Arlington, Virginia's Transportation Future
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Arlington, Virginia's Transportation Future

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More People, Less Traffic is Focus of Arlington’s Transportation Future

More People, Less Traffic is Focus of Arlington’s Transportation Future

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Arlington, Virginia's Transportation Future Arlington, Virginia's Transportation Future Presentation Transcript

  • FY 2015 – FY 2024 Proposed Capital Improvement Plan County Board Worksession - Transportation June 18, 2014
  • • Investments in transportation help achieve a sustainable community • Travel trends – moving more people without more traffic • County Board adopted policies guide the transportation CIP • Recent accomplishments • Ongoing and proposed investments • Using dedicated transportation funding and leveraging external sources • Programs of interest Presentation Overview 2
  • Investments in transportation infrastructure and services help the community meet its sustainability goals. R-B CORRIDOR 1970 R-B CORRIDOR TODAY Achieving a Sustainable Community 3
  • Transit-Oriented Development 44.5 million sq. ft. of office space*  41 million sq. ft. in Metrorail station areas* with over 4 million sq. ft. of supporting retail and services 109,000 housing units  Over 43,700 in Metrorail station areas and 17,000 units along the Columbia Pike corridor  56% of all housing in established transit corridors * Includes the Pentagon @ 5 million sq. ft. Success in concentrating growth around transit corridors 4
  • Providing Travel Options • 1,094 lane-miles of streets and 19 miles of HOV lanes • Over 5,300 on-street metered parking spaces • 12 miles of Metrorail and 11 stations • VRE commuter rail • Extensive regional and local bus service • Car-share program with over 80 cars • Bikeshare program with 69 stations • 50 miles of multi-use trails and 36 miles of on-street bike lanes and sharrows • Extensive and growing network of sidewalks Investing to enhance the quality of all travel options. 5
  • Street Segment Street Type 1996 2011/2012 % Change 1996-2012 Lee Hwy - Rosslyn EW 6-lane arterial 37,770 31,951 -15.4% Wash. Blvd. - VA Square EW 4-lane arterial 20,469 17,500 -14.5% Clarendon Blvd. EW 2-lane 1-way arterial 13,980 13,292 -5.0% Wilson Blvd. - Clarendon EW 2-lane 1-way arterial 16,368 12,603 -23.0% Arlington Blvd. EW 6-lane arterial 55,865 65,259 16.8% Glebe Road - Ballston NS 6-lane arterial 35,230 31,000 -12.0% Glebe Road - South of Columbia Pike NS 4-lane arterial 29,000 27,000 -6.0% George Mason Drive NS 4-lane arterial 20,002 20,518 2.3% Jefferson Davis Hwy north of Glebe Road NS 6-lane arterial 52,000 44,000 -15.4% Smart growth has allowed Arlington to add population while decreasing traffic volumes. Traffic on main arterials is down over 15-year period. Traffic Trends 6
  • Arlington is focused on the development of high-quality transit – moving more people without more traffic. Transit ridership grew significantly over 15-year period. Transit Ridership Trends FY1996 Actual FY2013 Actual % Growth Metrorail Arlington Stations 45,335,000 59,528,744 31.3% Metrobus Arlington Routes 12,049,000 14,848,036 23.2% VRE – Crystal City 567,000 1,102,076 94.4% Arlington Transit (ART) 105,000 2,644,000 2,518% Total Annual Ridership 58,076,000 78,122,856 34.5% 40% of Virginia’s total annual transit ridership is from Arlington-related trips. 7
  • Local Bus Ridership is Growing 674,806 926,574 1,060,441 1,225,427 1,428,827 1,990,402 2,261,100 2,537,000 2,644,000 2,833,000 0 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 2,500,000 3,000,000 FY 05 FY 06 FY 07 FY 08 FY 09 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY 14 Fiscal Year AnnualRidership Along with ridership, 2013 survey shows satisfaction with ART has also hit new high – 90% of riders are satisfied or very satisfied 8
  • County Board-adopted policy guides our transportation CIP investments. Transportation policy history: • MTP Goals and Summary, November 2007 • MTP Map, December 2007 • Bicycle Element, July 2008 • Pedestrian Element, July 2008 • Demand and System Management, December 2008 • Transit Element, June 2009 • Parking and Curb Management Element, November 2009 • Streets Element, February 2011 • 2014 Updates – MTP Map – Bicycle Element Master Transportation Plan (MTP) 9
  • MTP General Policies A. Integrate transportation with land use B. Support the design and operation of Complete Streets C. Manage travel demand and transportation systems 10
  • Projects Completed Since Adoption of the Prior CIP July 2012 – June 2014
  • Jefferson Davis Rosslyn-Ballston County-wide Transit Complete Streets Maintenance Capital Investment Areas Columbia Pike Implementing the MTP and Supporting Land Use Plans 12
  • Accomplishments - Jefferson Davis Projects: Pentagon City (South Hayes Street) $ 9.1 M ART Operations and Administration Center $ 1.6 M Crystal Drive – Two-way $ 2.2 M • 12th to 15th Street • 23rd to 26th Street Total Project Costs: $ 13 M Benefits: • Improved pedestrian, bicycle, vehicle and transit access and safety. • New two-way operations on Crystal Drive. • South Hayes Street streetscape improvements, bio-retention facilities and street lighting. Ribbon cutting of Hawk Signal in Crystal City 13
  • Accomplishments – Columbia Pike Projects: Columbia Pike $ 7.4 M • Wakefield St. to Four Mile Run Drive (utility phase) • Bike Boulevard – Signage and Markings Total Project Costs: $ 7.4 M Benefits: Improved pedestrian, bicycle, vehicle and transit access and safety.Columbia Pike Sidewalk Improvements 14
  • Accomplishments – Rosslyn-Ballston Projects: Rosslyn Metro Station Access Improvements $ 49.9 M Clarendon Metro Plaza Improvements $ 0.8 M Clarendon Metro Station Bike Shelters $ 150 K Wilson Blvd. – N. Oakland to N. Randolph St. $ 2 M Wilson Blvd. – Sidewalk improvements at substation $ 250 K N. Highland St. – Sidewalk Improvements $ 350 K 13th St. N. – Hudson St. to Ivy St. $ 400 K N. Quinn St Extension – Developer $ 500 K Glebe Rd. Pedestrian Safety Improvements $ 2.7 M Total Project Costs: $ 57 M Benefits: • Improved safety and access at Rosslyn Metrorail Station. • Clarendon Metrorail Station bike shelters and plaza improvements. • Improved pedestrian, bicycle, vehicle and transit access and safety. Rosslyn Metro Station Access Improvements Clarendon Metro Plaza Improvements 15
  • Accomplishments – County Wide Projects: Henderson Rd. – Intersection Improvements $ 303 K 16th St. – Raised Crosswalk $ 85 K Lee Hwy. – Old Dominion Dr. – Toyota $ 350 K Old Dominion Dr. – Wall $ 250 K Old Dominion Dr. Phase 1 $ 750 K Walter Reed Dr. – Pollard St to Four Mile Run $ 500 K Walter Reed Dr. – Columbia Pike to Glebe Rd. $ 450 K George Mason Dr. – Lee Hwy to Washington Blvd. $ 500 K George Mason Dr. – Arlington Blvd. to 6th St. $ 350 K 8th St. S. – S. Court House to Barton St. $ 600 K S. Joyce St. – 15th to 16th St., Phase I $ 123 K S. Joyce St. – 16th St. to 23nd St., Phase II & III $ 416 K ART Bus Replacement and Expansion $ 1.54 M Bus Stops Improvements & Bus Stop Inventory $ 652K Transit IT and Security Technology $ 227K Fiber Network (phases 1 & 2) $ 7 M Signals & ITS $ 3.5 M LED Streetlight Retrofit $ 2 M Subtotal Project Costs: $ 20 M VDOT / FHWA $ 100 M Court House Road-Arlington Boulevard Interchange Washington Boulevard-Columbia Pike Interchange Glebe Road Bridge Replacement South Joyce Street Improvements Total Project Costs: $ 120 M Benefits: Improved pedestrian, bicycle, vehicle and transit access and safety. Bus Stop Improvements Court House – Arlington Blvd. Interchange 16
  • Investing in technology to expand and improve the level of service and system efficiency 17
  • Transportation Technology • Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) • Traffic Optimization & Messaging • Emergency Management • Transit Messaging • Fiber Optics Network • Smart Streetlights (LED) • Traffic Management Center • Automated Multimodal Monitoring System 18
  • ITS: Smart Route Choices • Three major arterials: – Arlington Blvd. (Rt. 50) – Lee Highway – Columbia Pike • Bluetooth technology tracks travel times in corridors • Travel times to key destinations displayed on DMSs • Messages Amber alerts and incident management • Balances capacity 19
  • Technology: ITS Fiber Network 20
  • 21 Smart Transportation Management
  • • Adaptive control system • Real time traffic detection systems • Emergency vehicle support system • Transit management system • Real-time traffic monitoring • Real-time bicycle and pedestrian traffic monitoring • Queue detection system • 180 CCTV Cameras Traffic Management 22
  • FY 2015 – FY 2024 Proposed Capital Improvement Plan
  • Population Growth Trends Of the County’s major transit corridors, the most significant population growth through 2040 will occur along Columbia Pike. 24
  • Investments - Jefferson Davis Projects: Complete streets projects: $ 58.6 M Crystal Drive – 26th St. to 27th St. Crystal Drive – US 1 to 27th St. Clark/Bell St’s – 12th St. to 18th St. Clark/Bell St’s – Vicinity of 15th St. 18th St. – US 1 to Crystal Dr. S. Eads St. – 15th to 23rd St. 12th St S. – S. Eads St. to S. Clark St. Airport Viaduct Removal S. Clark St. – 20th St to 27th St. Viaduct Trail Access to National Airport Boundary Channel Dr. @ I-395 $ 9.3 M Army Navy Drive – Joyce St. to 12th St. $ 5.4 M Transit: Crystal City Streetcar $ 227.3 M Crystal City Potomac Yard Transitway $ 11.4 M Crystal City Multimodal Center $ 1.6 M Crystal City Station East Entrance $ 67.3 M Pentagon City Metro Station Second Elevator $ 4.7 M Pentagon City Pedestrian Tunnel $ 0.7 M Total in FY15-FY24 CIP: $ 386 M Narrative: Improved pedestrian, bicycle, vehicle and transit access and safety. Boundary Channel Drive @ I- 395 interchange improvements. Crystal City Potomac Yard Transitway. Crystal City Streetcar, Multimodal Center Station and East Entrance. Crystal City Potomac Yard Transitway Boundary Channel Drive @ I-395 25
  • Investments – Columbia Pike Projects: Complete Streets Projects: $ 69.5 M • Columbia Pike – S. Frederick St. to Jefferson St. • Columbia Pike – Oakland St. to S Wakefield St. • Columbia Pike – S. Garfield St. to Quinn St. • Columbia Pike – Orme St. to Joyce St. • Bike Boulevards – Bicycle facility improvements Transit: • Columbia Pike – Streetcar $ 286.7 M • Columbia Pike – Transit Stations $ 12.4 M Total in FY15 – FY24 CIP: $ 369 M Narrative: Projects improve pedestrian, bicycle, vehicle and transit access and safety. Bike Boulevards. Columbia Pike Streetcar. Columbia Pike Cross-section Columbia Pike Streetcar Route 26
  • Investments – Rosslyn - Ballston Projects: Complete Streets Projects: $ 32.8 M R-B Corridor Accessibility Clarendon Circle Pedestrian Improvements Wilson/Courthouse Sidewalk Nubs Wilson Blvd. – N. Lincoln St. to 10th St. N. Transit: Court House Metro Station Second Elevator $ 16.6 M Ballston Metro Station Multimodal Improvements $ 4.6 M Ballston-MU – Metro Station West Entrance $ 89.9 M Total in FY15-FY24 CIP: $ 144 M Narrative: Projects and programs improve pedestrian, bicycle, vehicle and transit access and safety. Ballston Metro Station Improvements and west entrance. Court House second elevator Proposed Court House Station Second Elevator Proposed Ballston - MU Station West Entrance 27
  • Investments – County Wide Projects/Programs: Complete Streets Projects: $ 43.3 M • S. Fillmore St. - Arlington Blvd. to 5th St. S. • N. George Mason Dr. – 14th St. S. to Washington Blvd. • Walter Reed Dr. – Glebe Rd. to Pollard St. • Walter Reed Dr. – Arlington Mill Dr. to FMR Dr. • N. Carlin Springs Rd. – Vermont St. to Edison St. • McKinley Rd. – Wilson Blvd. to I-66 • Arlington Ridge @ Lang St. • Arlington Ridge @ Lynn St. • Pershing Dr. – Barton Dr. to Edison St • Military Rd. – Nellie Custis to 38th St. • Washington Blvd. – Arlington Blvd. to 10th St. N. • George Mason Dr. and Washington Blvd. WALK Arlington $ 12.8 M BIKE Arlington $ 14.2 M Capital Bikeshare $ 13.4 M Bridge Renovation $ 17.4 M East Falls Church Streets $ 2.0 M Transit : • ART Fleet New and Replacement Program $ 28. 9 M • ART Fleet Rehabilitation $ 8.3 M • ART Facilities $ 42.0 M • Bus Stop & Shelter Program $ 5.9 M • Transit ITS & Security Program $ 2.6 M Traffic Engineering & Operations: • Transportation Systems & Traffic Signals Program $ 41. 8 M • Fiber Network (phase 3) $ 16.7 M • Street Lighting $ 5.1 M • Parking Meters & Technology, & Regulatory Signage $ 10.0 M Maintenance Capital: Bridge Maintenance $ 4.8 M Paving $128.3 M Total in FY15-FY24 CIP: $ 397.5 M Narrative: Projects and programs improve pedestrian, bicycle, vehicle and transit access and safety. Note: Excludes new programs/projects in the FY15-FY24 CIP ART Fleet Capital Bikeshare 28
  • New Items in the CIP (County-wide) Lee Highway Multimodal Improvements ($20.0M) – Improves safety & capacity in the corridor Intelligent Transportation Systems (non-fiber project portion) ($18.2M) – Improve /expand equipment & software for efficiency, safety, and emergency operations Neighborhood Complete Streets ($9.7M) – Provides pedestrian & other transportation enhancements along non-arterial streets Commuter Stores ($1.2M) – To upgrade/replace facilities (currently four fixed locations & one mobile store) Safe Routes to Schools ($1.1M) – Improves safety near schools STAR Call Center Office Space ($1.1M) – Relocation of STAR call center to improve functionality ART System Service & Asset Plan, and 2nd TDP Plan ($0.8M) – Bus service expansion feasibility & realignment study for ART ART Bus Maintenance Equipment ($0.7M) – For additional maintenance equipment to keep buses in a state of good repair 29
  • Significant Increases in the CIP Jefferson Davis, Columbia Pike, & Rosslyn-Ballston Corridors Crystal City Streetcar ($81.6M) – Due to more detailed planning & conceptual engineering work, higher annual inflation rate assumption, and increased contingency from 18% to 30% Columbia Pike Streetcar ($87.7M) – Due to additional scope, extended project schedule, additional years of inflation, and increased contingency from 18% to 30% Rosslyn-Ballston Arterial Street Improvements ($15.8M): – Greater engineering & construction costs were identified for Rosslyn Esplanade Court House Metrorail Station Second Elevator ($7.6M): – Greater engineering requirements and complexity of construction were identified in WMATA’s feasibility study completed in February 2014 Projects to be delivered sooner: Crystal City Metrorail Station East Entrance ($49.8M): – In prior 10-year plan, project was not fully funded; timing has moved forward Ballston-MU Metrorail Station West Entrance ($65.3M): – In prior 10-year plan, project was not fully funded; timing has moved forward 30
  • Significant Increases in the CIP County-wide Transportation Systems & Traffic Signals ($31.8M): – Majority of equipment is beyond its designed life cycle and requires replacement Paving ($14.1M): – To reverse the decline on PCI, and steadily increase the paving condition ART Facilities ($26.6M): – Right-of-way, land acquisition and design/construction costs for a heavy maintenance facility have been added ART Fleet & Equipment Replacement & Expansion ($8.5M): – Number of buses added to the fleet or replaced in 10-year plan increases from 38 to 56. – Total anticipated fleet at end of CIP is 80 (up from 51 today). Capital Bikeshare ($8.1M): – Current CIP based on the Arlington Capital Bikeshare Transit Development Plan (TDP) Improvements Outside Major Corridors ($7.0M): – Increased funding capacity to address projects with scopes that could not be funded with other sources. 31
  • Significant Decreases in the CIP Columbia Pike Streets (-$11.5M): Cost estimates for outyear projects have been revised downward based on bid results for the projects currently under construction. Columbia Pike Transit Stations (-$8.4M): Cost estimate has decreased due to significant changes in design, and timing has been adjusted to align work with Columbia Pike Streets projects. Neighborhood Traffic Calming (-$3.5M): Program has been eliminated; future funding for traffic calming projects will come from new Neighborhood Complete Streets program and other CIP programs. 32
  • Funding Sources - Overview • Most projects have more than one funding source • Combination of local, regional, state and federal sources • Goal is to leverage external sources with local dollars • Look to dedicated transportation funds first, minimizing reliance on GO Bonds & PAYG See Attachment #1, Arlington County Transportation 101 for review of all program funding sources 33
  • New Funding Source in the CIP 2013 Virginia General Assembly enacted transportation funding legislation (House Bill 2313), which raises new transportation revenues for Northern Virginia: – Additional 0.7% state Sales & Use Tax – 2% increase in the Transient Occupancy Tax (hotel tax) – 0.15 per $100 valuation increase to the Grantor’s tax (Congestion Relief Fee) – Matching requirement – Maintenance of effort Two components: – Regional: 70% of revenues will be retained by NVTA to fund regional projects; projects must be submitted to NVTA for evaluation & ranking against other regional priorities; $26.6M in FY14 – Local: 30% of revenues will be returned to localities, to be used for locally selected transportation projects; $11.4M in FY14 See Attachment #2, HB 2313 - Excerpt of Funding Uses and Maintenance of Effort Language 34
  • Transportation Capital Fund Transportation Capital Fund – Commercial & Industrial Tax • Authorized by General Assembly in 2007; adopted by County Board in 2008 • Funds ongoing investments in multimodal transportation infrastructure that support the function, competitive position, & ongoing development of Arlington’s commercial and mixed use districts such as the Rosslyn-Ballston Corridor • Cannot be used to supplant existing commitments • Has served as a basis for leveraging state and federal transportation funds for major capital projects See Attachment #3, Use & Level of Effort Requirements for the Commercial & Industrial Real Estate Tax 35
  • External Funding Leveraged 36 $4.06 $8.24 $18.10 $9.83 $18.36 $0 $2 $4 $6 $8 $10 $12 $14 $16 $18 $20 FY 10 FY 11 FY 12 FY 13 FY14 Transportation Capital Fund Leveraged Millions
  • Funding Sources - Local PAYG • Typically funds smaller scale projects and minor renovations GO Bonds • Projects typically have a useful life at least as long as the period over which the bonds will be repaid (generally 20 years) Tax Increment Financing (TIF) • Established in 2010 to support infrastructure investment in the Crystal City Sector Plan and infrastructure that will support Potomac Yard and Pentagon City Developer/Other • Developer contributions negotiated as part of site plan / tied to specific projects • Cash often not accessible until project is completed • Sources vary year to year 37
  • Funding Sources – Non-Local State • Various funding mechanisms, each with its specific guidelines / restrictions • May require a local match Federal • Most funding must be used within a certain timeframe • Typically for specific programs / projects; local match may be required • Requires NEPA documentation and federal accounting • Must be included in various State Transportation Plans (STIP, CLRP, & TIP) 38
  • FY 2015 – FY 2024 CIP $(000) Capital Cost Schedule FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22 FY23 FY24 Total Transit 53,335 40,961 56,223 109,563 244,861 232,216 61,285 1,663 4,059 9,428 813,594 CompleteStreets 51,832 56,715 60,200 50,510 38,100 32,184 35,869 24,048 26,429 26,784 402,671 MaintenanceCapital 13,000 11,752 12,323 12,467 13,072 13,228 13,868 14,032 14,453 14,886 133,081 Program Administration 2,000 2,060 2,122 2,185 2,251 2,319 2,388 2,460 2,534 2,610 22,929 Total 120,167 111,488 130,868 174,725 298,284 279,947 113,410 42,203 47,475 53,708 1,372,275 FundingSchedule FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22 FY23 FY24 Total Federal 2,032 2,842 2,791 1,693 58,983 58,353 31,388 2,230 3,400 2,305 166,017 State 6,132 10,070 20,856 28,655 44,686 70,958 12,953 4,148 4,717 9,629 212,804 Developer Contributions - - 1,600 1,555 15,400 - 3,585 3,690 - - 25,830 New Bond Issue 8,870 11,870 12,150 11,380 11,650 13,220 12,620 13,240 14,230 13,330 122,560 PAYG 9,675 6,632 5,697 5,800 6,139 5,833 6,315 6,716 6,635 7,120 66,562 Other - 2,399 2,399 22,774 22,772 15,625 - - - - 65,969 TCF- C&I 6,444 14,535 24,972 29,300 38,800 17,165 7,107 5,584 6,196 7,515 157,618 TCF- HB2313 Local 3,638 8,854 10,900 16,925 20,481 12,244 5,991 7,351 7,433 8,743 102,560 TCF- HB2313 Regional 10,600 6,500 3,400 12,300 10,602 34,137 24,600 - - 2,500 104,639 TCFBonds - - 8,620 21,261 42,994 34,786 6,462 - - - 114,123 TIF 900 1,399 4,138 5,130 8,388 4,068 1,933 869 1,465 992 29,282 TIFBonds - - - 1,261 11,532 9,823 - - - - 22,616 Subtotal - New Funding 48,291 65,101 97,523 158,034 292,427 276,212 112,954 43,828 44,076 52,134 1,190,580 Authorized but Unissued Bonds 2,284 - - - - - - - - - 2,284 Issued but Unspent Bonds 11,858 412 200 - - - - - - - 12,470 Other Previously Approved Funds 115,012 25,047 16,048 5,741 3,251 1,548 294 - - - 166,941 Subtotal - Approved Funding 129,154 25,459 16,248 5,741 3,251 1,548 294 - - - 181,695 Total 177,445 90,560 113,771 163,775 295,678 277,760 113,248 43,828 44,076 52,134 1,372,275 39
  • Transportation Program Summary Complete Streets 29.3% Transit 59.3% Paving 9.3% Bridge Maintenance 0.3% Program Admin. 1.7% Program $M CompleteStreets 403 Transit 814 Paving 128 BridgeMaintenance 5 ProgramAdmin. 23 Total 1,372 40
  • Transportation Funding Summary Federal 14% State 17% Regional 17% Developer/Oth er 7% GO Bond 10% PAYG 5% TCF & TCF Bonds 26% TIF & TIF Bonds 4% Source $M* Federal 186 State 233 Regional (HB 2313) 234 Developer/Other 95 GO Bond 137 PAYG 69 TCF & TCF Bonds 361 TIF & TIF Bonds 57 Total 1,372 * Figures for the various sources include new funds as well as previously approved funds 41
  • Funding Comparison State/Fed 19% TCF 16% TIF 5% Other Bonds 19% PAYG 8% GO Bonds 14% Previous 19% FY13-FY22 CIP ($981M) State/Fed 28% Developer /Other 7% TCF 11% TIF 2% Other Bonds 10% PAYG 5% GO Bonds, 9% HB 2313 Local, 7% HB 2313 Regional 8% Previous 13% FY15-FY24 CIP ($1,372M) 42
  • General Obligation (GO) Bonds 2014 Referenda ($M) Program/ Project 2015 Issue 2016 Issue Total % Paving 6.6 8.9 15.5 74.7% BridgeRenovation (Shirlington Road bridge) 1.3 1.3 6.3% Improvements OutsideMajor Travel Corridors 0.8 0.3 1.1 5.1% Transportation Systems & Traffic Signals 0.5 0.5 1.0 4.8% BIKEArlington 0.5 0.3 0.8 3.9% WALKArlington 0.3 0.3 0.5 2.6% Neighborhood CompleteStreets 0.2 0.3 0.5 2.2% East Falls Church Streets (design of initial projects) 0.1 0.1 0.5% Total 8.9 11.9 20.7 43
  • Programs of Interest
  •  Data driven  Ranking of projects based on criteria: – Site locations within ¼ mile of schools – Sites directly connected to Arterial Streets – Projects not normally funded by NC – Annual call for projects  Project elements: – Improved walking connectivity – Upgrade of street crossings – Modifying incomplete streets – Minimize vehicle/pedestrian conflicts – Complete missing elements of the residential (non-arterial) street infrastructure – Promote connections to transit  Civic Association & abutting property owners to review elements  Enhanced project delivery  Supported by a County Board-appointed Neighborhood Complete Streets Commission Neighborhood Complete Streets 45
  • • Facilitates safe travel to and from school • Program funds projects, initiatives and outreach • Coordinates efforts between DES Transportation and APS • Funds total $1.146M over 10 years 46 Safe Routes To Schools
  • • Expands multimodal capacity, leverages opening of the Silver Line – Added ART Capacity – Reduced transit travel times – Real-time transit arrival information – Bus stop improvements – Sidewalk improvements – Roadway striping improvements – Traffic signal prioritization – Bicycle improvements • Improving connections between East Falls Church and Rosslyn Metrorail Stations • Improves pedestrian/bike safety • Reduce single occupancy travel • Corridor planning process to identify work program 47 Lee Highway Multimodal Improvements
  • East Falls Church • Implement upgrades as identified in East Fall Church Area Plan • Improvements included on: – Sycamore Street – Washington Boulevard – Lee Highway – Westmoreland Street – Fairfax Drive • Improved pedestrian/bike safety and accessibility • Improved transit access and service at East Falls Church Metrorail Station • Expand on improvements associated with VDOT’s I-66 Spot Improvement Project 48
  • Progress to date • Completed conversion of most commercial districts and 85% of all County-owned lights • Instituted programmable dimming for all installations • Dramatically reduced energy usage and associated cost of electricity Lessons learned • Must communicate with communities earlier in the process • Provide notice to the community of initial test period, implications • Conduct lighting demonstration in communities prior to implementation • Poll community after implementation, stay in touch to ensure smooth transition 49 LED Streetlight Program
  • Prioritize High Density & Safety Areas Work Items Identify remaining high density & safety areas Prioritize high density & safety locations Communicate priorities to leadership Conduct community outreach Conduct field demonstrations Retrofit in priority order Continue to test new technologies Monitor community acceptance Update leadership on progress Complete On-going Prior to new installations On-going (existing and new locations) Complete Underway On-going (existing and new locations) On-going 50 LED Streetlights: Action Plan
  • 51 LED Streetlights: Priority Locations Priority Area Civic Association 1 Crystal City general area Crystal City 2 N. Glebe Road/N. Pershing Drive area Buckingham/Ashton Heights 3 Lee Highway/N. Lincoln Street area Cherrydale 4 Lee Highway/N. Harrison Street area Leeway Overlee 5 Washington Blvd/N. Pershing Drive area Lyon Park 6 Washington Blvd/McKinley Road area Overlee Knolls/Westover Village 7 S. Glebe Road/13th Street S. area Douglas Park 8 N. Wakefield Street/23rd Street N. area Old Dominion/Donaldson Run 9 Lee Highway/N. Westmoreland Street area Arlington-East Falls Church 10 N. Potomac Street/N. Powhatan Street area Madison Manor
  • 52 During the next 30 years… 65% of County’s population growth, 44% of employment growth along Columbia Pike and Route 1 corridors. Quarter mile from all planned streetcar stations 2010 2040 Population 39,400 81,500 Housing units 22,600 42,700 Employment 62,900 100,100 Streetcar: Investment in our Future
  • 53 We will combine the flexibility of bus with the certainty and permanence of streetcar More people in fewer vehicles = Reduced congestion Streetcar vehicle can hold 100% more passengers than a bus, 40% more than an articulated bus Skyline Columbia Pike Pentagon City Crystal City Potomac Yard VRE Buses to Culmore, Annandale Buses to Rosslyn, Courthouse, Ballston Buses to Pentagon, Downtown Streetcar: Maximizing Capacity
  • 54 Streetcar: Improving Connectivity
  • 55 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 70000 2010Actual 2035Forecast Through trips Crystal City local trips Columbia Pike local trips Streetcar = 37,100 Crystal City Columbia Pike Buses = 22,700 Buses = 24,700 Average Weekday Boardings • Reflects population and employment forecasts based on updated County and regional plans • Shows the benefits of having a seamless streetcar system (“one seat ride”) Streetcar: Projected Ridership
  • 56 Daily Weekday Ridership Columbia Pike – Crystal City: 2010 bus ridership 2035 rail and bus ridership 24,700 59,800 Metrobus 16th Street S-line 20,000 Portland Streetcar 18,000 Cleveland Health Line BRT 16,000-20,000 Norfolk, Va. Tide Light Rail 4,000 Corridor Transit Comparison
  • 57 $3.2 billion to $4.4 billion in net, or new, real estate value for Arlington and Fairfax Counties over 30 years • Over and above project capital and operating costs • Benefits due to property value increases and greater extent and faster pace of growth 6,600 new jobs attracted to the corridor within 10 years of project construction • Based on new growth due to the transit infrastructure investment • More than 3x the amount supported by enhanced bus From 2014 Columbia Pike Transit Comparative Return on Investment Study: Streetcar = Economic Competitiveness
  • 58 • Revenues are net -- over and above project costs. • Presented in 2014 dollars. $0 $10,000,000 $20,000,000 $30,000,000 $40,000,000 $50,000,000 $60,000,000 $70,000,000 Enhanced Bus Streetcar Annual New Arlington County Tax Revenues Over Baseline Streetcar total = $1,260 million Enhanced bus total = $385 million FY 2015: $0.01 on the tax rate = $6.6 million Streetcar = New Tax Revenues
  • 59 Columbia Pike streetcar Crystal City streetcar Arlington County $287 million $227 million Fairfax County $71 million* -- Total $358 million $227 million Start of service Spring 2021 Spring 2020 * Proposed +$48 million from 2013 Federal Transit Administration "most likely" project estimate of $310 million  Due to extended project schedule and additional years of inflation +$81 million from 2013 CIP, due to more detailed planning and conceptual engineering work, higher annual inflation rate assumption Both project schedules reflect more conservative timeframes for engineering, procurements and FTA approvals. Columbia Pike: Crystal City: FY15-24 Streetcar Capital Cost
  • 60 Local funding sources: • A commercial real estate tax supports the County’s Transportation Capital Fund, which can only be used for new transportation projects. • The Crystal City infrastructure fund is named the Crystal City, Potomac Yard, Pentagon City Tax Increment Financing Fund. Streetcar Funding ($ in millions)
  • Questions?