberesponsivetotheMinistry‟stransformationinitiativesandstrategicobjectiv es.Tothisend,thepersonwhowasidentifiedtoleadtherespective functionalarea,workedwithaTeamconsistingofpersonsdrawnfromrelevantareas,supportedbypersons providingorganisationalstructuringorhumanresourcemanagementexpertise,asrequired.Thedevelop mentoftheorganisationalstructuresforthefollowingDivisionswassignificantlyadvancedin2012:• SchoolSupervisionandManagement • CorporatePlanning • TeachingandTeacherDevelopment • Educational ServicesDelivery Uponcompletionoftherestructuringexercise,therequisiteapprovalswillbesoughtsothatimplementat ionmaycommence. PROJECTIONSFOR2013-2015 • Conductof an organizationalreview oftheHRManagementDivisionwhichwillfacilitateacoordinatedalignment ofstructurewithroles,aswellas,fortheassessmentofthecurrentHRMprocesses,inclusiveofitsI HRIS • ReviewofcurrentandproposedmanagementstructureoftheMOEandmakingofrelevantrecom mendations • Identificationoftheresourcesrequired, optimumperformanceofthebusinessprocesses. • The Ministry will be recruiting a Consultant for the Human Resource Management Strategy, Organisation Structuring, Process and Organisation Transformation and IHRIS implementation. Review current and proposed management structure of the MoE in order to foster improved decision making, processes and systems of the Ministry Develop a Monitoring and Evaluation Framework for the Ministry. Conduct of rapid assessment/evaluation of projects and programmes. Communicate and disseminate strategy for the Education Sector Strategic Plan 2011 – 2015. AdminReport Identify the resources required, including technological, that will ensure optimum performance • • • • • includingtechnological,thatwillensure
  • 66. of the business processes. 2.1.1 InformationandCommunicationTechnology • Inadditiontoinitiativesimplementedattheschoollevel,theMinistryisworkingtoprovideatthec entrallevelaCentralisedWANOptimisedWirelessSystemthatwillfacilitateseamlessroamingby Students,Teachers,AdministrativeStaffandotherStakeholdersthroughoutallMOElocations/s ites.Computerisationoftheeducationdistrictofficesisongoing.TheSouthEasternDistrictoffic eiscurrentlybeingupgraded,whiletheinstallation and commissioningofLocalAreaNetworksatsix(6)EducationalDistrictOfficeshavebeenco mpleted.Atotalof$3Mhasbeenexpendedtoimprove theICTinfrastructureattheEducationDistrictOffices. In2013,the Ministryplansto:1. Provideatleasta10MbNetworkconnectiontoeachMOESitewhichwillfacilitatetheSharingof ServicesamongstallStakeholders 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 67. 2. Providefencefencewirelesscoveragetoallstakeholders withinMOESites. 3. Provideatleasta1GbofFilteredInternetth atwillbeprioritisedandSharedamongstal lSites 4. Upgradethehardwareinfrastructureateac hsite. 5. Procurecomputersandperipheralequipm entfortheoutfittingoftheMinistry‟soffice sinthenewbuildingsandthedistrictoffice sfor Caroni,Port-ofSpainandEnvirons,NorthEasternandSt. Patrick 6. Procurecomputersandperipheralequipm ent foronehundred andthirtynine(139)schoolsundertheCo mputerizationofPrimarySchoolsProgra mme 7. Provideeducationalsoftwareforfourhun dredandseventysix(476)primaryschools 2.2HumanResourceManagementandS trengthening Theservicesofaconsultantarebeingprocuredto providetechnicalassistance forthe conductofaconsultancyaimedatthetransformati onoftheHumanResource ManagementDivisionoftheMinistry,includingf ullutilizationoftheIntegratedHumanResourceIn formationSystem(IHRIS).ArevisedTORforthis consultancywasdeveloped and a request forProposal was senttothenine(9)qualifiedbiddersonJuly25th,20 12bytheCentralTendersBoard.Theclosingdatef orRFPwasAugust23rd,2012.Proposalshavebee nevaluated.TheselectedConsultantisexpectedt obecontractedandtobeginworkshortly. 2.2.1Staffing TheMinistryofEducationcollaboratedwiththeT eachingServiceCommissioninthefillingofvaca nciesinpromotionalpositionsasfollows:- 8. Expandtheprimaryschoolnetworkinfras tructuretoaccommodatewirelessnetwor kaccessatthreehundredandforty(340)pri maryschool 9. Providesupportforthelaptopinitiative throughthe provision of wirelessandnetworkinterfacecards,cabli ng,connectors,serversandhub 10. Providehardwareandsoftwaretosupporta webbasedSchoolBasedManagementSystem( SBMS)thatwillcapturedata onstudents,teachersandschoolstoinformp olicy-making AdminReport
  • 68. 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 69. TeachingService PromotionsreceivedfromTeachingServiceCommissionfor2012areasfollows:- PrimarySchools POSITIONS TOTAL Principal(Primary) 82 VicePrincipal(Primary) 15 HeadsofDepartment(Primary) 63 SeniorTeacher(Primary) 3 Dean(Primary) 60 SeniorTeacher(Primary) 100 SeniorSpecialTeacher(Primary) AssistantTeacher(Primary) 3 130 SecondarySchools POSITIONS TOTAL Principal(Secondary) 25 VicePrincipal(Secondary) 24 HeadofDepartment(Secondary) 6 Dean(Secondary) 60 DuringthelastyeartheMinistryofEducationreceivednoticefromtheTeachingServiceCommission ofthepermanentappointmentsofonehundredandforty-five(145)teachers(Technical/Vocational TeacherI/II/III/IV–TeacherII/III). 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 70. DELINKEDSTAFF NEW APPOINTMENT PROMOTION ChiefEducationOfficer ACTINGAP POINTMENT 1 Director, EducationalResearchand Evaluation 1 AssistantDirector, EducationandEvaluation 1 CurriculumOfficer 29 SchoolsSupervisorIII 2 SchoolsSupervisorI GuidanceOfficer 4 2 EducationTestingOfficer 1 InthelastyeartheMinistryofEducationrecommendedtotheTeachingServiceCommissiontwohundre dandthirty(230)newrecruitsforthepositionsof(Technical/VocationalTeacherI/II/III/IV– TeacherII/III). CivilService PromotionsintheCivilService Inthelastyear,therewereninetyone(91)promotionsinvariouscategoriesofstaff, onehundredandthirtytwo(132)permanentappointmentsinvariouscat egoriesofstaff,while there were one hundredand twenty-four (124)newrecruitmentsinvariouscategories. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: AdminReport Develop and implement an eRegistry of Teachers. Implement a Training Plan for Civil Service staff. Develop a Policy on the implementation of a Recognition System for staff of MoE. 2.3CorporateCommunicationStrategy The Ministry‟s Communication strategyiscrucialtogettingthemessageouttoourst akeholdersregardingoureffortstotransformtheed ucationsystem.Thefeedbackfromstakeholdersis highlyrespected sinceithelpsustoimproveourperformance.TheMi nistryisworkingtowardsstrengtheningitscommu nicationsarmasitseekstoimprove itsbrandandlevelsofeffectiveness.Plans areintraintohireaDirectortoheadtheCommunicati ons Unit. That personwillberesponsibleforthedevelopmentofac omprehensivecommunicationstrategy,amongoth erthings.ThehiringprocesscommencedinJanuary 2013.
  • 71. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: The Ministry will embark on the selection and recruitment of a Consultant to develop the MOE‟s Communication Strategy. Sign a contract with the selected Consultant 2.4 InternalStakeholders Thestrengthofanyorganizationdependsonitsh umanresources.TheMinistryrecognizestheim portanceofitsstaffandtheirinputtowardstheatt ainmentofitsorganizationalgoalsandpriorities .DuringthelastyeartheMinistrycontinuedtore cognize andshowitsappreciationformembersofstafffo rtheirinvaluablecontributions.Onesuchappre ciation washeldforretireesoftheMinistryatagalafunct ionheldinNovember2011. SEAAwardCeremony WorldTeachers’Day SEA2013PrimeMinisterandMinisterofEdu cationschoolvisits. 2 AdminReport
  • 72. Figure11:CelebrationsattheMinistryofEducation SomeoftheothercelebratoryeventsthatwereheldinthelastyearincludedaChris tmasfunctioninDecember2011 andafunction forsecretarialstaffinApril2012.Theselighteroccasionswereembracedbystafft omixandmingleandtogettoknoweachotherbetter.Figure14capturessomeofth esemoments 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 73. CHAPTERTHREE Goal 3 Engage Stakeholdersin theChangeandTransformationProcess
  • 74. Engage Stakeholders in the ChangeandTransformationPro cess uccessfuldeliveryineducationreliesonmanypeopleandorga nisationsacrossthecommunityworking togetherforthebenefitofschools. TheMinistryanditsmany stakeholdersandbenefactorscontinuetoworkprogressivelytoim provethequalityofeducation.AstheMinistryseekstoadvanceitsre forminitiatives,theneedtoengagestakeholderscannotbeoverstat ed.Moreso,since,severaloftheseinitiativesrequire inputfromstakeholdersandquiteoftenconstantdialogueandexch angeofinformation.Incollaborationwithourstakeholderswewere abletoachievethefollowingin2011/2012. S Principals’ Consultation AdminReport
  • 75. AdminReport20112012 3.1 EngagingStakeholders InJune2012,theMinistryofEducationalongwith otherMinistriesandagenciesparticipatedinaPub licServiceCareerFair.Informationontrainingop portunitiesandemploymentwere providedtojobseekers.TheJobFairallowedcitize nsoveraperiodoffourdaysinNorthandSouthTrin idadandTobagotointeractwithgovernmentservi ceproviders,andlearnmore aboutwhatdifferentpublicsectororganisations aredoingtomakeservicesmoreaccessibleinatim elyandcost-effectivemanner. TheMinistryheldanumberofmeetingswithoneo fitskeystakeholders– TTUTA,toinformandgarnertheirsupportforsev eralinitiativesincludingtheintroductionoftheCo ntinuousAssessmentComponent(CAC)oftheSec ondaryEntranceAssessment. Meetingswerealso heldwiththeNational ParentTeacherAssociation(NPTA),todiscussfu rtherstrengtheningoftheirrelationship withtheMinistry.TheMinisterofEducationreite ratedhiscommitmenttoengageandrecognisethe roleofparentsinthesupportanddevelopmentofc hildrenasfundamentalelementsofoureducation system.TheNPTAwasinformedoftheMinistry‟s planstosetstandards,specificationsandrequire mentsthatareapplicabletotherecruitmentofpers onsforteachingpositionsbytheTeachingService Commission(TSC).TheNPTAexecutivewasco mmendedfortheirinitiativeindealingwithprobl emsliketardinessbystudentsandintheiroveralla pproachtoproblemsolving.NPTAandtheMinist ry of Education also agreed to worktogethertoimprovethequalityofthemealsb eingofferedtostudentsinallschoolcafeteriasasw ellas,thosedistributedbytheNational e=2011-
  • 76. 2012 AdminReport
  • 77. WorldTeachers’Day SchoolDietaryServicesLtd.Bothpartiesreiterat edtheircommitment tojoin forcestoachievetheholisticdevelopmentofourc hildren,astheNPTAoffereditssupportre:theMin istry‟sContinuousAssessmentComponent(CA C). TheMOEhostedaPrincipals‟LeadershipConfer encethemed „TheLeader in Me‟.TheconferencewasheldattheCentreofExcel lence,MacoyaonMarch27,2012andwaswellatte ndedbyacrosssectionofprincipalsfromprimary andsecondaryschools.Theobjectivewastocreat eleadershippersonalities whoareequippedtosupportandimplementtheref orminitiativesforearlychildhoodcare andeducation,primaryandsecondaryschools. TheMOEcontinueditsprogrammeoftrainingofed ucatorsfortheContinuousAssessmentComponent oftheSEA.TeachersofstandardIV andV; school administrators and parent/ guardiansofchildrenwhoarebeinghomeschoole dwereinvitedtotrainingsessionsthatwereheldfr omJuly23rdtoAugust25th,2012. The achievements for 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 are as follows: 3.1.1 Stakeholder consultations Stakeholder Engagement Workshops were hosted for internal and external stakeholders to elicit the widest possible views on the Ministry‟s Strategy Report, November, 2010. Over four hundred and fifty (450) primary school Principals, School Supervisors, Representatives of TTUTA, NPTA, Denominational Boards, UWI, UTT, participated in the Primary School Principals‟ Workshop on November 15, 2011 at Centre of Excellence. MOE strengthened its relationships with stakeholders by holding meetings on a regular basis to extensively discuss issues relating to
  • 78. education. Meetings were held with TTUTA and the NPTA. As a result, the Ministry got full support from these organizations with respect to the change of the date of the SEA from March to May 2012. In the spirit of collaboration TTUTA was invited to assign a representative to sit on the national Council for Early Childhood Care and Education which will comprise members of the Ministry of Education, private sector and universities, among others. TTUTA is one of the Ministry‟s key stakeholders whose input is highly valued and respected, therefore the Ministry remains committed to strengthening its working relationship with TTUTA to address some of the vexing problems affecting the schools. Ministry of Education hosted a Corporate Bodies Consultation on the alignment of extra- curricular activities with the key objectives of MOE. More than two hundred and fifty (250) NGOs, FBOs and other organizations participated. 3.1.2 Recognition and Reward The Ministry of Education honoured the nation‟s teachers as part of its celebration of World‟ Teacher Day (October 5,2011). Over two hundred and forty (240) retirees were honoured by the MOE on 11th February, 2012 at the HYATT One hundred and fifty-eight (158) SEA Top Performing Students (attaining scores of 95% and over) were honoured by the MOE at the Hyatt on 4th February 2012. 3.1.3 Reaching vulnerable children The Tobago School for Special Needs Children was opened on December 15, 2011. The Task Force on Violence and Indiscipline in schools was established under the chairmanship of the Minister in the Ministry of Education. The Task Force comprises persons from the Ministries of Sport, People and Social Development, Community Development, National Security, The Solicitor General‟s Office, National Parent Teachers Association (NPTA), Association of Principals of Public Secondary Schools, Association of Principals of Assisted Secondary Schools, Association of Denominational Boards, Trinidad and Tobago Unified Teachers‟ Association and representatives from the Ministry of Education. The National Student Hotline was activated in collaboration with Childline, a registered nonprofit organization, and the Ministry of the People and Social Development. The project provides a twenty–four (24) hour, free telephone service for children and young adults.Childline, the host of the National Student Hotline, offers children and adolescents counseling on a wide range of issues that affect their lives. 3.1.4 Engaging students Secondary school students participated in the Eco-Song Competition organized by the Environmental Management Authority (EMA). The Ministry of Education has also partnered with the EMA over the past 12 years on the Primary Schools‟ „Hands-On‟ Competition and the Secondary Schools‟ Dramatic Envirologue (Forms 4-6).
  • 79. 3.2 CommunityParticipatio n PrimeMinistercollaboratesforaholistic education A d m i n R e p TheMinistryrecognisestheimportanceofengagi ngthecommunityinthedeliveryofqualityeducati on.TheMinistryhasenjoyedalongstandingpartn ershipwiththelocalchurchesintheoperationofpr imaryandsecondaryschoolsinthecountry.Thisre lationshipwasformalisedwiththeenactmentofth eConcordatof1960,whichoutlinedthesharedres ponsibilitiesofbothpartiesinthedevelopmentofe ducation.Atotalof339primaryschoolsand41sec ondaryschoolsareownedandoperatedbyvarious denominationalboardsofmanagement,withfina ncialsupportprovidedbytheMinistry.Thispartne rshipwiththecommunitycontinuestobenurtured withtheprocessofinstallingLocal SchoolBoards(LSBs)inallgovernmentschools.Th eseLocalSchoolBoardscomprisemembersofthe school‟sadministration,thePTA,studentreprese ntatives,teacherrepresentativesandcommunity members.Atpresent,thereare thirtyfour(34or25%)governmentprimaryschoolsand onehundredandthirtyfour(134or100%)governmentsecondaryschool swithoperatingLocalSchoolBoards.Inaddition, theMinistryhascreatedaclosepartnershipwithth e National Parent -Teachers‟ Associationasavehicleforaddressingtheissuesf acingparentsintheeducationanddevelopmentof ourchildren. SpecialOlympics AdRep1-
  • 80. ImplementationofaMentorshipProgr ammeinPrimaryandSecondarySchool s TheMOEhaspartneredwiththeMinistryofNatio nalSecuritytoimplementtheNational MentorshipProgramme(NMP).TheNational MentorshipProgrammeisgearedtowardpositive youthdevelopment,andisaimedatyoungpeople betweentheagesof9to25years,fromprimarytote rtiarylevel,aswellasyouthingeneralwhomaynot havehadtheopportunitytobeexposedtoastablem entor.Participantswillbepairedwithrolemodels whowillteachthemfundamentallifeskills,civicr esponsibilityandpositivewaysofrelatingtotheir peers.Amongthemanypositives,alongtermbenefit oftheprojectisexpectedtobeareductioninyoutho ffences. Atpresent,thereare190mentees(150malesand4 0females)withmentorsregisteredintheprogram meand104menteesawaitingmentors. 114mentorshavecompletedthetrainingprogram mewith53mentorsmatchedand32mentorstentat ivelymatchedtomentees. ChildhoodCareandEducation(ECCE)providers topartnerwiththeMinistrytoachieveUniversalE ducation(ECCE).Theconsultationswere scheduledasfollows:• Group1ECCECentresinthefollowingEducationdi stricts:PortofSpain,St.GeorgeEastandNor thEastern • Group2ECCECentresinthefollowingEducationD istricts:Caroni,SouthEastern,Victoria andSt. Patrick • AnECCEconsultationisalsobeingplann edforTobago. Participantswerepresentedwithfouroptions.Eac hoptionoutlinedtheobligationsofboththeMoEa ndtheprospectiveserviceproviders.Thisprocess willstreamlineECCEsector,astheMinistrystrive stobethefirstnationtoachieve universalEarlyChildhoodCareandEducationby 2015. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 – 2015: 3.3 s ConsultationwithECCEProvider InJune2012aseriesofconsultationswasheldwit htheaimofengagingprivateEarly AdminReport Fully engage all stakeholders of the activities and plans of the Ministry with emphasis on soliciting feedback to ensure greater success in implementation.
  • 81. CHAPTERFOUR FinancialReview AdminReport
  • 82. FinancialReview For the financial year 2011/2012, the Ministry of Education was allocated the sum of four billion, one hundred and forty-three million, eight hundred and sixty-nine thousand, three hundred and thirty-eight dollars ($4,143,869,338) to facilitate both Development (Capital) and Recurrent (operational) expenditure. This allocation represented 6.99% of the total national expenditure of $59,215,465,885 (total recurrent and total development programme expenditure of Trinidad and Tobago) and also a small increase of 1.66% over the total expenditure of $4,076,069,389 provided for fiscal 2010/2011. YEAR TOTALRECURRENT EXPENDITURE $ TOTALDEVELOPMENT (CAPITAL)EXPENDITURE TOTALEXPENDITURE $ $ 2008 3,337,499,200 840,224,308 4,177,723,508 2009 3,211,995,835 1,066,286,466 4,278,282,301 2010 3,295,548,639 484,583,914 3,780,132,553 2011 3,475,411,204 600,656,185 4,076,067,389 2012 3,603,847,938 540,021,400 4,143,869,338 Table8–MinistryofEducation’sFinancialAllocation(2008–2012) Table8showsRecurrentExpenditure,Capital ExpenditureandTotalExpenditureoftheMinistr yofEducationoverafive(5)yearperiod2008to20 12.Overthefive- year period,,recurrentexpenditurehasincreasedfrom yeartoyear except for the year 2009 where it dropped to the lowestallocation in the sum of three billion, two hundred and eleven thousand nine hundred and ninety-five thousand, eight hundred and thirty-five dollars ($3,211,995,835).. Other than this only year, the total recurrent expenditure for each year within the said five-year period rose each year steadily. The Development (Capital) Programme expenditure fluctuates each year for the same five-year period, that is, it reflects increases and decreases from year to year to accommodate the infrastructural works done on behalf of the Ministry. . AdminReport
  • 83. Thegeneraltrendofthetotalexpenditureshowsi ncreasesfromyeartoyearexceptin2010where therewasasmalldecreaseintotalallocationtoth eMinistryofEducation.Fortheyearunderrevie w(2011– 2012)therewasanincreaseintherecurrentexpe nditure,howevertherewasadecreaseincapitale xpenditure. 4.1 RecurrentExpenditur e Government‟srecurrentexpenditurereflectsm oneyspentonthedaytodayoperationsoftheMin istry.Recurrentexpenditureconsistsmainlyof: • Personnelexpenditurewages;salaries;allowances;settlement ofarrears;overtime; government‟s contributiontonationalInsurance,grou phealthinsuranceandgrouppensionfor GeneralAdministration,PrimaryEduc ationandSecondaryEducation • Goodsandservicestravellingandsubsistence;overseastravelfacili ties;utilityexpenses;repairsandmaintenancet ovehicles,equipmentandbuildings;officemat erialsandsupplies;training;janitorialandmain tenanceservicesetc.forGeneralAdministratio n;PrimaryandSecondaryEducation;DistrictS ervicesDivision;EarlyChildhoodandCareand EducationUnitand AdminReport RudranathCapildeo LearningResourceCentre • Minorequipmentpurchasesvehicles;officeequipment;furnitureandfurnis hingsotherminorequipmentpurchasesforGen eralAdministration;PrimaryEducation;Distri ctServicesDivision;EarlyChildhoodandCare andEducationUnitandRudranathCapildeo LearningResourceCentre Currenttransfersandsubsidiestransfersandsubsidiesto Regional Bodies; United NationsOrganisations; International Bodies; Educational Institutions; Households; State Enterprises Currenttransferstostatutoryboardsandsimilar bodies-transferstoStatutoryboards; Trinidadand Tobago National CommissionforUNESCO; National Libraryand Information System Forfiscal2011/2012,the recurrentexpenditure of threebillion,sixhundredandthreemillion,eight hundredand forty seven thousandandninehundredandthirtyeightdolla rs($3,603,847,938) represented86.97%ofthe Ministry‟stotalallocationof four billion, one hundred and forty three million, eight hundred and sixty nine thousand and three hundred and thirty eight dollars ($4,143,869,338).
  • 84. DESCRIPTION Goods andServices MinorEquipmentPurchases CurrentTransfersandSubsidies CurrentTransferstoStatutoryB oardsandSimilarBodies TOTAL 2012REVISED ESTIMATES $ NETINCREASE/( DECREASE) $ 2,058,837,078 2,056,023,000 (2,814,078) 704,085,691 773,862,100 69,776,409 71,569,163 101,193,200 29,624,037 638,568,2 7 0 659,896,568 30,828,298 2,351,002 3,373,070 1,022,068 3,475,411,204 PersonnelExpenditure 2011ACTUAL EXPENDITURE $ 3,603,847,938 128,436,734 Table9-SummaryofRecurrentExpenditurefortheMinistryofEducation(2011–2012) Table9illustratesadecreaseinpersonnelexpendi ture oftwomillion,eighthundredandfourteenthousa ndandseventyeightdollars($2,814,078)whilee xpenditureongoodsandservices;minorequipme ntpurchases;currenttransfersandsubsidiesandc urrenttransferstostatutoryboardsandsimilarbod iesincreasedoverthefiscalyears2011and2012.T helargestincreaseofsixtyninemillion,sevenhun dredandseventysixthousand,fourhundredandni nedollars($69,776,409)wasasaresultof higherexpenditureforgoodsandservicesgoodsa ndservices utilized by the various Divisions, statutory Boards and Similar Bodies under the purview of the Ministry. Recurrentexpenditureforfiscal2011/2012represe ntsanincreaseofonehundredandtwentyeightmilli on,fourhundredandthirtysixthousand,andsevenh undredandthirtyfourdollars($128,436,734)fromt heallocationfor fiscal2010/2011asillustratedinTable9above. AdminReport
  • 85. ESCRIPTION 2011ACTUAL EXPENDITURE $ 2012REVISED ESTIMATES $ NETINCREASE/( DECREASE) $ PersonnelExpenditure 2,058,837,078 2,056,023,000 (2,814,078) 704,085,691 773,862,100 69,776,409 71,569,163 101,193,200 29,624,037 638,568,270 659,896,568 30,828,298 2,351,002 3,373,070 1,022,068 3,475,411,204 3,603,847,938 128,436,734 Goods andServices MinorEquipmentPurchases CurrentTransfersandSubsidies CurrentTransferstoStatutoryB oardsandSimilarBodies TOTAL Table9-SummaryofRecurrentExpenditurefortheMinistryofEducation(2011–2012) Table9illustratesadecreaseinpersonnelexpendi ture oftwomillion,eighthundredandfourteenthousa ndandseventyeightdollars($2,814,078)whilee xpenditureongoodsandservices;minorequipme ntpurchases;currenttransfersandsubsidiesandc urrenttransferstostatutoryboardsandsimilarbod iesincreasedoverthefiscalyears2011and2012.T helargestincreaseofsixtyninemillion,sevenhun dredandseventysixthousand,fourhundredandni nedollars($69,776,409)wasasaresultof AdminReport higherexpenditureforgoodsandservicesgoodsa ndservices. Recurrentexpenditureforfiscal2011/2012represe ntsanincreaseofonehundredandtwentyeightmilli on,fourhundredandthirtysixthousand,andsevenh undredandthirtyfourdollars($128,436,734)fromt heallocationfor fiscal2010/2011asillustratedinTable9above.
  • 86. SUB-HEAD/ITEM/SUBITEMDESCRIPTION 2012REVISEDESTIMATES $ 01PERSONNELEXPENDITURE 001GeneralAdministration 01Salariesand Costof LivingAllowance 05SecondaryEducation 01Salariesand Costof LivingAllowance 006PrimaryEducation 01Salariesand Costof LivingAllowance 154,000,000 907,000,000 860,000,00 02GOODSANDSERVICES 001GeneralAdministration 16ContractEmployment 37JanitorialServices 43SecurityServices 120,000,000 106,800,000 204,000,000 03MINOREQUIPMENTPURCHASES 001GeneralAdministration 90,844,000 04CURRENTTRANSFERSANDSUBSIDIES 006EducationalInstitutions 330,781,250 011TransferstoStateEnterprises 02NationalSchoolsDietaryServicesLimited 248,000,000 05 CURRENTTRANSFERSTOSTATUTORYBOARDSANDSIMI LARBODIES 004StatutoryBoards 13TrinidadandTobagoNationalCommissionforUNES CO 3,373,070 Table10-Majorrecurrentexpenditureundersub-headsforfiscal2011/2012 GOODS and SERVICES: Goods and services have accounted for a substantial proportion of the budget. These include payments for utilities (water and sewerage, telephone, internet access for all primary and secondary schools, and electricity). The expenditure for Rental/Lease of property for accommodation amounted to sixty-six million, six hundred and fifty-four thousand, two hundred and thirty-seven dollars ($66,654,237), while Repairs and Maintenance to Buildings amounted to nine million, eight hundred and eighteen thousand, nine hundred and thirty-two dollars ($9,818,932). The expenditure for contract employment, the provision of janitorial services and security services were high. Employees are hired on a contractual basis. There are also the provision Schools‟ Clerical Officers at the Primary Schools, cleaners/janitors and security guards at Primary Schools, Secondary Schools, ECCE centres and other buildings under the purview of the Ministry. The aforementioned expenses totalled four hundred and thirty million, eight hundred thousand dollars ($430,800,000) and represent 55.7% of total expenditure under total goods and services ($773,862,100). AdminReport
  • 87. MINOR EQUIPMENT PURCHASES: Minorequipmentpurchasesforgeneraladminist rationrepresentedthemajorityoftotalexpenditur eonminorequipment.Infiscal2011/2012theMi nistryofEducationboughtvehicles,officeequip ment,furnitureandfurnishingsandotherminore quipmentforgeneraladministrationvaluedatnin etymillioneighthundredandfortyfourthousand dollars($90,844,000).Thisrepresents89.8%oft otalexpenditureonminorequipmentpurchases ($101,193,200). There is also the purchase of Minor Equipment for District Services Divisions, RCLRC, and some Primary Schools. The cost of minor equipment for the Primary Schools was twenty million, three hundred and twenty-four thousand, eight hundred and forty-nine dollars ($20,324,849). The total expenditure for the other units was one million, five hundred and forty-six thousand, six hundred and ninety-three dollars ($1,546,693). MINOR EQUIPMENT PURCHASES: Currenttransfers/subsidiestoEducationalInsti tutionsandtheNationalSchoolDietaryService sLimitedamountedtofivehundredandseventy eightmillion,sevenhundredandeightyonetho usandandtwohundredandfiftydollars($578,7 81,250).Thisrepresented87.70%oftotalcurrent transfersandsubsidies($659,896,568).Theset ransfersincludedgrantstoassisted primaryschools,assistedsecondaryschools,pr ivateprimaryschools,privatesecondaryschoo lsandgovernmentsecondaryschools;textbook sprovidedthroughthetextbookrentalprogram meandbreakfastandlunchtostudentsetc. Infiscal2011/2012,currenttransferstostatutoryb oardsandsimilarbodiesrepresented0.1%oftotalr ecurrentexpenditure($3,603,847,938).Asinglet ransferwasmadetotheTrinidadandTobagoNatio nalCommissionforUNESCO.Thistransferwasv aluedatthreemillion,threehundredandseventyth reethousandandseventydollars($3,373,070). Onanannualbasislarge sums of money areallocatedfortheprovisionofjanitorial/mai ntenance services, security services,thetextbookloanprogramme,thesch AdminReport oolnutritionprogammeandgrantstoprimarya nd secondaryschools.Thegovernment‟ssustain edefforttoexpendontheseservicesindicatesit scommitment to ensuringthat students have allthenecessary resourcestosupporttheirlearning. 4.2 DevelopmentProgrammeExp enditure TotalcapitalexpenditurecomesfromtheConsol idatedandInfrastructureDevelopmentFunds.It consistsofexpenditureonSocialInfrastructure andMultiSectoralandOtherservicesfallingunderHead2 6(DevelopmentProgramme)andHead701(Inf rastructure Development).Thisexpenditurereflectstheac quisitionorenhancementoffixedorlongtermas sets. FallingundertheheadingofSocialInfrastructur e areimprovement/refurbishment/extensions;c onstruction;procurementoffurnitureandequip mentforECCEcentres,primaryschools,secon daryschoolsandschoolscateringforstudentswi thspecialneeds.Multisectoralandotherservicescaterforpaymentsm adefor administrativeservices andrenovations/construction/relocation/outfi ttingandrefurbishmentofpublicbuildings. Forfiscal2011/2012,thetotalprogrammeexpe nditureoffivehundredandfortymillion,twenty onethousandandfourhundreddollars($540,02 1,400)represented13.03%oftheMinistry‟stota lallocationoffourbillion,onehundredandforty threemillion,eighthundredandsixtyninethous andandthreehundredandthirtyeightdollars($4, 143,869,338).
  • 88. SUB-HEAD/ITEM/SUBITEMDESCRIPTION 2012REVISEDESTIMATES $ 09DEVELOPMENTPROGRAMME (HEAD26) 004SocialInfrastructure 04Education 10,450,000 005Multi-SectoralandOtherServices 06GeneralPublicServices 31,132,400 26MINISTRYOFEDUCATION(HEAD701) 004SocialInfrastructure 04Education Pre-Primary Primary Secondary SpecialEducation 005Multi-SectoralandOtherServices 06GeneralPublicServices TOTALCAPITALEXPENDITURE 7,000,000 200,570,000 285,869,000 3,000,000 2,000,000 540,021,400 Table11-Summaryofcapitalexpenditureforfiscal2011/2012 AsseeninTable11,thelargestcontributortototald evelopmentprogrammeexpenditure wassocialinfrastructureunderHead701,valueda tfourhundredandninetysixmillion,fourhundred andthirtyninethousanddollars($496,439,000). This represents91.9%oftotalcapitalexpenditure($54 0,021,400).Duringthefiscalyear2011/2012,the MinistryofEducationspentlargeproportionsof money onimprovements/refurbishments/extensionsto ECCEcentres,primaryschools,secondaryschoo lsandspecialschools.Paymentswere madeforconstructionofPenalRockSDMS;Mon keyTownGovernmentPrimarySchool;St.Barba ra‟sSpiritualShouterBaptistSchool;EnterpriseG overnmentPrimarySchool;BicheHighSchool;S ipariaEastSecondary;SchoolforSpecialEducati onatPoint Fortinandmany more. UnderHead26,multisectoralandotherserviceswerethesecondlargest contributortototaldevelopmentexpenditurevalu edatthirtyonemilliononehundredand thirtytwothousandandfourhundreddollars($31, 132,400).Thisrepresents5.76%oftotaldevelop mentexpenditure($540,021,400).Duringfiscal 2011/2012theMinistryallocatedmoneytowards theSeamlessEducationSystemProject;Professi onalDevelopment;InstitutionalStrengthening;r elocationofMinistryofEducationandrenovation atheadoffice. TheMinistry remainscommittedtoenhancingthequalityofed ucationandensuringthateachchildhasaccesstoe ducationthroughitsschoolconstructionprogram me.TheMinistryrecognizestheneedtocatertostu dentswith 2011-2012 AdminReport
  • 89. specialeducationneedsthroughthedevelopmentofschoolswhichprovidespecialisedservicesforstud entswithmoderateandsevereeducationalneeds. Lookingahead,theMinistryreceivedabudgetaryallocationofoverapproximately(5)billiondollarsfor fiscal2012/2013.Table12showsthebreakdownoftheallocationforrecurrentexpenditureandtheDevel opmentProgramme. RecurrentExpenditure 4,208,124,536 DevelopmentProgramme TotalAllocation 711,200,000 Table 12:BudgetaryAllocation for fiscal 2012/2013 2011-2012 AdminReport 4,919,324,536
  • 90. CHAPTERFIVE TheWayForward
  • 91. TheWayForward tisevidentthattheMinistryisonanambitiousdrivetoreforma ndreengineertheeducationsystem.Thesignsoftheparadigmshifttha tistakingplaceineducationtomeettheeverchangingdemandsan dcontemporaryneedsofsocietyareundeniable.Fromearlychild hoodeducationtosecondaryeducation,fundamentalchangesar etakingplacetoensure alllearnersbenefitfromhighqualityeducation.Asindicatedearli er,thesechangesincludenewschoolbuildings,newprimaryscho olcurriculum,teachertraininganddevelopment andpreparationofchildrenforlearninganddevelopment. I Lookingback,theMinistryaccomplished severalofitstargetsthatwereoutlinedinitsStr ategicPlan2011– 2015andsixteenpriorityareas,amidallthech allenges.However,thereareareasthat requiremuchmoreworkifwearetomeetourta rgets.Aswe lookaheadto2013theMinistrywillsharpenit sfocusonthedeliveryofservicesarounditspri orityareas.Weintendtoimproveourstakehol derrelationshipsandseekoutnewmeansofen gagementinordertoliftthelevelsofachievem entsofalllearners.We arealsoimprovingourICTinfrastructure atalllevelsofthesystem.Further,more attentionwillbepaidtoouroperatingmodelat centralanddistrictlevelstoensure itsflexibilityandresponsivenessinsupportof oureffortstoimproveoutcomes. Transformationexercisesarenevershortofch allenges.Onecurrentchallengeistherestruct uringofsomeofthekeyDivisions AdminReport andworkprocesseswithintheMinistryandatt hesametimecontinuewithdaytodayoperatio nsincludingthefulfilmentofstatutoryrequir ements.Alsotheissueofstaffingisanotherco ncern. WithinthelastyeartheMinistrywasonadrive torecruitstaffforsomekeyDivisions. Thisprocessisatdifferentstagesofcompletio nforthevariouspositionsandoncompletions houldresultinDivisionshavingafullcomple mentofstaff. Amidallthechallengesweareoptimisticthat ourgoalsfortheeducationsystemandbyexte nsionthoseforourstudentswillberealized.Gi ventheastuteleadershipoftheMinister,theS ETandtheskillsandenergyofthestaffattheM inistryofEducationthereisnoreasonwhywec annotachieve whatwehaveplanned.
  • 92. 2011-2012 70
  • 93. AdminReport
  • 94. 2011-2012 AdminReport 72 ProducedbyMini stryofEducation CorporateCommunicationsDivision June2013

×