LEED/Transportation Symposium - Chris Marshall

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Chris Marshall, manager of LEED Technical Development at the U.S. Green Building Council, gives examples of what developers can do to earn LEED points from transportation measures and also discusses …

Chris Marshall, manager of LEED Technical Development at the U.S. Green Building Council, gives examples of what developers can do to earn LEED points from transportation measures and also discusses the most recent updates to the latest version of LEED (v4).

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  • Location and Transportation is a new credit category within LEED BD&C, ID&C, and EBOM. The Location and Transportation category rewards project locations that are within relatively dense areas, are near diverse uses, have access to transportation options, and are on sites with development constraints. The introduction of the Location and Transportation category is primarily a re-organization for the purposes of communication of the general trajectory of these specific credits. LEED2009 recognized the value of Location related issues via credit weightings – this is the next step in conveying that importance.  In general, changes to the LT credits include introducing gradation into our credits knowing that there are varying levels of performance to reward – The density, transit, and parking credits now have tiers at which you can earn points, rather than either earning a sum of points or not, as it is in LEED 2009.
  • LEED for Neighborhood Development Location:This new credit serves as an alternative compliance path to the other location and transportation credits by leveraging the benefits of the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System. It is meant to be an opportunity for project teams to take advantage of a streamlined performance path. Project teams can earn all LT points by being located in an ND project and do not have to document all of the credits. Sensitive Land ProtectionIncludes the requirements of LEED 2009 SSc1: Site Selection and requires location on previously developed sites or only building on the previously developed portion of a site, or following a variety of mitigation strategies when locating on sensitive lands such as near water bodies, wetlands, floodplains, etc. This credit helps project teams to effectively manage development near sensitive areas.HIGH PRIORITY SITE: This credit rewards projects that locate on sites with difficult development constraints. It leveragesthe potential for a LEED certified project to be transformative in an area that really needs it, such as brownfields, economic empowerment zones, or other social and economically constrained areas. Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses: This credit has been renamed from “Development Density and Community Connectivity.”There are now multiple thresholds includedto reward different density levels and amounts of diverse uses. There are specific requirements for Warehouse and Distribution Centers, which have unique needs based on the project type. This credit continues to be heavily weighted credit because density hits a lot of LEED impact categories, including potential for carbon reduction, and economic and social viability, among others.Quality Transit This credit has been renamed from “ Alternative Transportation-Public Transportation Access.” The credit has been revised inintent to distinguish it from other former LEED 2009 “Alternative Transportation” credits. There are multiple thresholds to reward varying service levels and recognize varying levels of performance. Specific instruction on transit trip counting has been added.Bicycle Network, Storage, and Shower Rooms: This credit has been revised to add requirements for proximity to a bicycle network that connects to various amenities; the network definition is very broad to provide flexibility for project teams. Proximity to a bikable network is important for this credit to be effective as simply providing storage and showers will not ensure use of the amenities if a relatively safe infrastructure is not available. Additionally, greater specificity for bicycle storage requirements has been incorporated. Reduced Parking Footprint: Renamed from “Alternative Transportation-Parking Capacity.”New requirements are to reduce parking capacity by certain percentages, as compared to parking ratios in the ITE Transportation Planning Handbook.Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles: This credit has been revised from LEED 2009 to duly requires preferred parking and providing alternative fuel refueling stations. Specific requirements for Schools and Warehouses & Distribution Centers in terms of fleet requirements. Alternative Transportation- EBOMHeavily weighted credit - Worth 15 points. Specified that survey data collection procedures must follow SCAQMD requirements or equivalentRemoved reward for parking spaces for alternative fuel vehicles. First point is earned by completing a survey and submitting the results to USGBC; not required to show reduction in order to earn the point. Important for USGBC to get data and helpful for buildings to see. Second option rewards project teams for implementing elements of an alternative transportation program to earn a subset of available points.
  • LEED for Neighborhood Development Location:This new credit serves as an alternative compliance path to the other location and transportation credits by leveraging the benefits of the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System. It is meant to be an opportunity for project teams to take advantage of a streamlined performance path. Project teams can earn all LT points by being located in an ND project and do not have to document all of the credits. Sensitive Land ProtectionIncludes the requirements of LEED 2009 SSc1: Site Selection and requires location on previously developed sites or only building on the previously developed portion of a site, or following a variety of mitigation strategies when locating on sensitive lands such as near water bodies, wetlands, floodplains, etc. This credit helps project teams to effectively manage development near sensitive areas.HIGH PRIORITY SITE: This credit rewards projects that locate on sites with difficult development constraints. It leveragesthe potential for a LEED certified project to be transformative in an area that really needs it, such as brownfields, economic empowerment zones, or other social and economically constrained areas. Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses: This credit has been renamed from “Development Density and Community Connectivity.”There are now multiple thresholds includedto reward different density levels and amounts of diverse uses. There are specific requirements for Warehouse and Distribution Centers, which have unique needs based on the project type. This credit continues to be heavily weighted credit because density hits a lot of LEED impact categories, including potential for carbon reduction, and economic and social viability, among others.Quality Transit This credit has been renamed from “ Alternative Transportation-Public Transportation Access.” The credit has been revised inintent to distinguish it from other former LEED 2009 “Alternative Transportation” credits. There are multiple thresholds to reward varying service levels and recognize varying levels of performance. Specific instruction on transit trip counting has been added.Bicycle Network, Storage, and Shower Rooms: This credit has been revised to add requirements for proximity to a bicycle network that connects to various amenities; the network definition is very broad to provide flexibility for project teams. Proximity to a bikable network is important for this credit to be effective as simply providing storage and showers will not ensure use of the amenities if a relatively safe infrastructure is not available. Additionally, greater specificity for bicycle storage requirements has been incorporated. Reduced Parking Footprint: Renamed from “Alternative Transportation-Parking Capacity.”New requirements are to reduce parking capacity by certain percentages, as compared to parking ratios in the ITE Transportation Planning Handbook.Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles: This credit has been revised from LEED 2009 to duly requires preferred parking and providing alternative fuel refueling stations. Specific requirements for Schools and Warehouses & Distribution Centers in terms of fleet requirements. Alternative Transportation- EBOMHeavily weighted credit - Worth 15 points. Specified that survey data collection procedures must follow SCAQMD requirements or equivalentRemoved reward for parking spaces for alternative fuel vehicles. First point is earned by completing a survey and submitting the results to USGBC; not required to show reduction in order to earn the point. Important for USGBC to get data and helpful for buildings to see. Second option rewards project teams for implementing elements of an alternative transportation program to earn a subset of available points.
  • LEED for Neighborhood Development Location:This new credit serves as an alternative compliance path to the other location and transportation credits by leveraging the benefits of the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System. It is meant to be an opportunity for project teams to take advantage of a streamlined performance path. Project teams can earn all LT points by being located in an ND project and do not have to document all of the credits. Sensitive Land ProtectionIncludes the requirements of LEED 2009 SSc1: Site Selection and requires location on previously developed sites or only building on the previously developed portion of a site, or following a variety of mitigation strategies when locating on sensitive lands such as near water bodies, wetlands, floodplains, etc. This credit helps project teams to effectively manage development near sensitive areas.HIGH PRIORITY SITE: This credit rewards projects that locate on sites with difficult development constraints. It leveragesthe potential for a LEED certified project to be transformative in an area that really needs it, such as brownfields, economic empowerment zones, or other social and economically constrained areas. Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses: This credit has been renamed from “Development Density and Community Connectivity.”There are now multiple thresholds includedto reward different density levels and amounts of diverse uses. There are specific requirements for Warehouse and Distribution Centers, which have unique needs based on the project type. This credit continues to be heavily weighted credit because density hits a lot of LEED impact categories, including potential for carbon reduction, and economic and social viability, among others.Quality Transit This credit has been renamed from “ Alternative Transportation-Public Transportation Access.” The credit has been revised inintent to distinguish it from other former LEED 2009 “Alternative Transportation” credits. There are multiple thresholds to reward varying service levels and recognize varying levels of performance. Specific instruction on transit trip counting has been added.Bicycle Network, Storage, and Shower Rooms: This credit has been revised to add requirements for proximity to a bicycle network that connects to various amenities; the network definition is very broad to provide flexibility for project teams. Proximity to a bikable network is important for this credit to be effective as simply providing storage and showers will not ensure use of the amenities if a relatively safe infrastructure is not available. Additionally, greater specificity for bicycle storage requirements has been incorporated. Reduced Parking Footprint: Renamed from “Alternative Transportation-Parking Capacity.”New requirements are to reduce parking capacity by certain percentages, as compared to parking ratios in the ITE Transportation Planning Handbook.Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles: This credit has been revised from LEED 2009 to duly requires preferred parking and providing alternative fuel refueling stations. Specific requirements for Schools and Warehouses & Distribution Centers in terms of fleet requirements. Alternative Transportation- EBOMHeavily weighted credit - Worth 15 points. Specified that survey data collection procedures must follow SCAQMD requirements or equivalentRemoved reward for parking spaces for alternative fuel vehicles. First point is earned by completing a survey and submitting the results to USGBC; not required to show reduction in order to earn the point. Important for USGBC to get data and helpful for buildings to see. Second option rewards project teams for implementing elements of an alternative transportation program to earn a subset of available points.
  • LEED for Neighborhood Development Location:This new credit serves as an alternative compliance path to the other location and transportation credits by leveraging the benefits of the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System. It is meant to be an opportunity for project teams to take advantage of a streamlined performance path. Project teams can earn all LT points by being located in an ND project and do not have to document all of the credits. Sensitive Land ProtectionIncludes the requirements of LEED 2009 SSc1: Site Selection and requires location on previously developed sites or only building on the previously developed portion of a site, or following a variety of mitigation strategies when locating on sensitive lands such as near water bodies, wetlands, floodplains, etc. This credit helps project teams to effectively manage development near sensitive areas.HIGH PRIORITY SITE: This credit rewards projects that locate on sites with difficult development constraints. It leveragesthe potential for a LEED certified project to be transformative in an area that really needs it, such as brownfields, economic empowerment zones, or other social and economically constrained areas. Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses: This credit has been renamed from “Development Density and Community Connectivity.”There are now multiple thresholds includedto reward different density levels and amounts of diverse uses. There are specific requirements for Warehouse and Distribution Centers, which have unique needs based on the project type. This credit continues to be heavily weighted credit because density hits a lot of LEED impact categories, including potential for carbon reduction, and economic and social viability, among others.Quality Transit This credit has been renamed from “ Alternative Transportation-Public Transportation Access.” The credit has been revised inintent to distinguish it from other former LEED 2009 “Alternative Transportation” credits. There are multiple thresholds to reward varying service levels and recognize varying levels of performance. Specific instruction on transit trip counting has been added.Bicycle Network, Storage, and Shower Rooms: This credit has been revised to add requirements for proximity to a bicycle network that connects to various amenities; the network definition is very broad to provide flexibility for project teams. Proximity to a bikable network is important for this credit to be effective as simply providing storage and showers will not ensure use of the amenities if a relatively safe infrastructure is not available. Additionally, greater specificity for bicycle storage requirements has been incorporated. Reduced Parking Footprint: Renamed from “Alternative Transportation-Parking Capacity.”New requirements are to reduce parking capacity by certain percentages, as compared to parking ratios in the ITE Transportation Planning Handbook.Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles: This credit has been revised from LEED 2009 to duly requires preferred parking and providing alternative fuel refueling stations. Specific requirements for Schools and Warehouses & Distribution Centers in terms of fleet requirements. Alternative Transportation- EBOMHeavily weighted credit - Worth 15 points. Specified that survey data collection procedures must follow SCAQMD requirements or equivalentRemoved reward for parking spaces for alternative fuel vehicles. First point is earned by completing a survey and submitting the results to USGBC; not required to show reduction in order to earn the point. Important for USGBC to get data and helpful for buildings to see. Second option rewards project teams for implementing elements of an alternative transportation program to earn a subset of available points.
  • LEED for Neighborhood Development Location:This new credit serves as an alternative compliance path to the other location and transportation credits by leveraging the benefits of the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System. It is meant to be an opportunity for project teams to take advantage of a streamlined performance path. Project teams can earn all LT points by being located in an ND project and do not have to document all of the credits. Sensitive Land ProtectionIncludes the requirements of LEED 2009 SSc1: Site Selection and requires location on previously developed sites or only building on the previously developed portion of a site, or following a variety of mitigation strategies when locating on sensitive lands such as near water bodies, wetlands, floodplains, etc. This credit helps project teams to effectively manage development near sensitive areas.HIGH PRIORITY SITE: This credit rewards projects that locate on sites with difficult development constraints. It leveragesthe potential for a LEED certified project to be transformative in an area that really needs it, such as brownfields, economic empowerment zones, or other social and economically constrained areas. Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses: This credit has been renamed from “Development Density and Community Connectivity.”There are now multiple thresholds includedto reward different density levels and amounts of diverse uses. There are specific requirements for Warehouse and Distribution Centers, which have unique needs based on the project type. This credit continues to be heavily weighted credit because density hits a lot of LEED impact categories, including potential for carbon reduction, and economic and social viability, among others.Quality Transit This credit has been renamed from “ Alternative Transportation-Public Transportation Access.” The credit has been revised inintent to distinguish it from other former LEED 2009 “Alternative Transportation” credits. There are multiple thresholds to reward varying service levels and recognize varying levels of performance. Specific instruction on transit trip counting has been added.Bicycle Network, Storage, and Shower Rooms: This credit has been revised to add requirements for proximity to a bicycle network that connects to various amenities; the network definition is very broad to provide flexibility for project teams. Proximity to a bikable network is important for this credit to be effective as simply providing storage and showers will not ensure use of the amenities if a relatively safe infrastructure is not available. Additionally, greater specificity for bicycle storage requirements has been incorporated. Reduced Parking Footprint: Renamed from “Alternative Transportation-Parking Capacity.”New requirements are to reduce parking capacity by certain percentages, as compared to parking ratios in the ITE Transportation Planning Handbook.Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles: This credit has been revised from LEED 2009 to duly requires preferred parking and providing alternative fuel refueling stations. Specific requirements for Schools and Warehouses & Distribution Centers in terms of fleet requirements. Alternative Transportation- EBOMHeavily weighted credit - Worth 15 points. Specified that survey data collection procedures must follow SCAQMD requirements or equivalentRemoved reward for parking spaces for alternative fuel vehicles. First point is earned by completing a survey and submitting the results to USGBC; not required to show reduction in order to earn the point. Important for USGBC to get data and helpful for buildings to see. Second option rewards project teams for implementing elements of an alternative transportation program to earn a subset of available points.
  • LEED for Neighborhood Development Location:This new credit serves as an alternative compliance path to the other location and transportation credits by leveraging the benefits of the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System. It is meant to be an opportunity for project teams to take advantage of a streamlined performance path. Project teams can earn all LT points by being located in an ND project and do not have to document all of the credits. Sensitive Land ProtectionIncludes the requirements of LEED 2009 SSc1: Site Selection and requires location on previously developed sites or only building on the previously developed portion of a site, or following a variety of mitigation strategies when locating on sensitive lands such as near water bodies, wetlands, floodplains, etc. This credit helps project teams to effectively manage development near sensitive areas.HIGH PRIORITY SITE: This credit rewards projects that locate on sites with difficult development constraints. It leveragesthe potential for a LEED certified project to be transformative in an area that really needs it, such as brownfields, economic empowerment zones, or other social and economically constrained areas. Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses: This credit has been renamed from “Development Density and Community Connectivity.”There are now multiple thresholds includedto reward different density levels and amounts of diverse uses. There are specific requirements for Warehouse and Distribution Centers, which have unique needs based on the project type. This credit continues to be heavily weighted credit because density hits a lot of LEED impact categories, including potential for carbon reduction, and economic and social viability, among others.Quality Transit This credit has been renamed from “ Alternative Transportation-Public Transportation Access.” The credit has been revised inintent to distinguish it from other former LEED 2009 “Alternative Transportation” credits. There are multiple thresholds to reward varying service levels and recognize varying levels of performance. Specific instruction on transit trip counting has been added.Bicycle Network, Storage, and Shower Rooms: This credit has been revised to add requirements for proximity to a bicycle network that connects to various amenities; the network definition is very broad to provide flexibility for project teams. Proximity to a bikable network is important for this credit to be effective as simply providing storage and showers will not ensure use of the amenities if a relatively safe infrastructure is not available. Additionally, greater specificity for bicycle storage requirements has been incorporated. Reduced Parking Footprint: Renamed from “Alternative Transportation-Parking Capacity.”New requirements are to reduce parking capacity by certain percentages, as compared to parking ratios in the ITE Transportation Planning Handbook.Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles: This credit has been revised from LEED 2009 to duly requires preferred parking and providing alternative fuel refueling stations. Specific requirements for Schools and Warehouses & Distribution Centers in terms of fleet requirements. Alternative Transportation- EBOMHeavily weighted credit - Worth 15 points. Specified that survey data collection procedures must follow SCAQMD requirements or equivalentRemoved reward for parking spaces for alternative fuel vehicles. First point is earned by completing a survey and submitting the results to USGBC; not required to show reduction in order to earn the point. Important for USGBC to get data and helpful for buildings to see. Second option rewards project teams for implementing elements of an alternative transportation program to earn a subset of available points.
  • USGBC has conducted outreach to almost 70 firms expressing interest in participating in a beta test for LEED v4.   Through this outreach, we have identified numerous candidate beta projects from around the globe and representing all LEED project types.  The beta period is intended to allow a small group of LEED users to preview and test the program resources (submittals, forms, calculators, reference guide) before the full public launch. The details of the beta program will be released shortly, and a limited number of project teams will have the ability to sign on for guided support through the LEED v4 certification process prior to the full launch of the system. Interested project teams should contact Chrissy Macken at cmacken@usgbc.org.  

Transcript

  • 1. LEED and AlternativeTransportation StrategiesNovember 29, 2012Chris MarshallManager, LEED Technical Development
  • 2. The Westory Building LEED GOLD Washington, DC• First certification:June, 2010, LEED SilverEB:O&M• Occupant transportationsurvey conductedonline, relatively lowresponse rate• Recertification processbegan in 2011•Conducted in-personsurvey to achieve higherresponse rate• Achieved LEED Gold inApril, 2012
  • 3. Salt River Fields LEED GOLD Scottsdale, AZ• Certified in May, 2011• Problem: High number ofvisitors for small portion ofthe year• Solution: Replacehardscape with native grassfields and use them as playfields for Native Americancommunity• Capitalizes on nearbycommercial development:walkable access for visitorsand shared parking
  • 4. Adlai E. Stevenson High School LEED GOLD Lincolnshire, IL• LEED EB:O&M v2009• Original transportationsurvey had low responserate (15%)• Project team knew 2/3 ofstudents didn’t drive alone• Partnered with studentGreen Team to re-organizeand re-distribute the survey• Survey conducted vialunch hours and with candyincentives
  • 5. TITLE OF PRESENTATIONDate Name of Presenter
  • 6. Credit 1: LEED-ND LocationCredit 2: Sensitive Land ProtectionCredit 3: High Priority SiteCredit 4: Surrounding Density and Diverse UsesCredit 5: Access to Quality TransitCredit 6: Bicycle FacilitiesCredit 7: Reduced Parking FootprintCredit 8: Green Vehicles
  • 7. LEED for Neighborhood Development Location • Alternative compliance path to other LT credits • Leverage benefits of LEED-ND rating system • Streamline the process!Sensitive Land Protection • Avoid sensitive areas on or near project site • Updated version of LEED 2009 SSc1: Site Selection • Can be earned by locating on prev. developed site
  • 8. High Priority Site • Motivate location in areas w. development constraints • LEED project can transform a surrounding area • QCT, EPA National Priority site, brownfieldsSurrounding Density and Diverse Uses • Points earned for surrounding density and/or uses • Multiple thresholds for different density levels and number of uses • Most number of total points in LT category
  • 9. Access to Quality Transit • Changes intended to reward for better transit • Different thresholds for varying service levels • Specific instructions on transit trip countingBicycle Facilities • New requirement to be proximate to “bicycle network” • Network includes lanes, trails, and low-speed streets • Separate requirements for short- and long-term storage
  • 10. Reduced Parking Footprint • Changed baseline from local code to ITE standard • Reduce supply versus Trans. Planning Handbook • Supply less parking than conventional amountsGreen Vehicles • Requires preferred parking and alt. fuel stations • Meant to accommodate green vehicles of all types • Unique requirements for Schools and Warehouses
  • 11. EB: O&M Alternative Transportation • Three new options: o Option 1 – Survey building occupants o Option 2 – Show reductions in conventional trips o Option 3 – Implement a TDM program • First intention to understand transportation patterns • Once patterns are known, either rewarded for good patterns or given opportunity to change patterns